Nov 26, 2022  
Website Catalog (In Development) 
    
Website Catalog (In Development)

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    PMD 214 - Advanced Prehospital Care of Medical Emergencies


    This fourth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic is an introduction to various medical pathophysiology and advanced medical treatment modalities for neurologic, endocrinologic, toxicologic, environmental, allergy & anaphylaxis and behavioral medical patients.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PMD 213 Advanced Prehospital Trauma Care

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
              a.  A seizure
              b.  A cerebral vascular accident
              c.  A transient ischemic attack
              d.  A diabetic emergency
              e.  An acute coronary syndrome of various etiologies
              f.  A neurological problem
              g.  An endocrine problem
              h.  A toxic substance exposure
               i.  An environmentally induced or exacerbated medical condition
               j.  An allergic reaction
              k.  An anaphylactic reaction
    2.  Consistently demonstrate safe, empathetic competence in caring for patients with behavioral emergencies.

  
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    PMD 221 - Paramedic Foundations and Comprehensive Physical Exam


    This sixth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this first course in a Critical Care' Technician's progression to Paramedic covers foundational paramedic level concepts.  Early in the course general cellular pathophysiology is expanded on with and in-depth discussion of hypoperfusion and various shock states.  Physical and emotional developmental milestones are reviewed along with effective communication strategies.  Additional advanced airway assessment tools and skills are developed.  An in-depth pharmacology knowledge is cultivated and the course concludes with the development of comprehensive history taking and physical examination skills.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. Recognize, classify, and determine proper management of the types of shock.
    2. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with pharmacology knowledge and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement an appropriate pharmacologic management plan.
    3. Consistently apply therapeutic communication principles to effectively communicate with any patient while providing care.
    4. Recall and integrate physiological, psychological, and sociological changes throughout human development with assessment and communication strategies for patients of all ages.
    5. Recognize, classify, and properly manage a difficult patient airway including:
        a.  Surgical establishment of a patient airway
        b.  Use of capnography to assess and adjust the ventilation of a patient
    6. Integrate appropriate alternative techniques to obtain a patient's medical history.
    7. Explain the pathophysiological significance of normal and key abnormal physical exam findings.
    8. Consistently integrate advanced principles of history taking and physical exam techniques to perform a comprehensive patient assessment.
    9. Consistently and accurately collect, organize and state patient information in verbal form, either in person or over the radio following accepted formats.
    10.  Consistently and accurately collect, organize, and clearly write patient information on patient documentation forms.


  
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    PMD 222 - Paramedic Care of Cardiovascular & Special Patient Populations


    This seventh course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this second course in a Critical Care Technician's progression to Paramedic covers the synthesis of information in order to make sound clinical decisions.  In-depth discussion of geriatric emergencies is followed by advanced cardiac pathophysiology and skills including 12 lead interpretations.  Neonatology and pediatrics emergencies and the skills necessary to care for them are reviewed.  The course concludes with a brief discussion of the recognition of abuse.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PMD 221 Paramedic Foundations and Comprehensive Physical Exam

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. Systematically apply accepted clinical decision making skills to formulate a field impression and treatment plan.
    2. Consistently integrate advanced diagnostic techniques and skills for the patient with cardiovascular disease.
    3. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the unique emergencies of the:

              a.  Geriatric patient
              b.  Pediatric patient
              c.  Patient who has sustained abuse or assault

  
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    PMD 223 - Paramedic Trauma Care


    This eighth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this third course in a Critical Care Technician's progression to Paramedic covers advanced preparatory concepts such as well-being of the paramedic, roles and responsibilities, medical legal and ethical issues.  The majority of this course is devoted to pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of a trauma patient and concludes with complex trauma scenarios requiring efficient synthesis of knowledge and skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: PMD 222 Paramedic Care of Cardiovascular & Special Patient Populations

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the paramedic's professional and community responsibilities with respect to:
              a.  Continuing education
              b.  Continuous EMS improvement
              c.  Injury prevention
    2.  Recall and discuss common out-of-hospital issues with respect to:
              a.  Laws and regulations
              b.  Medical ethics
              c.  Personal ethics
              d.  On- and off-line medical control
              e.  Patient advocacy
    3.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
              a.  Multi-system trauma
              b.  Extensive soft tissue trauma
              c.  Suspected spinal injury
              d.  Complex musculoskeletal injury

  
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    PMD 224 - Paramedic Care of Medical Emergencies


    This ninth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this fourth course in a Critical Care Technician's progression to Paramedic covers the body's defenses against disease and injury including discussion of the immune and inflammatory responses.  The majority of this course is devoted to pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of medical patients and concludes with complex medical scenarios requiring efficient synthesis of knowledge and skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: PMD 223 Paramedic Trauma Care

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. Describe the components of the body's physical barriers, immune and inflammatory systems and their responses when activated.
    2. Recall the body's response to acute and chronic stress.
    3. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:

              a.  A neurological problem
              b.  An endocrine problem
              c.  An allergic or anaphylactic reaction
              d.  A gastroenterological problem
              e.  A renal or urologic problem
              f.  A toxic substance exposure
              g.  A hematopoietic system disease
              h.  An environmentally induced or exacerbated medical condition

  
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    PMD 225 - Paramedic Operations, Pediatric Emergencies, Integrated Care


    This tenth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this fifth course in a Critical Care Technician's progression to Paramedic covers assessment based management and patients who present unique challenges for the paramedic.  Also, included are acute interventions for the chronic patient and an awareness of general rescue operations.  This course will re-emphasize and hone pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of pediatric patients and concludes with a comprehensive review of all paramedic objectives including complex patient care scenarios.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: PMD 224 Paramedic Care of Medical Emergencies

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Synthesize pathophysiological and psychosocial principles to adapt the assessment and treatment plan for diverse patients and those who face physical, mental, social and financial challenges.
    2.  Describe various special medical devices that might be encountered while caring for an acute chronic care patient and explain how to trouble shoot common devices.
    3.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for:
              a.  Acute deterioration of a chronic care patient
              b.  Common complaints
              c.  Acute pediatric patient
    4.  Restate standards and guidelines that help ensure safe and effective ground and air medical transport.
    5.  Describe and be able to implement the principles of rescue operations to safely rescue a patient from:
              a.  Water
              b.  Hazardous atmospheres
              c.  Trenches
              d.  Highways
              e.  Hazardous terrain

  
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    POS 111 - Public Policy


    This course offers students an analytical survey of policy formulation and implementation in the United States, together with an examination of the impact of policy upon individuals and groups in American society.  Topics covered will include:  policy making processes, policy analysis, federal and state policies, rationality and irrationality in public policy, incrementalism, special interests, public choice, and institutional influences.  Satisfies the civic education requirement for programs that require it.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    SOS 111
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
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    POS 116 - International Business Environments


    An overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic factors that influence the trade related interaction of nations and the operations of global business enterprises.  Trade theory, economic integration, global sourcing, export-import basics, cultural awareness, and other current topics relating to international business will be covered.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BUS 116
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.


  
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    POS 201 - Introduction to American Government


    An in-depth overview of American national government: constitutionalism, federalism, Civil Liberties and Civil Rights, Congress, Presidency, political philosophy and political parties, the Supreme Court, national elections, and political behavior.  An examination of national laws and policies and their effect on citizens.  Students will apply learned concepts to contemporary issues and events.  This course is strongly recommended for students who want to develop a deeper understanding of their role and responsibilities as citizens and want to make a difference.  Satisfies the Civic Education requirement for programs that require it.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
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    POS 204 - American State and Local Government


    Examination of how state and local governments function nationwide and how they are similar/dissimilar in their approach to governing.  State and local government structures and policies will be studied and compared from state to state.  A close examination of those structures and policies and their disparate effect on citizens.  Students will apply learned concepts to contemporary issues and events.  This course is strongly recommended for students who want to develop a deeper understanding of their role and responsibilities as citizens.  Satisfies the Civic Education requirement for programs that require it.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
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    POS 205 - Women and Politics


    This course will focus on women in government and politics.  The women's suffrage movement in the U.S. and abroad will be examined.  Students will research women that have contributed to the women's movement.  Students will consider these questions and more.  Does gender matter in politics?  Are men privileged in politics?  Are issues prioritized differently based on a politician's gender?  Is there a gender gap?  We will use social science methodology to hypothesize, observe, measure and assess the roles of women in politics and the political process.  Satisfies the Civic Education requirement for programs that require it.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
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    POS 210 - Political Internship


    POS 210 is a service learning course, with an academic component, which allows students to receive credit for serving an internship in the political field.  There will be one class hour per week, focusing on issues related to these service activities.  Service activities include, but are not limited to, working with local political parties, serving in election campaigns, and working with local elected officials.  The instructor will determine which service activities are appropriate and how both the service and academic components are assessed.

     

    Credits: 1-3
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Service Activities
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the major theories used by political scientists to study local government as they relate to internships.
    2. Identify the major research methods used by political scientists to study local government as they relate to internships.
    3. Analyze political behavior using at least one of the major theories used by political scientists.
    4. Discuss contemporary local political issues from the political science perspective.


  
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    POS 299 - Independent Study


    An independent student project which is beyond the scope of courses currently offered by the department, directed by a faculty member with approval of the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester hours of political science

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Course outcomes will be determined by the instructor with the consent of the department chair and Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
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    PSY 110 - General Psychology


    Survey of the field of psychology.  Major principles, theories, and methods, and their application to the study of human behavior.  Topics include the history and fields of psychology, the scientific method and statistical applications, the neural system, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory, intelligence and cognition, maturation, emotion, personality and social influences.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate understanding of the methods psychologists use to explore psychological and social phenomena, such as observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, models and issues in the field of psychology.


  
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    PSY 210 - Human Development


    Human development from conception through adulthood to the end of life.  Considers physical, intellectual, emotional, and social maturation and typical problems in various stages of the life cycle.  Especially designed for Health Sciences, Education and Psychology majors.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate understanding of the methods psychologists and social scientists use to explore developmental phenomena, such as observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, models and issues of the field of human development.


  
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    PSY 211 - Child Development


    An overview of the growth and development of the child from conception to adolescence including cognitive, physical, social and psychological changes.  Major theories and research related to child development.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological theories and models of child development.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of biological, psychological, cognitive and social processes in child development.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the research methods and ethical considerations appropriate for the study of child development.
    4. Critically evaluate empirical evidence concerning child development.
    5. Apply child development concepts to further the development and welfare of children in real-world settings.


  
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    PSY 212 - Adolescent Development


    Study of adolescent development and the complex nature of adolescent thought, behavior, and relationships.  Focus is on physical, cognitive, social, psychological, and moral development.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological theories and models of adolescents' development.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of biological, cognitive, social, and psychological processes on adolescent development.
    3. Critically evaluate empirical findings concerning adolescent development.
    4. Consider ways to effectively apply theoretical concepts to interacting with adolescents in personal and/or professional settings.


  
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    PSY 214 - Abnormal Psychology


    Overview of the history of psychopathology, major psychological disorders, theoretical perspectives to understanding abnormality and approaches to treatment and therapy.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the concept of abnormality.
    2. Describe the major diagnostic categories of mental disorders.
    3. Understand and articulate the differences between the major theories currently used to explain causes and symptoms of mental disorders.
    4. Distinguish between the varieties of approaches used to treat mental disorders.


  
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    PSY 217 - Introduction to Counseling Theory and Practice


    Theoretical foundations and techniques associated with a variety of individual counseling approaches including psychoanalytic, humanistic, existential, cognitive - behavioral, feminist, and integrative.  Basic counseling skills are introduced and practiced.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe and demonstrate the basic principles of counseling, listening, and attending skills.
    2. Evaluate the various theoretical models of counseling and their efficiency in the treatment of various counseling issues.
    3. Describe and apply the ethical and professional principles of counseling.
    4. Identify personal qualities that foster a therapeutic relationship and the process by which counselors develop their own counseling styles.
    5. Explain the role of cultural competency skills and how they are applied to counseling practice.


  
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    PSY 223 - Human Exceptionality and Its Assessment


    PSY 223 is a survey of human exceptionality:  attention will be focused on the problems, etiologies (causes), and expectancies of exceptional people in their communities, at school, and at home.  Topics include persons with learning disabilities, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders, emotional disabilities, mental retardation, autism, and people who are gifted, talented, and creative.  Special consideration is given to intelligence testing and the placement of atypical learners in special education and inclusive school settings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding and application of the facts, concepts, and theories associated with atypical development.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method in the study of behavior and the research methods used to gain knowledge about atypical development.
    3. Critically evaluate research about human exceptionalities.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the etiologies associated with different exceptionalities.
    5. Appreciate the various needs of individuals with exceptionalities throughout their lifespan.
    6. Become familiar with local, state, and federal resources for parents, educators, and other professionals interested in the field of human exceptionality.
    7. Identify and appreciate social and ethical issues associated with working with exceptional individuals.
    8. Apply course concepts in personal, educational and professional settings dealing with exceptional individuals.


  
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    PSY 227 - Learning and Behavior


    Exploration of the basic principles of conditioning and learning.  Emphasis on classical and operant conditioning and their place in the larger theoretical framework of behavioral psychology.  Application of these principles to understanding and changing individual and group behavior.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate a knowledge of behavioral orientation in psychology.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the explanations for behavior as postulated by behaviorists.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of classical and operant learning theory.
    4. Define basic terms and understand principles and processes associated with classical and operant learning theory and conditioning.
    5. Describe the various methods used in behavioral research.
    6. Utilize basic techniques of behavior change.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between classical and operant learning research findings, many of which are based on animal studies, and direct application to human behavior and its modification.


  
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    PSY 234 - Psychology of Addiction


    Overview of the psychology of addictive behavior, psychophysiology of the brain and the addictive process.  Addiction to alcohol, illicit drugs, over-the-counter medications, psycho-pharmaceuticals, food, gambling and sex are introduced.  The impact of the addictive cycle on the individual, the family, and society as a whole is explored.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology or Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of addiction as a concept.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of various types of addictive behavior.
    3. Integrate and apply information regarding how the central nervous system and other bodily systems process chemical substances.
    4. Recognize the comprehensive impact of addiction on an individual's overall well-being.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of addiction on the individual, family and society.
    6. Apply information about various addiction treatment modalities.
    7. Recognize the role that culture and the media have in relationship to addictive behavior.


  
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    PSY 240 - Psychology of Advertising


    Emphasizes the psychological dimensions of advertising as a basis for attracting and retaining consumer awareness of products, companies, and services.  Theories of communication, motivation, personality, attitude formation, perception and learning that pertain to the diffusion of media advertising messages are examined and analyzed using television, radio, print, and Internet media.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical foundations of the psychology of advertising.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical issues surrounding advertising strategies currently in use.
    3. Describe and analyze theories of motivation, perception and personality as each pertains to specific advertising campaigns.
    4. Describe the rationale for market segmentation strategies through the analysis of consumer life-style and life-cycle theories and understand the rationale for utilizing both quantitative and qualitative analyses.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of theories of communication, such as encoding and decoding advertising messages.
    6. Identify and explain examples of both classical and operant conditioning techniques utilized in advertising campaigns to affect consumer behavior.
    7. Assess the importance of the diffusion of innovation in advertising and the psychological components of each market segment.
    8. Demonstrate how advertising can be used to shape an individual's perceptions of advertising messages.


  
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    PSY 255 - Forensic Psychology


    The primary goal of this course is to investigate the psychological disorders present in both perpetrators and victims of crime as these disorders apply to the various aspects of the United States criminal justice system.  Psychological underpinnings of crimes such as stalking, child abuse, murder, and sexual deviance are explored.  The course also provides an overview of the role psychologists play in criminal investigations, including profiling, risk assessment, crime scene analysis, and therapeutic interventions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1. This course is designed to familiarize students with the symptoms of clinical syndromes and the application of diagnostics to forensic populations.
    2. Students will be exposed to the aspects of forensic psychology as a career.
    3. This course is intended to develop student research and writing skills in the expected professional writing format for social and behavioral sciences and criminal justice (APA).

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize, reflect on, and articulate (both orally and in writing) the scope of the field of forensic psychology including main terminology.
    2.  Summarize major topics, theories, research and concepts in the discipline and explain the interaction between the fields of Criminal Justice and Psychology.
    3.  Apply the principles learned in this course to practical experiences in the field specifically:

    • Differentiate between the various disorders most common in the criminal justice system including the etiology, symptomology, and treatment.
    • Effectively communicate with a variety of people involved in the criminal justice system including perpetrators, victims, and criminal justice personnel.
    • Interpret ambiguous situations involving the accused and the accuser using knowledge of reasoning and behavior.

    4.  Explain different aspects of crime, considering social, biological, cultural, and cognitive influences.
     

     

  
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    PSY 265 - Sport Psychology


    This course will provide an overview of the growing field of Sport Psychology, which examines human behavior in the context of athletic pursuits and the interaction between psychological variables and sports performance.  This multi-faceted field integrates theories and concepts from general, social, personality and developmental psychology as well as exercise psychology, sport sociology, and motor learning.  Topics will include group and team dynamics, leadership, motivation, psychological skills training, use of imagery and performance enhancement, promotion of health and well-being, the relationship between personality and performance, and psychopathology in sport.  This introductory course is ideal for students who wish to work with athletes in some capacity, pursue a career in physical education teaching and/or coaching or who plan on working with individuals in the health, fitness, or wellness industry.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology
     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Through verbal or written communication, students will be able to list and describe definitions, distinctions, and proposed casual mechanisms of psychological theories that have been used to study human behavior in the context of sport.  For example, students will be able to compare similarities and differences between various personality theories, understand theories describing the development of personality, and how these personality theories apply to sports psychology.
    2. Demonstrate how to apply theoretical knowledge to solve common problems that may be encountered in the field through written and verbal communication.
    3. Show independent critical thinking and communicate these ideas both verbally and in writing by critically analyzing current research in the field.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the interdisciplinary nature of the study of sport from perspectives through a written exam.  Perspectives such as gender difference, social context, developmental and biological changes and, professional ethical issues/concerns within the field will be covered.

     

  
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    PSY 295 - Psychology Research Capstone (WE)


    Students perform original research in psychology, to produce professional publications or presentations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I, and approval of the instructor.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Research Seminar Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to identify a researchable problem in psychology.
    2. Locate and critically evaluate appropriate existing psychological research.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding and mastery of a particular research method used in psychology, including research design, data analysis, data interpretation, and the development of conclusions from evidence.


  
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    PSY 299 - Independent Study in Psychology


    Guided or advanced study in psychology, typically beyond the scope or requirements of Psychology courses offered by the department.  Conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology plus at least 3 additional hours in a 200 level Psychology course

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    To be determined prior to approval.  Agreed to by student, faculty member and department chairperson.

  
  •  

    PTA 100 SL - Introduction to Physical Therapy I


    An introduction to the profession of physical therapy presented with an emphasis on the definition of the role and education of the Physical Therapist Assistant.  Includes an outline of the history and development of medicine, basic knowledge of SOAP note writing, medical terminology, health care institutional organization, ethics, medical-legal aspects of patient care, and fiscal considerations.  Interpersonal skills and professional/patient interactions are discussed.  This course is designated as a service learning course.  The service learning component of the course requires the completion of 50 hours of approved volunteer/service learning experience in a hospital physical therapy department prior to the start of the course.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  50 service learning hours in a hospital physical therapy department

    Corequisite:  PTA 104L Basic Musculoskeletal Anatomy

    Prior or Concurrent:  BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I, PHY 118 Physics for Physical Therapist Assistants

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the history and the roles of medicine, physical therapy, the State Board of Physical Therapy, Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy, and the American Physical Therapy Association.
    2. Summarize the standards of practice, ethical conduct, state and federal laws and the New York State Practice Act for Physical Therapy.
    3. Demonstrate critical thinking skills through the analysis of situations related to biomedical ethics, confidentiality, and healthcare equity.
    4. Complete appropriate documentation in patient record keeping.
    5. Characterize the practice of Physical Therapy.
    6. Demonstrate therapeutic communications.
    7. Delineate learning styles and their impact on teaching and learning.
    8. Discuss the Psychosocial Aspects of Heath Care.
    9. Explain the purpose, standards and procedures established for the clinical training of Physical Therapist Assistant.
    10. Discuss basic pharmacology.
    11. Participate and reflect on a service-learning experience as it relates to civic involvement and the comparative analysis of roles and mission, as they relate to the field of physical therapy.
    12. Display good body mechanics.
    13. Demonstrate the use of universal precautions, clean and sterile aseptic technique.
    14. Describe cultural competence and demonstrate steps taken to progress towards cultural competence.


  
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    PTA 101 - Introduction to Physical Therapy II


    General concepts of disease and disease processes are discussed.  Diseases of selected organs are studied as they relate to Physical Therapy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 100 Introduction to Physical Therapy II

    Corequisite:  BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define terms related to the disease and disabilities studied in this course.
    2. Explain the causes, pathophysiological processes and classification of disease and disability studied in this course.
    3. Outline the principles of healing.
    4. Review health care literature in relation to pathophysiology.
    5. Explain the roles various health care providers have in the management of commonly seen pathology.


  
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    PTA 102 - Introduction to Rehabilitation


    A theoretical and applied study of rehabilitation techniques used in the field of physical therapy.  The course includes the study of principles of normal body alignment, body mechanics, posture, balance and cultural competence.  Topics include bed positioning, moving and lifting the dependent patient, as well as the techniques of goniometrics, transfer and elevation activities, passive and self-range of motion exercises.  Emphasis is on orthopedic and neurologic treatment techniques, including the therapeutic gymnasium, wheelchairs and assistive devices, orthotics, prosthetics, and the exploration of architectural barriers.  In addition, interventions for the pediatric patient and patients with amputations are explored.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 103 Physical Agents and Massage

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe and technically competent manner.
    2. Describe etiology, clinical picture, precautions and complications, functional significance, patient management, and overall goals of rehabilitation for patients.
    3. Instruct patient, family and colleagues, using teaching methods commensurate with the needs of the learner, to achieve the goals as outlined in the plan of care.
    4. Explain the immobilization syndrome.
    5. Instruct a patient in Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL).
    6. Identify architectural barriers.
    7. Display good body mechanics.
    8. Describe the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the human body.
    9. Identify a variety of braces, orthotics, and prosthetics including components, the material used in fabrication, advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications.


  
  •  

    PTA 103 - Physical Agents and Massage


    A review of the basic principles of massage and application of modalities.  Includes principles and procedures related to the use of the Hubbard tank, therapeutic pool, and intermittent compression.  Specific skills practiced in the laboratory include various massage techniques; use of hot and cold packs, paraffin application; fluid therapy, use of whirlpool and contrast baths; use of ultrasound; application of microwave diathermy; use of electrical stimulation; and ultraviolet and infrared radiation therapy techniques.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 102 Introduction to Rehabilitation

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe and technically competent manner, including massage, superficial heat modalities, deep heat modalities, hydrotherapy, therapeutic pool exercises, electrotherapy, traction, aseptic technique, wound care, handwashing, intermittent compression, and vital sign data collection.
    2. Explain and discuss the role of the Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and in the patient examination/evaluation process.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport, and communicating adequate instruction/explanation orally and in writing concerning all interventions with patient, peers, and other caregivers.


  
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    PTA 104L - Basic Musculoskeletal Anatomy


    An experientially-based study of basic human bone and muscle anatomy.  Emphasis is on the study of anatomical human musculoskeletal structures as they relate to the field of physical therapy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  PTA 100 Introduction to Physical Therapy I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Lab Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Name the bones and muscles of the body according to region.
    2. List the origin, insertion, nerve, and action of each muscle studied.
    3. Palpate the superficial bony landmarks and muscles studied.
    4. Define planes, axes, and directional anatomical terminology of the body.


  
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    PTA 110 - Clinical Affiliation I


    An introductory clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, ambulation, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  Additional emphasis on cultural competence and time management skills.  The student meets with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 102 Introduction to Rehabilitation, PTA 103 Physical Agents and Massage

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    10.7 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Provide physical therapy services as specified in the plan of care developed by the physical therapist.
    2. Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    3. Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    4. Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    5. Deliver established patient care in a professional manner that reflects respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.
    6. Manage a caseload of at least 2-3 patients with basic diseases, conditions, and injuries.
    7. Demonstrate time management skills.
    8. Access information from literature relevant to interventions.
    9. Recognize pharmaceuticals, their indications and side effects as they relate to patient rehabilitation.


  
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    PTA 201 - Kinesiology


    A study of muscle structure and function as they relate to the science of human motion.  Emphasizes basic principles of movement and their application to physical therapy, including, manual muscle testing, pathological posture and gait patterns.  A laboratory experience that includes the application of kinesiology and exercise principles is integrated in the learning experience.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner.
    2. Instruct patient, family, and colleagues, using teaching methods commensurate with the needs of the learner, to achieve the goals as outlined in the plan of care.
    3. Discuss and apply the essentials of Kinesiology.
    4. Describe joint and muscle function regarding the forces placed upon them.
    5. Perform manual muscle testing (MMT) and palpation as assessment tools to collect data on patient progress.
    6. Experiment with normal motor learning and motor skill acquisition.
    7. Demonstrate critical thinking skills through the analysis of the process and impact of patient motor skill acquisition, using evidence-based research.


  
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    PTA 202 - Therapeutic Exercise


    The principles and techniques of therapeutic exercise are presented.  Specific neurological, medical, surgical and orthopedic conditions are studied.  Lecture, lab activities, cooperative learning, group activities and individual assignments are examples of learning/teaching methods utilized in this course.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain and discuss his/her role as a Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and the patient examination/evaluation process.
    2. Perform all modalities/interventions presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner as they relate to specific diagnosis presented, including:  manual and mechanical resistance exercise, stretching, proprioceptive exercise, aerobics, plyometric exercise and assessment, and interventions for orthopedic conditions.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport and in communicating adequate instructions/explanations orally and in writing concerning all interventions with patient, peers and other caregivers.
    4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct, including respect for others' differences when engaged in learning and simulated patient care activities.


  
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    PTA 203 - Therapeutic Assessment & Review for the PTA


    An overview of the basic orthopedic, neurological, integumentary, pediatric and cardiopulmonary assessments in th physical therapy clinical setting.  Includes the application of specific state laws to the performance of these assessments by physical therapist assistants.  Also included in this course will be brief reviews of pertinent/related pathological conditions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 213 Senior I, PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
     Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify basic therapeutic assessments in the following areas: upper and lower extremity orthopedics, spinal orthopedics, sensory system, balance and coordination (sitting and standing), pediatrics, integumentary and cardiopulmonary areas of physical therapy.
    2. Explain the implications of the following as they pertain to rehabilitation: orthopedic injuries, neurological injuries/diseases, wound management, postural deficits, cardiopulmonary pathology, pediatric diseases/disabilities, gait deviations, normal gait patterns and pharmaceuticals.


  
  •  

    PTA 210 - Clinical Affiliation II


    A clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility to assist students to improve skills and increase experience.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, ambulation, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  The student meets with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Includes the observation of surgical procedures.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 5 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 110 Clinical Affiliation I

    Corequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    13.3 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Provide physical therapy services as specified in the plan of care developed by the physical therapist.
    2. Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    3. Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    4. Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    5. Deliver established patient care in a professional manner that reflects respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.
    6. Manage a caseload of at least 1/2 of a typical PTA patient caseload of patients with basic diseases, conditions, and injuries.
    7. Demonstrate time management skills.
    8. Access information from literature relevant to interventions.
    9. Recognize pharmaceuticals, their indications and side effects as they relate to patient rehabilitation.
    10. Examine the method and document the experience of an observed surgical procedure.


  
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    PTA 213 - Senior Seminar I


    An exploration of the physical therapist assistant's professional role in the testing and treatment of more complex neurological, orthopedic, medical and surgical conditions.  Consideration of psychosocial issues are also discussed.  Review for the PTA licensing exam.  This course is presented in a seminar format of 12 to 15 hours per week for the first 7 weeks of the semester.  SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS:  This course may be presented by guest lecturers, and sessions may be held off campus in various health care facilities depending upon the particular topic.  Significant preparation time outside of regular class hours is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

     

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    5 Seminar Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner.
    2. Interact professionally with other members of the health care team and discuss professional research presented in seminars.
    3. Recognize individual and cultural differences and respond appropriately in all aspects of physical therapy services.
    4. Identify career development and lifelong learning opportunities.
    5. Identify professional promotion opportunities.
    6. Identify personal areas of strength and areas requiring further study in preparation for the professional licensing exam.
    7. Instruct in interprofessional collaborative education.


  
  •  

    PTA 220 - Clinical Affiliation III


    A clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility to assist students in mastering entry-level skills for employment as a physical therapist assistant.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with a wide variety of patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, gait training, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  Students meet several times with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Clinical hours:  40 hr/week for 6 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

    Corequisites:  PTA 213 Senior Seminar I, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

    Credits: 6
    Hours
    16 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Provide physical therapy services as specified in the plan of care developed by the physical therapist.
    2. Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    3. Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    4. Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    5. Deliver established patient care in a professional manner that reflects respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.
    6. Manage a typical FULL ENTRY-LEVEL PTA patient caseload of patients with a variety of complex conditions/diseases.
    7. Demonstrate time management skills.
    8. Access information from literature relevant to interventions.
    9. Recognize pharmaceuticals, their indications and side effects as they relate to patient rehabilitation.


  
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    PTA 224 - Senior Seminar II


    A capstone course designed to allow students to integrate their theoretical knowledge and their clinical experience.  Students meet and present case studies in seminar format based on their clinical experience.  If time permits, special topics are presented and discussed.  In addition, a student/teacher conference is required for each student prior to graduation.  The course is held for 9 hrs/week for 2 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PTA 213 Senior Seminar I, PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Seminar Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Evaluate the impact of psychosocial factors and reimbursement policies on patient interventions and outcomes.
    2. Defend the interrelationship of physical therapy practitioners and other health care providers to the patient's total treatment plan.
    3. Integrate of theory learned in PTA courses and learning gained through practical experience in the clinic.
    4. Demonstrate that he/she has been socialized into the role of Physical Therapist Assistant.
    5. Present a case study on a patient undergoing physical therapy.  You will choose from case studies assigned by the Professor.
    6. Discuss the impact of data collected in progression of patient interventions within the plan of care established by the PT.


  
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    PTA 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project with advanced work in a specific area of physical Therapy.  Independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of courses currently offered by the department chairperson.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Approval of Department Chairperson

     

    Credits: 1-3
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
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    RAD 100 - Introduction to Clinical Education


    Overview of radiologic technology through the study of its historical development, its placement in the medical field today, the organization of a modern radiology department, professional ethics, medicolegal aspects of radiology, and medical terminology.  This course is designated as a service learning course.  The service learning component of the course requires the completion of 50 hours of approved volunteer/service learning experience in a hospital diagnostic imaging department prior to the start of the course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  50 volunteer/service learning hours in a hospital diagnostic imaging department

    Credits: 2.5
    Hours
    2.5 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Communicate with patients in a compassionate and caring manner.
    2. Define basic medical terms, medical abbreviations and symbols.
    3. Apply medical/professional ethics in the context of a broader societal ethic.
    4. Explain concepts of personal honesty, integrity, accountability, competence and compassion as ethical imperatives in health care.
    5. Identify legal and professional standards and relate each to practice in health professions.
    6. Explain the legal implications of professional liability, malpractice, professional negligence and other legal doctrines applicable to professional practice.
    7. Identify the benefits of continuing education as related to improved patient care and professional enhancement.


  
  •  

    RAD 101 - Image Production and Evaluation I


    Introduction to the basic principles of radiographic imaging including x-ray production, photon interactions with matter, principles and operation of digital imaging systems, factors impacting image acquisition, display, radiographic image analysis, and technical factors that govern the image production process.  Lecture and laboratory (RAD 101L) are coordinated to enhance these fundamental concepts.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and describe a quality radiographic image, various imaging systems, and the components of an imaging system.
    2. Define terminology associated with digital imaging systems.
    3. Describe the various types of digital receptors, the response of digital detectors to exposure variations, and various digital processing.
    4. Identify and describe how the geometric and photographic properties affect a quality digital radiographic image such as brightness, contrast resolution, spatial resolution, and distortion.


  
  •  

    RAD 101 L - Image Production and Evaluation I Laboratory


    Introduction to the basic principles of radiographic imaging including image processing methods, image analysis, radiographic quality and receptor exposure responses.  Lecture and laboratory are coordinated to enhance these fundamental concepts.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform quality digital radiographic images on various imaging systems and define the components of a digital imaging system.
    2. Perform image analysis on a quality digital radiographic image and describe the analysis criteria utilized.
    3. Perform quality digital radiographic images and describe the response of digital detectors to exposure variations.
    4. Perform, identify, and briefly describe the calculation of the exposure indicator with changes in exposrue values on various digital imaging systems.
    5. Relate the performance of various positioning, projections, and anatomical identification from the energized laboratory to the 3D images of the Anatomage Table.


  
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    RAD 102 W - Image Production and Evaluation II


    Advanced study of the factors contributing to the radiographic image and evaluation.  This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 101 Image Production and Evaluation I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and describe the basic fundamentals of x-ray production, analyze and perform calculations of exposure techniques, image magnification, percent magnification, penumbra, beam restriction, and half-value layer (HVL) formulas.
    2. Describe the possible fates of x-ray photons interacting with matter and how various beam limitations and grids can control scatter.
    3. Identify and describe the anatomical and pathological factors that affect the radiographic image.
    4. Perform and describe how the image receptor responds to automatic exposure control or manual techniques, and the various tools and charts that are used to evaluate this response.
    5. Perform, identify and describe image analysis.


  
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    RAD 103 L - Positioning I


    Instruction and practice in radiographic positioning or the appendicular skeleton.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    5 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and discriminate between terms such as digital image, projection, position, method, view, and several other basic positioning terms.
    2. Identify and describe the patient positioning, CR direction, tube angulation, centering point, anatomical structures demonstrated and evaluation criteria for each of the following radiographic projections/positions involving the upper extremities, lower extremities, chest, abdomen, and shoulder girdle.
    3. Identify the position demonstrated on radiographic images of the upper and lower extremities, chest, abdomen, and shoulder girdle regions.
    4. Perform or simulate the above mentioned radiographic projections/methods on phantoms or live subject, respectively.
    5. Perform 85% proficiency in hands-on evaluations with each of the following areas:  upper extremity, lower extremity, chest, abdomen, and shoulder girdle, prior to performing these types of exams on patients in the clinical setting.


  
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    RAD 104 - Positioning II


    Instruction and practice in radiographic positioning of the axial skeleton.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 100 Introduction to Clinical Education

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and describe the patient positioning, CR direction, tube angulation, centering point, anatomical structures demonstrated, and evaluation criteria for the required radiographic positions/projections involving the bony thorax, pelvic girdle, spinal column, and skull.
    2. Identify the position/projection demonstrated on radiographic images of the bony thorax, pelvic girdle, spinal column, and skull.
    3. Perform or simulate the required radiographic positions/projections on phantoms or live subject, respectively.
    4. Perform 85% on practical evaluations with each of the following areas; bony thorax, pelvic girdle, spinal column, and skull, prior to performing these exams on patients in the clinical setting.


  
  •  

    RAD 110 L - Methods of Patient Care


    Patient care procedures routinely performed in the radiology department.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and explain the following procedures that deal with the care of a patient in the radiology department; basic first aid, transporting the patient safely, vital signs, medical and surgical asepsis, intubation, and contrast media.
    2. Perform practical evaluations for patient transport, care of patient medical equipment (e.g., oxygen tank, IV tubing), respiration, pulse, temperature, pulse oximetry, and blood pressure on live patients.
    3. Fill a syringe with contrast media.
    4. Give a brief explanation of the ancillary radiology departments.


  
  •  

    RAD 115 - Radiation Protection


    Basic radiation protection for the student radiographer.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the justification and responsibility of providing radiation protection during radiographic exams.
    2. Define and identify the production of x-ray and the types of x-ray interactions with matter.
    3. Identify and differentiate radiation quantities, the appropriate symbols for each, and the recommended measurement guidelines.
    4. Identify and describe the biological effects from ionizing radiation and means of protecting the patient and occupational radiographers.
    5. Identify and describe the various methods and/or devices that may be used to detect and monitor radiation exposure.


  
  •  

    RAD 131 - Clinical Education I


    Introduction and orientation to the Radiology Department in an affiliating site.  Clinical hours: 7.5 hours/day for 6 days; 45 hours total.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 100 Introduction to Clinical Education

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    45 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Properly identify patients and exam to be performed.
    2. Communicate effectively with the patient, the staff, and classmates.
    3. Read and utilize radiographic control panels.
    4. Observe and assist the radiographer in a radiographic examination.
    5. Perform all four (4) tasks analyses.
    6. Identify all items on the clinical performance evaluation with 90% accuracy.
    7. Maintain all records of clinical assignment hours and clinical examinations observed or performed with a radiographer.


  
  •  

    RAD 132 - Clinical Education II


    Observation and clinical experience for the development of competency involving elementary radiographic procedures in an affiliated site. Clinical hours: 12 hr/week for 15 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: RAD 100 Introduction to Clinical Education, BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I, RAD 131 Clinical Education I, and RAD 103 L Positioning I, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    12 Clinical Hours/Week
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform imaging procedures under direct supervision for first year level students.
    2. Develop professional attitude by putting into practice knowledge of ethics, patient care, and communication skills.
    3. Become more proficient in the use of radiographic equipment and adhere to radiation protection measures.
    4. Integrate the radiographer's practice standards and HIPAA requirements into the clinical practice setting.
    5. Perform with 80% accuracy a minimum of 10 competencies on specific categories, after proving proficient on-campus practical exams.


  
  •  

    RAD 133 - Summer Clinical Education III


    Clinical experience for development of competency involving general radiographic procedures in an affiliated site. Clinical hours: 7.5 hr/day for 30 days; 225 hours total.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: RAD 132 Clinical Education II, BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II, RAD 104 Positioning II, or permission of instructor

    Corequisites: RAD 216 Imaging Modalities

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    7.5 hr/day for 30 days; 225 hours total
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform imaging procedures under direct/indirect supervision for progressing second year level students and observing other imaging modalities.
    2. Maintain professional attitude by integrating appropriate personal and professional values into clinical practice.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of radiographic equipment, radiation protection, patient communication, and contrast agents.
    4. Maintain radiographer's practice standards and HIPAA compliance.
    5. Perform with 80% accuracy a minimum of 10 competencies on specific categories, after providing proficient on-campus practical exams.


  
  •  

    RAD 201 - Equipment Operation and Maintenance


    Principles and operation of radiographic imaging equipment, tube design, X-ray circuitry, mobile equipment, image intensification, and digital radiography/fluoroscopy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  RAD 102W Image Production and Evaluation II

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Compare and describe the construction of the main components of various imaging systems and the principles of operation of each.
    2. Discuss various modalities and fixed/mobile radiographic equipment in terms of purpose, components, types, and applications.
    3. Discuss fixed and mobile fluoroscopic equipment, image-intensified, flat panel and pulsed fluoroscopy in terms of purpose, components, types and applications.
    4. Define and explain electrostatics, electrodynamics, and magnetism.
    5. Identify and briefly describe electromagnetism, laws of electromagnetic induction, electromechanical devices, and transformers.
    6. Describe the construction and principles of operation of the x-ray circuitry, timers, rectifiers, generators, and mobile x-ray units.
    7. Identify and describe the advantages and disadvantages of x-ray tube design, rating charts, and methods used to extend x-ray tube life.


  
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    RAD 204 L - Advanced Positioning


    Instruction and practice in positioning techniques involving the skull, facial bones, and advanced radiographic procedures and sectional anatomy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 133 Clinical Education III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and describe the patient positioning, CR direction, tube angulation, centering point, anatomical structures demonstrated, and evaluation criteria for the required radiographic positions/projections involving the skull, sinuses, orbits, and facial bones.
    2. Identify the position/projection demonstrated on radiographic images of the skull, sinuses, orbits, and facial bones.
    3. Perform or simulate the required radiographic positions/projections on phantoms or live patients respectively.
    4. Perform 90% on practical evaluations with each of the following areas of the head; sinuses, orbits, and facial bones.
    5. Identify and explain the following Advanced Radiographic procedures; Pediatric Radiography, Bone Densitometry, Radiography of the Respiratory System, Radiography of the Genito-Urinary System, and Radiography of the Reproductive System.
    6. Identify the basic sectional anatomy of the brain, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and extremities.
    7. Correlate and identify sectional anatomy on CT & MRI images with cadaver images and diagrams.

     

  
  •  

    RAD 211 - Pharmacology for Radiographers


    Pharmacology and drug administration for imaging technologists.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Distinguish between the chemical, generic and trade names for select drugs.
    2. Classify drugs according to specific categories.
    3. Explain the effects of select drugs on medical imaging procedures and explain the actions, uses and side effects for select drugs.
    4. Explain the pharmacology of barium and iodine compounds.
    5. Describe methods and techniques for administering various types of contrast agents and identify and describe the routes of drug administration.
    6. Demonstrate appropriate venipuncture technique on a simulated arm utilizing appropriate aseptic technique.
    7. Identify, describe and document complications associated with intravenous drug therapy and appropriate actions to resolve these complications.
    8. Explain the current legal and ethical status of the radiographer's role in drug administration.


  
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    RAD 216Y - Imaging Modalities


    Introduction to the principles of computerized axial tomography, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  RAD 102 Image Production and Evaluation II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the following imaging procedures:  MRI; CT; Nuclear Medicine; PETCT, Ultrasound, and Radiation Therapy.
    2. Provide patient education concerning the following procedures:  MRI; CT; Nuclear Medicine; PETCT, Ultrasound, and Radiation Therapy.
    3. Observe each of the various imaging modalities for diagnostic studies:  MRI; CT; Nuclear Medicine; PETCT, Ultrasound, and Radiation Therapy.
    4. Perform basic CT exam of the head, thorax and/or abdomen.


  
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    RAD 220 - Radiologic Pathology


    A presentation of the various medical and surgical diseases and their relationship to radiographic procedures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define basic terms related to pathology.
    2. Discuss the symptoms manifested and treatment of various congenital, chronic, acute, and acquired diseases.
    3. Identify diseases causes by or contributed to by genetic factors.
    4. Identify various disease processes radiographically.
    5. Explain how a disease might affect the production of the radiographic image.


  
  •  

    RAD 225 W - Advanced Imaging Procedures


    An overview of advanced imaging procedures such as:  equipment, the use of computers in imaging, responsibilities of the radiographer, and the care of the patient.  The use of body systems-based approach to imaging procedures.  This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 230 Clinical Education IV, RAD 204 Advanced Positioning, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe specialized radiographic equipment utilized for vascular, cardiac, surgical, interventional, and trauma radiography.
    2. Identify radiographic anatomy utilizing advanced imaging procedures.
    3. Determine the ideal diagnostic procedure which will provide optimal diagnostic results.
    4. Provide patient education for advanced imaging procedures.


  
  •  

    RAD 227 - CT Physics and Equipment


    This course is designed to cover system operations and components, image processing and display, image quality, and artifacts involved in Computed Tomography (CT).  Emphasis will be placed on data acquisition, tissue attenuation conversions, image reconstruction algorithms, processing display, and factors controlling image resolution.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  The student must be a Registered Radiologic Technologist (ARRT)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the history of Computed Tomography.
    2.  Describe the components of the CT imaging system.
    3.  Describe the types, location, and function of CT detectors.
    4.  Define linear attenuation coefficient.
    5.  Define and describe the functions of the data acquisition system (DAS).
    6.  List CT computer data processing steps.
    7.  Identify common filters, algorithms, and kernel settings.
    8.  Explain post-processing techniques.
    9.  Define terms such as:
         a)  Pixel
         b)  Matrix
         c)  Pitch
         d)  X, Y, Z coordinates
         e)  CT/Hounsfield
         f)  Window width (WW) and Window level (WL)
         g)  Spatial resolution
         h)  Contrast resolution
         i)  Noise
         j)  Region of interest (ROI)
         k)  Sampling
    10.  Name the factors affecting image quality in CT.
    11.  Trace the sequence of events in CT scanning from application of electrical current to the x-ray tube through image display.
    12.  Relate differences between conventional and spiral CT scanning.
    13.  Name the radiation protection devices and scan factors used to reduce patient dose in CT.
    14.  List and describe current data storage techniques.

  
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    RAD 228 - CT Sectional Anatomy


    This course will cover the function and identification of cross-sectional anatomy as related to the Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging process.  Emphasis will be placed upon visualization of CT images of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and musculoskeletal system for imaging professionals.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  The student must be a Registered Radiologic Technologist (ARRT) or Permission of the Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Name anatomical structures located within the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, upper and lower extremities.
    2. Describe the relationship of each anatomical structure to surrounding structures.
    3. Describe the function of each anatomical structure.
    4. Locate the anatomical structures on CT images in the transverse axial, coronal, sagittal, and orthogonal (oblique) planes.


  
  •  

    RAD 229 - CT Pathology


    This course will provide an understanding of common diseases diagnosable using Computed Tomography (CT).  Importance will be placed upon the examination and demonstration of disease or trauma process from its description, etiology, associated symptoms and diagnosis with CT.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  The student must be a Registered Radiologic Technologist (ARRT)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define common terms used in the study of pathology.
    2.  Name common pathological conditions affecting any of the body systems studied in this course.
    3.  For each common pathological condition identified in the course:
         a)  Describe the disorder
         b)  List the etiology
         c)  Name the associated symptoms
         d)  Name the common means of diagnosis
         e)  List characteristic CT manifestations of the pathology
    4.  Identify each of the pathological conditions studied on CT images.
    5.  Identify pathology resulting from trauma on CT images.
    6.  Identify pathology common only in pediatric patients.

  
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    RAD 230 - Clinical Education IV


    Practical application of advanced positioning techniques in an affiliating site.  Clinical hours:  18 hrs/week for 15 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 133 Summer Clinical Education III or permission of instructor

    Credits: 6
    Hours
    18 Clinical Hours/Week
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform advanced imaging procedures under more indirect supervision for second year level students focusing on procedures such as:  skull, sinuses, facial bones, surgical, pediatric, trauma.
    2. Demonstrate continued professional attitude in the clinical practice.
    3. Maintain proficiency in the use of radiographic equipment, radiation protection, patient communication, and contrast agents.
    4. Maintain radiographer's practice standards and HIPAA compliance.
    5. Perform with 80% accuracy a minimum of 10 competencies on specific categories, after proving proficiency on campus practical exams.


  
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    RAD 232 - Clinical Education V


    Application of advanced radiographic procedures including evening assignments in an affiliated hospital.  Clinical hours:  12 hr/week for 15 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 230 Clinical Education IV

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    12 Clinical Hours/Week
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform advanced imaging procedures, simulations, and terminal competencies to include patient care and communication skills, radiation protection, image production, and evaluation images.
    2. Demonstrate entry level radiographer skills and professional attitude.
    3. Demonstrate competency in the use of radiographic equipment, radiation protection, patient communication, and contrast agents.
    4. Maintain radiographer's practice standards and HIPAA compliance.
    5. Complete American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Clinical Competency Requirements.


  
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    RAD 245 - Radiobiology


    Radiobiology and advanced radiation protection procedures related to diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radiation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 201 Equipment Operation and Maintenance

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define and describe radiobiology, interactions of radiation and atoms, basic concepts of radiation, and the chemical composition of the human body.
    2. Identify and describe the molecular composition of a cell and the effects of radiation on cells.
    3. Describe the tissue radiosensitivity, systemic, genetic, and somatic effects of ionizing radiation.
    4. Briefly describe the radiation-induced mutations of DNA and chromosomes.
    5. Identify and describe means of radiation protection and measurement in order to follow the ALARA Concept.


  
  •  

    RAD 250 L - Quality Assurance


    The basic principles and techniques of quality assurance testing presented and illustrated through laboratory experiments.  Major emphasis on the tests and measurements used to analyze imaging systems with minimum information loss.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 201 Equipment Operation and Maintenance

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define and describe the historical development of quality assurance, quality management, quality care, quality control testing and the QM tool used to evaluate them.
    2. Perform, identify and describe the purpose, frequency of testing, test equipment, potential problems, acceptance limits, and possible corrective actions for radiographic equipment, processing equipment, and viewing equipment.
    3. Perform, identify and describe the quality control testing for beam geometry and quality.
    4. Define and briefly describe quality assurance/control testing for CT, MRI, Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine, Interventional, Mammography, and Digital Imaging.
    5. Explain the purpose of Total Quality Management within a radiology department.


  
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    RAD 262 - Mammography


    Individual modules consisting of 1) patient education and assessment; 2) anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the breast; 3) positioning and image evaluation; 4) mammographic technique; and 5) instrumentation and quality assurance.  Preparation for the AART mammography registry examination.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisitie:  RAD 230 Clinical Education IV or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate basic mammographic positioning skills.
    2. Explain advanced positioning techniques for supplementary views, difficult patients and implant patients
    3. Describe how various physical characteristics of the x-ray tube affect mammographic imaging; perform mammography quality control testing procedures per MQSA guidelines.
    4. Describe the differences between imaging systems used to perform Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) examinations.
    5. Describe and develop a comprehensive quality assurance program for digital mammography; understand the differences between film-screen and digital imaging.
    6. Describe the parameters in digital imaging that control resolution and contrast.


  
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    RAD 264 - CT Procedures


    This course is designed to provide detailed coverage of procedures for Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging.  Emphasis will be placed on patient care, patient assessment, basic pharmacology, medical ethics and law, and scanning procedures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  The student must be a Registered Radiologic Technologist (ARRT)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. List the CT scanner and scan room preparation steps necessary for CT procedures.
    2. Educate the patient on the general aspects of CT and the specifics of the CT procedure.
    3. Name the patient preparation required for each protocol.
    4. Determine if contrast media is indicated for a specific protocol and if indicated, name the type, specify the dosage, and the route of administration.
    5. Determine from the patient medical laboratory results, patient history, and charted information if the use of contrast media is contraindicated and explain why.
    6. Describe the conditions that require a patient to grant informed consent in writing for a CT procedure.
    7. List the range, azimuth, anatomical landmarks, patient orientation, position, and technical factors used to produce CT images for a given protocol.
    8. Provide correct information concerning the scan field of view, display field of view, mode, algorithm, gantry angle, technical factors, range, table incrementation, and slice thickness for each procedure protocol.
    9. List the routine filming format for each protocol studied.
    10. Perform any nonroutine procedure tasks associated with CT protocols.
    11. Differentiate between scanning parameters for routine CT procedure vs. spiral protocols.
    12. Explain current trends in CT image archiving.
    13. List post-procedure patient instructions for each procedure protocol.


  
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    RAD 266 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging


    Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Radiographer.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the physics of MRI.
    2. Analyze the types of disease processes that are diagnosed through the use of MRI.


  
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    RAD 295 - Seminar in Radiography


    Preparation of the technical report and its organization for both written and oral presentation.  Readings, review sessions, and practice exams in current literature and journals will prepare students for their ARRT Certification Examination.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Senior year status

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Prepare oral and written presentation.
    2. Develop a resume.
    3. Pass Comprehensive Final examinations with an 80% in:  Patient Care, Safety, Image Production, and Procedures.


  
  •  

    RAD 298 - Independent Clinical Study


    A one-time individual student clinical experience to be conducted under the direction of a clinical instructor and approved by the department chairperson.

    Credits: (1-2)
    Hours
    Clinical: TBD
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform specified imaging procedures to an appropriate level of competency.

  
  •  

    RAD 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of radiography.  Independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of courses currently offered by the department.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Approval of Department Chairperson

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
  •  

    SAC 250 - Career Exploration


    How to plan, establish, and change a career.  The process of deciding on a career and implementing career goals, assessment of values, interests and skills plus their relationship to occupations.  Analysis of the labor market needs, identification of employers and sources of occupation information, the means of securing employment through proposals, resumes, applications and job interviews.  Supportive small group atmosphere.  Class activities include discussion, speakers, testing, and individual counseling within career development theory.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of Career Development Theory and a model of career development.
    2. Incorporate Career Development Theory with needs theory and occupational information.
    3. Understand how the development of effective attitudes and competencies enables you to take charge of your career and life.
    4. Know how the career/life decision-making model can be used to make realistic career choices.
    5. Have translated career needs and wants you have identified into goals and objectives.
    6. Have identified those career alternatives best suited to your unique personal attributes.
    7. Understand how to effectively explore the occupational world and how to obtain information needed for informed career decision-making.
    8. Have made a tentative or definite career choice through a careful assessment of your list of career alternatives.
    9. Have developed objectives appropriate to your career choice and translated those into achievable action plans. Specific to this will be short and long-term academic plans.
    10. Have developed and submitted for review a Skills Portfolio reflecting SCANS standards and consistent Career Development skills theory.
    11. Develop and maintain a Resume reflective of at least two of the three generally acceptable styles.


  
  •  

    SAC 251 - Career Search


    For people who know their interests, skills, and values but are not sure which career field or lifestyles would be most satisfying to them.  Sources of occupational information, analysis of labor market needs, what colleges and college majors best prepare students for their career goals.  For students who are beginning a career, changing careers, or returning to the job market.  For students who scored 13-18 on My Vocational Situation.  Supporting small group atmosphere.  Discussion sessions, speakers, testing field work, and individual counseling.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Seminar Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify at least five sources of occupational information.
    2. Research and understand career search data.
    3. Conduct an analysis of labor market needs.
    4. Identify and create four types of resumes
    5. Write an effective cover letter
    6. Identify appropriate job/career opportunities and successfully apply.
    7. Identify what college majors best prepare students for their career goals.
    8. Identify 4 colleges and universities that offer their desired field of study.


  
  •  

    SAC 295 - Seminar in Human Potential


    Human Potential seminar centers on the person within a positive group setting while working on and with the potential of all involved. It assists persons in achieving the following:  becoming more self-directed, self-motivating, self-aware, self-controlled, self-disciplined and empathetic toward others.  The focus is on developing the person's own resources by utilizing specific and structured procedures.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Avoid and escape negative states such as anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, anger, and self-defeating behavior.
    2. Deal effectively with the normal demands of everyday life (have good relationships with others, cope with stress, organize yourself, set and accomplish goals, etc.).
    3. Improve yourself beyond mere "normality" (become more creative, increase awareness, and develop a higher quality life).


  
  •  

    SOC 110 - Introduction to Sociology


    An introduction to the major sociological theories, research methods, and concepts used by sociologists to study society and the human behavior that occurs as a result of the social environment.  Topics covered include sociological theory, social research methods, culture, socialization, social interaction, deviance, social stratification, the major social institutions, and social change.  

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major sociological concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods sociologists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identify involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systematic levels.


  
  •  

    SOC 111 - Social Problems


    An introduction to the major concepts, sociological theories, and social scientific research methods used by sociologists to study social problems.  Content will include, but not be limited to, sociological theories, social scientific research methods, social stratification, diversity, inequality, the social institutions, crime/deviance and social control, social justice, social policy, and social action.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major sociological concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods sociologists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
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    SOC 155 - Media and Society


    Timely interactive social theory and methods course that focuses on the influence of mass media on society and society's influence on mass media.  Course includes the use of computers in the classroom so students get first-hand research and media literacy training.  Topics include, but are not limited to, social theory, research methods, culture, social stratification, and the social institutions as these are engaged through local, national, and international media sources.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
     

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify social theories used by sociologists to study media.
    2. Identify social research methods used by sociologists to study media.
    3. Discuss issues related to the influence of media on social life.


  
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    SOC 186 - Food in History and Society


    A socio-historical examination of food from the Middle Ages to the present with a focus on the United States and Europe.  Topics will include, but will not be limited to, how societies gather and prepare food; culinary tastes of different times and places; the influence of food/taste on trade, colonization, cultural exchange, and the impact of immigration, globalization, and technology on food.  An exploration of the history and role of diversity (race/ethnicity/gender and social class) in development of culinary taste and modern day culinary practices.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    HOS 186
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major concepts and theories used by historical sociologists.
    2. Apply the methods historical sociologists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    4. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    5. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
  •  

    SOC 220 - Race and Ethnicity


    An introduction to the major sociological theories, social scientific research methods, and concepts used by sociologists to study race and ethnicity in society.  Students will learn how the history of race and ethnicity in the U.S. affects opportunity structures across multiple social institutions.  Content will include, but not be limited to, sociological theory, research methods, dominant/minority group relations, social stratification/inequality, social/human diversity, assimilation, pluralism, immigration, prejudice, discrimination, and the multiple levels of racism, democracy, social policy, social justice, and social action.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major sociological concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods sociologists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
  •  

    SOC 250 - Introduction to Social Work


    Students are introduced to the profession of social work.  Topics covered will include the historical development of the profession, philosophical foundations for practice, theoretical perspectives for practice, ethics of social work practice, social service delivery networks, the social welfare system, social problems, human/social diversity, and social policy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology or SOC 111 Social Problems

    Corequisites:  SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology or SOC 111 Social Problems

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the theoretical perspectives for social work practice.
    2. Identify the ethical standards for social work practice.
    3. Explain the historical development of the social work profession.
    4. Discuss the philosophical foundations for social work practice.


  
  •  

    SOC 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project in sociology which is beyond the scope or requirements of the courses offered by the department, conducted under the direction of a faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester Hours in Sociology

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed by the instructor and approved by the department chair and Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
  •  

    SPA 101 - Beginning Spanish I


    This course introduces the student to the sound system and grammatical structure of the Spanish language.  The focus will be on developing and raising skill levels in the areas of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.  Use of the target language is greatly stressed.  This course will also address various cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.

    Spanish 101 is for students with little or no previous Spanish study.  Students are not expected to know Spanish when they begin the course.  This is not a course to be taken for review.  Students with more than two years of high school Spanish should NOT enroll in this course.  You must talk to your Professor, immediately, if you do have more than two years of high school Spanish.  **Be aware that this class is not suitable for native and heritage speakers of Spanish.  Native and heritage speakers must not enroll in this course** NO EXCEPTIONS.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate beginning level knowledge about Spanish cultures through course activities.
    2. Conduct beginning level conversations in Spanish in the present tense including: giving directions, asking and answering simple questions, and relating daily academic and familial activities.
    3. Demonstrate beginning Spanish grammatical structure and syntax, including proper use of regular and stem-changing present tense verbs, reflexives, noun/adjective agreement, and direct object pronouns.
    4. Demonstrate ability to read and comprehend beginning level Spanish materials.
    5. Demonstrate ability to write in beginning level Spanish, using complete sentences in paragraph form or in a dialogue.


  
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    SPA 102 - Beginning Spanish II


    This course will build upon the grammatical structure of the Spanish language learned in first semester SPA 101.  Speaking the language is greatly stressed at this level.  Students of SPA 102 are expected to enhance the four language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.  This course will also discuss various cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.

    Spanish 102 is for students who have taken first semester college Spanish (SPA 101) or three years of high school Spanish.  Students who have four or more years of high school Spanish may not take this class.  **This course is not suitable for native or heritage speakers of Spanish.  Native speakers or heritage speakers of Spanish must not enroll in this course.**

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 101 Beginning Spanish I

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate high-beginning level knowledge about Spanish cultures through course activities.
    2. Conduct high-beginning level Spanish conversations in the present and past tenses including: ordering at a restaurant, asking and answering questions, and expressing opinions and relating stories regarding fashion and social life.
    3. Demonstrate high-beginning level Spanish grammatical structure and syntax, including proper use of indirect object pronouns, double object pronouns, and the preterit and imperfect past tenses.
    4. Demonstrate ability to read and comprehend high-beginning level Spanish materials.
    5. Deliver an oral presentation in high-beginning level Spanish.
    6. Write a composition in high-beginning level Spanish.


  
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    SPA 201 - Intermediate Spanish I


    One purpose of this class is to review what the student has already learned and to expand on it.  This is a grammar class with an introduction to cultural and literary readings and basic research on topics related to the Spanish-speaking world.  All skills (reading. Writing, listening, and speaking), as well as the three basic fields (grammar, literature, and culture), will be emphasized in the course.  Speaking the language is greatly stressed at this level.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 102 Beginning Spanish II

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    SPA 201 is an appropriate entry point for most students with four or more years of high school Spanish.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Develop an understanding of intermediate Spanish grammar that cover forms, meanings and functions, and use them appropriately in oral and written communication.
    2. Develop intermediate oral fluency in pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking, and oral presentations necessary for successful real-world communication.
    3. Develop their active vocabulary of high-frequency words, collocations, and idiomatic expressions that are commonly used in the Spanish-speaking world.
    4. Develop reading comprehension fluency at the low intermediate level through a variety of authentic genres, including academic discourse, newspaper and magazine articles, fiction, poetry, and essays.
    5. Develop intermediate writing proficiency through various writing assignments such as comprehension questions, paragraphs, essays, journals, and letters.
    6. Develop an understanding of Spanish-speaking cultures and societies as well as that of their own.


  
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    SPA 202 - Intermediate Spanish II


    The study of grammar and syntax will be emphasized through writing, reading, and conversation about Spanish and Latin American literary works of recognized authors.  Speaking the language is greatly stressed at this level.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Acquire a solid understanding of intermediate Spanish grammar that cover forms, meanings and functions, and use them effectively in oral and written communication.
    2. Demonstrate intermediate oral fluency and proficiency in pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking, and oral presentations necessary for successful real-world communication.
    3. Expand their active vocabulary of high-frequency words, collocations, and idiomatic expressions that are commonly used in the Spanish-speaking world.
    4. Demonstrate reading comprehension proficiency at the intermediate level through a variety of authentic genres, including academic discourse, newspaper and magazine articles, fiction, poetry, and essays.
    5. Increase intermediate writing proficiency through various writing assignments such as comprehension questions, paragraphs, essays, journals, and letters.
    6. Develop a greater awareness and appreciation of Spanish-speaking cultures, as well as develop an understanding of their own cultural values and beliefs.


  
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    SPK 110 - Effective Speaking


    Principles and practices of public speaking.  Students will present extemporaneous and prepared speeches.  They will research, write, revise and deliver speeches, paying attention to audience, organization, technology, development, delivery, critical listening, and constructive evaluation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Produce coherent texts within common college-level written forms; demonstrate the ability to revise and improve such texts; research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details as they prepare a research-supported speech.
    2. Give proficient speeches.
    3. Evaluate an oral presentation according to established criteria.


  
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    SPM 110 - Foundations of Sports Management


    An overview of the sports management profession focusing on its foundational aspects and current topics from the field.  Students will learn the relevance of sociological, cultural, historical, political, and psychological concepts to the management of sport.  Students will also learn the necessary professional skills and attitudes of sports managers, and the manner in which the globalization of sport continues to affect the sport management professions.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the historical aspects of the commercialization of sport and the role of the sport industry in our economy and society.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of management and leadership principles and their application in a sport industry setting.
    3. Demonstrate a knowledge of the main sport industry settings including professional sport, intercollegiate athletics, interscholastic athletics, youth and community sport, and sport tourism.
    4. Demonstrate a knowledge of selected sport management functions including sport marketing, strategic communication, sport finance and sport event and facility management.


  
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    SPM 189 - Sports Law


    Professional and amateur sports have attained great importance both in the United States and abroad.  Concomitant with this growth is the greater sophistication of the legal issues that affect the operation and regulation of this industry.  This class will provide an overview of the legal principles and business models and rules governing the sports industry and the legal controversies and policy considerations surrounding those rules.

    Cross-listed
    3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal environment in which the sports industry operates and how the legal system creates context for decision making for sport managers.
    2. Demonstrate an ability to identify legal concepts and apply them to issues in the sport industry including sports agency, contract law, and negligence and tort law.
    3. Apply and discuss laws and regulations regarding Title IX to all levels of sport and assess and evaluate compliance components of Title IX requirements.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of ethical issues in sports and the ability by identifying the relevant law or ethics rule from the code of ethics of sport organizations.


  
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    SPM 279 - Management/Promotion of Sports Events and Facilities


    This course provides students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications for understanding the sporting event industry.  The course will focus on sporting events within a sport facility setting and will include budgeting, marketing, sponsorship, volunteer management, community relations, and all aspects of facility operations.  Students will participate in the development and operational administration of a game or special sport event.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPM 110 Foundations of Sports Management

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and scope of the sport event and facility management industry, and management competencies required through exploring reglarly held local and regional sporting events and the steps and actions involved in conducting those events.
    2. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the functions and roles of management in sport facility management organizations and apply those principles through case study analysis.
    3. Demonstrate a knowledge of selected sport event management functions including marketing, sponsorship, project management, and risk management.
    4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills in the recognition and solution of problems and challenges in event management through observing and/or planning and conducting a sport event.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to use common sport industry and professional networking tools to prepare for further study and eventual successful entry into the sport industry.


  
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    SPM 297 - Sports Management Practicum


    An introductory experience dealing with the management and promotion of sports games and events.  With supervised assistance, students will help plan, organize, promote and conduct athletic events.  Placement is typically in collegiate athletics, but could also be in other sports related venues.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  SPM 110 Foundations of Sport Management, SPM 279 Management/Promotion of Sports Events and Facilities, and SPM 189 Sports Law

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    90 Practicum Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply classroom instruction to the job experience and articulate this in writing.
    2. Investigate and report on procedures followed for employee training and evaluation.
    3. Describe, in- depth, in writing, exactly what was learned in the accomplishment of learning objectives.
    4. Describe, in writing, job training and job duties.


  
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    STM 100 - Women in STEM


    Despite notable gains in the chemical and biological sciences, women continue to represent a minority in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers.  This course will explore the contribution of women to STEM disciplines throughout history as well as in the local community.  Students will have the opportunity to learn from female professionals who can speak of their personal experiences as women in their education/careers.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define the role of women in STEM throughout history.
    2. Identify the scope of STEM careers and the options available to them at the local, regional, statewide, and national levels.
    3. Model open-mindedness and respect for gender roles in STEM programs/careers.
    4. Pursue an education and career in a STEM field.
    5. Develop leadership skills.


  
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    STM 105 - Freshman Planning Seminar


    An orientation course designed for first semester students in the Liberal Arts Associate in Science program intending to transfer to a four-year school in a science program.  Students will gain an understanding of the community college and the transfer process.  Faculty will lead students in discussions on goal setting, time management and skills for success in Math and Science at the college level.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify campus resources
    2. Understand the LAAS program as it applies to their future goals.
    3. Identify several transfer schools of interest.
    4. Formulate an academic plan for their studies at BCC.
    5. Identify key faculty at BCC with similar science interests.
    6. Identify their main learning style.
    7. Manage their study habits and develop a weekly study plan.


  
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    TEC 101 - Introduction to Engineering Technology


    This course serves as a gateway into the engineering technology profession.  Topics range from overviews of the engineering disciplines to the specifics of formatting a laboratory report.  Computer literacy is important to the engineering profession and successful completion of the course will require proficiency with word-processing, spreadsheets and PowerPoint.  Most engineering problems require mathematical solutions that must be clear, neat, easily followed and accompanied with a clear sketch.  The engineering profession subscribes to a strong code of ethics which will be discussed and then applied to the students in the class.  Throughout the course projects will be assigned requiring team participation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1. Students will gain an understanding of the three major engineering disciplines (civil, electrical and mechanical).
    2. Students will understand the necessity for clear neat calculations.
    3. Students will learn the fundamentals of creating a clear neat sketch of an engineering problem.
    4. Students will develop proficiency with common office software (Word, Excel and PowerPoint) and their use in engineering applications.
    5. Students will develop a sense of responsibility based on the code of engineering ethics.
    6. All students will be required to contribute fully to team projects.


    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Clearly define the difference between the three disciplines of engineering technology at BCC:  Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical.
    2. Use word-processing software to prepare laboratory reports that includes graphs and equations.
    3. Setup and format a spreadsheet for simple calculations.
    4. Use prepared VBA routines to extend the function range of spreadsheet calculations.
    5. Prepare and present a technical PowerPoint presentation that includes graphics, calculations and graphs.
    6. Draw neat clear sketches to accompany problem solutions.
    7. Prepare neat logical solutions to engineering problems.
    8. Understand the ethical consequences of decisions made during their professional life.
    9. Work as a productive team participant.


  
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    TEC 106 - Electronic Portfolios


    Learn how electronic portfolios can help you to organize and market your work experience, education, skills, hobbies and volunteer activities in an easy to use web based format.  This course will focus on the creation of biographies, resumes, description of skills and work samples to help you market yourself and gain a competitive edge in the job market or in applying to four-year institutions.

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    BIT 106
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1. Prepare students to market themselves by reflecting on their achievements and goals.
    2. Understand the impact of technologies such as electronic portfolios and social networking as part of showcasing skills, reflection, networking and lifelong learning.
    3. Utilize service learning to learn about possible career paths while providing a service for the community.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Utilize career searching database tools available at BCC and other college libraries.
    2. Understand the importance of reflection as part of lifelong learning.
    3. Perform written critiques of their peers which include criticism on writing content, style and visual design.
    4. Market themselves to employers or admissions representatives utilizing their electronic portfolio as a background of their best work.
    5. Craft professional resumes to target various employers/audiences.


  
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    THR 101 - Theater Appreciation: The Image Makers


    This course surveys the history and evolution of drama from Ancient Greece to the present time, emphasizing all aspects of the art form including playwriting, acting, directing, scene design, and an analysis of dramatic literature.  Attendance at local productions is required. 

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Appreciate theater as an art form and differentiate it from other art forms.
    2. Write about and analyze the parts of a play including Aristotle's six parts.
    3. Define characteristics of theater in various periods of history.
    4. Explain the organizational process involved in bringing a play to a fully staged theatrical production.
    5. Recognize the aspects of theater including artistic, production and administrative.
    6. Define the roles/responsibilities of all the personnel who mount a theater production including directors, designers, actors, etc.
    7. Practice critical analysis of live and recorded theatrical productions.
    8. Analyze form, context and aesthetic qualities of dramatic literature and performances.


  
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    THR 102 - Introduction to Musical Theatre


    Chronological history of American Musical Theatre (with contemporary British additions) from 19th century minstrelsy, melodrama, vaudeville and burlesque to the present day Broadway musical.  Interaction of composer, lyricist, librettist, director, choreographer, performers and technicians.  Illustrated by films, slides and live performances.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define the evolution of the American musical from the 19th century to the present.
    2. Identify the roles played by the various migrating groups to America in shaping the art form.
    3. Recognize and define the roles of the composer, lyricist, and book writer.
    4. Recognize and define the contribution made to the production by the director, choreographer, stage designer, costume designer, sound designer, etc.
    5. Explain how musical theater reflects the culture and period in which it occurs.


  
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    THR 111 - Introduction to Acting


    Fundamental principles of acting technique are introduced.  Exercises for body and voice are practiced as well as the skills of concentration, improvisation, imagination, sense memory, objectives, action, obstacles and circumstances.  Excellent for students in disciplines other than theater who wish to explore how acting techniques can enhance their life and work.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Use their voice and body (actor's tools) for effective performance skills.
    2. Practice Stanislavsky's elements i.e. concentration, observation, imagination, etc.
    3. Demonstrate the elements of a dramatic scene.
    4. Explore the language and stories of Shakespeare.
    5. Define the history of the acting profession and the "business" of acting.
    6. Define the different skills needed for film vs. stage acting.


  
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    THR 112 - Acting II


    This is an intermediate course for those who wish to continue the study of the acting process in greater depth.  "Method" and classical approaches are employed for an actor's approach to a role; text and character analysis of various dramatic genres.  For a basic foundation, students work with the works of major playwrights including Shakespeare.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting or consent of Instructor by audition

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Be proficient in the skills of relaxation/concentration/observation/improvisation/imagination.
    2. Practice voice and movement exercises to help develop their physical "instrument."
    3. Analyze and write about the elements of dramatic material such as character, objectives, physical and emotional circumstances and actions.
    4. Identify and write about acting theory as it developed over time including the methods, directors, actors and teachers involved.
    5. Perform, recite and interpret the heightened language of Shakespeare.
    6. Create a life for a character from dramatic literature.
    7. Discuss and write about the development and history of the acting profession.
    8. Employ a basic knowledge of the "business" of acting.


  
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    THR 114 - Oral Interpretation


    Oral presentation of prose, poetry, drama and comedy performed individually and in groups.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Acquire the performance skills necessary to share a believable, honest and clear interpretation of a literary work with an audience.
    2. Analyze and understand the meaning of selected works of literature.
    3. Apply their own life experience to performance of texts.
    4. Evaluate and critique the oral interpretative skills of others.
    5. Use constructive collaborative skills as a result of the team spirit needed to work with a group or partner on an interpretative project.


  
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    THR 140 - Announcing for Radio/TV


    Presentation as on-air personality.  Development of visual and vocal techniques relating to presentation of news, interviews, commercials and on-air announcements.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Formulate techniques of effective on-camera presentation, including posture, dress and presence.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of phonetic spellings and pronunciations.
    3. Utilize voice skills for on-camera/microphone work and differentiate between the two.
    4. Demonstrate various announcing styles.
    5. Define and utilize equipment commonly used by announcers.
    6. Acquire necessary skills to read and perform from scripts prepared by other writers.
    7. Explain FCC rules that effect announcers.


 

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