Nov 26, 2022  
Website Catalog (In Development) 
    
Website Catalog (In Development)

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    BUS 269 - Business Reports and Computer Communications


    Methods and skills for formal and informal business writing through the logical analysis of business case problems.  Emphasis on utilizing the computer in the preparation, transmittal, and retrieval of business information and reports.  Proper construction of business charts, graphs, tables, and graphics, using various computer software.  Students learn to properly construct business letters, memos, bids, quotes, and other business reports and documents.  Transmitting business reports using E-mail.  Accessing and transmitting business information using the computer.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Provide written evidence of the ability to communicate appropriately through electronic means by transferring business documents and information.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate business tone and style through writing samples prepared with process writing options and then presented in a course portfolio at the end of the semester.
    3. Develop business documents including charts, graphs, and tables using various computer software and include in written reports.
    4. Provide evidence and knowledge of the nine types of commonly used business reports; select a customized topic; and prepare a PowerPoint outline of the report for electronic transmission, as well as complete a formal report appropriate for business.  This is a culminating class activity in both face-to-face and online course.


  
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    BUS 275 - Accounting Information Systems


    Computer-based accounting systems with emphasis on development and implementation.  Topics will include: creation of a general ledger, establishment of accounts receivable and billing procedures, management of cash and current liabilities, and payroll accounting.  Also to be addressed is the development of a variety of custom management reports.  The course will be divided into two parts.  During part one students will learn the tools necessary to implement an accounting system.  Part two will consist of students working in teams to develop a system.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 200 Intermediate Accounting I or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of accounting and accounting software necessary to enter transactions and complete the accounting cycle into an Accounting Software Program such as Peachtree and QuickBooks.


  
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    BUS 296 - Disney World Internship/Co-op


    Students accepted into the program will work for an extended period of time at the Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida.  These are paid positions, mostly full time.  Students must also complete the training program for their specific job in addition to any general Disney customer service training.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Instructor approval

    Credits: (3-6)
    Note
    See Co-op Coordinator for further information.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Verify the completion of a minimum of 600 hours of work at Disney World.
    2. Verify the completion of the basic Disney training program and the job specific training program.  Verify completion and demonstrate knowledge of training, in writing.
    3. Verify, with manager's written evaluation, successful completion of work assignments.
    4. Articulate, in writing, skills and knowledge obtained from the job experience.


  
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    BUS 297 - Co-operative Work Experience


    On-the-job experience may be obtained in such areas as retailing, banking, fast foods, government services and hotel management, as well as CPA firms, public accounting offices, industrial, business and government offices where accounting is performed.  Cooperative work students will meet with the coordinator one hour each week.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  2.5 GPA and 3.0 in Business courses

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply classroom instruction to the job experience and articulate this in writing.
    2. Investigate and report on procedures followed for employee training, evaluation, and advancement.
    3. Describe, in-depth, exactly what was learned in the accomplishment of learning objectives.
    4. Describe, in writing, job training and job duties.
    5. Have developed work skills related to career goals and describe these in writing.


  
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    BUS 299 - Independent Study


    The student, under the guidance of a faculty member, undertakes an investigation, study and research in an advanced concept or problem concerning his/her major field of study.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Instructor and department chairperson approval

    Credits: (1-4)
    Note
    Only one independent study course is allowed per semester.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    1. The learning outcomes for this course will vary, depending on the material being covered
    2. In each case the student will be able to demonstrate successful completion of the learning activities specified in the Independent Study Contract.


  
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    CAS 101 - Introduction to the Gaming Industry


    Introduction to the operations found in casino and gaming establishments.  This course explores the function of casinos/racinos and their relationships to hotels, restaurants, resorts, and entertainment facilities within the hospitality industry.  Students will trace the history of the gaming industry and look ahead to future areas of expansion.  Special attention will be paid to the Racino concept.  Instruction on principles to practices found in a variety of gaming venues.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the evolution of gaming.
    2. Understand the requirements of Pari-mutuel, Lottery and Racino Operations.
    3. Understand and describe Slot and Video Operations.
    4. Possess a general understanding of games of chance found in various gaming operations.
    5. Understand and describe the general gaming regulations found throughout the industry.
    6. Articulate the positive economic impact of gaming operations.
    7. Have an introductory understanding of the sociological impact of the gaming industry.
    8. Be versed in Native American gambling operations.
    9. Possess an introductory understanding of river boat and cruise ship gaming.
    10. Gain introductory requirements for gaming, marketing, and promotions specific to the gaming industry.
    11. Possess an introductory understanding of gaming financial and accounting control found in a variety of venues.
    12. Understand the basics of security and surveillance.
    13. Understand Canadian gaming in the Provinces and International gaming abroad.
    14. Articulate the future of the gaming industry regionally and on the Internet.


  
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    CAS 109 - The Mathematics of Gaming


    The Mathematics of Gaming is a Liberal Arts Mathematics course.  Using the backdrop of traditional casino games and horse racing, students will investigate relevant concepts that involve applications of arithmetic, algebra, probability and statistics.  The students will learn different ways to present and interpret numerical and statistical data.  The students will investigate mathematical models and simulations along with their applications.  The students will investigate gaming strategies involving mathematical reasoning and psychological components such as risk versus reward, wagering and bluffing.  Students will also be required to read and discuss the short novel "The Gambler" by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.
     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 093 (4-credit) Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, MAT 091 Mathematical Literacy I, or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    MAT 109
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the content and use of mathematical models in order to optimize success in games.
    2. Understand and use concepts from statistics and probability to analyze outcomes and expected values for games
    3. Complete calculations using mathematical formulas and mathematical equations with and without the use of scientific calculators.
    4. Generate, analyze and use sample data to make inference about various aspects of games.


  
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    CAS 200 - Casino/Racino Games


    Practical instruction on important casino/racino games including - blackjack, craps, slots, video poker, baccarat, roulette, keno, sports betting, Texas Hold'em, harness racing.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to play, run, supervise and manage a variety of casino/racino games including:
    • blackjack
    • craps
    • slots
    • video poker
    • roulette
    • keno
    • sports betting
    • TexasHold'em
    • harness racing


  
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    CAS 201 - Casino Internship I


    Career-related employment in the gaming industry focusing on an area of interest in a casino, racino or other gaming related enterprise.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a gaming business setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  First year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to effectively perform the skills required of the profession, including: the ability to integrate theory and practice, communicate effectively, demonstrate professional behaviors, perform technical skills, and carry out the tasks related to their job assignment.


  
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    CAS 210 - Casino Operations Management


    Course topics include: Current high-roller marketing tactics and their effect on profitability, the effect of popular money management systems on casino profits, the initial development process of an Indian casino, studies designed to identify the patronage motives of gamblers, including those of riverboat customers; slot club design: player rating issues, point accumulation schemes, principles of casino floor design: managing table game and slot location; studies designed to measure the profit contribution of popular slot promotions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CAS 101 Introduction to the Gaming Industry; CAS 200 Casino/Racino Gaming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1. Discuss the history of modern gaming.
    2. Understand and articulate gaming control in a variety of regions.
    3. Understand and calculate gaming taxes and internal control systems.
    4. Understand and employ principles of casino management including casino organizational structure and casino hotel structure and staffing.
    5. Understand and enact currency reporting requirements.
    6. Design and manage casino cage, credit, and collections procedures.
    7. Understand and implement slot management.
    8. Implement and design table game operations including revenue per square foot and betting limits.
    9. Understand and perform basic casino accounting including: Table Drop and Count, Slot Drop and Count, Key Control, Internal Audit, Casino Audit, Statistical Reports.

    10.  Understand the mathematics of casino games.
    11.  Understand and employ the elements of an effective player rating system.
    12.  Understand table game hold as a management tool.
    13.  Understand and utilize specific casino marketing techniques addressing such concerns as consumer choice factors, player action criteria, the premium player segment and discounting.
    14.  Understand sports book operations.
    15.  Special emphasis on race operations: student to be versed in betting at the track, types of races, types of bets, racing terms, regulatory requirements, race book operations.
    16.  Understand, calculate and utilize casino statistics.

  
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    CAS 297 - Casino Internship II


    Career-related employment in the gaming industry focusing on an area of interest in a casino, racino or other gaming related enterprise.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a gaming business setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  Second year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to effectively perform the skills required of the profession, including: the ability to integrate theory and practice, communicate effectively, demonstrate professional behaviors, perform technical skills, and carry out the tasks related to their job assignment


  
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    CHM 090 - Preparatory Chemistry


    Introductory course in chemistry emphasizing problem solving techniques related to chemical concepts.  Atomic structure, stoichiometry, metric units, chemical bonding.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the general and physical properties of matter.
    2. Understand the basic model of the atom.
    3. Determine names and formulas of simple binary compounds and simple acids.
    4. Perform basic algebraic manipulations to relative to simple chemical calculations.
    5. Perform mathematical manipulations such as unit analysis with proper attention to units and significant figures.
    6. Use the concept of the mole in quantitative chemical calculations.
    7. Balance chemical equations.
    8. Calculate amounts of chemicals involved in reactions.
    9. Calculate and utilize solution concentration units such as molarity.
    10. Classify chemical reactions.
    11. Use concepts of pH in acidic and basic solutions.
    12. Predict shape and geometry of simple molecules.
    13. Understand the ideal gas law and its application in quantitative problems.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, chapter exams, and the final exam.

  
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    CHM 120 - Fundamental Chemistry


    CHM 120 is a one-semester general chemistry course that offers an overview of general, organic, and biological chemistry appropriate for students looking for an introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry topics.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world including:
      a)  an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling and
      b)  the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences
    2. Understand key chemical and physical properties of inorganic and organic matter, including atomic structure and the model of the atom and use the periodic table to obtain information such as atomic number, atomic weight, and the number of subatomic particles.
    3. Recognize, write, draw, and name chemical formulas of representative inorganic and organic compounds, including organic compounds with common functional groups (i.e., alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amides, amines, and aromatic compounds).
    4. Perform simple calculations involving dimensional analysis and stoichiometry as it pertains to the concepts of chemical reactions, gas laws, and solutions.
    5. Identify, balance, write, and predict products in simple inorganic reactions, oxidation/reduction reactions, acid/base common functional groups (i.e., alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amides, amines, and aromatic compounds).
    6. Describe the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and relate their structure to biological functions.

     

  
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    CHM 121 - Forensic Sciences


    CHM 121 is a one-semester general science course that presents a broad introduction to the scientific foundations of forensics and its importance in the criminal justice system.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including:
      a)  an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling and
      b)  the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.
    2. Recognize how the areas of chemistry, biology, physics, and geology relate to the analysis of physical evidence.
    3. Recognize and describe the proper collection techniques and packaging of various forms of physical evidence.
    4. Analyze and distinguish various forms of physical evidence such as glass fracture patterns, hair, fibers, fingerprints, firearms, toolmarks, bodily fluids, and drugs.


  
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    CHM 123 - Environmental Science


    Is your water safe to drink?  Worry about hotter climates, holes in the ozone layer, pesticide residues in food, and extinction of species?  This course is designed to give the student a better scientific background for understanding the environment from a chemical viewpoint and do hands-on laboratory investigations to better appreciate the ecosystem in which we live.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CHM 123L Environmental Science Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2. Understand the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.


  
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    CHM 124 - Environmental Science II


    A continuation of CHM 123 Environmental Science: this course will include biotec, geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric factors of the environment, human impacts and interdisciplinary issues.  Federal and State regulations and approved methodology for monitoring and remediation will also be discussed as illustrated by case studies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 123 Environmental Science

    Corequisite:  CHM 124L Environmental Science II Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2. Understand the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.


  
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    CHM 124 L - Environmental Science II Laboratory


    A continuation of CHM 123L Environmental Science Laboratory emphasizing the use of approved methodology, field trips, and a special project to study environmental problems of both local and global interest.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CHM 124 Environmental Science II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Produce ASTM 6751 biodiesel from waste vegetable oil collected from local restaurants.
    2. Measure the BTU content of various biomass fuels using bomb calorimetry.
    3. Construct a fully functional wind turbine.
    4. Measure the variation in wind turbine output based on height above ground, wind speed, distance from any obstruction, and rotor rpm.
    5. Calculate the instantaneous and maximum current, voltage, and power for a wind turbine.
    6. Calculate the minimum wind speed required to generate power and the average power that can be generated anywhere in the U.S. based on NOAA records.
    7. Measure the variation in current, voltage, and power in a photovoltaic array based on load, angle, direction, solar constant, and cloud coverage.
    8. Calculate the instantaneous and maximum current, voltage, and power for a PV array.
    9. Connect a wind turbine, PV array, lead storage battery, load monitor, and inverter to run various loads in the Natural Science Center.
    10. Construct and operate a fully functional electric car (NEV) with a photovoltaic charging system.
    11. Research a local environmental problem and present it to the class.


    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of laboratory reports, formal papers, and group presentations.

  
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    CHM 125 - Fire Protection Chemistry


    Fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry.  Composition of substances, kinetic and molecular theories, atomic structure and bonding, solutions and colloids, ions in solution and introduction to organic chemistry.  For Fire Protection Technology students.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2. Understand the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.


  
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    CHM 126 - Marine Chemistry: An Introduction to Chemical Oceanography


    Would you like to learn more about the Earth's Oceans?  They cover 71% of Earth but are often neglected because we are land-based creatures.  The Earth's oceans are not simply water, but a mixture of various compounds.  The student will learn the basic principles of chemical oceanography.  The course topics presented will allow an understanding of the coupled atmospheric/ocean system and also demonstrate the current and future effects of human activities on the coastal and oceanic environments.  The chemical properties of the ocean are important to understand because the marine environment supports the greatest abundance of life on earth.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the use of the scientific method to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2. Understand the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in chemistry.


  
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    CHM 127 - Kitchen Chemistry


    You are what you eat.  Cooking and recipes may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and chemical research.  This course will cover the basic chemistry of the main components of food, carbohydrates, lipids, and protein, as well as water, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, food additives, flavors, and colors.  It will also cover the processing of food and the use of fermentation in the production of yogurt, cheese, wine, and beer.  The laboratory component will give the students a chance to perform the reactions presented in lecture.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BHM 127
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the use of the scientific method to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2. Understand the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in chemistry.


  
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    CHM 128 - Brewing and Fermentation Science


    An introduction to the chemistry of brewing beer and other fermentation processes in the food science field.  The course will examine process by which malted barley, hops, yeast, and water are turned into beer in a commercial brew house.  The chemistry behind the process of making wine, cheese, and yogurt will also be explored.  In the laboratory portion of the course students will produce and analyze beer, wine, yogurt, and cheese in a pilot plant atmosphere.  This course is open to both science and non-science majors.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CUL 128
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the basic steps in the brewing of beer.
    2. Recognize the types of yeast used for fermentation.
    3. Explain the functions of the alpha acids in hops and the isomerization products when boiled.
    4. Describe the kinetics and temperature dependence of amylases.
    5. Explain the methods of denaturing casein proteins.
    6. Describe how to determine sugar content by various methods.
    7. Describe how to determine alcohol content by various methods.
    8. Describe how to determine IBU/pH/Acid content by various methods.
    9. Describe how to determine carbohydrate content by various methods.
    10. Describe how to determine protein content by various methods.


  
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    CHM 129 - The Chemistry of Art


    This course is a study of art from a scientific perspective.  The molecular basis of art will be explored by using the atomic theory to explain how paints are made, the function of binders and varnishes, the absorption of light, the structure of ceramics, the process of photography, and the materials used for sculpture.  The atomic structure of the material will be used to explain its function for the artist.  The use of chemistry in art conservation, restoration, and the detection of forgery will also be investigated.  This course includes a hands-on laboratory and is intended for non-science majors.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    ART 129
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the use of the scientific method to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2. Demonstrate the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in chemistry.


  
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    CHM 130 - Unit Operations & Food Processing


    This combined lecture-laboratory course focuses on the chemical principles and practices fundamental to modern distilleries, breweries, and dairy foods processing.  The first part deals with the unit operations, chemical transformations such as separation, crystallization, evaporation, filtration, polymerization, isomerization, and other reactions involved in breweries and the production of whisky, gin, and vodka.  The second part focuses on the chemistry of dairy processing and food processing in general (pasteurization, sterilization, centrifugal separation, homogenization, membrane separation, concentration, and drying).  Laboratories are conducted in the food science pilot plant facility, where students gain hands-on experience in operating distillery and food processing equipment.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the basic steps in the distillation of alcohol.
    2. Recognize the types of chemical products from distilleries.
    3. Explain the functions of the various components of a still.
    4. Describe the unit operations involved in distilleries and breweries.
    5. Explain the methods producing different types of foods from milk.
    6. Describe how to determine separation efficiency.
    7. Describe how to determine alcohol content by various methods.
    8. Describe how different types of cheese are produced.
    9. Describe how to package different types of food.


  
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    CHM 133 - Survey of Organic Chemistry


    Fundamental treatment of organic chemistry, nomenclature, properties of selected functional groups, mechanisms, stereochemistry and synthetic methods.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 145 General Chemistry I and CHM 145L General Chemistry I Laboratory

    Corequisites:  CHM 133L Survey of Organic Chemistry Laboratory and CHM 146 General Chemistry II and CHM 146L General Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply the IUPAC rules of nomenclature to alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, phenols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, carbohydrates, amino acids, and proteins.
    2. Draw the structures of the above mentioned compounds given their names.
    3. Use the cis-trans system or the E,Z sequence rules to classify alkenes.
    4. Predict the major and minor products of addition and elimination reactions using Markovnikov's rule and Zaitsev's rule.
    5. Identify the major product(s) in electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions.
    6. Propose synthetic routes to substituted benzenes via multi-step pathways.
    7. Classify stereoisomers as either enantiomers or diastereomers.
    8. Predict the predominant reaction pathway as SN1, SN2, E1, or E2.
    9. Outline synthetic routes to primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols.
    10. Explain how the Williamson synthesis is used to prepare ethers.
    11. Describe the preparation of aldehydes/ketones from alcohols using oxidizing agents.
    12. Use Grignard reagents in syntheses that convert aldehydes/ketones to alcohols.
    13. Describe the use of the Fischer esterification reaction to make esters from carboxylic acids.
    14. Show how an amino group can be attached to an aromatic ring via the reduction of a nitroarene.
    15. Outline synthetic routes to substituted benzenes via the Sandmeyer reaction.
    16. Draw and name the cyclic structures of monosaccharides.
    17. Classify disaccharides and polysaccharides as reducing or nonreducing.
    18. Draw and name the structures of peptides.
    19. Determine the structure of a peptide given sequencing data.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assess via 8 quizzes and 12 exams.

  
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    CHM 141 - General, Organic, and Biochemistry I


    CHM 141 is the first course of a two semester sequence in general, organic, and biochemistry.  This course will offer an overview of general chemistry primarily intended for health science students but appropriate for others looking for an introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry topics.  Applications include energy sources, effects of radiation, the environment, and life processes.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including:
      -   an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling and
      -   the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in the context of chemistry, a natural science.
    2. Apply basic theories of the structure and behavior of atoms and molecules and recognize the chemical and physical properties of matter, including the factors involved in the physical states of matter.
    3. Perform basic metric and scientific measurements, use mathematical manipulations such as unit analysis and simple chemical calculations, including gas laws and their applications, with proper attention to units and significant figures.
    4. Determine names and formulas of simple binary and ternary compounds and identify, balance, write, and predict products in simple inorganic reactions, including oxidation/reduction reactions, acid/base reactions, and nuclear reactions.
    5. Use the concept of the mole in quantitative chemical calculations, including the amounts of chemicals involved in reactions, the reversibility of reactions/chemical equilibrium, and the calculation of pH and solution concentration.


  
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    CHM 142 - General, Organic, and Biochemistry II


    CHM 142 is a continuation of CHM 141 General, Organic, and Biochemistry I.  It is the second course of a two semester sequence in general, organic, and biochemistry.  This course will offer an overview of organic and biological chemistry primarily intended for health science students but appropriate for others looking for an introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry topics.  Applications include consumer products, living systems, food and metabolism.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including:
      -   an understanding of the methods scientists use to expore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling and
      -   the application of scientific data, concepts, and models in the context of chemistry, a natural science.
    2. Identify basic chemical and physical properties of organic compounds, including the prediction of the physical states and boiling point trends of simple organic compounds and the effects of simple organic compounds on living things.
    3. Determine the formulas and names of simple organic compounds and complete basic organic chemical equations.
    4. Identify and differentiate stereoisomers and recognize their applications in biochemistry.
    5. Interpret the structures and describe the basic chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes, nucleic acids, hormones, and vitamins.


  
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    CHM 145 - General Chemistry I


    Comprehensive treatment of general chemistry for the science-oriented student.  Builds on their prior chemistry, with emphasis on the basic laws and theories of chemistry and their derivation from experimental evidence.  Presents the qualitative and quantitative aspects of matter's composition and changes and their unifying principles.  Includes physical and chemical properties, periodicity of elements, stoichiometry, current atomic and bonding theories, laws and theories of physical states and changes of state, solution chemistry, and thermochemistry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Regents Chemistry (75 minimum final grade) or CHM 090 Preparatory Chemistry, MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or Math A (minimum grade of 85)

    Corequisite:  CHM 145L General Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the use of the Scientific Method and its importance in accessing experimental data.
    2. Understand the method of factor labeling and its application of solving a variety of chemistry problems, especially mole relationships.
    3. Understand the language of chemistry with regard to nomenclature, equation writing and stoichiometry.
    4. Demonstrate the intricate nature of the elements by examining atomic structure, electronic configuration and formation of compounds through techniques such as spectroscopy.
    5. Understand chemistry laws with their respective chemical equations to explore the gas laws, thermochemistry, atomic structure and bonding.
    6. Develop a chemical aptitude to understand the importance of chemical structure of compounds with respect to bonding, intermolecular relationships and molecular geometry.  This chemical awareness will be utilized to comprehend complex chemistry scenarios such as oxidation reduction systems; global climate change; pharmaceutical research; nanotechnology; energy transformations; and many other areas where chemistry helps individuals to explain the laws of nature.


  
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    CHM 146 - General Chemistry II


    Continuation of CHM 145 General Chemistry I including thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, equilibrium in aqueous solution, acids and bases, coordination chemistry and electrochemistry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 145 General Chemistry I, CHM 145L General Chemistry I Laboratory and Math B (minimum grade of 65) or MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry

    Corequisite:  CHM 146L General Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Manipulate the colligative properties to determine molality, molarity, mole fraction, % composition, osmotic pressure as well as molar masses of compounds.
    2. Understand graphing techniques to ascertain the rate constants of chemical reactions; energy of activation, Ea; equilibrium constants, Kc; and acid-base dissociation constants, (Ka and Kb).
    3. Understand advanced thermochemistry functions such as Enthalpy, H; Entropy, S; and Gibbs-Free Energy, G to determine feasibility of chemical reactions.
    4. Understand oxidation reduction systems to illustrate the value of redox reactions such as combustion processes and their thermochemistry relationships with respect to energy generation.
    5. Understand the value of natural logarithmic (ln functions) and logarithmic (log functions) in the determination of rate constants; understanding half-life for radioactive isotopes; and solution concentrations of specific analytes (i.e., pH measurements to determine hydrogen ion concentrations).
    6. Understand electrochemistry as it pertains to electromotive force, Eo; oxidation reduction reactions; galvanic and electrochemical cells; battery construction; and fuel cell technology.


  
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    CHM 231 - Food & Beverage Analysis


    This course introduces the basic analytical and instrumental analysis as used in the food and beverage industry.  The principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis, as well as confidence and detection limits will be covered.  In addition, instrumental methods such as HPLC, GC, GC/MS, FTIR, AAS, ICP-OES, and ICP-MS will be used to analyze food and beverage samples with special emphasis on FDA labeling requirements, pesticide, and heavy metal analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 146 General Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis as applied to chemical analysis as used by the food and beverage industry.
    2. Determine the presence and concentration of chemicals, such as heavy metals, pesticides, and alcohols, in food and beverages to evaluate impurities and meet FDA labeling requirements.
    3. Identify the correct analytical technique for specific analytes in food.
    4. Demonstrate the analysis of food products using advanced instrumental techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, rheology, UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, colorimetry, and specialized FDA and TTB analysis.


  
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    CHM 232 - Brewery, Distillery, & Winery Operations


    This course offers the student hands-on training in the operation of a brewery, distillery, and winery.  The practical aspects of everyday operations will be emphasized and tours of actual breweries, distilleries, and wineries will be used to give the students first-hand insight into the daily operations of these industries.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 146 General Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain and use the scientific approach to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis as applied to the chemicals reactions that occur in the brewing, distillation, and winery industry.
    2. Describe the steps involved in brewing, distillation, and wind making processes.
    3. Apply scientific data, concepts, and models used in the brewing, distillation, and winery industry.
    4. Communicate complex food science information in both formal papers and group presentations.
    5. Evaluate the quality of environmental conditions for the operation of a brewery, winery, and distillery.


  
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    CHM 234 - Food Chemistry


    Food chemistry deals with the chemical properties of food constituents and the chemical changes these constituents undergo during cooking, handling, processing and storage.  Food chemistry is central to food science where the fields of general, organic, and biochemistry are used to study the nature of foods, deterioration, food processing, and the optimization of foods from a consumer and sustainability perspective.  The chemistry of lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and water will be discussed in detail.  The student will learn how food chemistry is used in the food industry to provide products that are of high quality to the consumer.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 146 General Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain and use the scientific approach to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis as applied to the chemical constituents and reactions that occur in food items.
    2. Apply knowledge gained in food chemistry to the development, preservation, processing, and packaging of food products.
    3. Identify the macroscale properties of food and explain how these properties depend on the chemistry of the molecules that make up food.


  
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    CHM 235 - Food & Beverage Internship


    On-the-job experience directly related to Food Science.  This can include the fields such as brewing, distillingP, food production, food analysis, fermentation, and other industries related to food science.  Projects will be set up with local industries with specific learning objectives and expectations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 127 Kitchen Chemistry and CHM 128 Brewing and Fermentation Science

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate working competencies in areas agreed to and documented bythe student, the instructor, and the business's manager which may include:

           a.   Brewing
           b.   Food production and packaging
           c.   Food Analysis
           d.   Fermentation


  
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    CHM 245 - Organic Chemistry I


    A fundamental treatment of organic chemistry.  Organic nomenclature, chemical properties of selected functional groups, mechanisms, stereochemistry and synthetic methods.  For Liberal Arts science majors and Engineering Science students with departmental approval.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 146 General Chemistry II

    Corequisite:  CHM 245L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply the IUPAC rules of nomenclature to the alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, and alkynes.
    2. Draw the structures of the above mentioned compounds given their names.
    3. Interpret Lewis, condensed, and line-angle structural formulas.
    4. Predict the hybridization and geometry of the atoms in a molecule.
    5. Identify constitutional isomers and stereoisomers.
    6. Describe the structures and relative stabilities of carbocations and carbanions.
    7. Given an IR spectrum, identify the characteristic peaks and functional groups.
    8. Use IR data to propose structures for unknown organic compounds.
    9. Classify molecules as chiral or achiral, and identify mirror planes of symmetry.
    10. Identify asymmetric carbon atoms, and name them using (R) and (S) nomenclature.
    11. Draw all stereoisomers of a given structure.
    12. Classify stereoisomers as enantiomers, diastereomers, or meso compounds.
    13. Predict the products of SN1, SN2, E1, and E2 reactions, including stereochemistry.
    14. Identify the predominant reaction pathway as SN1, SN2, E1, or E2.
    15. Predict the major and minor products of addition and elimination reactions using Markovnikov's rule and Zaitsev's rule.
    16. Use the cis-trans system or the E,Z sequence rules to classify alkenes.
    17. Predict the products of dehydrohalogenation, dehalogenation, and dehydration.
    18. Propose synthetic routes to alkenes and alkynes via multi-step syntheses.
    19. Predict products of additions, oxidations, and reductions of alkenes and alkynes.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed via 8 quizzes and 12 exams.

  
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    CHM 245 L - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory


    Basic techniques of separation and purification such as simple distillation, fractional distillation, steam distillation and extraction.  Characterization methods including melting point, gas chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and classification tests.  Introduction to modern organic synthesis with emphasis on miniscale techniques and methods of separation and purification.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Accurately record data and observations in a properly maintained lab notebook.
    2. Construct a well-written lab report that concisely presents all the components of an experiment.
    3. Separate and purify compounds by simple distillation, fractional distillation, steam distillation and extraction.
    4. Charaterize compounds by melting point, gas chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and classification tests.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed via lab notebooks, lab reports and a written lab exam.

  
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    CHM 246 - Organic Chemistry II


    A continuation of CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I including spectroscopy and introduction to molecules of biological importance.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I

    Corequisite:  CHM 246L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply IUPAC rules of nomenclature to alcohols, arenes, ethers, phenols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, carbohydrates, amino acids, and proteins.
    2. Draw the structures of the above mentioned compounds given their names.
    3. Outline synthetic routes to primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols.
    4. Show how oxidizing agents can be used to convert alcohols to aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids.
    5. Describe the conversion of alcohols to alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, ethers, esters, and alkoxides.
    6. Use NMR data to propose structures for unknown organic compounds.
    7. Explain how the Williamson synthesis is used to prepare ethers.
    8. Identify the major product(s) in electrophilic aromatic substitutions.
    9. Propose synthetic routes to substituted benzenes via multi-step pathways.
    10. Use Grignard reagents in synthetic schemes that convert aldehydes and ketones to alcohols.
    11. Describe the use of the Fischer esterification reaction to make esters from carboxylic acids.
    12. Show how an amino group can be attached to an aromatic ring via the reduction of a nitroarene.
    13. Devise synthetic routes to substituted arenes via the Sandmeyer reaction.
    14. Draw and name the cyclic structures of monosaccharides.
    15. Classify disaccharides and polysaccharides as reducing or nonreducing.
    16. Draw and name the structures of peptides.
    17. Determine the structure of a peptide given sequencing data.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed via 8 quizzes and 12 exams.

  
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    CHM 246 L - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory


    A continuation of CHM 245L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory including an introduction to complex multi-step synthesis with emphasis on miniscale techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I and CHM 245L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

    Corequisite:  CHM 246 Organic Chemistry II

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Accurately record data and observations in a properly maintained lab notebook.
    2. Construct a well-written lab report that concisely presents all the components of an experiment.
    3. Separate and purify compounds by simple distillation, recrystallization, fractional crystallization and extraction.
    4. Characterize compounds by melting point, thin layer chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and classification tests.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed via lab notebooks, lab reports and a written lab exam.

  
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    CHM 247 - Biochemistry


    A study of the chemical and physical properties of biomolecules occurring in living organisms including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids.  Enzyme kinetics particularly emphasized.  Experiences in the laboratory involve the application of techniques used in biochemical investigations.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisties:  CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I


     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the use of the scientific method to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2. Demonstrate the application of scientific data, concepts, and models of one of the natural sciences.


  
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    CHM 265 - Analytical Chemistry


    Analytical Chemistry serves as an introduction to laboratory techniques with an emphasis on quantitate data gathering and analysis.  By course end, the student should be able to identify the appropriate laboratory technique to solve several types of chemistry problems, thoroughly explain the implementation of several techniques, statistically analyze data, and communicate results in standard scientific research paper format.  Techniques investigated include atomic spectroscopy, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and spectrophotometry, as well as several titration and electrochemical techniques.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 146 and 146L General Chemistry II and General Chemistry II Laboratory, with a minimum grade of "D", MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry, with a minimum grade of "D"

     

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the basic sientific principles for following techniques:  atomic spectroscopy, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, spectrophotometry, as well as several titration and electrochemical techniques.
    2. Perform standard laboratory calculations.
          a.  Carry uncertainty through calculations.
    3. Calibrate standard laboratory equipment, such as burets and pipets.
    4. Collect data during laboratory exercises using select techniques discussed in lecture.
    5. Keep a well-organized laboratory notebook which throughly documents laboratory experiments.
    6. Analyze laboratory data for meaning.
          a.  Use electronic spreadsheet programs (example: Microsoft Excel)
          b.  Use appropriate statistical analysis to identify insignificant outlying data and determine relative and absolute uncertainty in results
    7. Report results which agree with anticipated results, within specified tolerances.
    8. Write complete laboratory reports which follow the reporting format used in scientific publications.


     

  
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    CHM 265 L - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory


    Analytical Chemistry Laboratory serves as an introduction to laboratory techniques with an emphasis on quantitate data gathering and analysis.  By course end, the student should be able to identify the appropriate laboratory technique to solve several types of chemistry problems, thoroughly explain the implementation of several techniques, statistically analyze data, and communicate results in standard scientific research paper format.  Techniques investigated include atomic spectroscopy, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and spectrophotometry, as well as several titration and electrochemical techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: CHM 146 General Chemistry II and CHM 146L General Chemistry II Laboratory, with a minimum grade of "D", MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry, with a minimum grade of "D".

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the basic scientific principles for following techniques:  atomic spectroscopy, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, spectrophotometry, as well as several titration and electrochemical techniques.
    2.  Perform standard laboratory calculations.
              a.  Carry uncertainty through calculations
    3.  Calibrate standard laboratory equipment, such as burets and pipets.
    4.  Collect data during laboratory exercises using select techniques discussed in lecture.
    5.  Keep a well-organized laboratory notebook which thoroughly documents laboratory experiments.
    6.  Analyze laboratory data for meaning.
              a.  Use electronic spreadsheet programs (example: Microsoft Excel)
              b.  Use appropriate statistical analysis to identify insignificant outlying data and determine relative and absolute uncertainty in results
    7.  Report results which agree with anticipated results, within specified tolerances.
    8.  Write complete laboratory reports which follow the reporting format used in scientific publications.


  
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    CHM 290 - Forensic Toxicology


    Application of the principles of forensic toxicology and the related forensic sciences within the scope of medical-legal investigation.  Drug and poison analysis, examination of physical evidence and death investigation.  Laboratory sessions will provide basic knowledge of forensic analysis utilizing microscopy, gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography and spectroscopy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 120 Fundamental Chemistry or CHM 145 General Chemistry I or permission of department

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the role of poisons and drugs in the human body.
    2. Understand the use of the gas chromatograph.
    3. Determine the presence of drugs or poisons in body tissues, organs, or fluids.
    4. Perform basic algebraic manipulations to relative to simple chemical calculations.
    5. Perform mathematical manipulations such as unit analysis with proper attention to units and significant figures.
    6. Use the concept of the mole in quantitative chemical calculations.
    7. Balance chemical equations.
    8. Calculate amounts of chemicals involved in poisonings and LD 50.
    9. Calculate and utilize solution concentration units such as molarity.
    10. Classify poisons and drugs.
    11. Use concepts of pH in acidic and basic solutions.
    12. Understand the use of the mass spectrometer.
    13. Understand the ideal gas law and its application in poisonous gases.
    14. Understand the use of liquid chromatography.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcome will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, chapter exams, and the final exam.

  
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    CHM 291 - Special Topics in Chemistry


    Special courses covering particular topics in the field of Chemistry beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 1-4
    Hours
    1-4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore chemical phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2. Demonstrate an application of scientific data, concepts, and models in chemistry.


  
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    CHM 298 - Chemistry Senior Seminar


    This course is a capstone course for students in the LAAS program who plan to go on to major in chemistry or a related area.  Students will learn to search for, read, and interpret scientific papers.  Students will also be required to give oral presentations and poster board sessions based on their research.  Leaders in research from various areas of environmental, forensic, medicinal, and industrial chemistry will also be invited to present.  This will prepare students for success at a 4-year college.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 145 Chemistry and CHM 146 Chemistry

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to search a scientific journal database for articles related to their interest.
    2. Understand how to read and evaluate scientific papers.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to convey complicated scientific topics in a understandable manner to peers.
    4. Summarize the information learned from an oral presentation and ask relevant questions.
    5. Conduct a formal presentation on a current topic in chemistry.


  
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    CHM 299 - Independent Study


    The student undertakes an independent project in his/her specialty under the guidance of a faculty member.  Only one independent study course allowed per semester.  Consideration may be given a project involving a work assignment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  permission of department

    Credits: (1-4)
    Hours
    (1-4 Class Hours), (1-4 Laboratory Hours)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. State a scientific problem.
    2. Develop a testable hypothesis.
    3. Develop a null hypothesis.
    4. Design experimental studies.
    5. Collect and analyze data.
    6. Make conclusions.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, chapter exams, and the final exam.

  
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    CIV 113 - Engineering Drawing I w/CAD


    An introductory course in the fundamentals of engineering drawing and the basics of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD).  Manual drafting techniques are integrated with extensive use of AutoCAD.  Topics include use of the drawing instruments, geometric construction, freehand sketching, orthographic projection, sectional and auxiliary views and proper dimensioning techniques.  CAD topics include file management; command structure; creating, editing, and manipulating drawing elements; dimensioning.  Students will gain an understanding of engineering drawing concepts by applying them in both manual drafting and AutoCAD assignments.

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    MET 113
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Be aware of the requirements of modern graphic language and be able to apply these requirements through both manual and CAD drafting techniques.
    2. Understand and use professional language including abbreviations, specifications, and terminology associated with the development of working drawings.
    3. Use both the Architect's and Engineer's Scale in the development of both manual and CAD drawings.
    4. Use board-drafting tools in the completion of engineering drawings.
    5. Sketch and construct orthographic projections, sectional views, and 3D drawings using manual drafting techniques.
    6. Use proper dimensioning techniques in the development of both manual and CAD drawings.
    7. Use AutoCAD including an understanding of menu options, status window, prompt line, history line, dialogue boxes, etc. in the completion of multiple types of CAD drawings.
    8. Create, edit, and plot AutoCAD drawings.
    9. Construct a working drawing complete with border, scale, details, titles, etc. using manual or CAD drafting techniques.


  
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    CIV 119 - Architectural Drawing w/CAD


    Fundamentals of architectural drafting including floor plans, elevations, sections, details, schedules, plot plans, plumbing layouts, electrical layouts.  Emphasis on residential drawings, instruction in the use of Architectural Desktop for the above types of drawings.  Drawing assignments done both manually and using AutoCAD.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 113 Engineering Drawing I w/CAD

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Be aware of the considerations in the preliminary planning of a residence.
    2. Understand the basic framing techniques and typical details for residential structures.
    3. Have knowledge of materials and terminology used in residential construction.
    4. Create the following architectural working drawings using both board drafting tools and the college's Architectural CAD software:  Floor Plans, Basement/Foundation Plans, Section Views, Elevations, Site Plans, etc.
    5. Be aware of architectural drafting conventions including common material symbols, appropriate lineweights, and level of detail required on various drawings.
    6. Be proficient in the use of the college's architectural CAD software for creating the above residential plans.
    7. Create basic three dimensional models of a residential structure using the college's Architectural CAD software.
    8. Use proper dimension techniques for architectural working drawings.
    9. Construct an architectural working drawing complete with border, scale, details, titles, etc. using manual or CAD drafting techniques.
    10. Understand how to incorporate energy efficient design into residential structures.


  
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    CIV 124 - Mechanics (Statics)


    Instruction will be directed to the study of static force systems and equilibrium as applied to civil engineering structures.  Topics of study will include:  force distribution, moments, system equilibrium, free-body diagrams, centroids, moments of inertia.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    MET 134
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand, compute and resolve forces as vectors into concurrent force systems, parallel force systems, and non-concurrent force systems.
    2.  Understand moments and couples.
    3.  Understand and apply Varignon's Theorem.
    4.  Understand and solve problems in static equilibrium, including:
              a.  Computation of beam reactions
              b.  Calculate the magnitude of forces in truss members
              c.  Calculation of pin reactions in pin connected frames
    5.  Sketch free-body diagrams.
    6.  Understand and calculate center of gravity and the centroid of complex shapes.
    7.  Understand and calculate the moment of inertia of complex figures.

  
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    CIV 136 - Construction Methods & Management


    Principles of construction methods and management used in the construction industry including contracts, plans, specifications, methods, planning and scheduling, economics and safety.  Field trips to various local engineering and/or architectural firms/local construction sites.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have an understanding of the construction industry and the parties (owner, architect, engineer, contractor, subcontractors, construction manager, etc.) involved in the construction process.
    2. Calculate % swell, % shrinkage, shrinkage factor, and load factor for use in earthwork computations.  Students will have an understanding of soil volume changes and resulting implications of those changes to construction costs.
    3. Calculate and use the productivity rates for five types of heavy equipment including the backhoe, shovel, dragline, dozer, and loader.  In addition, students will have the ability to make an informed decision regarding the choice of equipment to be used for specific construction projects.
    4. Understand various project planning and scheduling methods including the development of bar charts, arrow notation, and precedent notation.
    5. Understand the critical path method (CPM) with implications for time and budget control within construction projects.
    6. Calculate equipment costs including ownership and operating expenses with an understanding for use in the estimating of equipment expenses for construction projects.
    7. Understand project safety and the importance of compliance to safety standards during the construction process.
    8. Collaborate effectively with team members for purposes of research and class presentations of construction projects.
    9. Appreciate the contractor's responsibilities involved in constructing LEED Certified buildings.


  
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    CIV 137 - Construction Inspection


    At some point in their career almost every civil engineer will be called upon to provide some level of construction inspection; others will dedicate their entire career to this specialty.  This course will prepare the student for employment as an inspector by reviewing the responsibilities and duties typically associated with the position; how to document quantities and to work with various materials as well as assuring a safe jobsite.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Clearly state the role of a construction inspector.
    2. Outline the basic responsibilities of an inspector for maintaining a safe jobsite.
    3. Express distances in stations.
    4. Read highway plans.
    5. Keep an inspector's diary.
    6. Prepare inspection reports and documentation.
    7. Perform basic inspection tasks for bituminous paving.
    8. Perform basis inspection tasks for Portland Cement paving.
    9. Perform basic inspection tasks for highway earthwork.
    10. Perform basic inspection tasks for pipelines.
    11. Perform basic inspection tasks for building foundations and reinforced concrete construction.


  
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    CIV 201 - Surveying I


    Introduction to the basic concepts of plane surveying as well as measurement by global position systems.  Class instruction covers the theory and application of measurement science.  Laboratory exercises develop skill in the use and care of surveying equipment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry, CIV 113 Engineering Drawing I w/CAD

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand and apply the theory of measurement used in plane surveying.
    2. Understand and use the basic mathematics required for plane surveying calculations.
    3. Express direction by bearings and azimuths.
    4. Keep field notes and operate surveying instruments for a survey crew.
    5. Reduce level notes.
    6. Compute closure, adjust, and calculate the area of a closed traverse.
    7. Operate and care for the following types of surveying equipment:  surveyor's tape; compass; automatic level; transit; theodolite; and total station.
    8. Prepare CAD maps based on the student measurements.
    9. Work effectively as a member of a survey crew. 


  
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    CIV 202 - Surveying II


    This course covers the basics of horizontal and vertical curve geometry as used in highway design before undertaking the study of more advanced road design topics including:  use of mass diagrams to track earthwork on highways; control surveying mathematics; universal coordinate systems as used by NYSDOT; and boundary location, as needed for highway right-of-way.  Laboratory exercises will vary between CAD drawings and one or two outdoor exercises.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 201 Surveying I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have a thorough understanding of the geometry of horizontal and vertical curves.
    2. Use CAD to prepare plan and profile drawings.
    3. Understand the calculations used for spiral curves.
    4. Understand and apply mathematical methods for establishing location in non-Euclidian space.
    5. Have a basic understanding of control surveying techniques and calculations.
    6. Have a basic appreciation and understanding of global positioning systems (GPS).
    7. Understand the fundamentals of geographic information systems (GIS).


  
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    CIV 217 W - Materials Testing


    Civil Engineering projects require knowledge of many materials; this course introduces properties and testing of some of the most common including:  Portland cement concrete, aggregates, cement admixtures, bituminous materials, and ferrous metals.  Additional topics include:  design and proportioning of concrete mixes; placing and curing of concrete; and deformation measurement of materials under stress.  Students will learn  seven concrete sampling techniques required by American Concrete Institute and may elect to take the test for Concrete Field Testing Technician near the end of the semester.  This is a writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CIV 219 Strength of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. Understand the purpose and importance of inspection and testing on construction projects.
    2. Have knowledge of the properties, qualities, and specifications for aggregates.
    3. Be aware of the types of and properties of portland cement.
    4. Understand the properties of portland cement concrete and requirements for quality concrete.
    5. Know the proper procedures for mixing, placing, and curing concrete.
    6. Understand the basics of concrete mix design.
    7. Understand the importance of specifications for materials and procedures used in concrete construction.
    8. Have a knowledge of bituminous materials including asphalt cement, liquid asphalt, and emulsified asphalt.
    9. Understand the types of bituminous pavements.
    10. Perform seven field testing procedures used in concrete construction:  temperature, sampling, slump, entrained air by pressure meter, entrained air by the volumetric meter, preparation of samples for strength testing, unit weight.
    11. Understand the requirements of the ASTM test specifications for the above seven field test procedures.
    12. Work in teams to perform lab testing on concrete aggregates and portland cement concrete.
    13. Prepare professional quality laboratory reports.
    14. Analyze lab results and write about data trends, observations, and conclusions.


  
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    CIV 219 - Strength of Materials


    Behavior of materials due to axial force, shear force, and moments can be quantified by stress and strain.  Students will learn how to calculate stress and strain, apply Hooke's Law, draw shear and moment diagrams, calculate beam deflection, identify points of maximum and minimum stress and then use this information to select structural members.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics), MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry, MET 134 Statics

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. Have an understanding of the fundamental behavior of materials subject to axial force, shear, bending moment, and torsion.
    2. Understand the relationships between stress and strain and be able to apply Hooke's Law.
    3. Understand the concept of safety factors and allowable stresses.
    4. Solve for reactions and draw shear and moment diagrams for statically determinate beams.
    5. Calculate stresses due to axial force, shear force, bending moment and torsion.
    6. Solve for beam deflections using the moment-area method.
    7. Calculate combined stresses from combinations of axial plus bending, biaxial bending, and eccentric loadings.
    8. Have an understanding of combined normal and shear stresses and be able to compute by applying Mohr's Circle.
    9. Solve for reactions, shears and moments of statically indeterminate beams.


  
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    CIV 224 - Reinforced Concrete Design


    Fundamental theory and principles for design of reinforced concrete by the strength method.  Design, analysis and detailing of rectangular beams, T-beams, slabs and columns.  Integrated design and detailing projects.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 219 Strength of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Analyze and design rectangular beams, slabs, and T-beams for compression and T-beams for flexure using the strength method.
    2. Design shear reinforcement for beams.
    3. Calculate development lengths, splices, and bar cutoffs for tension bars.
    4. Design a cantilever retaining wall.
    5. Have an understanding of the use of current design specifications including the most up-to-date version of ACI-318.
    6. Be familiar with the various types of concrete framing used in buildings and bridges.
    7. Be familiar with the current industry standards for detailing reinforced concrete members.


  
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    CIV 226 - Structural Steel Design


    Fundamental theory and principles of design of simple steel structures using LRFD Method.  Design, investigation and detailing of beams, columns, tension and compression members and their connections.  Composite beams.  Includes an integrated design and detailing project.  Introduction to use of structural analysis/design computer program.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 219 Strength of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Be familiar with the AISC Steel Construction Manual.
    2. Understand the concepts of structural design by the Load and Resistance Factor Method and the Allowable Stress Design Method, and will understand the differences between the methods.
    3. Analyze and design steel tension members.
    4. Analyze and design steel compression members.
    5. Analyze and design steel beams.
    6. Design structural steel connections using bolting or welding.
    7. Prepare detail drawings of structural steel connections.
    8. Create fabrication drawings for steel members.
    9. Design continuous steel beams using structural analysis software.


  
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    CIV 231 - Estimating & Construction Planning


    A systematic approach to estimating building project costs.  Semester long project will include building a cost estimate of a commercial building.  Microsoft EXCEL spreadsheet will be used as an estimating tool.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 119 Architectural Drafting w/CAD, CST 106 Computers in Technology

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have a sound foundation and knowledge of various aspects related to the construction estimating and bidding process including contracts, specifications, bonding requirements, types of estimates, estimate organization, overhead, contingencies, and profit.
    2. Have the ability to use modern computer estimating tools including Microsoft Excel and Means Costworks software.
    3. Have the ability to complete material takeoffs and associated material, labor, and equipment costs for building construction projects.
    4. Have the ability to prepare a complete construction bidding package including the quantity takeoffs and cost estimate for a small commercial building.


  
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    CIV 237 - Hydraulics/Storm Water Management


    The principles of hydraulics and hydrology are covered, followed by application of these principles to the solution of stormwater runoff problems.  Runoff quantity is calculated by the Rational and Win-TR55 methods and then used to size culverts and stormsewer systems.  Manning's Equation is used for backwater analysis when establishing outlet control in culverts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand and be able to apply basic fluid mechanics.
    2. Understand the hydrologic cycle and its relationship to storm runoff.
    3. Compute storm runoff using the Rational and the SCS TR-55 Methods.
    4. Calculate storm sewer flows.
    5. Correctly size storm sewers.
    6. Correctly size culverts.
    7. Understand the desirability of using mitigation techniques such as on site detention basins to reduce storm flow.


  
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    CIV 238 - Architectural Design & Building Materials w/CAD


    Design and detailing of commercial buildings including site considerations, space requirements, layout planning, building materials, construction methods, construction details, working drawings.  Emphasis on individual creativity.  Semester project.  Technical oral presentation.  Use of AutoCAD and Architectural Desktop for drawings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 119 Architectural Drafting w/CAD

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have a basic knowledge of considerations involved in the preliminary design of small commercial buildings.
    2. Understand the significance and purpose of building codes, and have a knowledge of the major topics covered in building codes.
    3. Understand light gage steel framing construction and typical associated details.
    4. Understand structural steel frame construction, have knowledge of material choices and typical connection details.
    5. Be aware of foundation choices and details for small commercial buildings.
    6. Understand the materials used in masonry construction and have a knowledge of typical details used in commercial buildings.
    7. Have a knowledge of materials used in wood construction and understand framing methods and typical details used in timber frame construction.
    8. Have an understanding of the materials and building methods used in reinforced concrete construction.
    9. Use the college's architectural CAD system to create a three dimensional building model.
    10. Use the college's architectural CAD system to create construction drawings for a commercial building, including floor plans, foundation plans, sections and elevations.
    11. Work in teams for the development of a design project for a small commercial building.
    12. Present the proposed design to the class, with oral explanations and sketches of the building concept.
    13. Appreciate sustainable design and construction technologies, and understand the basic factors of LEED Certification.


  
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    CIV 240 - Soil Mechanics


    Topics include:  soil origin and nature; soil density, gradation and compaction; soil water content and reaction to frost; stress distribution in soil, soil shear strength; and pile bearing strength.  Laboratory instruction is based on ASTM and AASHTO specifications particularly as they are used to classify and predict soil behavior.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 219 Strength of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have knowledge of soil types.
    2. Perform soil gradation testing and create gradation curves.
    3. Classify soils for engineering uses.
    4. Provide soil descriptions by visual and manual examination of soil samples.
    5. Have an understanding of basic engineering properties of soils such as Atterberg Limits, relative density, and gradation.
    6. Solve problems involving weight and volume relationships of soils.
    7. Have an understanding of soil compaction, be able to perform compaction testing in the lab, and be able to create moisture-density curves.
    8. Conduct field density testing by the sand cone.
    9. Have an understanding of the flow of water through soils and be able to conduct lab permeability tests.
    10. Have an understanding of the common methods of soil exploration and obtaining soil samples.
    11. Calculate subsurface stresses in soils.
    12. Calculate expected consolidation settlements in soils.
    13. Understand the concepts of soil shear strength.
    14. Perform soil strength testing by the unconfined compression test and the direct shear test, and be able to analyze the results to determine strength parameters.
    15. Understand the basics of shallow foundation design.


  
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    CIV 299 - Independent Study


    The student undertakes an independent project in his/her specialty under the guidance of a faculty member.  Only one independent course allowed per semester.  Consideration may be given to a project involving a work assignment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Departmental approval

    Credits: (1-4)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
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    CLT 110 - Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Technology


    Overview of the field of Clinical Laboratory Technology and its role within healthcare organizations.  Designed to acquaint the student with the clinical laboratory and the professional role of practitioners within the health care delivery system.  Review of professionalism, safety and regulatory issues, introduction to values, ethics, and interpersonal communication in these settings.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the roles and elements in the organizational structure of a typical healthcare facility.
    2. Describe the roles of health care practitioners in healthcare facilities and laboratories, including their academic preparation, professional credentials, and contributions as part of the healthcare team.
    3. Explain basic concepts of communication and identify professional communication sufficient to serve the needs of patients and the public.
    4. Identify policies and procedures for maintaining laboratory safety, including those related to infection control, electrical, chemical, radiation and biological hazards, and fire safety.
    5. Describe the impact of regulatory compliance on individuals and healthcare organizations, including licensure, HIPAA, CLIA, OSHA, and others.
    6. Apply ethical standards to potential situations in the healthcare setting, including patient confidentiality.
    7. Explain the importance of professional conduct in healthcare, including communication, collaboration, and a commitment to lifelong learning.

     

  
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    CLT 120 - Clinical Laboratory Techniques and Practices


    Introduction to basic skills and equipment used in the clinical laboratory.  Orientation to elements of quality control, laboratory mathematics, clinical assay techniques, safety, and collection and handling of specimens for laboratory analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 110 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Technology and approval of CLT advisor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe safety regulations and best practices in the laboratory.
    2. Identify and explain the use of common laboratory equipment.
    3. Perform common laboratory mathematical calculations.
    4. Describe what a quality assurance program is and identify common components.
    5. Discuss the function of hematology, chemistry, microbiology, urinalysis, immunology and immunohematology labs in regard to: (a.) type of specimen analyzed (b.) type of testing performed.
    6. Review the policies and procedures of the SUNY Broome Community College's Clinical Laboratory Technician Program.


  
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    CLT 200 - Histological Techniques


    An introduction to the principles of histologic techniques used in the clinical laboratory.  Course content includes preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting, and staining of tissues for the purpose of microscopic examination.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Co-requisite:  CLT 200L Histological Techniques Lab

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of the morphology of the microscopic anatomy of the human body and correlate it with general function.
    2. Relate the functions of those cells, tissues, and organ systems to their structures.
    3. Identify the basic tissues, the major organs, and the cells that compose them, when shown glass slides and photomicrographs.
    4. Describe variations from normal histological structure (histopathology).


  
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    CLT 200L - Histological Techniques Lab


    Laboratory activities that provides a practical preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting, and staining of tissues for the purpose of microscopic examination.  Also includes evaluation of stained tissues preparations and identification of common cellular structures, laboratory safety and review of relevant regulations.
     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I and approval of CLT advisor

    Corequisite:  CLT 200 Histological Techniques

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Practice histological techniques used in the clinical laboratory, including preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting, and staining of tissues for the purpose of microscopic examination.
    2. Perform basic evaluation of quality of stained tissues preparations.
    3. Adhere to laboratory safety practices and regulations relevant to the clinical histology laboratory.


  
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    CLT 201 - Hematology & Coagulation (WE)


    A comprehensive study of the hematopoietic and coagulation systems, including the normal physiology and classic pathology of both systems.  Emphasis is on the theory and clinical significance of routine and special test procedures. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I and approval of the CLT advisor

    Corequisite: CLT 201L Hematology & Coagulation Lab

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the hematopoietic and coagulation systems, including normal physiologic and classic pathology of both systems.
    2. Describe the theory of hematopoietic cell formation and the resulting cellular morphologies.
    3. Understand the mechanisms of hematopoietic disease and recognize the morphological changes associated with it.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles and procedures of hematology and coagulation testing, including quality assurance and quality control.
    5. Interpret hematological patient data based on case study analysis and recognize normal and disease states.


  
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    CLT 201L - Hematology & Coagulation Lab


    A practical application of the hematopoietic and coagulation systems.  Emphasis is on the performance, interpretation and clinical significance of routine and special test procedures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CLT 201 Hematology & Coagulation

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the general principles and techniques of basic manual hematology procedures.
    3. Perform a CBC on an instrument and review and interpret data from the instrument.
    4. Perform peripheral blood smear differentials.
    5. Describe and recognize normal cellular morphology changes associated with various disease states.
    6. Integrate hematology panel results with other patient data through the interpretation of case studies.
    7. Define the process of hemostasis, explain how the coagulation laboratory accesses it, and be able to interpret the laboratory tests used in that assessment.


  
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    CLT 202 - Urinalysis & Body Fluids


    A study of the physiologic processes which result in the formation of urine and body fluids.  Emphasis on the analysis of fluids and interpretation of the clinical significance of test results.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I and approval of the CLT advisor

    Corequisite: CLT 202L Urinalysis & Body Fluids Lab

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the structure and function of the major components of the kidney and urinary tract.
    2. Explain the collection and handling procedures for urine and body fluids.
    3. Describe the observational and physical measurements of urine and body fluids performed by the clinical laboratory.
    4. Describe the chemical screening methods used on urine and other fluids analyzed by the clinical laboratory.
    5. Describe the preparation and performance of a urine microscopic analysis.
    6. Correlate urinalysis test data with specific disease states and state the clinical significance of test results.
    7. Describe the performance and clinical significance of a CSF and other body fluid cell count.


  
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    CLT 202L - Urinalysis & Body Fluids Lab


    A practical application of the urinary system and formation of other bodily fluids.  Emphasis is on the performance, interpretation and clinical significance of routine and special test procedures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite: CLT 202 Urinalysis & Body Fluids

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2. Explain the collection and handling procedures for urine and body fluids.
    3. Perform the physical, chemical and microscopic examination of urine and body fluids performed by the clinical laboratory.
    4. Understand the test methodologies used in the chemical analysis of urine.
    5. Identify commonly seen urinary crystals, cells and casts.
    6. Perform a CSF and other body fluid cell count and morphology and understand the clinical significance of these tests.


  
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    CLT 204 - Fundamental Phlebotomy


    Training and experience in the practice of phlebotomy, teaching students to recognize and use blood collection equipment, practice standard precautions, and perform procedures of routine venipuncture and skin puncture.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I or BIO 101 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the best practices for interaction with patient, patient advocates, and other healthcare staff.
    2. Perform a successful venipuncture and dermal puncture, including correct order of draw and safety measures.
    3. Differentiate supplies and procedures for all patient types, including newborns through geriatric adults.
    4. Identify the most common additives used in blood collection, explain their reasons for use, and correlate the tube color with the additive and associated tests.
    5. Name and explain frequent causes of phlebotomy complications and discuss the problems caused by breaking sterile and antiseptic techniques.

     

     

  
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    CLT 206 - Immunohematology


    An introduction to the field of blood banking, including the study of theoretical knowledge of blood groups and blood grouping, component and transfusion therapies, transfusion reactions, and allo- and auto-antibody formation. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 216 Immunology or BIO 216 Immunology, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Corequisite:  CLT 206L Immunohematology Lab

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe classic problems inherent to blood transfusion and the solutions currently in use.
    2. Apply basic principles of genetics to immunohematology.
    3. Apply basic principles of immunology to blood group serology.
    4. Explain the process of donor selection, describe the processes of blood or blood component donation, including apheresis.
    5. Explain the clinical significance of abnormal and disease states related to immunohematology, including drug-induced red blood cell destruction, polyagglutination, transfusion reactions, and Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn (HDN) and list the procedures relevant to each.
    6. Discuss medicolegal aspects of blood banking and the medicolegal responsibilities of an immunohematologist.
    7. Describe the theory behind alternative technologies and automation in routine blood bank testing.

     

  
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    CLT 206L - Immunohematology Lab


    A practical application of the ABO and Rh grouping, antibody identification, and compatibility testing.  Emphasis is on the performance, interpretation and clinical significance of routine and special test procedures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CLT 206 Immunohematology

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2. Display appropriate professional behavior.
    3. Demonstrate logical approaches to problem solving - selecting appropriate units and crossmatching them with unknown patient specimens.
    4. Describe and perform the testing procedures performed in the clinical immunohematology laboratory, including Coombs' (antiglobulin) testing, ABO testing, Rh testing, other blood group testing, alloantibody screening, RBC autoantibody testing, compatibility testing.
    5. Describe and perform transfusion test procedures, including procedures related to component therapy.


  
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    CLT 207 - Clinical Chemistry & Serology


    Designed to cover principles, analytical methods, and clinical significance of clinical chemistry as performed in the medical laboratory, including theoretical principles of serological and molecular methodologies.  The relationship of physiochemical of body function in health and disease including the renal, liver, digestive, and respiratory systems.  Emphasis on those clinical tests which evaluate the function of these systems related to metabolism, protein synthesis, pH, blood gases, electrolyte balance, enzymes, and hormones.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  CLT 216 Immunology as a Prior or Concurrent Requirement

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the general principles and techniques of basic manual and automated chemistry procedures through class discussion and examinations.
    2. Correlate clinical chemistry data with normal and abnormal physiological states and identify the clinical significance of test results.
    3. Describe the mechanisms and performance of basic serological techniques and immunological assays.
    4. Select the appropriate testing methodologies for evaluation of infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.
    5. Evaluate the clinical significance of clinical serology testing, including infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.


  
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    CLT 207L - Clinical Chemistry & Serology Lab


    Designed to cover principles, analytical methods, and clinical significance of clinical chemistry as performed in the medical laboratory, including theoretical principles of serological and molecular methodologies.  The relationship of physiochemical of body function in health and disease including the renal, liver, digestive, and respiratory systems.  Emphasis on those clinical tests which evaluate the function of these systems related to metabolism, protein synthesis, pH, blood gases, electrolyte balance, enzymes, and hormones.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CLT 126 as a Prior or Concurrent Requirement

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the general principles and techniques of basic manual and automated chemistry procedures through class discussion and examinations.
    2. Correlate clinical chemistry data with normal and abnormal physiological states and identify the clinical significance of test results.
    3. Describe the mechanisms and performance of basic serological techniques and immunological assays.
    4. Select the appropriate testing methodologies for evaluation of infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.
    5. Evaluate the clinical significance of clinical serology testing, including infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.


  
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    CLT 208 - Pathogenic Microbiology


    An introduction to microorganisms of importance in human health and disease.  Topics include the morphology, isolation, and clinical significance of pathogens, the interrelationships of microorganisms and human hosts, and the prevention and control of infectious diseases.  Emphasis on bacteriology; includes survey of mycology, parasitology, and virology.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I

    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 209L Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory or CLT 210 Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CLT 208
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Discuss the history of microbiology and the significance of the microbial world.
    2. Describe classification systems for organisms and apply that knowledge to microorganisms.
    3. Summarize the basic principles of infection and resistance and their application to transmission of infectious disease.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the biology of microorganisms, including microbial anatomy, genetics, metabolism, growth, and control of growth.
    5. Explain the mechanisms employed for control of microbial growth and describe the various assays used to evaluate effectiveness of antimicrobial agents, including antibiotic sensitivity testing.
    6. List the characteristics of representative organisms of clinical significance, including their significant disease states, target populations, means of transmission, means of prevention and/or treatment, virulence factors, identifying symptoms and organismal characteristics.


  
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    CLT 209 L - Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory


    An overview of the basic clinical microbiology techniques, including collection and processing of clinical specimens, media used for isolation and identification of organisms common to human flora, aseptic techniques, staining procedures, susceptibility testing, and isolation techniques.  This course also includes a review of the main components and functions of the human immune system.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the microbiology laboratory at all times.
    2. Demonstrate logical approaches to problem solving by identifying unknown cultures.
    3. Describe the elements which comprise the immune system and summarize the mechanisms of the human immune system.
    4. Discuss in general terms the biological mechanisms of immunizations, immunological screening for congenital infections, and evaluation of immune abnormalities.
    5. Perform procedures in the laboratory using aseptic techniques, including selection of media, Gram staining, isolating organisms, performing biochemical and serological identifications, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, evaluating smears, and culturing and evaluating cultures of human specimens.


  
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    CLT 210 - Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory


    A comprehensive study of diagnostic methods for identification of normal and pathogenic microorganisms from clinical materials by appropriate laboratory techniques.  Emphasis on cultural, microscopic and biochemical characteristics, chemical significance, collecting and processing of clinical specimens, diagnostic tests, and susceptibility tests.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    MLT 210
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the microbiology laboratory at all times.
    2. Demonstrate logical approaches to problem solving by identifying unknown cultures.
    3. Perform all basic procedures generally done in the clinical microbiology laboratory using septic techniques, including selection of media, Gram staining, isolating organisms, performing biochemical and serological identifications, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.
    4. Evaluate cultures and direct microscopic examinations of human specimens to identify the host and microbial elements and to indicate the clinical significance of those elements.


  
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    CLT 214 - Specialized Phlebotomy


    Advanced techniques in collecting venous blood and capillary blood specimens.  Topics include anatomy and physiology as related to specimen collection; properties of arterial blood versus venous blood; specialized collection equipment; specialized collection techniques; requisitioning, specimen transport and specimen processing, and quality assurance.  Competency required in the performance of routine venipuncture and micro blood drawing techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the procedure and situations that necessitate special venipuncture techniques and special dermal puncture techniques the reason and procedure for arterial blood collection and perform the modified Allen test.
    2. Understand the significance of infection control measures.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of requisitioning, specimen transport and specimen processing for in-house and reference lab testing and for testing to be used for legal evidence.
    4. List non-blood samples tested in the laboratory and describe the collection procedure required for the non-blood samples collected in an outpatient setting.
    5. Describe the system for monitoring quality assurance in the collection of blood specimens.
    6. Define the different terms used in the medicolegal aspect for phlebotomy and discuss policies and protocol designed to avoid medicolegal problems.
    7. Perform a successful venipuncture using a winged infusion device.


  
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    CLT 215 - Phlebotomy Practicum


    A practical application of phlebotomy techniques in a clinical laboratory setting or health care environment.  The course focuses on safety, quality control, communication, interpersonal skills, and ethical considerations relating to patients.  Clinical hours:  160 hours total.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy and CLT 214 Specialized Phlebotomy, and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    120 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2. Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    3. Demonstrate competence in performing phlebotomy and phlebotomy procedures as specified in the associated clinical objectives list.
    4. Perform a minimum of 100 successful unaided venipuncture collections.
    5. Complete at least 144 hours of clinical time in an accredited healthcare facility.
    6. Observe and describe the organization and functioning of a typical clinical laboratory.


  
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    CLT 216 - Immunology


    An introduction to the basic concepts in immunology, including development of the immune system, innate immunity, immunoglobulin structure and genetics, antigen-antibody reactions, the major histocompatibility complex and antigen presentation, T cell receptors, T cell activation and effector functions, energy and apoptosis, adhesion molecules, phagocytic cell function, immune responses to infections organisms and tumors, autoimmune diseases, allergies, immune deficiencies and AIDS.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I and BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BIO 216
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the structure of immunoglobulins and discuss the mechanism for generation of antibody diversity.
    2. Discuss the nature of antigens and the characteristics that contribute to immunogenicity.
    3. Outline the key components of the innate and adaptive immune responses and describe their roles in defense.
    4. Compare and contrast the development, function, and the antigen recognition systems of the innate and adaptive immune systems.
    5. Describe various immunological manipulations and evaluate their advantages and limitations.
    6. Identify the main mechanisms of immune tolerance and its role in autoimmunity hypersensitivity states.
    7. Evaluate clinical cases to apply information to assess diagnoses, symptoms, etiology, prognosis, possible treatments, and other case-related information.


  
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    CLT 240 - Clinical Affiliation I


    Performance of procedures in clinical chemistry, immunology-serology, and immunohematology in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 206 Immunohematology, CLT 206L Immunohematology Lab, CLT 207 Clinical Chemistry, CLT 207L Clinical Chemistry and Serology Lab, CLT 216 Immunology, and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    10.7 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2. Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    3. Process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    4. Using established criteria, identify and evaluate patient specimens for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    5. Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    6. Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    7. Recognize the preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors that impact procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits.
    8. Describe how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    9. Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    10. Describe the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    11. Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the associated clinical objectives list.


  
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    CLT 241 - Clinical Affiliation II


    Performance of procedures in urinalysis, body fluid analysis, phlebotomy, hematology, and coagulation in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CLT 201 Hematology and Coagulation, CLT 201L Hematology and Coagulation Lab, CLT 202 Urinalysis/Body Fluids, CLT 202L Urinalysis/Body Fluids Lab, CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    14 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2. Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    3. Process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    4. Using established criteria, identify and evaluate patient specimens for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    5. Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    6. Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    7. Recognize the preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors that impact procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits
    8. Describe how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    9. Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    10. Describe the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    11. Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the associated clinical objectives list.


  
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    CLT 242 - Clinical Affiliation III


    Performance of procedures in microbiology in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical Hours: 40 hr/week for 2 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology, CLT 210 Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory, and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    5.3 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2. Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    3. Process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    4. Using established criteria, identify and evaluate patient specimens for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    5. Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    6. Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    7. Recognize the preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors that impact procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits.
    8. Describe how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    9. Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    10. Describe the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    11. Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the associated clinical objectives list.


  
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    CLT 250 - Human Histology


    The study of microscopic anatomy dealing with the structures of cells, tissues, and organs, with a focus on their recognition, structural aspects, and basic functions.  The course covers, cell anatomy, basic tissue types, and common histochemical stains, and applies these to the study of organs as systemic arrangements of tissues performing a specific function, such as respiration, digestion, reproduction, etc.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I and BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize the general morphology characteristics of cells and tissues of the human body.
    2. Recognize characteristics specific to cells and tissues, as well as recognize common histological stains appropriate for those cells and tissues.
    3. Relate the microanatomy and gross anatomical morphology of cells, tissues, and organ systems studied to their functions.


  
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    CLT 250L - Histology Lab


    A practical application of microscopic anatomy.  The course includes light microscopy techniques, quality control, and identification of cellular anatomy, tissues, and histochemical stains.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CLT 250 Human Histology or permission of the department chairperson

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the components, function, and maintenance of a light microscope.
    2. Describe a three-dimensional component (object) from a two-dimensional image seen under the microscope.
    3. Indentify specific cells and tissues, as well as recognize selected common histological stains.


  
  •  

    CLT 252 - Advanced Histological Techniques


    A lab-oriented course designed to teach students the theory involved in preparing tissue for histological evaluation and study.  Discussions are designed to teach the chemical basis and physical principles of fixation, processing, and staining animal tissue specimens for light microscopy.  The focus will be on routine paraffin techniques, but will include frozen section techniques, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 200 Introduction to Histological Techniques

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe proper histological preservation and fixation methods for various tissue specimens, including their classification, impact on specimen, characteristics, and safety concerns.
    2. Describe proper processing of rapid diagnosis or special component preservation as an alternative to paraffin techniques.
    3. Describe the physical and chemical basis for staining histological specimens.
    4. Describe the common stains for each tissue type, including the purpose, preferred fixative, preferred specimen preparation, principle, and control technique.
    5. Describe procedures in specialty areas such as immunohistochemical staining, in situ hybridization techniques, electron microscopy and cytotechnology.


  
  •  

    CLT 252L - Advanced Histological Techniques Lab


    A practical application of tissue preparation and processing for histological evaluation.  The lab exercises are designed for the student to perform fixation, processing, and staining of animal tissue specimens while maintaining appropriate safety precautions and ensuring integrity of specimen.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CLT 252 Advanced Histological Techniques or permission of the department chairperson

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate proper histological preservation and fixation methods for tissue specimens received for examination and diagnosis.
    2. Process, embed, section and stain paraffin embedded tissue.
    3. Freeze, section, and stain tissue specimens for rapid diagnosis or special component preservation as an alternative to paraffin techniques.
    4. Demonstrate proper lab safety techniques, and biohazard and chemical handling.
    5. Describe and demonstrate standard quality assurance procedures in the histological laboratory.


  
  •  

    CLT 258 - Histotechnology Practicum


    Performance of procedures in histological technology in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine histological procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on cell and tissue morphology, tissue fixation, tissue processing, use and care of a microtome, routine and special histochemical procedures, as well as an introduction to cryotomy, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CLT 250 Human Histology, CLT 252 Advanced Histological Techniques

    Credits: 8
    Hours
    320 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice accepted procedures for the histology laboratory.

    • Demonstrate knowledge of types of histological specimens usually submitted for gross and microscopic examination.
    • Document and maintain lab records.
    • Promote and contribute to universal bio-safety regulations as well as lab safety.
    • Practice quality control in the histology laboratory as required.

    2.  Perform common tissue processing methods.

    • Demonstrate knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as related to histotechnology.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of normal histology of human organs.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of diagnostic terminology.
    • Evaluate, accept, identify and label histologic specimens.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of tissue processing methods, including a variety of fixatives used and how each relates to a specific entity or disease process to be diagnosed.
    • Practice proper tissue processing protocols and embedding methods for paraffin block embedding with an understanding of proper dehydration, clearing and infiltrations reagents and methods.

    3.  Operate and maintain common histological equipment.

    • Operate and maintain a tissue processor.
    • Operate and maintain a microtome.
    • Process, embed, cut, stain, and coverslip all assigned specimens.
    • Section, stain and coverslip frozen tissue specimens with a knowledge of cryostat function and maintenance.
    • Operate and troubleshoot common laboratory equipment such as chemical recyclers, auto stainers, and cover slippers.
    • Prepare and stain slides for cytological examination.

    4.  Evaluate processed, sectioned, and stained tissue.

    • Recognize properly differentiated hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections.
    • Effectively troubleshoot hematoxylin and eosin stains.
    • Effectively troubleshoot special stains.
    • Evaluate histologic specimens for quality of preparation and staining.


  
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    CLT 260 - Intro to Parasitology


    An introductive study of parasites causing human disease emphasizing the taxonomy, morphology, life cycles, modes of transmission, and epidemiology of the clinically significant organisms.  The course has both lecture and lab components with the lab component focusing on the distinguishing characteristics of protozoans and helminths.  Laboratory procedures for specimen preparation and examination for parasites are included.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the impact parasitic organisms have on human health and how epidemiological factors contribute to infection.
    2. Describe morphological characteristics of protozoans, and helminths of public health concern.
    3. Recognize and identify parasitic helminths and protozoa in microscopic images.
    4. Describe proper specimen processing techniques for parasite recovery and detection.


  
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    CLT 295 - Seminar in Laboratory Technology


    A capstone course that reviews the knowledge base, didactic theory, laboratory skills applicable to the clinical lab, and ethical evolution of the profession.  Preparation of professional portfolio, practice for certification examinations, and preparation of public education presentation included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  CLT 240 Clinical Affiliation I, CLT 241 Clinical Affiliation II, CLT 242 Clinical Affiliation III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and utilize professionalism in all communications and submissions.
    2. Create a personal portfolio, including a resume and cover letter suitable for clinical laboratory employment.
    3. Review of all content areas of histotechnology.
    4. Discuss strategies to navigate and succeed in a new career environment.
    5. Review test taking strategies with computer adaptive testing.
    6. Evaluate areas of strength and weakness in preparation for national certification examinations.
    7. Discuss key issues within the field in a way that would make sense to a lay audience.


  
  •  

    CLT 296 - Seminar in Histotechnology


    A capstone course that reviews the knowledge base, didactic theory, laboratory skills applicable to the histology lab, and ethical evolution of the profession.  Preparation of professional portfolio, practice for certification examinations, and preparation of public presentation included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CLT 250 Human Histology and CLT 252 Advanced Histological Techniques

    Corequisites:  CLT 258 Histotechnology Practicum

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and utilize professionalism in all communications and submissions.
    2. Create a personal portfolio, including a resume and cover letter suitable for clinical laboratory employment.
    3. Review of all content areas of histotechnology.
    4. Discuss strategies to navigate and succeed in a new career environment.
    5. Review test taking strategies with computer adaptive testing.
    6. Evaluate areas of strength and weakness in preparation for national certification examinations.
    7. Discuss key issues within the field in a way that would make sense to a lay audience.

     

  
  •  

    CLT 298 - Special Topics


    The study of a topic relevant to the Clinical Laboratory Technologies that is beyond the scope of the existing course offerings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Department approval

    Credits: 1-2
    Cross-listed
    MLT 298
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define core concepts in the topic content area.
    2. Discuss the relevance of the special topic to the field of Clinical Laboratory Technologies.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge in the specified content area.
    4. Differentiate the significance of the special topic.
    5. Critique contrasting perspectives on the special topic.


  
  •  

    CLT 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of clinical laboratory technology.  Independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of courses currently offered by the department.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member with approval by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Departmental approval

    Corequisites:  CLT 240 Clinical Affiliation I, CLT 241 Clinical Affiliation II, CLT 242 Clinical Affiliation III

    Credits: 1-5
    Cross-listed
    MLT 299
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
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    COL 105 - Academic Planning Seminar


    An orientation course for first semester Liberal Arts and Human Services Division students. Students will reflect upon their personal and academic goals, develop learning strategies to enhance their academic success, and acquire a working knowledge of campus services and procedures.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Access intracollege electronic portals that provide information critical to their academic and personal goals.
    2. Synthesize information gained from research into academic, career and personal goals leading to a coherent academic plan that proposes a pathway to degree completion or other academic goal.


  
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    COM 100 - Introduction to Mass Media


    This entry level course offers students an overview of the components of American mass media.  The topics discussed in this course include media's history, structure, economics, regulations and dynamics, as well as the use of verbal and visual imagery.  Radio, television, newspapers, magazines, film, and the closely related advertising and public relations field are surveyed.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the theory behind communication and the differences between intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, and mass communication theories.
    2. Relate the theory and history of mass media to its continually changing role in global society.
    3. Understand the differences between various methods of mass communication and how the role of technology has impacted those methods.
    4. Explain the difference between various theories of mass communication and be able to explain how they inter-relate.
    5. Possess the ability to produce a class project specifically highlighting one or more of the mass media methods covered in class.


  
  •  

    COM 112 - Beginning Photography


    Basics of camera design and operation, plus the fundamentals of photographic visualization and composition; line, form, color, light and shadow.  Darkroom procedures, film processing, basic printmaking, selecting printing techniques.  (Students can sign-out cameras and other supplies from the Communications Department thus reducing the overall costs for photo supplies).

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 112
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Control camera, composition, and photographic approach (sharp focus, shallow D.O.F., blur motion, frozen image, etc.)
    2. Make choices regarding film, paper, lens, filters and light to achieve a good quality photograph as a final product.


  
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    COM 115 - Writing for the Media


    This course is an introductory study of the elements necessary for all media-based writing.  Students will be exposed to standard industry formats used in newspaper, magazine, public relations, print advertising, and internet media.  Students will learn to work against a deadline as they would in a staff writer position.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the history of written communication mediums and how they have both evolved and changed over time.
    2. Describe the role that technology has played in changing how people gain access to written communication mediums over time.
    3. Understand the basic functions and tasks of various positions in the advertising, news reporting, and public relations industries.
    4. Have a working knowledge of basic grammatical and citational styles and formats when completing their assignments.
    5. Produce a class project specifically highlighting one or more of the written communication mediums and print industries covered in class.


  
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    COM 124 - Introduction to Computer Graphics


    The study of Visual Communication theory relating to applied arts fields such as, advertising and editorial design, animation, gaming, and web design.  Students are introduced to vector and raster graphic programs on Macintosh computers, and learn how to develop initial thumbnail sketches into final design comprehensives.  Other topics include digital photography, scanning, image manipulation, color correction, and typography.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 105, BIT 108 or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 125
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply classical design theory to page layout, typographical composition and image manipulation.
    2. Employ knowledge regarding various vector, raster and page layout digital software.
    3. Articulate verbally and in written form the inherent process for conceiving a visual communication piece, such as a poster, print media advertisement designers that were integral to the development of several design movements.
    4. Describe verbally and in written form distinguishing characteristics relating to several design movements.
    5. Investigate various professions relating to various visual communication fields, such as editorial design, advertising design, corporate design, book design, music/record design, information design, and animation.


  
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    COM 125 - Introduction to Audio Theory and Production


    The particular focus of this entry level class will be the fundamentals of sound and recording, and the use of digital sound recording equipment.  Students will conceptualize, record and produce a variety of forms of digital audio presentations including: advertisements, documentaries, interviews, as well as television and film production sound.  The successful student will be well versed with Adobe Audition sound editing and creation programs and their applications.  Additionally, there is a strong course emphasis on creating sound and sound effects designed for use in Foley Science, or the art of adding sound to film.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the fundamental principles behind the perception of sound and its effect on the human sense of hearing.
    2. Discern the differences between analog and digital methods used to record sound throughout the 20th and 21st centuries and be able to explain them.
    3. Know the difference between various digital audio formats and the role of compression/decompression algorithms (codecs) in each of them.
    4. Possess the ability to record their own digital audio files, either in the studio or in the field, and be able to export their files to a PC or Macintosh-based workstation.
    5. Gain a fundamental understanding of digital audio editing software (specifically, Adobe Audition) and be able to produce short projects of varying length using the digital audio files they have recorded over the course of the class.


  
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    COM 130 - Introduction to Video Theory and Production


    This entry level course introduces student to single-camera video production techniques; including operation of digital video cameras and recorders, as well as the basic usage of sound and lighting.  Students will also be instructed on the use of non-linear editing equipment.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Possess a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of image composition and visualization, and how images are captured in the medium of digital video.
    2. Understand video as a time-based multimedia format and be able to explain how the theory of intermittent motion applies to video capture.
    3. Understand the role of proper lighting and be able to follow and practice standard safety protocols when working individually or in a group setting.
    4. Explain the different roles of single-system sound and dual-system sound and be able to incorporate each into their individual video productions.
    5. Produce a series of short individual video projects that creatively highlight the technical lessons and topics covered in class.
    6. Possess the ability to produce short individual video projects using a digital non-linear editing system.


  
  •  

    COM 145 - Contemporary Film Analysis


    Topics covered within the class are cinematography, narrative vs. non-narrative structure, symbolism, genre, realism vs. expressionism, composition, and editing style.  Course work consists of analysis of contemporary issues through screening and discussion of film/cinema work from numerous historical periods.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Produce a cohesive written discourse analyzing specific aspects of a motion picture production relative to a specific topic of study.
    2. Understand the fundamental differences between analyzing specific aspects of a motion picture and simply reviewing or summarizing its major plot points.
    3. Recognize and identify different styles of filmmaking and how these styles have changed over the 20th and 21st centuries.
    4. Draw parallels between narrative storytelling styles and techniques in film as well as in other communication mediums (i.e. - literature).
    5. Demonstrate a working ability to identify contemporary social issues and themes presented by each of the filmmakers and assess its impact on the narrative of the selected film.


  
  •  

    COM 150 - Public Relations


    This course is designed to provide the communications major with a clear picture of the functions of the public relations industry and cite practical applications of public relations principles.  Practical examples will be used with emphasis on communications technology presently used throughout the world.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the professional function of the public relations industry and its effect on society.
    2. Understand the historical significance of several successful and unsuccessful public relations campaigns throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
    3. Possess the ability to create public documents and issue them via specific mass media forms to the general public.
    4. Gain specific knowledge on how technology has changed the way that the public relations industry as a whole communicates with itself and the general public as a whole.
    5. Work as part of a group problem solving team in response to a specific real-world example of a public relations campaign.


 

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