Nov 26, 2022  
Website Catalog (In Development) 
    
Website Catalog (In Development)

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    DEN 213 W - Community Dental Health


    A study of the principles of community health and fundamentals of assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating of public health care with emphasis on community dental health.  Laboratory experience emphasizes reading scientific literature, statistics, community health education, and partnerships with community health agencies.  Emphasis is placed on service learning. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 202 Dental Hygiene IV, DEN 214 Current Topics in Dental Hygiene

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain basic principles of public health and community dental health.
    2. Explain the fundamentals of public health including: assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating public health care.
    3. Read and reflect upon evidence-based, scientific literature and statistics.
    4. Provide successful community health education.
    5. Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as graphs and tables.
    6. Represent mathematical information using symbols and numerals, expressed verbally and visually.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    Lecture - Understand the principles of public health and community dental health, the methods of oral epidemiology, the prevalence and control methods, and the order of importance and effectiveness.  Understand the process and principles of assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating community dental health programs and to understand dental care in the United States, including the delivery and financing of one and the role of the dental professional.

    Laboratory - Understand the role of research in community dental health and the importance of scientific literature, have a basic understanding of statistics as it relates to public health and community dental health and become familiar with the role of dental health promotion and education as it relates to the community.  To participate in community health projects which allow the student "in-the-field" experience with community agencies.

  
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    DEN 214 - Current Topics in Dental Hygiene


    Review of current topics relevant to the contemporary practice of dental hygiene, including dental specialties, risk management and the hygienist's role in the care of special patients.  Emphasis is on case-based learning and patient case presentation derived from the student's clinical experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 202 Dental Hygiene IV, DEN 213W Community Dental Health

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the role of the dental hygienist as a caregiver for patients with special needs.
    2. Describe those physical conditions that may necessitate treatment alterations and understand the evidence-based rational for those treatment modalities.
    3. Describe the Americans With Disabilities Act and the role it plays in advocating accessibility for patients with special needs.
    4. Apply the concepts of evidence-based care to patient assessment, treatment planning, implementation, and evaluation of all patients.
    5. Apply these concepts of evidence-based care to the investigation and evaluation of case studies in preparation for the National Board Examination as well as the student's individual Case-Based Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy Project.
    6. Describe and apply the concepts of risk management as it relates to the practice of dental hygiene.
    7. Describe the various types of oral piercings and explain the risks associated with each type of piercing procedure.
    8. Enrichment of Cultural Diversity through interaction with the BCC International Student Organization.
    9. Share clinical patient experiences through classroom discussion by investigating numerous case studies in dental hygiene.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    This capstone course covers a variety of current issues relating to dental hygiene practice.  The course encompasses dental hygiene care for patients with special needs; case-based presentations utilizing computerized dental technology as well as additional topics relating to the practice of dental hygiene.  The patients with special needs topics include areas not covered thus far in the curriculum.  This course has been designed to provide the student with the additional knowledge necessary to provide comprehensive dental hygiene care to their diverse pool of patients.

    In addition, the case-based learning component continues to prepare the student for evidence-based contemporary dental hygiene practice.  Participation in a mock-board simulation is also included.

  
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    DEN 298 - Independent Study-Fall/Spring


    Advanced studies in Dental Hygiene conducted under the guidance of a Dental Hygiene instructor.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  DEN 101 Dental Hygiene I, DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II, and permission of Department Chairperson

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
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    DEN 299 - Independent Study-Fall/Spring


    Advanced studies in Dental Hygiene conducted under the guidance of a Dental Hygiene instructor.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  DEN 101 Dental Hygiene I, DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II and permission of Department Chairperson

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
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    EAS 123 - Natural Disasters


    The study of natural geological and weather related disasters including, earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, tsunamis, tornadoes, hurricanes, winter weather and flooding.  The course is founded on the science of when, where, and why disasters occur including the discussion of primary vs secondary disasters.  The course will also touch on the scientific monitoring and risk management of disasters through the use of natural disaster case studies.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling.
    2. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.
    3. Analyze a natural disaster event and communicate the fundamental scientific causes of that event, distinguishing between primary and secondary disasters.


  
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    EAS 210 - Mountain Geology and Climate


    This course entails an in-depth study of processes affecting topography in mountainous regions, focusing on the geological and meteorological aspects of mountain formations.  The geological portion of study includes rock formations and units of the region, orogenesis (mountain formation), glacial geology and mass wasting.  The meteorological portion of study includes the climatology of the region, orographic uplift and the influence of mountains on severe and hazardous weather.  The highlight of the course is intensive field study in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, including hiking of five or more miles per day with significant elevation gain.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify key geologic features in mountainous terrain.
    2. Interpret past geologic settings and environments based on present day observations.
    3. Identify key meteorological phenomenon that occur in mountainous regions.
    4. Interpret past climate and meteorological conditions based on present day geological observations.
    5. Use basic tools geologists and meteorologists use in observational field study.


  
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    ECE 104 - Success in Education Seminar


    This course is designed to support students in the Teacher Education and Early Childhood Education Department to become acclimated to campus resources available for academic and personal purposes.  Students will also become familiar with college and departmental policies and procedures, as well as academic and career planning practices.  Students will reflect upon and establish individual, scholastic and career goals.  Students will also identify behaviors, knowledge and skills that support learning and professional success.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify campus resources available for academic and personal uses.
    2. Identify departmental expectations and procedures.
    3. Create individual, educational and professional goals.
    4. Map behaviors, knowledge and skills to support educational and professional success.


  
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    ECE 110 - Introduction to Early Education


    This course is an introduction to early childhood and elementary school education.  ECE 110 will provide an overview of professionalism, child development, learning theories with a historical perspective, family involvement, contemporary issues in education, and career options within the field of education.  Students will also explore the definition and concept of developmentally appropriate practice for young children (infants through eight years old).  Eight hours of field observation and four hours of community service experiences are required.  ECE 110 is required for A.A.S. Early Childhood Education majors.  ECE 110 is an advised career pathway course for Teacher Education Early Childhood and Childhood bachelor programs.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain developmentally appropriate practices in accordance with various ages and stages of development.
    2. Examine the history, philosophy, and social and cultural norms, related to early childhood and elementary education.
    3. Identify various observation and documentation techniques used to evaluate early development and learning.
    4. Explain various ethical and professional standards related to early childhood.


  
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    ECE 120 - Curriculum Development


    This course concentrates on developing curriculum for young children (infants through eight years old).  Methods and materials for planning developmentally appropriate activities will be explored.  Literacy, mathematics, science, social studies, the arts, technology, health and safety topics will be addressed.  Students will create and practice lessons in local early childhood settings.  Other course topics include:  creating anti-bias environments; the mechanics of lesson planning; positive child guidance; differentiated instruction; assessment and; the value of self-reflection for professional growth.  Sixty hours of field, and additional service learning experiences are required.  ECE 120 is required for A.A.S. Early Childhood Education majors and is part of a sequence that may benefit students transferring into Early Childhood or Early Childhood / Childhood bachelor programs.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Education

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe child development and learning theories relevant to young children and how they relate to childrens' development and learning via class discussions, field experiences and written assignments.
    2. Recognize the ecological relationships that exist between family, community and curriculum as they relate to childrens' development and learning via class discussions, field experiences and written assignments.
    3. Utilize observation and evaluation as a basis for developmentally appropriate curriculum via class activities, field experiences and written assignments.
    4. Select developmentally appropriate approaches to teaching young children via class discussions, field experiences and lesson plan assignments.
    5. Facilitate knowledge acquisition and dispositions for learning in all content areas (literacy, mathematics, social studies, science, the arts, health and technology) via class activities, field experiences and written assignments.


  
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    ECE 145 - Children and the Arts


    This course prepares students to effectively teach the arts to young children.  Students learn the role of creative movement, dramatics, music, and visual art in young children's education through the exploration of their own creative identity and become comfortable in using integrated teaching methods, which nurture creativity in young children.  Through discussion and analysis of current research and theory in the teaching of the arts, they also learn how to choose and use multicultural fine artworks, music, and children's literature, how to use the arts in inclusionary practice, and how to assess children's artistic progress to enhance children's creative development in the arts.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 145
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Plan and carry out developmentally appropriate, integrated activities in the arts that nurture creativity and foster children's development and meet the arts standards.
    2. Understand the role their personal experiences in the arts play in how they approach arts education with young children.
    3. Use authentic assessment tools to evaluate children's development in the arts.
    4. Adjust and adapt arts activities to meet the needs of children of different ages, backgrounds, and abilities.


  
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    ECE 155 - Language and Literacy in Early Childhood


    This course examines the development of language and literacy in young children (infants through eight years old).  Students will explore theoretical foundations of early literacy development and the implementation of various models to effectively support young children as listeners, speakers, readers and writers.  Other topics include:  working with families to support language and literacy development; selecting quality children's literature for effective instruction; evaluating early literacy development using formal and informal assessment methods; integrating language and literacy throughout the curriculum and; adaptations for individual children in diverse and inclusive settings.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe and critically evaluate the historical, philosophical, theoretical and practical foundations of early literacy development and instruction via class discussions, written assignments and examinations.
    2. Identify the developmental stages of language and literacy acquisition via class discussions, activities, written assignments and examinations.
    3. Outline the criteria for quality children's literature via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    4. Define the role and recognize the importance of family in language and literacy development in young children as well as develop strategies for successful partnerships with family members via class discussion, written assignments and presentations.
    5. Demonstrate practical knowledge and skill in planning and implementing developmentally appropriate language and literacy experiences for young children via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    6. Differentiate between assessment strategies and tools as well as identify particular strengths and weaknesses of each via class discussions and written assignments.


  
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    ECE 190 - Infants, Toddlers and Families


    This course is on the developmental milestones of children under three years old.  Students will learn how to plan individualized activities and preparing quality environments.  Appropriate practices in child care centers and family day care homes will be examined with an emphasis on producing positive partnerships between families and early childhood educators to ensure that infants and toddlers receive high-caliber, consistent care-giving and education.  Twenty-five hours of child observation required.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Use observation and documentation techniques to evaluate the development of infants and toddlers.
    2. Address a societal issue in the community that negatively impacts young children.
    3. Use early learning standards and best practices to appraise high quality early care environments for infants and toddlers.
    4. Create developmentally appropriate learning experiences that support the needs and interests of infants and toddlers.


  
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    ECE 190L - Infant Toddler Observation Lab


    This lab concentrates on the developmental milestones of children under three years of age.  Students will learn how to carefully observe infants and toddlers, as well as early learning environments in order to make informed evaluations.  Other course topics include: early learning guidelines, authentic assessment, and the responsibilities of an effective infant/toddler teacher.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  ECE 190 Infants, Toddlers, and Families

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Evaluate the development of infants and toddlers.
    2. Appraise an infant or toddler environment using a standardized rating scale instrument.


  
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    ECE 200 W - Field Experience I


    This course is a seminar focused on guiding students in their role as practicing teachers in early childhood settings (infant through four years old).  Topics will include the students' weekly teaching experiences and current issues in early childhood education.  Students will teach in an assigned classroom under the supervision of a qualified educator for 8-10 hours per week over the course of the semester for a minimum of 96 hours total.  Students will also be observed by the seminar instructor.  Field and service learning experiences are required.  A.A.S. Degree students taking their second semester of Field Experience will be required to assume all lead teacher responsibilities successfully for one day.  The seminar instructor and sponsor teacher will evaluate each student's effectiveness.  ECE 200W is required for A.A.S. Early Childhood Education majors. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Education, ECE 120 Curriculum Development

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate competence in planning and implementing developmentally appropriate curriculum in a supervised field experience via seminar discussion, field experience and written assignments.
    2. Act ethically and practice professionalism in the supervised field experience.
    3. Communicate in writing the rationale for developmentally appropriate practice.
    4. Identify and explore current issues in early childhood education and their impact on children, families and society via seminar discussions, field experiences and written assignments.


  
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    ECE 210 - Children With Special Needs


    This course provides an overview in recognizing, understanding and supporting children with special needs in early childhood settings.  Students will learn about common developmental delays and the various physical, cognitive and emotional diagnoses that are used to classify a child as having special needs.  Students will also become familiar with special education terminology, federal laws, referral agencies, the referral process, evaluation instruments and methods, the role of various specialists in special education, individual family service plans (IFSPs), individual education programs (IEPs), teacher accountability as well as how to work with families of children with special needs.  Ten to fifteen hours of child observation required.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Develop appropriate concepts and attitudes towards people with disabilities via class discussions and written assignments.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge in the identification of children with special needs via class discussions, written assignments and examinations.
    3. lllustrate an understanding of the concept of as well as the rationale and procedure for curricular adaptations when working with children with special needs via class discussions and written assignments.
    4. Identify the placement options along the continuum of services for children with special needs via class discussions and examinations.
    5. Enhance their understanding of the importance of family involvement in the educational process via class discussions and written assignments.
    6. Distinguish between types of learning disabilities including sensory impairments, physical, learning and behavioral disabilities via class discussions, written assignments and examinations.


  
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    ECE 211 - Children with Special Needs II


    This course provides a deeper examination of important topics in Special Education to better support children with special needs and their families in early childhood settings.  Students will explore the relationship between development, environment, relationships and behaviors as a way to enhance understanding of the children in today's world.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ECE 210 Children with Special Needs

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge in the differentiation of curriculum to meet the individual learning needs of all students.
    2. Illustrate an understanding of the principles and importance of a multi-tiered system of support for behaviors as well as positive behavior management strategies to address student needs.
    3. Explain the importance that family-teacher partnerships have in the educational process.
    4. Examine the components of the NYS Blueprint for Improved Results for Students with Disabilities and how it relates to everyday classroom practices.


  
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    ECE 223 - Positive Child Guidance


    This course explores best practices for early education classroom guidance strategies.  Students will learn about theoretical foundations related to child development and various child guidance models that foster self-control and pro-social skills in young children.  Other topics include:  creating dynamic environments; identifying typical and atypical behaviors based on age and stage of child development; defining and distinguishing problem behavior; investigating effective methods for addressing persistent and challenging behaviors; and; defining and promoting culturally sensitive practices.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe theoretical and practical attributes of child development and guidance.
    2. Identify challenging behavior in young children.
    3. Describe various pro-social and positive child guidance strategies in accordance with ages and stages of child development that affectively guide early care environments and curriculum.
    4. Describe the interconnectedness of family, culture and parent-teacher partnerships on child guidance.


  
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    ECE 230 - Working With Families in Early Childhood Programs


    This course examines the importance of family involvement in the education of young children.  Topics include:  diversity; definition of family; parenthood as an emotional experience; definition of family involvement; barriers to partnerships; issues of trust; communication methods; conferencing; home visits; families in the classroom; parent education and; exploring model programs.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize family diversity, modern challenges and how family life impacts learning and teaching via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2. Identify the various roles that family members have and the emotions of parents as well as how to address them as an educator via class discussions and written assignments.
    3. Define and identify factors that motivate family involvement via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    4. Determine potential barriers to teacher-family partnerships via class discussions and written assignments.
    5. Develop strategies for working partnerships with families and the community via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.


  
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    ECE 245 - Social Development of Young Children


    This course explores the developmental, environmental and temperamental aspects of the socialization process for young children.  Topics include:  separation; transitions; aggression; learning self-regulation; cooperation; sharing; resolving conflicts; moral development; peer interaction; gender-role development; communicating with families and; valuing diversity.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize the importance of social-emotional learning via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2. Discriminate between and define positive self-identity, empathy, a sense of competence as well as recognizing and labeling emotions via class discussions and written assignments.
    3. Differentiate between and define cooperative play, conflict resolution, moral development, self-regulation and democratic participation via class discussions and written assignments.
    4. Identify how family culture and diversity impacts social development while, in turn, creating strategies to individualize social needs via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    5. Describe the value of positive role modeling in the classroom environment to teach pro-social skills via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.


  
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    ECE 255 - Special Topics in ECE


    This course is based on the particular needs of early childhood students and/or community.  A forum will be provided for early childhood professionals to share their unique knowledge and skills with students.  Recent topics have included:  Infant and Toddler Language and Literacy Development and; Autism.  Other topics are:  Sensory Integration Dysfunction; Gifted Children; Gender Issues in Early Childhood Education; Health and Safety in Early Childhood Settings as well as; Anti-Bias and Multicultural Education.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Education or permission of the department chair

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define core concepts in the identified content area via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2. Discuss the relevance of the special topic to the field of early childhood education via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge in the specified content area via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    4. Differentiate the significance of the special topic in teaching young children via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    5. Create a project that applies the special topic to an early childhood setting.
    6. Critique contrasting perspectives on the special topic via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.


  
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    ECE 256 - STEAM for Young Children


    This course explores how to create and implement integrated science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics or STEAM activities for young children from infancy to age eight.  Developmentally appropriate mathematics instruction for young children is emphasized.  Activity planning, child observation and assessment, teacher reflective practices and documenting learning using digital technology will be explored through hands-on projects with young children.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Plan and carry out developmentally appropriate, integrated, inquiry-based science, technology, engineering, arts, and math, [STEAM] activities for children from infancy to age eight that address number and operations, patterns, functions and algebra, geometry and spatial concepts, measurement, and graphing.
    2. Explain how STEAM activities meet STEM standards.
    3. Incorporate thinking routines and deep questioning in their STEAM activity plans to develop critical thinking skills in young children.
    4. Use authentic assessment tools to observe and assess children's learning in the STEM areas.
    5. Use digital technology in developmentally appropriate ways with young children to further learning.
    6. Document children's STEAM learning as a way to foster the home-school connection.
    7. Reflect on their teaching practices and evaluate their effectiveness as a STEAM teacher.


  
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    ECE 257 - Exploring Science with Young Children


    This course explores the methods and materials used to present developmentally appropriate science concepts and skills to the young child.  Topics will include:  the teacher's role in the learning process; the role of the environment in the learning process; using the senses for observation and discovery and exploring physical, earth, and life science.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe developmentally appropriate ways young children learn about science.
    2. Identify effective teaching techniques and strategies that aid young children in their development of and appreciation for scientific concepts.
    3. Identify the NYS Pre-Kindergarten Learning Standards for Science.


  
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    ECE 262 - IT for Classrooms and Boardrooms


    This course explores the use of emerging and innovative technology and apps to communicate and collaborate effectively in educational, business, and other settings.  Through hands-on projects students will learn how to design effective, outcome-based, informational content suitable for an audience of any age from early childhood to adult and then assess its effectiveness.  Technology such as iPads, responsive touch technology, collaborative technology, interactive presentations, and social media will be incorporated into student projects.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BIT 215
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe current technologies that can be effective instructional and communicative tools for audiences of varying backgrounds, abilities, and ages.
    2. Explain effective and appropriate uses for collaborative, touch-responsive, virtual and embedded technology in educational and other settings.
    3. Use the elements and principles of design with differing types of technology to create engaging and appropriate educational materials and/or presentations.


  
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    ECE 294 - Personal Leadership


    This course concentrates on developing personal leadership skills in early childhood education.  Students will explore the impact that temperament, personality, mindset, and unmet needs have on our behavior.  Other topics that will be explored are attaining and maintaining healthy relationships, effective communication skills, teacher accountability, balancing professional and personal responsibilities, building and sustaining a positive perspective and goal setting.  Students will also strategically discuss, self-assess, practice, and reflect upon several teaching strategies.  This course requires 32 hours (minimum) of field observation/experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Childhood

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply techniques for creating and maintaining high quality early childcare environments.
    2. Analyze strategies for building healthy relationships with children, families and colleagues.
    3. Define secondary traumatic stress and burn-out, as well as describe common symptoms of each.
    4. Identify self-care as a critical component of educator effectiveness and develop self-care strategies.


  
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    ECE 299 - Independent Study in Early Childhood


    This course is designed as an individual student project that goes beyond the scope of requirements offered by the Teacher Education and Early Childhood Department.  The project is facilitated under the direction of a faculty member and upon approval by the department chairperson and Dean of Liberal Arts.  No more than three credits may be acquired toward the Early Childhood Education A.A.S. Degree or Liberal Arts General Studies A.S. Degree in independent study projects.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  6 Semester hours in Early Childhood Education courses

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define core concepts in the identified subject area via instructor meetings, written assignments and project work.
    2. Discuss the relevance of the selected topic to the field of early childhood education via instructor meetings, written assignments and project work.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge in the identified subject area via instructor meetings, written assignments and project work.
    4. Differentiate the significance of the topic selected in teaching young children via instructor meetings and project work.
    5. Create a project that applies the concept to early childhood settings.
    6. Critique contrasting perspectives on the selected topic via instructor meetings and project work.


  
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    ECO 110 - Micro-Economics


    An analysis of supply and demand in markets for goods and the factors of production, as well as an examination of the behaviors of consumers, firms, and governments.  Study of various market structures in resource scarcity and price determination in perfect and imperfect competitive markets.  Quantitative examination and analysis of concepts that include domestic and global environments, income distribution, price elasticity, and taxation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Satisfies the Civic Education requirements

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major microeconomic concepts and theories.
    2. Apply microeconomic methods economists use to explore social phenomena.


  
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    ECO 111 - Macroeconomics


    An analysis of the performance and behavior of aggregate economic activity.  Quantitative analysis of the determinants of gross domestic product, national income, total unemployment, total inflation, interest rates, and economic measures of evaluation will be analyzed.  Topics include the roles of monetary and fiscal policy, national income, economic growth, business cycles, diverse economic schools of thought, international trade, and exchange rates.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Satisfies the Civic Education requirements

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major macroeconomic concepts and theories.
    2. Apply macroeconomic methods economists use to explore social phenomena.


  
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    ECO 299 - Independent Study-Economics


    An individual student project in economics which is beyond the scope or requirements of the courses offered by the department, conducted under the direction of a faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester Hours in Economics

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be determined by the instructor with the consent of the department chair and Dean.

  
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    EDU 111 - Foundations of American Education


    This course is an introduction to the profession of teaching.  The social, economic, and political history of American education will be explored.  Contemporary goals, practices, and issues will also be investigated.  Specific topics include:  diversity; special education; child/adolescent development; legal issues; ethics; professionalism; curriculum; philosophy; learning theories and pedagogy.  Thirty hours of field and additional hours of service learning experiences are required.  This course is appropriate for L.A.G.S. Teacher Education (A.S. Degree) transfer majors who wish to pursue Childhood (Grades 1-6), Middle Childhood (Grades 5-8), Adolescence (Grades 7-12), Physical Education (K-12), Art Education (K-12) or Music Education (K-12) teacher certification.

     

    Credits: 3
    Note
    See teacher certification.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and explain the central philosophies, issues and disputes surrounding American education via class discussions, field experiences and written assignments.
    2. Apply knowledge of child/adolescent development to educational practice and curriculum via class discussions, field experiences and written assignments.
    3. Relate developments in American education and schooling to broad themes in our social, economic and political history via class discussions, field experiences and written assignments.
    4. Appraise the teaching profession as a career choice via examination of the field and written reflection.


  
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    EET 090 - Introduction to Electricity


    This course provides a general overview of topics covered in the Electrical Engineering Technology curriculum.  Basic circuit theories are introduced and used to describe the operation of more complex systems.  Power generation and distribution, communication systems and networking, robotics and automation, and consumer electronics are some of the topics used to illustrate application of these basic concepts.  Laboratory exercises and demonstrations will be integrated with the lectures to give students experience in taking basic electrical measurements and recording those measurements for a technical report.  Computers will be used for recording data and for researching the topics listed above.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the basic electrical units of Voltage, Current, Resistance, and Power.
    2. Solve simple series, parallel, and series-parallel resistive circuits.
    3. Understand the basics of power generation and distribution.
    4. Set up a simple electrical circuit and take measurements in a laboratory environment.


  
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    EET 095 - Introduction to Digital Electronics


    This course serves as an introduction to digital logic including number systems, binary arithmetic, logic gates, flip flops, counters, memories, and basic computer architecture.  It includes the use of digital circuit simulation software.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the binary number system.
    2. Understand the operation of basic logic gates. (AND, OR, NAND, NOR, Invert)
    3. Generate a truth table for a logic circuit.
    4. Connect a circuit comprised of basic logic gates and collect and analyze data.


  
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    EET 107 - Electronic Computer Applications


    This course will introduce students to computer software and hardware specific to the Electrical/ Electronics curriculum, and provide experience using word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation software in electronic course work.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  EET 121 DC & AC Circuits, EET 121 DC & AC Circuits Laboratory

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Write technical reports with embedded data tables, graphs, circuit diagrams and equations.
    2. Create and deliver a technical presentation.
    3. Create electrical circuits and simulate them using software.
    4. Understand programming concepts and create simple algorithms.
    5. Program an industrial robot and programmable controller.
    6. Create a circuit board layout from a schematic.


  
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    EET 111 - Electrical Construction Laboratory


    An introductory course in residential and commercial wiring procedures, basic measuring techniques, and fundamentals of basic machine operations.  Students will gain experience in the fabrication, installation, and maintenance of electrical equipment through hands-on laboratory exercises.  This course also includes National Electrical Code topics with an emphasis on electrical safety.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Operate various machine tools, hand tools, and test equipment, including a vertical milling machine, bandsaw, engraver, Hipot tester and multimeter.
    2. Layout and install basic residential wiring circuits in compliance with the National Electric Code.
    3. Build a project from a dimensioned print.
    4. Populate and solder a printed circuit board.
    5. Work safely in a shop environment.


  
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    EET 112 - Electronic Fabrication Laboratory


    An introductory course in electronic project construction which includes printed circuit board design and manufacturing.  In this course the student will layout and manufacture a printed circuit board, fabricate an enclosure, assemble a finished product, and document the process.  Soldering and wiring techniques will be covered.  This course also includes telecommunications cabling (telephone, coaxial, computer networking, fiber optics), low voltage control applications, and surface mount technology.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EET 111 Electrical Construction Laboratory

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Create documentation required to manufacture a project.
    2. Use design software to layout a printed circuit board from a schematic.
    3. Fabricate a printed circuit board.
    4. Assemble and solder an electronic project.
    5. Package an electronic project in an enclosure.
    6. Install connectors on telecommunications cabling.
    7. Understand concepts of low voltage control.


  
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    EET 121 - DC & AC Circuits and Laboratory


    This course teaches the fundamentals of electrical circuits, application of circuit laws, theorems and measuring techniques for both DC and AC single and polyphase circuits.  Topics include loop and nodal analysis, superposition, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, RLC series and parallel circuits, and three phase circuits.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EET 110 Introduction to Electricity

    Prior or Concurrent:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply basic circuit laws and network theorems to the solution of DC circuits involving multiple sources and circuit elements.
    2. Write loop and nodal equations for multiple window DC circuits and use those equations to solve for all currents and voltages.
    3. Reduce a two terminal circuit to its Thevenin or Norton equivalent.
    4. Solve RC time constant problems.
    5. Apply network theorems and complex numbers to the solution of AC circuits.
    6. Use circuit simulation software to analyze circuit behavior.
    7. Demonstrate the proper use of voltmeters, ammeters, wattmeters, counters, multimeters, and oscilloscopes to make accurate measurements.
    8. Neatly and accurately record and analyze laboratory data, construct graphs, and complete a professional technical document based on laboratory work.


  
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    EET 127 - Alternate Energy Concepts and Solutions


    This course takes an in-depth look at various alternate energy concepts and solutions for our modern world.  Topics include current energy issues, energy usage, and the following specific technologies; photovoltaic (PV) solar, wind energy, geothermal energy, passive solar energy, solar thermal energy, atomic power, biofuels, and other special topics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe verbally or in written form a knowledge of various aspects related to current and future alternative energy systems.
    2. Calculate various alternative energy systems to determine the optimal system for a given application (ie find the size of a PV system to meet peak home energy demands).
    3. Measure and quantify available energy from the sun, earth and wind.
    4. Calculate the potential energy conversion for each of the technologies evaluated.
    5. Prepare technical papers and communicate through the written medium.
    6. Identify electrical requirements for both off-grid and on-grid applications of the seven electrical technologies covered in the course.


  
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    EET 150 - Electronic Devices and Laboratory


    This is a first course in Electronics, with an introduction to semi-conductor physics and the active devices fundamental to the field.  Diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors, thyristors, and optoelectronic devices are studied.  Amplifiers and other representative circuits based on these building blocks are analyzed and designed using traditional and computer based methods.  Frequency response characteristics and Bode plots of amplifiers are analyzed.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: EET 107 Electronic Computer Applications, EET 121 DC & AC Circuits, EET 121L DC & AC Circuits Laboratory, MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the operation of diodes, their application in rectifier circuits, and the block diagram of a complete power supply.
    2. Describe the characteristics of a zener diode and its operation in a voltage regulator circuit.
    3. Describe the function and operation of bipolar and field effect transistors and their use as amplifiers and switches.
    4. Explain the purpose of DC bias and the use of load-line analysis in amplifier circuits.
    5. Explain the AC small signal model of an amplifier and discuss amplifier characteristics like voltage gain, input and output resistances, and loading effect.
    6. Describe frequency response characteristics and bandwidth limitations of amplifier circuits.
    7. Explain the characteristics and applications of thyristors and optoelectronic devices.
    8. Use simulation software to analyze circuits.
    9. Use electronic test equipment including: DC power supply, function generator, digital multimeter, curve tracer, oscilloscope, and frequency counter.
    10. Breadboard and troubleshoot circuits, take measurements, analyze data, and produce coherent lab reports.


  
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    EET 153 - Robotics and C Programming


    This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of hardware control via a programming language.  While introductory in nature, this course will use an actual robot trainer and elements of the C programming language to control motion, read sensors, detect switch positions and more.  Students will learn key aspects of the C programming language such as the declaration of constants and variables.  Data types and sizes will be discussed along with control loops such as for, while and more. 

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CST 153
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. List and describe the key components of a typical robot.
    2. List and differentiate between a variety of robotic sensors and switches.
    3. Describe, in writing, how hardware is controlled with software.
    4. Physically assemble robotics from supplied components, in order to accomplish lecture or laboratory objectives.
    5. Use the hardware components assembled and make (trouble shoot) adjustments so that the hardware performs to the project's specifications.
    6. Write C programming code to control the various aspects of the robot.  This includes motion control, switch detection, sensor input, output and more.
    7. Write, compile and link the C code necessary for these operations.
    8. List and describe (as well as use in a laboratory setting) all fundamental aspects of the C programming language; including variable declarations, loops, control statements, function calls and more.
    9. Read a project's specifications and create a hardware and software solution for that project.  This includes the trouble shooting required to produce a working project.


  
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    EET 183 - Applied Electricity


    Practical applications of electricity, electronics, computing and simulation.  Topics include DC and AC circuits with computer simulation and Internet research.  Laboratory work includes demonstration of basic electrical and electronic concepts using measuring instruments, Multisim, and computers.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra & Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the basic electrical units of Voltage, Current, Resistance, and Power for DC and AC circuits.
    2. Solve simple series, parallel, and series-parallel resistive circuits.
    3. Understand the basics of power generation and distribution and control.
    4. Set up electrical circuits, take measurements, and analyze data in a laboratory environment.


  
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    EET 210 - Applied Electricity and Electronics


    This course provides a practical overview of topics in electricity, energy conversions, electronics, and digital circuitry.  Topics include DC and AC circuit theory, power generation, DC and AC motor operation, electronic devices, digital logic gates and microprocessors.  Laboratory exercises include use of measuring instruments such as digital multimeters, oscilloscopes, function generators, counters, wattmeters, and bridges.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra & Trigonometry or MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry I or higher

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the basic electrical units of Voltage, Current, Resistance, and Power in DC and AC circuits.
    2. Solve series, parallel, and series-parallel resistive circuits.
    3. Understand the basics of power generation and distribution.
    4. Set up electrical circuits, take measurements and analyze data in a laboratory environment.
    5. Be familiar with the operation of diodes, transistors, logic gates, and microprocessors.


  
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    EET 230 - Electronic Design Project


    This course involves the prototyping, package design and construction of an electronic project in a team environment.  The project will include the use of both electronic and mechanical computer aided design software.  Various electronic and mechanical manufacturing processes will be used to fabricate the project.  Industrial standard documentation practices will be used to properly describe all phases of the project.  Chassis layout, printed circuit board design, exposure, machining, wiring, soldering and enclosure fabrication are required.  This course also includes discussion of product cost, marketing a product and other topics related to small businesses and entrepreneurship.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  EET 112 Electronic Fabrication Laboratory, EET 150 Electronic Devices, EET 150L Electronic Devices Laboratory

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Select components and create a parts list from a schematic diagram.
    2. Breadboard and troubleshoot an electronic project.
    3. Create a printed circuit layout from a schematic diagram.
    4. Produce a printed circuit board from a layout master.
    5. Design and fabricate an enclosure for an electronic project.
    6. Assemble and troubleshoot a complete electronic project.
    7. Create a cost estimate of a final product.
    8. Work effectively in teams.
    9. Develop and deliver oral presentations.


  
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    EET 247 W - Energy Conversions & Automation and Laboratory


    The theory, operation, application and control of DC and AC motors and generators with special emphasis on their application in wind energy.  PV as an alternative energy source will be viewed from the application and conversion of energy processes.  Additional material will include single and polyphase transformers, power generation systems, and power transmission.  Programmable Controller applications will be discussed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EET 150 Electronic Devices, EET 150L Electronic Devices Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe in written and verbal form, the operation and control of a variety of DC and AC motors and generators as they relate to industrial and alternative energy concepts and applications.
    2. Describe single and polyphase transformers and make calculations for their installation and use.
    3. Describe power generation and transmission theory for the distribution of power from commercial power generation stations and make the necessary calculations for this distribution.
    4. Discuss the theory of, and calculate quantities for, the operation of open and closed loop control systems.
    5. Use computer mathematical modeling tools for modeling and stability analysis.
    6. Program Programmable Logic Controllers.
    7. Program industrial type robots.


  
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    EET 251 - Electronic Circuitry and Laboratory


    This second course in Electronics incorporates the devices introduced in EET 150 into representative circuits of moderate complexity.  They include amplifiers, oscillators, regulators, op-amp active filters, and other related circuits.  The characteristics of operational amplifiers and their use in various linear and non-linear applications are explored in some detail.  Computer simulation software is used to perform frequency response analysis of active filters, and to also analyze other electronic circuits.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EET 150 Electronic Devices, EET 150 Electronic Devices Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the characteristics and different classes of power amplifiers.
    2. Explain the characteristics of an operational amplifier (op-amp), and the differences between open loop and closed loop operation of an op-amp.
    3. Design and analyze op-amp linear amplifier and filter circuits.
    4. Describe and analyze operation of oscillator and voltage regulator circuits.
    5. Explain the difference between time and frequency domains, and discuss the frequency spectrum of non-sinusoidal waveforms using Fourier theory.
    6. Use simulation software to design and analyze filters and other circuits.
    7. Demonstrate competency in the use of electronic test equipment.
    8. Construct and troubleshoot electronic circuits on a breadboard, take measurements, analyze data, and produce coherent lab reports.


  
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    EET 252 W - Electronic Communications Systems and Laboratory


    The course will explore basic analog and digital communications concepts such as modulation, multiplexing, SNR, bandwidth, data rates, and encoding techniques.  Communications systems such as AM and FM radio, analog and digital television, and satellites will be studied.  Students will be introduced to various communications media and learn about the fundamentals of data communications and networking.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  EET 251 Electronic Circuitry, EET 251L Electronic Circuitry Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe amplitude and frequency modulation, and the block diagram of a superheterodyne receiver.
    2. Describe the operation of a phase locked loop and its application in communications circuits.
    3. Explain the characteristics and applications of copper, fiber and wireless transmission media.
    4. Explain multiplexing concepts, and the characteristics of frequency, time, and wave division mulitplexing.
    5. Describe analog and digital televison transmission and reception principles.
    6. Describe satellite communication principles and the characteristics of geosynchronous satellites.
    7. Explain analog-to-digital conversion using pulse code modulation, and other types of pulse modulation methods.
    8. Explain basic data communications concepts and digital modulation techniques.
    9. Describe network fundamentals: topologies, hardware, media, and data transmission.
    10. Research a current topic in the field of study and write a formal report using library and internet resources.
    11. Demonstrate competency in the use of electronic test equipment, such as oscilloscopes, signal generators, and spectrum analyzers.
    12. Construct and troubleshoot electronic circuits and systems, take measurements, analyze data, and produce coherent lab reports.


  
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    EET 260 - Digital Electronics


    Study of number systems, logic gates and families (TTL/CMOS), logic design and simplification techniques, digital black box design, Karnaugh maps, standard circuits such as counters, shift registers and decoders, Boolean algebra, programmable logic, analog to digital interfacing, computer arithmetic, digital data transmission, memories, and microcomputer basics.  Appropriate laboratory exercises provide hands-on experience building and troubleshooting many types of digital circuits.  Electronic circuit simulation software is also used.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EET 150 Electronic Devices

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Count and convert numbers between binary, decimal, hexadecimal number systems, and perform binary arithmetic.
    2. Explain the operation of logic gates and their use in combinational logic circuits.
    3. Apply basic laws and rules of Boolean algebra, DeMorgan's theorems, and Karnaugh maps to simplify Boolean expressions and reduce digital logic circuits.
    4. Explain the operation of flip-flops, counters, shift registers, multiplexers, encoders, decoders, and their application in practical digital circuits.
    5. Describe analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion processes and compare different ADC and DAC circuits.
    6. Describe ASCII code and asynchronous serial data communication.
    7. Explain different types of memories and their attributes.
    8. Identify the components and functions of a simple microcomputer.
    9. Demonstrate competency in creating and testing fully functioning logic circuits on a breadboard, and writing technical reports.


  
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    EET 267 - Microprocessors


    Study of microprocessor and microcontroller hardware and software.  Microprocessor (Intel and Motorola 8/16/32/64-bit machines) assembly language programming using assemblers, DEBUG, disassemblers, monitors, and loaders will be applied to industrial applications of microprocessors and microcontrollers.  Computer architecture and system design methods for microprocessor-based systems are also covered.  Appropriate laboratory exercises provide hands-on experience in two areas: microprocessor and microcontroller assembly language, and system interface hardware.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EET 260 Digital Electronics

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Be familiar with the history of computers and computing including the increasing requirements of: speed, address/data lines, memory sizing, available emulation software, and typical applications.
    2. Demonstrate the use of 8085, 8086, and 68000 assembler and simulator programming software to create working applications.
    3. Use the Internet to find information and solutions related to tasks assigned to microcomputers.
    4. Explain the operation of a basic microcomputer system such as the Prolog Single Board Computer from both a hardware and software view.
    5. Write and demonstrate application programs based on the studied microprocessor chips.
    6. Use a microcontroller to perform a task or application for a low cost solution.


  
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    EET 270 - Control Systems & Robotics and Laboratory


    Incorporated with this course are the theory, operation, design and implementation of open and closed loop control systems, including mathematical modeling and stability analysis.  Theory and application of both analog and digital controls are introduced.  Robotic applications and programming are integrated with this course.  Process control techniques with additional Programmable Logic Controller programming are included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  EET 247W Energy Conversions & Automation and Laboratory, EET 260 Digital Electronics

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Be exposed to simulation software such s MATLAB and Simulink.
    2. Understand control system block diagrams and be able to reduce to a single block.
    3. Determine characteristic equations for second order systems.
    4. Understand first, second, and multiple order control systems.
    5. Determine if a control system is stable.
    6. Understand concepts of frequency response and Bode plots.
    7. Understand effects of nonlinearities.
    8. Understand the concepts of digital control and robotics.

     

  
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    EET 297 - Cooperative Work Experience


    Cooperative education in Electrical Engineering Technology may be available. On-the-job experience may be obtained by working with businesses, industries, and offices whose operations require the use of electrical engineering technology, electrical technology, or related skills. To be eligible, a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.2 with no 'F' grades, and have completed at least 24 credit hours, including EET 112, EET 121, EET 150 and MAT 130 or higher.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: EET 112 Electrical Fabrication Laboratory, EET 121 DC & AC Circuits and Laboratory, EET 150 Electronics Devices & Laboratory, MAT 130 Applied Algebra & Trigonometry or higher

    Credits: 1
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have work experience in a technical field.
    2. Apply skills learned in the EET curriculum to perform technical tasks.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively in a technical setting.


  
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    EET 299 - Independent Study


    The student undertakes an independent project in his/her specialty under the guidance of a faculty member.  Only one independent study course allowed per semester.  Consideration may be given a project involving a job-related assignment. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Department chairperson approval

    Credits: (1-4)
    Note
    Any independent study project is based on instructor availability.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
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    EGR 100 L - Engineering Orientation: Student Success I


    This course is designed to enhance student success by addressing five primary themes: community building, professional development, academic success strategies, personal development, and orientation to the college environment.  This is an interactive course with emphasis on group problem solving and experiential learning.  Oral presentations from engineering design courses occur in the time designated for this course.

    Credits: 0.5
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. State what the engineering profession is, the types of engineering fields, and the types of engineering jobs.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of how to be a good student through improving study skills and time management.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of the 4-year engineering schools and the transfer process.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the companies in the area that do engineering work.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of what to expect at work and how to prepare for retirement.


  
  •  

    EGR 101 - Engineering Orientation: Student Success II


    A continuation of EGR 100:  This course is designed to enhance student success by addressing five primary themes: community building, professional development, academic success strategies, personal development, and orientation to the college environment.  This is an interactive course with emphasis on group problem solving and experiential learning.  Oral presentations from engineering design courses occur in the time designated for this course.

    Credits: 0.5
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    Laboratory Course

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. State what the engineering profession is, the types of engineering fields, and the types of engineering jobs.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of how to be a good student through improving study skills and time management.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of the 4-year engineering schools and the transfer process.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the companies in the area that do engineering work.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of what to expect at work and how to prepare for retirement.


  
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    EGR 150 - Engineering Design I with Graphics


    Engineers must be able to communicate their design ideas to others.  Thus, this first course in Engineering Design focuses on the improvement of communication skills.  These include written, oral presentation, sketching, and computer application skills.  Since our world is three-dimensional, some effort is made to improve the spatial visualization ability of students.  In addition, the principles of orthographic projection are learned and applied in drawing by hand and in modeling using the computer.  Students work in teams on projects with the goal of recognizing and developing behaviors associated with consensus decision-making and cooperative teamwork.  The steps of the engineering design process are learned.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Lab Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to analyze an engineering problem in a logical manner and apply basic principles to its solution.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of engineering design, its history, and its process.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to use tools useful in the design process, including sketching, engineering drawing, and CAD, Microsoft Word, and Excel.


  
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    EGR 151 - Engineering Design II


    A continuation of Engineering Design I.  The bulk of this course focuses on continuing to develop skills with computer aided drawing (CAD) programs and the ability to use computation software such as Excel and MATLAB.  Students continue working in teams on design projects with the goal of understanding and implementing the engineering design process for problem-solving.  The area of engineering ethics is investigated to create in students a realization of the importance of responsible behavior in the engineering field.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
     

     

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Lab Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to analyze an engineering problem in a logical manner and apply basic principles to its solution.
    2. Understand the role of failure in engineering design and practice.
    3. Understand the role of engineering ethics as related to the importance of responsible behavior in the engineering field.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to use tools useful in the design process, including Excel and MATLAB.
    5. Describe how racism impacts engineering education and the engineering field for individuals and organizations.


  
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    EGR 160 - Introduction to Systems Engineering


    This course is an introduction to Systems Engineering and the Systems Engineering discipline.  Topics include defining different types of systems, the steps of System Life Cycle Analysis, Ethical and Environmental Concerns, Systems Engineering management theories and statistical methods.  Students will also examine real-world systems and how they are designed and analyzed using a holistic approach.  Students will learn how to apply Systems Engineering skills to achieve greater college success.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define various types of systems.
    2. Describe the Systems Engineering profession.
    3. Describe how each of the life Cycle Stages applies to developing a new system.
    4. Apply Systems Engineering theories and techniques to a real-world problem.
    5. Develop and deliver an effective oral presentation with appropriate props and graphics.


  
  •  

    EGR 200 L - Engineering Orientation: Student Success III


    A continuation of EGR 101: This course is designed to enhance student success by addressing five primary themes: community building, professional development, academic success strategies, personal development, and orientation to the college environment.  This is an interactive course with emphasis on group problem solving and experiential learning.  Common examinations, field trips to industry, visits by four-year engineering recruiters, and oral presentations are included as components of this course.

    Credits: 0.5
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. State what the engineering profession is, the types of engineering fields, and the types of engineering jobs.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of how to be a good student through improving study skills and time management.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of the 4-year engineering schools and the transfer process.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the companies in the area that do engineering work.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of what to expect at work and how to prepare for retirement.


  
  •  

    EGR 201 L - Engineering Orientation: Student Success IV


    A continuation of EGR 200:  This course is designed to enhance student success by addressing five primary themes: community building, professional development, academic success strategies, personal development, and orientation to the college environment.  This is an interactive course with emphasis on group problem solving and experiential learning.  Common examinations, field trips, visits to industry, and oral presentations are included as components of this course.

    Credits: 0.5
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. State what the engineering profession is, the types of engineering fields, and the types of engineering jobs.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of how to be a good student through improving study skills and time management.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of the 4-year engineering schools and the transfer process.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the companies in the area that do engineering work.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of what to expect at work and how to prepare for retirement.


  
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    EGR 260 - Engineering Economics and Project Management


    This course applies economic concepts and analysis to engineering projects.  It also includes methods of cost estimating, selection of design alternatives, and project management.  Topics include supply and demand, cost-of-production theory, the time value of money, consumer behavior, market price determination, cash flows, cost/benefit, and life-cycle cost.  Laboratory experiences will include product development analysis, developing a project proposal, and creating a project management plan.  This course provides preparation for the Professional Engineering exam.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the terminology of engineering economics.
    2. Complete economic calculations such as simple interest, compound interest, present and future values and depreciation of an asset.
    3. Integrate engineering economics analysis into the engineering design process.
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of cost estimation techniques and probabilistic risk analysis.
    5. Demonstrate professional communications skills through written assignments and class presentations.
    6. Develop proficiency with project management scheduling using the Microsoft Project application.


  
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    EGR 270 - Clean Energy Systems Design


    Increasing our use of clean energy reduces our impact on the planet from carbon dioxide and other pollutants.  Using more clean energy can mean utilizing more clean sources, or reducing the amount of energy usage through conservation and increases in efficiency.  In this course, students will gain foundational knowledge of clean energy systems including solar, wind, hydro, smart building technologies and other techniques to improve energy efficiency and reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions.  Student teams will analyze campus energy systems and develop detailed clean energy project proposals.  Teams then present their plan to the campus Sustainability Committee for possible funding.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Utilize the engineering design process to develop clean energy project proposals.
    2. Develop and deliver an effective oral presentation with appropriate props and graphics.
    3. Show knowledge of cutting-edge techniques that can be implemented to save energy and/or increase the use of clean energy sources.
    4. Interpret campus Greenhouse Gas (GHG) production data from systems such as transportation, lighting, heating, and cooling.
    5. Illustrate effective interpersonal and written communication skills.


  
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    EGR 278 - Systems Engineering Design


    A project course where students apply previously learned knowledge to tackle real world System Engineering problems.  Student teams will identify a project and carry out the steps of System Life Cycle Analysis.  Advanced research and analytical methods will be taught for each team as needed.  Students will write project proposals and complete a final oral and written report.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply Systems Engineering theories and techniques to a real-world problem.
    2. Utilize the engineering design process to develop a clear and persuasive project proposal.
    3. Develop and deliver an effective oral presentation with appropriate props and graphics.
    4. Illustrate effective interpersonal and written communication skills.


  
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    EGR 281 - Mechanics (Statics)


    Fundamental concepts of the statics of rigid bodies developed by using a vector analysis approach.  Force systems, centroids and centers of gravity, analysis of structures, shear and bending moments, friction and moments of inertia.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 181 Calculus I and PHY 181 Physics I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of engineering mechanics for systems in equilibrium.
    2. Acquire an understanding of force systems in both two and three dimensional space.
    3. Determine appropriate free body diagrams for whole or parts of structures.
    4. Apply the equations of equilibrium (sum of forces equal zero, sum of moments equal zero) to both two and three dimensional systems.
    5. Apply the equations of equilibrium to trusses, frames and machines.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the laws of Coulomb friction.
    7. Locate the centroids of two and three dimensional bodies.
    8. Determine area and mass moments of inertia.


  
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    EGR 282 - Mechanics (Dynamics)


    Vector analysis approach to kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems of particles, kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies, forces, mass, acceleration, impulse, momentum, work and energy techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EGR 281 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of displacement, velocity, and acceleration.
    2. Solve problems involving the kinematics of a particle undergoing constant and non-constant acceleration in both two and three dimensional space.
    3. Calculate values for tangential and normal acceleration.
    4. Solve problems involving particle motion using Newton's Second Law, Work-Energy, or Impulse-Momentum analysis.
    5. Understand angular momentum and its application to orbits.
    6. Analyze and solve problems involving systems of particles.
    7. Apply the principles of kinematics to the motion of a rigid body in general plane motion.
    8. Solve problems involving the plane motion of a rigid body using Newton's Second Law, Work-Energy, or Impulse-Momentum analysis.


  
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    EGR 283 - Strength of Materials


    Elementary analysis of the strength and deformation of deformable bodies.  Topics include stress-strain, torsion, bending, Mohr's circle, flexure, energy methods, columns, and virtual work.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EGR 281 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand and work with the basic definitions of stress and strain.
    2. Understand the relationships between working stress, material strength, and safety factor.
    3. Understand Mohr's circle and be able to determine principal stresses.
    4. Calculate stresses for axial, torsion, beam bending, and combined loading.
    5. Draw shear and bending moment diagrams and write beam equilibrium equations including slope and deflection.
    6. Understand the concepts underlying beam deflection and Euler buckling calculation.
    7. Analyze beams, columns, and frames for normal, shear, and torsion stresses and to solve deflection problems in preparation for the design of such structural components.
    8. Analyze beams and draw correct and complete shear and moment diagrams for beams.
    9. Understand loads, stresses, and strains acting on a structure and their relations in the elastic behavior.
    10. Understand the states of stress and strain and the mechanical behavior of materials.
    11. Solve simple problems involving the stiffness and strength of materials.
    12. Use spreadsheets and computer programming techniques to model course concepts and complete basis designs.


  
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    EGR 284 - Materials Science


    Atomic model, bonding, lattice concept, crystal types, imperfections, stress and temperature effects, phase diagrams, alloys, ceramics, polymers, composites, corrosion, electrical and magnetic properties materials.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PHY 182 Engineering Physics II and CHM 145 General Chemistry I and CHM 145L General Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

    1. Understand how the molecular structures of materials impact their properties.
    2. Determine the processing needed to produce the desired mechanical properties.
    3. Demonstrate a general knowledge of the materials classifications and properties.
    4. Design the processes required to change materials mechanical properties.
    5. Understand the manufacturing methods used to transform materials into useful devices and structures.


  
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    EGR 285 - Electrical Circuits


    Comprehensive overview of electrical circuits.  Course covers units and definitions of charge, current, voltage, power, and energy.  Other topics covered within the course include:  Ohm's Law, active and passive elements, independent and dependent sources, resistance, Kirchhoff's Laws, network reduction, nodal and mesh analysis techniques, source transformation, superposition, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, maximum power transfer and capacitance and inductance.  Students will solve the natural, forced, and complete response of switched first order (RL, RC) and second order (RLC) circuits using differential equations.  The course also covers the analysis of AC sinusoidal steady state, including AC sinusoidal steady state power, computer aided circuit analysis and ideal and practical operational amplifier circuits.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 182 Calculus II 

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate a knowledge of circuit theorems (Ohm's law, KVL, KCL, current divider, voltage divider, superposition, source transformation, Thevenin equivalent, Norton equivalent and network reduction) by solving circuits that contain resistors, independent sources and dependent sources.
    2. Solve for the complete response of first and second order circuits where the sources are constants, exponentials or sinusoids using differential equations.
    3. Solve for the sinusoidal steady-state solution, determine the average power of circuit elements and power factor of circuits with sinusoidal sources.


  
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    EGR 287 L - Engineering Design III


    This course is the third course in a four course design sequence.  This course is intended to prepare engineering students for the future challenges of design.  Design is presented as the integration of creativity, knowledge, skills, collaboration and hard work to solve problems.  Emphasis will be on achieving design solutions that are high quality, innovative, low cost, and produced quickly.  The design process provides a structure in which the various phases of design occur in a logical and efficient sequence in order to arrive at the most successful outcome.  This course will present the best of traditional design practices as well as several design tools.  Creativity methods will be presented and creativity encouraged in the course.  Group design projects with oral presentations are required as part of this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EGR 151 Engineering Design II

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply knowledge of mechanical and electrical engineering to practical and hands-on problems.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to apply the steps of the design process to engineering problems.
    3. Communicate in written, oral, and graphical forms effectively.
    4. Articulate contemporary issues in engineering practice, including economic, social, political, and environmental issues and global impact.

     

  
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    EGR 288 L - Engineering Design IV


    This fourth course in design is intended to prepare engineering students for the future challenges of design.  Design is presented as the integration of creativity, knowledge, skills, collaboration and hard work to solve problems.  Emphasis will be on achieving design solutions that are high quality, innovative, low cost, and produced quickly.  The design process provides a structure in which the various phases of design occur in a logical and efficient sequence in order to arrive at the most successful outcome.  This course will present the best of traditional design practices as well as several design tools.  Creativity methods will be presented and creativity encouraged in the course.  Group design projects with oral presentations are required as part of this course.  Students are encouraged to enter their completed design projects in regional and national competitions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EGR 287 Engineering Design III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply knowledge of engineering and science fundamentals to real problems.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to apply steps of the design process to engineering problems.
    3. Communicate in written, oral, and graphical forms effectively.
    4. Articulate contemporary issues in engineering practice, including economic, social, political, and environmental issues and global impact.


  
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    EGR 289 W - Microprocessors


    An introduction to microprocessors including:  digital logic, machine and assembly and C language programming, serial and parallel input/output, A/D, and interrupts.  Hardware interfacing including switches, potentiometers, lights, motors (DC, stepper, servo), transistors and sensors (temperature, light, magnetic, etc). networking (SPI, CAN).  Students will design and build a project involving these topics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  EGR 151 Engineering Design II

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Write assembly and C code for a microprocessor in order to accomplish various tasks.
    2. Design, build, and debug circuits that interface with the microprocessor including devices such as GPS sensors, LCD screens, temperature sensors, distance sensors, and motors.
    3. Demonstrate a working knowledge of serial data (SPI, i2C, RS232), A/D, interrupts, PWM, Timers.
    4. Have a basic working knowledge of electrical current, voltage, power, logic gates.

     

  
  •  

    EGR 290 - Digital Systems


    Fundamental concepts of digital systems such as Boolean algebra, number systems, binary arithmetic and logic families will be investigated.  Design and implementation of combinational and sequential logic, minimization techniques, state machines, fundamental design methodologies and use of VHL and FPGA tools for logic implementation will be completed.  The laboratory will provide a hands-on experience with FPGA design.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  EGR 289 Microprocessors

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have a working knowledge of various logic gates, how they are constructed and their electrical characteristics.
    2. Design, analyze, and build combinational and synchronous digital logic circuits (such as adders, comparators, (de) multiplexers, encoders, decoders, counters, and shift registers) using truth tables and Karnaugh maps onto FPGA hardware.
    3. Know how a D flip flop is constructed, its characteristics, and limitations.
    4. Design Moore finite state machines, demonstrate a working knowledge of how to convert between a state diagram, a truth table representation, a circuit representation and VHDL implementation.
    5. Design an application specific computer with a control unit and data path.


  
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    EGR 291 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Special topics course for Engineering Science students.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply appropriate technical information.
    2. Apply appropriate computer and communication skills.
    3. Use/apply/employ problem-solving and critical thinking skills in engineering computations.


  
  •  

    EGR 292 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Special topics course for Engineering Science students.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply appropriate technical information.
    2. Apply appropriate computer and communication skills.
    3. Use/apply/employ problem-solving and critical thinking skills in engineering computations.


  
  •  

    EGR 294 - Special Topics in Engineering


    Special topics course for Engineering Science students.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply appropriate technical information.
    2. Apply appropriate computer and communication skills.
    3. Use/apply/employ problem-solving and critical thinking skills in engineering computations.


  
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    EGR 298 - Cooperative Work Experience


    Student/s undertake/s an independent supervised work experience in industry under the guidance of a faculty member.  Only one cooperative work experience course allowed per semester.  Equivalent Load.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Department approval

    Credits: (1-4)
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate understanding of professional practices.
    2. Improve problem-solving and critical thinking skills.
    3. Behave and dress professionally and appropriately.
    4. Listen effectively.
    5. Allocate time effectively.
    6. Adapt effectively to changing conditions.
    7. Develop appropriate workplace attitudes.
    8. Develop individual responsibility.


  
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    EGR 299 - Independent Project


    The student/s undertake/s an independent project in his/her specialty under the guidance of a faculty member.  Only one independent study course allowed per semester.  Special consideration will be given to design projects.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Department approval

    Credits: (2-4)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
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    EMT 110 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician


    This course prepares students for basic level life support, including assessing and treating medical and traumatic emergencies.  Lectures and labs provide students with instruction and hands-on experience with triage, vital signs, bandaging and splinting, rescue breathing and CPR, among other topics.  With successful completion of this course, students are prepared to sit for the NYS DOH Basic EMT examination.

    Credits: 8
    Hours
    110 Lecture Hours; 10 Lab Hours
    Note
    May be taken by any student.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate competency in the NYS DOH EMS core content.
    2. Demonstrate competency in the NYS DOH EMS scope of practice.
    3. Demonstrate competency in the NYS DOH EMS education standards.
    4. Demonstrate competency to sit for the NYS DOH Basic EMT examination.


  
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    ENG 091 - College Writing I Supplement


    In conjunction with College Writing I (ENG 110), this is a supplemental course to help students learn to use writing to develop their thinking and to read texts critically for both form and content.  They practice different writing processes and rhetorical strategies in order to write essays that are purposeful, thoughtful, and coherent, and that conform to the conventions of standard written English.  They understand writing as a social and collaborative process, both as a mode of individual expression and as a rhetorical act.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Write effective, college-level essays.
    2. Include ideas from sources properly and effectively in their essays.


  
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    ENG 107 - College Writing I for Non-Native Speakers of English


    This course integrates academic reading and writing and critical thinking for non-native speakers of English. Students practice different writing processes and rhetorical strategies in order to write essays that are purposeful, thoughtful, and coherent, and that conform to the conventions of standard written English. They practice vocabulary-building techniques and review grammatical structures needed for effective communication. They understand writing as a social and collaborative process.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: ENG 106 English as a Second Language Intermediate II, SPK 106 English as a Second Language Speaking & Listening 4

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours (equivalent to ENG 110 for International Students)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Properly annotate readings and outline the main point and supporting details in a text.
    2. Detect a writer's thesis, purpose, audience, tone, organization and bias.
    3. Use informal writing strategies to stretch and deepen their thinking about ideas they encounter in their reading, make connections between their reading and their own personal experience, and reinforce the practice of reading as a dialogue activity.
    4. Effectively write a critical reaction or response to a text.
    5. Understand pre-writing strategies such as brainstorming, free-writing, journal writing, journalist's questions, and outlining and apply them to various writing tasks.
    6. Write well-structured, unified and coherent essays with an introductory paragraph, several body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph.
    7. Demonstrate in multi-paragraph essays of varying lengths the ability to use appropriate rhetorical modes such as process, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, and argumentative.
    8. Express the main idea in a clear thesis and provide adequate support.
    9. Properly paraphrase and summarize texts.
    10. Revise their own texts by themselves and with a peer reviewer for content, organization and clarity, and give constructive feedback to peers about their writing.
    11. Use MLA in-text citations and correctly form a Works Cited page.
    12. Use correct grammar including sentence structure, S-V Agreement, verb tenses and verb forms, and mechanics including capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.
    13. Use more sophisticated sentence structure such as adjective clauses, noun clauses, adverb clauses, participial phrases, and reduced adverb clauses.


  
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    ENG 108 - College Writing II for Non Native Speakers of English


    This course, designed for non-native speakers of English at an advanced level of proficiency in written English, focuses on sophisticated analysis and evaluations of texts and on the writing of essays that expand and refine thinking about issues and ideas from across the disciplines.  Students analyze and evaluate ideas and information from a variety of sources, including electronic database and networks.  They acquire the skills to choose the appropriate rhetorical stance for different ideas, purposes, and audiences, and produce thesis-centered essays as a result of synthesizing multiple positions on global issues.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ENG 107 College Writing I for Non-Native Speakers of English

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours (equivalent to ENG 111 for International Students)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Critically read, annotate, analyze, and respond to texts using informal writing.
    2. Detect a writer's thesis, purpose, audience, tone, organization and bias.
    3. Use informal writing strategies to stretch and deepen their thinking about ideas they encounter in their reading, make connections between their reading and their own personal experience, and reinforce the practice of reading as a dialogue activity.
    4. Effectively write a critical reaction or response to a text.
    5. Understand pre-writing strategies such as brainstorming, free-writing, journal writing, journalist's questions, and outlining and apply them to various writing task.
    6. Develop competence in using appropriate rhetorical modes to address a writing task.
    7. Develop reasonable arguments about controversial issues, and express the main idea in a clear thesis and provide adequate support.
    8. Develop fluency in using paraphrases, summaries, or syntheses to avoid plagiarism.
    9. Revise their own texts by themselves and with a peer reviewer for content, organization and clarity, and give constructive feedback to peers about their writing.
    10. Use MLA and/or APA in-text citations properly and correctly form a bibliography page.
    11. Improve proof reading skills by detecting and correcting grammar, spelling, and mechanics errors in advanced texts and in their own work.


  
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    ENG 110 - College Writing I


    Students learn to use writing and oral communication to develop their thinking and expression.  They learn to read texts critically for both form and content.  They practice different writing processes and rhetorical strategies in order to write essays that are purposeful, thoughtful, and coherent, and that conform to the conventions of standard written English.  They understand writing as a social and collaborative process, both as a mode of individual expression and as a rhetorical act.  At the end of this course, students will know how to write effective, college-level essays and how to include ideas from sources properly and effectively in their essays.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Placement Test

    Students who earn a score of 85 or higher on the NYS ELA may enroll directly into ENG 110 without taking the Placement Test.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details.
    2. Demonstrate coherent college-level communication (written and oral) that informs, persuades, or otherwise engages with an audience.
    3. Evaluate communication for substance, bias, and intended effect.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to revise and improve written and oral communication.


  
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    ENG 111 - College Writing II


    Students produce sophisticated analyses and evaluations of texts and write essays that expand and refine their thinking about important ideas and issues.  They analyze and evaluate ideas and information from a variety of sources, including electronic databases and networks, providing appropriate documentation.  Students strengthen their writing and oral communication skills by learning to choose an appropriate rhetorical stance for different ideas, purposes, and audiences, and to assert an original thesis as a product of synthesizing ideas from multiple perspectives.  At the end of this course, students will know how to write effective, analytical, college-level essays incorporating research and how to synthesize ideas from sources properly and effectively in their essays.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I or Placement Test

    Students who earn a score of 90 or higher on the NYS ELA may enroll directly into ENG 111 without taking the Placement Test.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details.
    2. Demonstrate coherent college-level communication (written and oral) that informs, persuades, or otherwise engages with an audience.
    3. Evaluate communication for substance, bias, and intended effect.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to revise and improve written and oral communication.


  
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    ENG 150 - Technical Writing


    This introductory course in technical communication offers a practical approach for writing and speaking effectively in professional, technical environments.  The course emphasizes analytical methods for understanding and fulfilling the communicational needs of one's audience and gives students opportunity to practice and apply these communication techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Write effective, analytical, college-level documents, targeted to business and technical fields, that incorporate research and demonstrate professional diction and grammar.
    2. Synthesize ideas from technical and business sources properly and effectively in their writing.


  
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    ENG 170 - Creative Writing


    Designed to provide students interested in imaginative writing with the opportunity to investigate concepts and to practice techniques implicit in prose, poetry, and drama.  Class discussion, workshops, and personal conferences with the instructor.  At the end of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of techniques such as discovery, invention, collaboration, critique, revision, proofreading, and editing, relevant to the creation of poetry, fiction, and/or creative nonfiction and will have created a body of polished literary works.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of creative writing and the creative process inherent therein.


  
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    ENG 175 - Creative Writing with Publication


    Students interested in imaginative writing have the opportunity to investigate concepts and to practice techniques implicit in three genres:  nonfiction, fiction, and poetry.  In addition, the class publishes a 100-page book presenting creative works drawn from a campus-wide group of writers.  Students are expected to work on various aspects of magazine production, including soliciting, editing, and arranging pieces.  At the end of this course, students will demonstrate knowledge of techniques such as discovery, invention, collaboration, critique, revision, proofreading, and editing, relevant to the publication of poetry, fiction, and/or creative nonfiction and will have produced a literary work appropriate to submit for publication in a literary magazine.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    5 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of creative writing and the creative process inherent therein.


  
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    ENG 220 - Communicating About Ideas and Values


    Critical analysis of issues and moral problems affecting all thinking adults.  Selected readings organized around broad themes.  Required writing assignments and oral communication.  Required of most degree students.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I and completion of at least one (but preferably two) Writing Emphasis ("W") courses.  Liberal Arts students will have also completed ENG 111 College Writing II

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Analyze their own position relative to the historical and/or geographic contexts of specific ideas, arguments or values.
    2. Evaluate ideas and arguments as they occur in their own and others' work.
    3. Create projects that reflect interdisciplinary synthesis and metacognition.


  
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    ENG 296 - Special Topics


    An in-depth investigation of topics of special interest in English.  Course will cover subjects beyond the scope of the normal course offerings.  Topics will vary but may be related to a campus academic theme or event, to a subject of special community or student interest, or to professional and career development.

    Credits: 1-3
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study for each course but will include the development of strong writing skills for use in academic and professional settings.

  
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    ENG 299 - Independent Study: English


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of language or literature.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  One semester of college level work including ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
  
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    ENV 100 - Environmental Science Orientation


    This course is designed to enhance the student learning process through lectures, group and experiential learning exercises, field trips and a service learning project.  Students will learn concepts and philosophies of sustainability and environmental science, community building, career and transfer opportunities, academic success strategies, personal development, and orientation to the college environment.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify various departments and services on campus.
    2. Demonstrate community building skills including knowing the other students in class, working effectively in groups, and being able to interact positively with other students.
    3. Summarize the opportunities and emerging trends in the field of Environmental Science.
    4. Understand and put into practice interaction with faculty and peers, use of campus resources and time management skills to improve academic success.
    5. Determine their preferred learning style and thinking preference.
    6. Become aware of the opportunities for transferring to a four year school.
    7. Explain current events and issues related to Environmental Science.


  
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    ENV 101 - Environmental Science Field Methods


    Environmental Science Field Methods provides students an overview of field methods utilized in Environmental Science, including water and soil sampling, geographic information system (GIS) data collection, sampling methods, use of drones for data collection and other relevant methods.  In addition, the course will cover risk assessment for field work, field safety and wilderness first aid.  Campus and program orientation topics will also be covered in this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Articulate the various transfer degree programs and colleges in Environmental Science.
    2. Evaluate safety hazards in the field.
    3. Create Risk Assessment Plans for field sites.
    4. Collect data using Environmental Science best practices.
    5. Recall campus resources in the areas of student success.


  
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    ENV 120 - Sustainable Agriculture


    This course will assess the various agricultural practices throughout the United States today, including but not limited to, organic farming, grazing and land use practices, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO), genetic modification and community supported agriculture.  Student field trips will be a required part of the course in order to experience different farming practices throughout the Southern Tier of New York.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the history of agriculture in the United States.
    2. Evaluate the economic impacts of United States agriculture policies on sustainable farming.
    3. Understand current food processing methods.
    4. Evaluate sustainable agriculture practices including, organic vs. natural, cage-free vs. free-range, dairy farm pasture use vs. free stall, farm size, land use, CAFO practices.
    5. Describe the history of genetically modified seed and foods (GMO), including an assessment of Monsanto practices.
    6. Evaluate current trends in local and regional agriculture and food practices, farm-to-table, buy local, urban food Islands, community supported agriculture (CSA).


  
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    ENV 199 - Industrial Hygiene


    Industrial Hygiene is the science of anticipating, recognizing, evaluating, and controlling workplace conditions that may cause workers' injury or illness (OSHA 3143).  This course is intended to provide students with the tools necessary to 1) identify potential problem areas with regard to workplace health and safety, 2) design environmental monitoring programs, and 3) determine compliance with Federal, State, and Local health and safety regulations.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Communicate their ideas effectively with college-level writing.
    2. Evaluate the effectiveness of the various health and safety laws, regulations, and code rule.
    3. Find solutions to common workplace health and safety problems.
    4. Engage in discussions regarding the need for workplace health and safety programs.
    5. Evaluate and apply Federal, State, and Local health and safety laws, regulations, and code rule.
    6. Design basic environmental monitoring programs.


  
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    ENV 210 - Environmental Issues & Policy


    This course is designed to provide students an introduction in Environmental Policy through the discussion of several environmental issues.  Students will read and discuss case studies that illustrate the science and politics of environmental policies.  A course capstone project will include the analysis of a current environmental policy.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the structure of government in the United States as it relates to environmental policy.
    2. Provide a brief summary of the history of environmental policy in the United States.
    3. Articulate the various policy options lawmakers use to develop environmental policy and achieve environmental goals.
    4. Explain the economic implications of environmental policy.
    5. Articulate the pressures a rising population puts on the environment.
    6. List policies related to population control.
    7. Explain the difference between preservation and conservation and compare and contrast related policies.
    8. Identify policies related to ecosystem management.
    9. Analyze the policy options related to Climate Change.
    10. Summarize the current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, including the current scientific evidence supporting climate change.
    11. Explain the impacts of a loss of biodiversity and the influence of non-profit agencies with lobbying functions related to environmental policy.
    12. Identify policies related to chemicals and the role of the EPA in regulation of chemicals.
    13. Summarize the concept of environmental ethics and environmental justice.
    14. Analyze an Environmental Policy.
    15. Prepare an Environmental Policy Brief.


  
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    ENV 212 - Ecology


    An introduction to basic principles of ecology, including ecosystem ecology, evolutionary ecology, major terrestrial and aquatic biomes, population and community ecology.  Labs have an emphasis on those ecosystems found in the N.E. U.S.  Field studies will emphasize the use of the scientific method and approaches used by ecologists in the field.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 117 Principles of Biology I

    Corequisite:  ENV 212L Ecology Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BIO 212
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of ecology.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of ecosystems.
    3. Analyze and discuss current scientific literature.
    4. Apply basic ecological principles to explain the interactions of organisms with their environment and with each other.
    5. Apply basic ecological principles in planning and conducting field and laboratory studies.


  
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    ENV 260 - Soil Science


    This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to Soil Science from the environmental and management perspective.  The course will cover the characterization, morphology and genesis of soils, issues of soil management and soil ecology and finally the course will address human pressures on soil resources.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the distribution and variability of soils and their properties across a landscape.
    2. Articulate the various soil properties and how they are created and affect landscape processes on a local and regional scale.
    3. Analyze soil characteristics.


  
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    ENV 290 - Environmental Science Seminar


    This is a capstone course for students in the Environmental Science program.  The course will provide students the opportunity to engage in undergraduate research and learn the skills necessary to present their findings to peers across multiple disciplines.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENV 101 Environmental Science Field Methods

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Develop community building skills including working effectively in groups.
    2. Collect data related to an undergraduate research project.
    3. Analyze data related to an undergraduate research project.
    4. Conduct a formal presentation.


  
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    ENV 291 - Special Topics in Environmental Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Environmental Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
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    ENV 292 - Special Topics in Environmental Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Environmental Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
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    ENV 293 - Special Topics in Environmental Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Environmental Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
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    ENV 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project in an environmental field which is beyond the scope of requirements of the courses offered by the department.  Conducted under the direction of an Environmental Science faculty member.  Only one independent study course allowed per semester.

    Credits: 1-3
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning Outcomes established via Independent Study contract and depend on the area of study.

  
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    ESL 093 - Accelerated ESL Grammar


    English grammar for non-native speakers at the intermediate level. Understanding and practice of intermediate grammar of American English, with a focus on form, meaning, and use in oral and written communication. Integrates grammar into practice of the other language skills. (This course is not acceptable for credits toward a degree).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Students should be at the intermediate level based on ESL placement or chair approval to be placed in this course.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the following tenses: Simple Present, Present Progressive, Simple Past, Past Progressive, Simple Future, Present Perfect, and Present Perfect Progressive by recognizing, constructing, and using them correctly in oral and written communication.
    2. Differentiate between adjectives and adverbs and use them correctly in oral and written communication.
    3. Distinguish between count and non-count nouns and employ them correctly with articles and quantifiers in oral and written communication.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of how to correctly form of WH-questions and use them in asking for specific information.
    5. Recognize and use a variety of modals properly to express ability, permission, requests, advice, suggestions, preferences, necessity, expectations, possibility, and inferences in oral and written communication.
    6. Identify, form, and properly use gerunds and infinitives in various grammatical functions to communicate orally and in writing.


  
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    ESL 094 - Accelerated Listening and Speaking


    Spoken American English for non-native speakers at the intermediate level. Further development of speaking, critical listening, and note-taking proficiency for full participation in academic, professional, and social situations. Understanding of rhetorical patterns of formal, spoken English and lectures from diverse disciplines. Understanding of how to organize and deliver an effective presentation. (This course is not acceptable for credits toward a degree).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Students should be at the intermediate level based on ESL placement or chair approval to be placed in this course.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Grasp the rules for word and sentence focus and apply them properly in English sentences, using proper stress, rhythm, and intonation.
    2. Recognize common patterns of lecture organization and take effective notes based on those patterns.
    3. Compose and deliver an academically structured speech with supporting materials.
    4. Use advanced language functions to communication effectively in real world situations.
    5. Distinguish between fact and inference, and between main ideas and details in spoken texts and dialogues.


  
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    ESL 095 - Accelerated Reading and Writing


    Accelerated Intermediate reading and writing skills for non-native speakers. Practice in reading intermediate texts and development of critical reading skills. Technique and practice in writing various kinds of rhetorical paragraphs, and in using intermediate sentence patterns and correct spelling and punctuation. Introduction to essay writing. (This course is not acceptable for credits toward a degree).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: Students should be at the intermediate level based on ESL placement or chair approval to be placed in this course.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the main idea and supporting details by using pre-reading strategies: skimming, scanning.
    2. Identify the topics and use context clues to understand unfamiliar vocabulary and meaning.
    3. Write coherent and unified paragraphs in response to course reading.
    4. Proofread for errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation.
    5. Understand and write short academic essays.


 

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