Feb 27, 2024  
Website Catalog (In Development) 
    
Website Catalog (In Development)

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • ENV 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project in an environmental field which is beyond the scope of requirements of the courses offered by the department.  Conducted under the direction of an Environmental Science faculty member.  Only one independent study course allowed per semester.

    Credits: 1-3
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning Outcomes established via Independent Study contract and depend on the area of study.

  
  • ESL 093 - Accelerated ESL Grammar


    English grammar for non-native speakers at the intermediate level. Understanding and practice of intermediate grammar of American English, with a focus on form, meaning, and use in oral and written communication. Integrates grammar into practice of the other language skills. (This course is not acceptable for credits toward a degree).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Students should be at the intermediate level based on ESL placement or chair approval to be placed in this course.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the following tenses: Simple Present, Present Progressive, Simple Past, Past Progressive, Simple Future, Present Perfect, and Present Perfect Progressive by recognizing, constructing, and using them correctly in oral and written communication.
    2. Differentiate between adjectives and adverbs and use them correctly in oral and written communication.
    3. Distinguish between count and non-count nouns and employ them correctly with articles and quantifiers in oral and written communication.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of how to correctly form of WH-questions and use them in asking for specific information.
    5. Recognize and use a variety of modals properly to express ability, permission, requests, advice, suggestions, preferences, necessity, expectations, possibility, and inferences in oral and written communication.
    6. Identify, form, and properly use gerunds and infinitives in various grammatical functions to communicate orally and in writing.


  
  • ESL 094 - Accelerated Listening and Speaking


    Spoken American English for non-native speakers at the intermediate level. Further development of speaking, critical listening, and note-taking proficiency for full participation in academic, professional, and social situations. Understanding of rhetorical patterns of formal, spoken English and lectures from diverse disciplines. Understanding of how to organize and deliver an effective presentation. (This course is not acceptable for credits toward a degree).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Students should be at the intermediate level based on ESL placement or chair approval to be placed in this course.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Grasp the rules for word and sentence focus and apply them properly in English sentences, using proper stress, rhythm, and intonation.
    2. Recognize common patterns of lecture organization and take effective notes based on those patterns.
    3. Compose and deliver an academically structured speech with supporting materials.
    4. Use advanced language functions to communication effectively in real world situations.
    5. Distinguish between fact and inference, and between main ideas and details in spoken texts and dialogues.


  
  • ESL 095 - Accelerated Reading and Writing


    Accelerated Intermediate reading and writing skills for non-native speakers. Practice in reading intermediate texts and development of critical reading skills. Technique and practice in writing various kinds of rhetorical paragraphs, and in using intermediate sentence patterns and correct spelling and punctuation. Introduction to essay writing. (This course is not acceptable for credits toward a degree).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: Students should be at the intermediate level based on ESL placement or chair approval to be placed in this course.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the main idea and supporting details by using pre-reading strategies: skimming, scanning.
    2. Identify the topics and use context clues to understand unfamiliar vocabulary and meaning.
    3. Write coherent and unified paragraphs in response to course reading.
    4. Proofread for errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation.
    5. Understand and write short academic essays.


  
  • EVE 101 - Fundamentals of Event and Sports Entertainment Management


    This course addresses major trends and successful business practices in Event Management and Sports Entertainment to provide the knowledge and tools to improve your effectiveness and profitability as an event manager.  In addition, students will learn how to manage staff and staffing problems and to ensure the safety of all event participants.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the structure of the event and sports entertainment industry.
    2. Demonstrate ability to design, plan, market, promote, schedule and stage an event.
    3. Demonstrate ability to effectively structure and manage an event planning schedule to an applied learning event project.
    4. Demonstrate ability to identify and prioritize event goals and objectives.
    5. Demonstrate ability to create and present proposals and agreements that are advantageous to all parties of an event.


  
  • EVE 125 - Wedding Planning, Coordination & Consulting


    Wedding Planning, Coordination and Consulting provides a comprehensive introduction to the planning and management of weddings.  Looking through an event management lens, this course will thoroughly explore the foundations, practice and business of wedding planning.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EVE 101 Fundamentals of Event Management; self-evident

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to design wedding plans for diverse clients.
    2. Demonstrate ability to create and maintain realistic and profitable wedding budgets.
    3. Execute a mock or actual wedding in an applied learning environment.


  
  • EVE 201 - Event Internship I


    Career-related employment in the Meetings, Expositions, Events and Conventions (MEEC) industry focusing on an area of interest in a MEEC enterprise.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a MEEC business setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  First year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to effectively perform the skills required of the profession, including:  the ability to integrate theory and practice, communicate effectively, demonstrate professional behaviors, perform technical skills, and carry out the tasks related to their job assignment.


  
  • EVE 215 - Special Event Interior Design


    This course addresses major trends and successful business practices in Special Event Management and Interior Design to provide the knowledge and tools to improve your effectiveness and profitability as a special event designer/manager/owner/operator.  Students will learn special event design materials and tool usage, special event centerpiece design and construction with a special focus on weddings, trade show booth displays and construction, table settings and material selection and related special event décor props design and construction.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    INT 215
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Develop design strategies and event concepts by determining venue essentials, seating layout and table décor, using created color schemes and proposals in an applied learning setting.


  
  • EVE 220 - Principles of Floral Design for Event and Sports Entertainment


    This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the hands-on skills and theory required for career success in event and sports entertainment function and commercial/residential floral design.  Students will understand the elements of design (focal point, line, shape/form, texture, value, color principles), principles of design (balance, proportion, scale, rhythm, unity and variety), styles and techniques of floral design.  Students will learn to identify flowers and interior foliage plants, create specialty floral items and develop knowledge of sound business management practices and careers in the floral industry.  Students will learn floral marketing, pricing and sales.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    INT 220
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify fundamental industry floral supplies, equipment, and safety standards.
    2. Create functional three-dimensional forms utilizing construction methods currently practiced in the floral industry by applying the elements and principles of design.
    3. Develop the process of design through the exploration of multiple event venues.


  
  • EVE 225 - Meetings, Corporate Events, Conventions, Trade Shows & Expos


    This course provides an understanding of the growing role of the Meetings, Expositions, Events and Conventions (MEEC) industry, as well as trade shows for both the United States and internationally.  It provides practical information for designing and managing projects from a trade show exhibit to planning and coordinating an entire exposition, meeting, convention or corporate event.  Virtually every organization, from government agencies to every part of the private sector, mom and pop entrepreneurs to corporate trade associations, all regularly hold large and small meetings of every description.  This course provides the basic tools to successfully plan and manage everything found in the course title.  Course information covers the basic competencies tested in the ISES Certified Special Events Professional (CSEP) and Certified Meeting Professional (CMP) examinations.  The Meetings, Expositions, Events, and Conventions industry continues to grow and garner increasing attention from the hospitality industry, communities, and government alike.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EVE 101 Fundamentals of Event Management; self-evident and designed sequence

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Comprehend and competently express where MEEC fits in relation to the hospitality industry.
    2. Identify the roles and functions of Destination Marketing Organizations for MEEC.
    3. Write clear and concise meeting objectives using the SMART technique.
    4. Recognize and apply technology which currently impacts professional meetings.
    5. Execute professional MEEC in an applied learning environment.


  
  • EVE 297 - Event Internship II


    Career-related employment in the Meetings, Expositions, Events and Conventions (MEEC) industry focusing on an area of interest in a MEEC enterprise.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a MEEC business setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  Second year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.  

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to effectively perform the skills required of the profession, including: the ability to integrate theory and practice, communicate effectively, demonstrate professional behaviors, perform technical skills, and carry out the tasks related to their job assignment.


  
  • FLG 299 - FLG 299


    This course is designed to offer a variety of relevant foreign languages that are not currently listed in the catalog of foreign languages (such as Chinese, Vietnamese, etc.).  The course has a variable credit range of 1-4, and covers beginning to intermediate to advanced topics of the foreign languages and cultures.  Topics will vary but may be related to academic, professional, and career development.

    Credits: 1-4
    Hours
    1-4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate effective oral communication skills, such as proper use of:  grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation in verbal communication
    2. Demonstrate effective written communication skills, such as proper use of:  grammar, sentence structure, and paragraphs in written essays.


  
  • FRE 101 - Beginning French I


    An introduction to the basic principles of grammar.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Students will learn to appreciate the French culture through discussions and examination of real life situations in France & Francophone countries.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Exhibit basic proficiency in the understanding and use of French.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctive features of the cultures associated with French.


  
  • FRE 102 - Beginning French II


    An introduction to the basic principles of grammar.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Students will learn to appreciate the French culture through discussions and examination of real life situations in France & Francophone countries.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  FRE 101 Beginning French I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Exhibit basic proficiency in the understanding and use of French.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctive features of the cultures associated with French.


  
  • FRE 201 - Intermediate French I


    Intensive review of grammar and syntax.  A cultural, conversational and literary approach to French language.  Students will continue learning about the French & Francophone cultures and examine them and be prepared to handle various situations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  FRE 102 Beginning French II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Exhibit basic proficiency in the understanding and use of French.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctive features of the cultures associated with French.


  
  • FRE 202 - Intermediate French II


    Intensive review of grammar and syntax.  A cultural, conversational and literary approach to French language.  Students will continue learning about the French & Francophone cultures and examine them and be prepared to handle various situations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  FRE 201 Intermediate French I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Exhibit basic proficiency in the understanding and use of French.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctive features of the cultures associated with French.


  
  • FRS 101 - Fire Prevention and Protection


    Methods, policies and procedures relative to establishing and operating appropriate fire prevention and protection programs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand history and development of public, local, state and federal fire prevention organizations.
    2. Analyze functions, duties and responsibilities of a fire prevention bureau.
    3. Review building code and fire prevention model building codes.
    4. Identify hazards and deficiencies of fire protection and fire protection equipment systems.
    5. Demonstrate a public fire safety education program.


  
  • FRS 105 - Fire Investigation


    The investigation of the cause and origin of fires, including natural, accidental, and incendiary, and the role and responsibilities of the investigator in making that determination.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the standards for professional qualifications of a fire investigator.
    2. Describe the scientific method and how it applies to fire investigations.
    3. Identify and describe the elementary chemistry of combustion.
    4. Identify the methods of collecting, documenting, and preserving evidence.
    5. Define arson.
    6. Recognize the progression of a fire within a structure.


  
  • FRS 200 - Hazardous Materials


    This course discusses the use, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous materials with an emphasis on flammable liquids, flammable solids, oxidizing materials, corrosive liquids, compressed gases, and explosives frequently encountered by emergency responders.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the common response protocols for responding to a hazardous materials incident.
    2. Identify the common elements on the periodic table by their atomic symbols.
    3. Describe the basic chemical and physical properties of gases, liquids, and solids, and predict the behavior of a substance under adverse conditions.
    4. Demonstrate effective usage of the U.S. Department of Transportation Emergency Response Guidebook.


  
  • GER 102 - Beginning German II


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom. Written homework assignments supplemented by work in audio-lingual laboratory.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  GER 101 Beginning German I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Exhibit basic proficiency in the understanding and use of German.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctive features of the cultures associated with German.


  
  • GLG 111 - Earth Investigations


    This course is a survey of the geosciences for non-majors.  The core principles of meteorology, geology, and the nature of our solar system will be discussed.  The laboratory component utilizes various multi-media resources and Google Earth to engage students.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the unifying themes of the geologic sciences.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method in general, and as it can be applied in the geologic sciences specifically.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze, and interpret scientific data.


  
  • GLG 115 - Introduction to Geology


    This course is an introduction to the geosciences.  Core topics include the rock cycle, earth surface environments and processes, geologic time, planetary formation, plate tectonics theory, energy resources, and climate change.  The local geology of the Southern Tier of NY and Northern Tier of PA will be discussed.  The laboratory experience emphasizes rock and mineral indentification and exploration of the planet using Google Earth.  The laboratory experience also includes a field mapping project utilizing GPS technology in a local watershed.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling.
    2. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.
    3. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods geologists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, expermentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling as it applies to the geoligic sciences.
    4. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including application of scientific data, concepts, and models in the geologic sciences.


  
  • GLG 125 - Historical Geology


    This course is a study of the evolution of the planet Earth.  Core topics include geologic processes, biologic evolution, mass extinction events preserved in the rock record, and methods for determining geologic time.  The local geologic history of the Southern Tier of NY and Northern Tier of PA will be discussed.  The laboratory experience emphasizes sedimentary rock, mineral, and fossil identification.  A laboratory field experience will focus on the local bedrock geology and fossil biota.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling.
    2. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.
    3. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to Geology, including describing and evaluating the current physical science basis for the evolution of environments and ecosystems over geologic time.


  
  • HCM 193 - Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems


    A survey of the American Health Care System that examines the elements related to the organization, delivery, financing and planning of health services.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the major component of US Health Care Systems and understand their relationships.


  
  • HCM 194 - Healthcare Financing


    This course will present the United States’ health care system from a cost perspective.  Students examine the history of health care costs in the U.S., the nature of competition, the characteristics of the market for medical services that influence competition, and the implications of these factors on the health care sector of our economy.  Special emphasis will be placed on the most current legislation and administrative proposals/enactments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequiste:  HCM 193 Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Be familiar with health care financing policy development and the implementation of these processes.
    2. Understand the size and scope of the health care financing system in the United States and its comparison to other countries.
    3. Understand the differences and similarities in the public and private financing components of the health care system and the different reimbursements of various provider categories.


     

  
  • HCM 195 - Managed Health Delivery Systems


    Managed Health Delivery Systems is designed to engage students in a learning process about the intricacies of managed care.  It will provide a core of basic information about managed care in the United States - history, promises and shortcomings.  In addition, this course will focus on managerial parameters of managed care.  Strategies for marketing services, physician recruitment and price quality competition will be presented in the context of the new market place realities.  Finally, consumer health behavior and utilization dynamics will be discussed and evaluated from the standpoint of their practical rather than theoretical significance.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HCM 193 Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Comprehend the public policy imperatives for health service reform.
    2. Understand the role of managed care in health service restructuring.
    3. Distinguish between traditional indemnity fee-for-service practice and managed care.
    4. Develop familiarity with the principles and techniques for marketing managed delivery systems in a highly competitive environment.
    5. Acquire greater awareness of the practical problems encountered in today’s health care market place.
    6. Identify ethical issues surrounding managed care implementation.


  
  • HCM 196 - Healthcare Ethics


    Health care ethics is designed for health care professionals and students planning to enter the health care field.  It offers participants the chance to understand health care ethics.  Some topics covered in the course will include:  autonomy in long-term care settings and withdrawing fluids and nutrition, euthanasia, and physician assisted suicide (medicide); HIV, reproductive rights, allocating health care resources, institutional missions, and obligations, competition and entrepreneurship in health care, and rationing.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the role of medical ethics regarding research and health care delivery in an historical context.
    2. Be familiar with ethical principles and their application to current situations in the health field.
    3. Analyze health care issues from varying ethical perspectives to determine how to make the best decisions.
    4. Examine various codes of ethics of organizations including the American Hospital Association, the American College of Health Care Executives, and the American Medical Association.
    5. Discuss current areas of ethical concerns from the perspective of consumers, providers, and payers of health care services.


     

  
  • HCM 198 - Long-Term Care


    Long-term care will be studied in its current and dynamic environment.  Students will learn how long-term care has evolved in the United States.  Specific emphasis will be placed on levels of care, payment systems, social and economic concerns, current legislative initiatives, and the future needs of our expanding long-term care population.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Develop a deeper awareness of the demographic and economic changes influencing public policy for the elderly.
    2. Discuss socio-cultural and socio-economic factors influencing long-term care in the U.S.
    3. Discern the political and economic controversies associated with high rates of public spending for the elderly.
    4. Understand the role of family and community social support structures for the elderly.
    5. Recognize the power of financial incentives for altering provider behavior.
    6. Identify the challenges and opportunities for evolving health and human services delivery systems.


  
  • HIS 103 - Western Civilization I


    A survey of the development of Western civilization and culture with an emphasis on political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual developments in relation to other regions of the world to 1800. An analysis of the structures, systems, and interrelationships in western civilization within historical context and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Construct a broad outline of world history and/or the development of the distinctive features of at least one civilization or culture in relationship to other regions of the world.
    2. Explain the structures, systems, and interrelationships among civilizations and cultures within historical and/or contemporary contexts, and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.
    3. Outline the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc. of Western civilizations to that of other regions of the world.


  
  • HIS 104 - Western Civilization II


    A survey of the development of Western civilization and culture with an emphasis on political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual developments in relation to other regions of the world from 1800 to the present. An analysis of the structures, systems, and interrelationships in western civilization within historical context and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Construct a broad outline of world history and/or the development of the distinctive features of at least one civilization or culture in relationship to other regions of the world.
    2. Explain the structures, systems, and interrelationships among civilizations and cultures within historical and/or contemporary contexts, and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.
    3. Outline the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc. of Western civilizations to that of other regions of the world.


  
  • HIS 116 - World History I


    A survey of the histories of human societies from the earliest civilizations to 1500.  The course considers how people, environment, social movements, religion, political ideologies, and philosophical ideas have shaped human society and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Construct a broad outline of world history and/or the development of the distinctive features of at least one civilization or culture in relationship to other regions of the world.
    2. Explain the structures, systems, and interrelationships among civilizations and cultures within historical and/or contemporary contexts, and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.


  
  • HIS 117 - World History II


    A survey of the histories of human societies from 1500 to the present.  This course considers how people, environment, social movements, religion, political ideologies, and philosophical ideas have shaped human society and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Construct a broad outline of world history and/or the development of the distinctive features of at least one civilization or culture in relationship to other regions of the world.
    2. Explain the structures, systems, and interrelationships among civilizations and cultures within historical and/or contemporary contexts, and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.


  
  • HIS 130 - United States History I


    The United States from 1607 to 1877.  The colonies, Revolution, Constitution, early national period, Jacksonian era, expansion, Civil War and Reconstruction, and Westward Movement.  Survey of political, economic, social and cultural developments through most of the 19th century.  

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe U.S. society and/or history, including the diversity of individuals and communities that make up the nation.
    2. Explain the role of individual participation in U.S. communities and government.
    3. Apply historical and contemporary evidence to draw, support, or verify conclusions.
    4. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    5. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    6. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    7. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
  • HIS 131 - United States History II


    The United States from 1877 to the present.  The closing of The Frontier, the American Empire, Progressive reforms, World War I, the Twenties, the Depression, The New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam involvement, and the present.  Emphasis on political, cultural, social, and economic & developments.  

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe U.S. society and/or history, including the diversity of individuals and communities that make up the nation.
    2. Explain the role of individual participation in U.S. communities and government.
    3. Apply historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    5. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    6. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    7. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
  • HIS 155 - War and the Western World


    A survey of world patterns of warfare from their earliest roots to the present examining the interaction of warfare and society.  Major emphasis is on how warfare and military developments helped shape society and its institutions, as well as a distinctive Western style of warfare.  Specific concern will be given to the role of gunpowder, industrialization, and nationalism, as well as economic, social, and cultural factors.  How the West used its distinctive style of warfare in its attempt to dominate the rest of the world and spread Western influence and institutions will also be considered, as well as the consequences.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Construct a broad outline of world history and/or the development of the distinctive features of at least one civilization or culture in relationship to other regions of the world.
    2. Explain the structures, systems, and interrelationships among civilizations and cultures within historical and/or contemporary contexts, and their impact on wellbeing and sustainability.
    3. Outline the development of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc. of Western civilizations to that of other regions of the world.


  
  • HIS 187 - The United States Civil War: Causes and Effects


    This corse surveys social, political, and economic differences emerging in the nation’s earliest days and how its leaders, social and political institutions, and people struggled with those issues as they brought on the war.  We will also place significant emphasis on the role of slavery in shaping social, political, and economic differences, particularly in shaping attitudes toward African Americans.  We will explore how such modern phenomena as nationalism and the Industrial Revolution impacted war.  Finally, we will examine the consequences of the Civil War, particularly how the legacy of slavery continues to shape America today.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe U.S. society and/or history, including the diversity of individuals and communities that make up the nation with a focus on the historical role of African Americans.
    2. Explain the role of individual participation in U.S. communities and government and the influence of African Americans on U.S. political, economic, and social institutions.
    • Apply historical and contemporary evidence to draw, support, or verify conclusions.
    • Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.
    • Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    • Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    • Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.


  
  • HIS 194 - African American History


    An introduction to African American history from the U.S. colonial period to the present.  Topics to be discussed include, but are not limited to, West Africa, the African diaspora, and the Atlantic slave trade; life among enslaved people and free black people in the colonial and revolutionary periods; slavery, abolitionist and anti-slavery movements, and African American life  in the antebellum years; the Civil War and emancipation; Reconstruction and the Jim Crow era; the development of African American institutions, thought and culture; the Civil Rights era; and recent developments.  

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe U.S. society and/or history, including the diversity of individuals and communities that make up the nation with a focus on the historical role of African Americans.
    2. Explain the role of individual participation in U.S. communities and government and the influence of African Americans on U.S. political, economic, and social institutions.
    • Apply historical and contemporary evidence to draw, support, or verify conclusions.
    • Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.
    • Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    • Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    • Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.


  
  • HIS 210-280 - Special Topics in History


    Additional history courses are available besides those listed here in the College Catalog. For further information consult the college master schedule or department chair.

    Credits: (1-3)
  
  • HIS 299 - Independent Study


    An independent study project which is beyond the scope of courses currently offered by the department, directed by a faculty member with approval of the department chairperson.  Independent study does not satisfy the Liberal Arts requirement in history, and it may not be taken in lieu of a 100-series course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 hours of College History

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed by the instructor and approved by the department chair and the Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
  • HIT 101 - Introduction to Health Information Systems


    Introduction to the organization of healthcare delivery and overview of the profession.  Definition of, standards for, and development of both paper and electronic health records as to content, format, evaluation and completion.  Numbering and filing systems, registries, indexes, forms and screen design are addressed.  A study of methods for compiling statistics for administration, medical staff, and licensing and accrediting agencies.  Vital statistics, public health statistics and hospital statistics are covered.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Trace the development of the health information profession and understand the responsibilities of the health information profession.
    2. Recognize and describe the uses, users, and functions of the health record.
    3. Understand the content, documentation requirements, and formats of the health record in various healthcare settings.
    4. Understand the advantages of electronic health records over paper-based and hybrid records.
    5. Identify and define terms, initiatives, and technologies used in the planning and implantation of the electronic health record.
    6. Describe the purpose, development, and importance of healthcare data sets and standards.
    7. Recognize the purpose, development, and maintenance of registries and indexes used in healthcare.
    8. Describe research methodologies used in health care. (CAHIIM, III.5)
    9. Identify the types of vital statistics that are collected in the healthcare industry.
    10. Identify and explain statistical terminology used in the healthcare industry.
    11. Calculate statistics for health care operations (ex: Census Data, Percentage of Occupancy, Length of Stay, etc.)
    12. Summarize standards for the exchange of health information. (CAHIIM III.7)
    13. Describe consumer engagement activities. (CAHIIM, VI.8)
    14. Apply privacy basics, confidentiality, and HIPAA standards to protected health information.


  
  • HIT 106 - Medical Terminology


    A study of the language of medicine, including suffixes, prefixes and root words.  Emphasis on terminology associated with the anatomic systems.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and define the five basic word parts.
    2. Define, pronounce, and correctly spell the word parts (combining forms, suffixes, and prefixes in each chapter).
    3. Understand the concept of analyzing and defining medical terms.
    4. Apply the rules of word building when building medical terms when given definitions.
    5. Define, pronounce, and correctly spell medical terms related to body structure, color, and oncology.
    6. Define, pronounce, and correctly spell terms which are used to describe directional terms, anatomic planes, regions, and quadrants.
    7. Define, pronounce, and correctly spell disease and disorder, surgical, diagnostic, and complementary terms associated with 15 body systems.
    8. Identify, interpret, and correctly spell medical abbreviations associated with the 15 body systems.
    9. Interpret, read, and comprehend the medical language in simulated medical statements and documents.


  
  • HIT 107 - Medical Transcription and Correspondence


    Introductory course emphasizing the fundamentals of medical transcription.  Orientation to equipment and software including authentic physician dictation organized by medical specialty.  Transcription of various medical reports including chart notes, letters, history and physicals, consultation reports, and discharge summaries, while building typing speed and accuracy.  Review of medical terminology related to the medical specialities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  HIT 106 Medical Terminology, MDA 104 Keyboarding and Medical Word Processing, BIT 100 Keyboarding

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Produce an error-free transcribed letter, consultation, chart note, history and physical report, and discharge summary dictated by a variety of physicians.
    2. Edit the transcript to correct obvious grammatical and punctuation errors, while identifying medical transcription inconsistencies.
    3. Develop keyboarding skills and an increased knowledge of medical terminolgy, confidentiality, and professionalism.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to utilize references and resources efficiently.


  
  • HIT 203 - Computers in Health Care


    Identification of computer applications in the health care industry; types of hardware and software systems; components of a health care facility database; electronic patient records; principles of database coding design and data dictionaries; overview of systems approach in the selection and development of an information system; data quality; methods to control security and confidentiality; and strategies for report management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify computer applications in the healthcare industry.
    2. Differentiate between the types of hardware and software used in healthcare.
    3. Discuss the components of a healthcare facility database.
    4. Identify electronic patient record system.
    5. Explain the principles of database coding design and data dictionaries.
    6. Discuss a systems approach used in the selection and development of an information system.
    7. Summarize the concepts that relate to data quality.
    8. List the types of methods used to control security and confidentiality.
    9. Discuss strategies for report management.


  
  • HIT 204 - ICD-10-CM Coding


    Principles and application of the ICD-10-CM & PCS coding systems.  Introduction to the Official Coding Guidelines for Coding and Reimbursement.  Theory and practice of coding medical records using manual methods and encoder software systems.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine ICD-10-CM codes according to coding guidelines by coding medical record documentation.
    2. Assign CCs (complications or comorbidities), MCCs (major complications or comorbidities), and HACs (hospital acquired conditions).
    3. Assign POA (present on admission) Indicators.


  
  • HIT 205 - ICD-10-PCS Coding


    Supervised practice structured so that students gain practical coding experience in a simulated hospital setting.  Laboratory hours: 2 hr/week for 15 weeks

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine ICD-10-CM Procedure Coding System (PCS) codes according to coding guidelines by coding medical record documentation.
    2. Assign Complications/Comorbidities (CCs), Major Complications/Comorbidities (MCCs), and Hospital Acquired Conditions (HACs).
    3. Assign Present on Admission (POA) Indicators. 


  
  • HIT 208 - Advanced Medical Transcription


    Transcription of authentic physician-dictated reports organized by body systems or medical specialties.  Emphasis on advanced skills, developing accuracy, speed and additional detailed study of medical terminology.  Emphasis on the basic medical reports as well as specialized reports relating to the various body systems.  Emphasis also on using references and other resources efficiently, editing and proof-reading techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 107 Medical Transcription

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Select the correct format for a dictated medical report.
    2. Demonstrate the proper use of reference materials.
    3. Transcribe consultations, chart notes, history and physical reports, discharge summaries and operative reports dictated by a variety of physicians.
    4. Edit the transcript to correct obvious grammatical and punctuation errors.
    5. Identify obvious medical inconsistencies.
    6. Produce a final, neat, error-free transcript.
    7. Increase transcription speed and productivity throughout the course.
    8. Understand the process of speech recognition technology.
    9. Successfully utilize the ExpressScribe Transcription Program.


  
  • HIT 210 - Management Principles for Health Information


    This course explores the principles of leadership, functions of management, and personnel supervision, as they relate to and are integrated with specific applications to health information management functions.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate fundamental leadership skills.
    2. Identify the impact of organizational change.
    3. Participate in the life cycle management of information systems on an organization-wide scale.
    4. Identify human resource strategies for organizational best practices.
    5. Utilize financial management processes as they pertain to productivity, staffing, budget, and revenue.
    6. Analyze the impact of culturally sensitive methods utilized by health information management professionals.
    7. Apply the principles of ergonomics to workspace design.
    8. Provide professional constructive feedback to recipients at all levels of organizational structure or hierarchy.


  
  • HIT 214 - CPT and HCPCS Coding


    A study of CPT and HCPCs as it relates to ambulatory and physician coding.  An overview of ambulatory and physician coding and data collection.  Theories and practical applications of ambulatory and physician payment methodologies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding System

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine CPT codes according to coding guidelines by coding medical record documentation.
    2. Calculate APCs from medical record documentation.
    3. Create a physician query.
    4. Manage coding denials.
    5. Ensure coding compliance and accuracy.  


  
  • HIT 217 - Reimbursement Methodologies


    A study of the reimbursement and prospective payment systems used in the health care industry.  Comprehensive review of the Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting, as well as Revenue Cycle Management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM Coding, HIT 205 Coding Practicum

    Corequisites:  HIT 214 CPT and HCPCS Coding

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Use basic language associated with the health care reimbursement methodologies.
    2. Describe the structure of the approved code sets used in the United States.
    3. Identify the Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting and to examine coding compliance issues that influence reimbursement.
    4. Distinguish between various insurance plans and government sponsored health care.
    5. Differentiate between inpatient, post-acute care and ambulatory reimbursement systems.
    6. Describe the components of revenue cycle management.
    7. Discuss inpatient and outpatient reimbursement methodologies.
    8. Define the provisions and functions of health care insurance plans.
    9. Differentiate between the various government sponsored health care programs.


  
  • HIT 220 - Survey of Healthcare Delivery


    The study of the regulatory issues, content, use and structure of healthcare documentation as it relates various healthcare settings.  Simulated electronic health record system is used.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the various types of healthcare facilities.
    2. Discuss the medical record documentation used in healthcare facilities.
    3. Explain the regulations that impact various types of healthcare facilities.
    4. Discuss the role of Healthcare Information Management (HIM) professionals in healthcare settings.
    5. Explore reimbursement methodologies used throughout healthcare.


  
  • HIT 222 - Medical Legal Aspects


    Introduction to legal and ethical standards pertaining to medical practice and health information management. Legal aspects explored from the perspective of both patients and health care institutions. Topics such as federal and state legislation, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), consents, professional liabilities, and changes to the legal landscape stemming from the delivery of electronic health information are explored.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
     

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify elements of the health record information.
    2. Apply privacy strategies to health information.
    3. Apply security strategies to health information.
    4. Apply legal processes impacting health information.
    5. Demonstrate compliance with external forces such as Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); federal and state legislation; court orders; subpoenas; and warrants through assessment of behavior in accordance with ethical standards of practice.
    6. Acknowledge limitations such as perspective and bias, through assessment of behavior in accordance with ethical standards of practice.
    7. Articulate issues related to potential abuse or fraud in healthcare practices, and critically examine how this impacts the healthcare delivery system in the United States.
    8. Develop well-reasoned arguments and judgments to determine appropriate internal and external consequences for misconduct, breaches, and violations in healthcare settings.
    9. Identify, analyze, and evaluate ideas, data, and arguments regarding advance directives and the legalities of end-of-life care decisions.


  
  • HIT 236 - Quality Improvement


    A study of the components of quality assurance and improvement programs in healthcare; including quality assessment, utilization management, clinical documentation improvements, and risk management.  Collection, organization and presentation of data will be included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Discuss the development of quality review in the healthcare industry.
    2. Explain general quality improvement (QI) processes that include ongoing monitoring and evaluation (such as workflow and change management).
    3. Explain the importance of clinical documentation improvement (CDI) programs.
    4. Perform quality assessment audits, analyze the findings, and display findings using visual tools.
    5. Discuss the various components of utilization management including pre-admission, admission, and continued stay reviews.
    6. Identify the impact of policy on health care such as court decisions, federal regulations, and The Joint Commission standards that relate to quality of care and risk management.
    7. Identify the components of risk management related to health information management.
    8. Develop quality improvement tools with guidance for implementation in health information departments.


  
  • HIT 240 - Pathophysiology & Pharmacology


    Students will learn the diagnostic process, including common diagnostic procedures, to understand the methods used to explore the etiology, symptoms, and pathology for diseases in various body systems; determine a diagnosis; and learn how treatment plans are developed through the application of evidence-based medicine.  Basic pharmacological principles will be covered, including commonly prescribed drugs and the use of the scientific method during the process of drug development, throughout  the phases of clinical trials, and FDA approval.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 106 Medical Terminology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe signs and symptoms of specific diseases affecting various body systems.
    2. Explain how a diagnosis is made for various diseases.
    3. Explain common forms of evidence-based treatments for specific diseases.
    4. Identify commonly prescribed drugs used to treat various diseases.
    5. Understand how scientific reasoning and the scientific method (including observation, hypothesis development, measurement, and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence and employment of data analysis) is applied during the process of drug development in clinical trials.


  
  • HIT 245 - Clinical Practicum


    Professional practice experience in facilities, organizations and agencies related to healthcare.  Students will gain practical experience in technical procedures, and in developing appropriate professional skills while interacting with other professionals and consumers in the healthcare field.  Students will spend 135 hours over 5 weeks in healthcare settings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  All HIT courses must be successfully completed prior to participation in Clinical Practicum (HIT 101, 106, 107, 203, 204, 205, 208, 210, 214, 217, 220, 222, 236, 240, 295)

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    150 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the HIM department in the overall function of the healthcare institution.
    2. Observe the working relationships of the HIM practitioners and department staff, facility staff, visitors, and medical staff.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of patient confidentiality throughout the clinical practicum experience.
    4. Recognize and apply the characteristics of a professional in his/her attitude throughout the clinical practicum experience.
    5. Follow and demonstrate an understanding of facility/departmental policy and procedures.
    6. Gain practical experience in a variety of HIM functions under the supervision of experienced practitioners.


  
  • HIT 295 - Health Information Seminar


    A capstone course that will review and integrate theory and practice in Health Information.  Guest speakers will present on various topics and issues relevant to the profession.  Career opportunities, resume preparation, interviewing techniques, the job application process, and RHIT exam preparation will be discussed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
     

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Prepare an effective resume and cover letter.
    2. Correctly complete a job application.
    3. Explain the importance of earning the RHIT credential.
    4. Describe components of an effective RHIT exam preparation and application process.
    5. Conduct a dental chart audit utilizing a chart audit tool to ensure the accuracy of the healthcare data.
    6. Earn a passing score on the mock RHIT exam.


  
  • HLS 111 - Introduction to Homeland Security


    An overview of homeland security, including an evaluation of the progression of homeland security and emergency management issues throughout New York and the United States.  An examination of the roles undertaken and methods used by governmental agencies and individuals to respond to those issues.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required for degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the history behind the current practice of homeland security in the U.S.
    2. Identify the goals and philosophies within the field of homeland security.
    3. Summarize programs and methods used to meet the homeland security needs.
    4. Identify the specific roles that individuals and governmental agencies play in homeland security.


  
  • HLS 150 - Emergency Management


    A study of establishing a process and structure for systematic, coordinated, and effective delivery of emergency assistance to address consequences of major disasters or other emergencies occurring in the United States.  Covers public and private responses, mitigation, and recovery measures carried out by state, federal and local governments.  Topics include types of aid available to individuals and communities, intergovernmental emergency preparedness, planning, training, exercises, and coordination of efforts.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the concepts of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery.
    2. Identify the types of emergencies that require multiple agencies, and describe the response functions of those agencies in disasters.
    3. Explain the planning process for emergency preparedness.
    4. Identify the elements of an effective emergency response plan for an individual, a community, and/or a non-governmental organization.


  
  • HLS 200 - Theory and Practice of Terrorism


    A study of terrorism and the threat to the United States is a terrorist target.  Includes methods and operations of domestic and international terrorism, cyber and narco terrorism, the mindset of the terrorist, and organized crime’s connection to terrorism.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the evolving definition of terrorism.
    2. Identify terrorist organizations and their respective ideologies.
    3. Explain various models for identifying and combating terrorism.
    4. Describe the various impacts terrorism has on citizens, communities, and/or government entities.


  
  • HLS 202 - Emergencies and Disasters


    This course examines major natural and human-made emergencies and disasters, their impact on U.S. policy and politics, and diverse approaches to planning for these types of events.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify key emergency or disaster events that have shaped U.S. disaster policy.
    2. Describe approaches used for disaster management in the U.S.
    3. Explain the roles of civilians and the military in responding to emergencies and disasters.


  
  • HLS 205 - Bioterrorism & Public Health Emergencies


    An examination of the roles and responsibilities of hospitals, public health agencies, and the emergency medical services system in preparing for, and responding to, natural and human-made disasters, including bioterrorism.  This course explores the objectives and implementation of federal, state, and local health emergency management programs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the difference between public health and medicine.
    2. Identify legal and ethical issues in emergency medical services and disaster medicine.
    3. Explain current Federal, State, and local organizations and programs supporting health emergency management.
    4. Explain the threat posed by Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) weapons.
    5. Identify response actions for selected Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) weapons.


  
  • HLS 207 - Emergency Medical Services Disaster Response


    A study of the roles and responsibilities of emergency medical services systems, with a focus on disaster response.  This course explores the history and development of federal, state, and local emergency medical services programs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the major components of an emergency medical services system.
    2. Describe the roles and functions of emergency medical services systems.
    3. Explain current federal, state, and local roles in the oversight and development of emergency medical services systems.
    4. Identify how emergency medical services systems contribute to disaster response.


  
  • HLS 210 - Special Security Issues


    This course covers a varying range of focused topics in Homeland Security and Emergency Management.  Includes evolving topics, such as:  critical infrastructure protection, transportation security, border and immigration issues, cyber security, public health emergencies, and executive protection.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe various homeland security and emergency management activities in which the federal, county, state, local, tribal, territorial, and non-government organizations participate.
    2. Describe the various responses homeland security and emergency management organizations use for responding to security and safety issues.


  
  • HMS 245 - Cultural Competency in Counseling


    This course is designed to provide an overview of topics related to special and diverse populations of clients encountered in human services fields.  This course will provide historical and social context as well as cultural awareness and encourage development of skills necessary to understand and effectively counsel individuals with diverse racial, ethnic, minority/protected status, legal status, age, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.  Various gender, gender identity, and sexual orientation issues will also be discussed.  Content specific to veterans, trauma survivors, criminal justice-involved, domestic violence, physical/cognitive abilities, co-existing psychiatric disorders, compulsive behavior disorders or other disabilities will be included.  Specific substance use, prevention and treatment needs of special populations will be infused throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ASA 245
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

     

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define culture and cultural worldview, and describe how worldviews inform and affect both clients and providers in counseling and substance use disorder treatment.
    2. Describe the ethical imperative to approach clients’ issues in a culturally and socially competent manner.
    3. Identify the dimensions of culturally competent counseling, the treatment needs of special and diverse populations and recognize the need for specialized treatment responses given the unique cultural and social experiences of diverse populations of clients.
    4. Analyze systems of oppression in American society, and the ways that systems of oppression serve the privileged within existing social structures.
    5. Identify their own cognitive biases and/or prejudices, and analyze how this may impact their own counseling practice, behavior and responses to socially or culturally diverse clients.
    6. Identify current public policy issues of concern to the field of counseling and substance use disorder treatment and formulate potential avenues for advocacy.


  
  • HMS 250 - Human Service Organizations


    Overview of agencies whose mission is to assist people with needs that develop in their lives.  Emphasis is on human service organizations and the way these organizations function, their role in society, and the services they provide.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the variety of services provided by human services organizations.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the challenges, demands, expectations, and opportunities that human service organizations face.
    3. Appreciate the role of human service organizations and their importance to the social, economic, political, and cultural fabric of our society.
    4. Appreciate human service administration and practice and the factors associated with organizations becoming effective and efficient.
    5. Become better prepared to enter the human services as practitioner and professional.


  
  • HMS 290 - Human Service Field Experience


    A field placement in a health, human service or education setting, under the supervision of faculty and agency personnel.  Weekly seminar to develop helping and relationship-building skills.  Minimum of 10-hours of field work per week is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ENG 110 College Writing I, HMS 250 Human Service Organizations, PSY 110 General Psychology, SOC Introduction to Sociology

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 10 Field Experience Hours
    Note
    For Human Services students only.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Analyze multiple Human Services theories, values and professional ethics.
    2. Utilize accepted Human Services skills in a practice environment.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of Human Service networks and how they assess and meet client needs.
    4. Demonstrate self-care techniques to maintain personal well-being while in a setting that may lead to professional fatigue.


  
  • HON 170 - Honors Seminar


    The Honors First Year Seminar is a one-credit interdisciplinary course to be offered each fall to the incoming cohort of students accepted into the Honors Program.  The course primarily serves students in the Honors Program during their first semester at SUNY Broome.  Students will develop skills essential to their success as Honors students including critical thinking, interdisciplinary inquiry, and effective collaboration with others.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate critical thinking through development of an interdisciplinary research project.
    2. Present their research in a multi-modal fashion before an audience.


  
  • HON 270 - Honors Capstone Seminar


    The Honors Capstone Seminar is a one- to two-credit interdisciplinary course that will be offered each spring for Honors Program students completing their Honors Program requirements.  Students will work on their capstone Honors research projects in this course while learning about research; proposal writing; source evaluation; library offerings; presentation platforms; and oral, visual, and written presentations.  The final project will be the culmination of intensive thinking, research, writing, and collaboration that will allow students to learn about a subject in depth and to teach others about that subject.

    Credits: 1-2
    Hours
    1-2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate critical thinking through development of an interdisciplinary research project that includes a research proposal and an annotated bibliography.
    2. Present their synthesized research in a multi-modal fashion in a formal, academic, public setting through the Honors Program.


  
  • HOS 101 - Introductions for the Hospitality Freshman


    * This is a blended course.

    An introduction to college life and the hospitality industry for the beginning student in the Hospitality Department.  Familiarity with characteristics of the hospitality and tourism industry as well as hospitality industry sustainability and corporate responsibility are stressed.  Study of current trends and issues using a daily or weekly hospitality publication and Introduction to the Hospitality Industry text.  College and departmental policies and procedures, academic advisement and registration, study skills, transfer and employment, career navigation and mapping; work ethic; college and departmental resources.  Required course for all first semester hospitality students.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate awareness of SUNY Broome student academic policies and procedures.
    2. Analyze and investigate the various career fields in which hospitality skills may be utilized.
    3. Locate and evaluate information with an awareness of authority, validity, and bias using tools and sources appropriate in the hospitality discipline.
    4. Use information to create and disseminate materials/products using professional ethics appropriate to the hospitality discipline.


  
  • HOS 110 - Hospitality Industry Certifications


    This course provides preparatory instruction permitting students to sit for several hospitality industry recognized certifying exams and hospitality-related micro-credentials.  Required certifications may evolve with industry demands.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Study and prepare for hospitality industry recognized certifications, typically in food safety and sanitation, food allergy awareness, safe alcohol sales and service, and professional guest service techniques.
    2. Be eligible to sit for all required industry certifications.


  
  • HOS 115 - Hospitality Marketing & Sports Entertainment Promotions


    Development of marketing and promotion systems for sport entertainment, lodging properties, restaurants, bars, casinos, events, wedding planners, caterers, conventions, trade-shows, expositions, meeting planners, microbreweries and cruise ships.  Hospitality case-study and marketing project analysis will be a key aspect of the course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate familiarity with and competency in executing fundamental hospitality marketing and promotions.
    2. Explain the interrelationship of marketing and promotions with guest service quality, guest satisfaction, and guest loyalty.


  
  • HOS 127 - Hospitality Purchasing


    In depth instruction on foodservice purchasing techniques.  This course covers product information as well as management of the purchasing function and the relationship of effective purchasing toward maintaining a successful operation.  The selection and procurement functions of product and equipment within the hospitality foodservice industry are covered in detail.  Farm-to-fork concepts, locavore purchasing, and sustainability are explored.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply and demonstrate the concepts of purchasing techniques in the hospitality industry by addressing product and equipment identification, selection and procurement.
    2. Apply and demonstrate comprehension of the relationships between hospitality purchasing and effective hospitality cost controls.
    3. Apply and articulate purchasing concepts related to farm-to-fork, locavore, and sustainable purchasing techniques.


  
  • HOS 186 - Food in History and Society


    A socio-historical examination of food from the Middle Ages to the present with a focus on the United States and Europe.  Topics will include, but will not be limited to, how societies gather and prepare food; culinary tastes of different times and places; the influence of food/taste on trade, colonization, cultural exchange; and the impact of immigrations, globalization, and technology on food.  An exploration of the history and role of diversity (race/ethnicity/gender and social class) in the development of culinary taste and modern day culinary practices.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    SOC 186
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major concepts and theories used by historical sociologists.
    2. Apply the methods historical sociologists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    4. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    5. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
  • HOS 201 - Hospitality Internship I


    Career-related employment in the hospitality industry focusing on an area of interest.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a hospitality business setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  First year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  28 credit hours successfully completed in a hospitality degree or permission of Hospitality Programs Chair

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to effectively perform the skills required of the profession, including:  the ability to integrate theory and practice, communicate effectively, demonstrate professional behaviors, perform technical skills, and carry out the tasks related to their job assignment.


  
  • HOS 242 - Hospitality Human Resources


    This course provides a contextual background of human resources in the hospitality industry.  Effective resourcing of the hospitality industry, development of hospitality human resources, rewards and remuneration, hospitality employment relationships, and discussions of contemporary issues in human resource management in the hospitality industry are presented.  Human resource management in multi-site hospitality operations are introduced.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Articulate familiarity with unique hospitality human resource demands.
    2. Develop effective job designs, recruitment, selection, appointments, and induction techniques for the various hospitality industry resourcing demands.
    3. Effectively calculate probability and labor costs for the hospitality industry.


  
  • HOS 297 - Hospitality Internship II


    Career-related employment in the hospitality industry focusing on an area of interest.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a hospitality business setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  Second year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.  Senior Status.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  57 credit hours successfully completed in a hospitality degree or permission of Hospitality Programs Chair

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to effectively perform the skills required of the profession, including:  the ability to integrate theory and practice, communicate effectively, demonstrate professional behaviors, perform technical skills, and carry out the tasks related to their job assignment.


  
  • HST 100 - Seminar in Health Sciences


    This course provides an overview of various aspects related to selecting and preparing for a career in the health sciences.  Students will gain an understanding of strategies to become successful at SUNY Broome Community College, including development of learning and study strategies to enhance academic success, effective time management techniques, information management skills, a working knowledge of campus services and resources, and an understanding of academic and college policies.  Students will identify their career interests and determine the professional characteristics, educational requirements, and training necessary for their chosen career.  An introduction to professional behavior, ethical decision making, laws affecting the healthcare system, and cultural diversity and sensitivity is included.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify their learning style and strategies to be successful within their academic pursuits.
    2. Locate campus resources and campus policies to increase academic success.
    3. Perform a critical analysis of cultural competence and sensitivity.
    4. Identify their career goal within the healthcare field.
    5. Demonstrate proficiency with information management.


  
  • HST 104 - Health for Hispaniola


    Students will use a scientific approach to explore dynamics between health care, education, and poverty, while engaging in experiential service learning on the Island of Hispaniola.  Classes will introduce students to scientific methods as well as the history, culture, economic, political, and spiritual aspects of Haiti or the Dominican Republic.  Students will apply scientific concepts and models while engaging in diverse service projects in urban and rural communities.  Partner needs and students’ preexisting skills will determine specific service projects.  The course is designed to foster fellowship, provide humanitarian assistance, enhance civic responsibility, develop scientific, critical thinking and reflection skills required for participation in our dynamic, global world.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BIO 104
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Within a given field or discipline, identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.
    2. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class, and gender.
    3. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    4. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    5. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling; and application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.

     

  
  • HST 105 - Global Health in Ireland


    This global service-learning course provides the student an experiential learning opportunity that compares health care delivery systems in Ireland with other countries.  The course includes study and participation in selected clinical practice applications in professional health settings in Ireland that will provide comparisons within global health.  Students will also have numerous excursions that immerse them in the history, culture, traditions and social issues of Ireland.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate critical reflection about how one’s own attitudes and beliefs differ from those of other cultures and communities to achieve a higher level of cultural competency.
    2. Identify legal and ethical principles when planning health promotion for global health communities.
    3. Demonstrate civic engagement by integrating knowledge from their program of study and apply it to produce a program or service for the Irish community.
    4. Demonstrate teaching/learning strategies that promote health for clients, families, and communities in global health settings.


  
  • HST 109 - Personal Success Strategies


    This course is designed to help students become more successful in academic, personal, and professional realms.  Students will gain an understanding of how thought processes impact habits, attitudes, beliefs, and expectations.  Students will identify personal and professional goals, the barriers affecting their ability to reach these goals, and identify strategies to overcome these barriers.  Cognitive and behavioral strategies to help students enhance success and become self-empowered are included.  This course focuses on the development of the soft skills needed to help students reach their individual potential.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify fixed and growth mindset and strategies to foster a growth mindset. 
    2. Recognize and discuss the components of developing positive self-talk and how negative self-talk can impede achievement of set goals. 
    3. Identify future goals, barriers to achievement of these goals, and strategies for overcoming these barriers. 
    4. Create affirmations and apply the affirmation process to help them achieve personal and/or professional goals. 
    5. Recognize and discuss diversity, inclusion, and racial injustice as it applies to healthcare.  


  
  • HST 114 - CPR, First Aid, & Infectious Disease


    This course focuses on the provision of basic first aid and CPR to respond to emergencies.  Emphasis is on the recognition and response to medical emergencies within the community or healthcare setting and the ability of the student to successfully perform first aid/CPR skills.  Course will include American Heart Association Professional Level Basic Life Support and Heartsaver First Aid certifications, which are valid for 2 years and there is an additional fee for the cards.  This course will also provide students with an understanding of the principles of infection control to prevent the spread of infectious diseases and/or bloodborne pathogens.

    This course requires additional fees for the CPR and First Aid Certification Cards.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate and recognize the principles of infection control to prevent the spread of infectious diseases and/or blood-borne pathogens following CDC guidelines.
    2. Demonstrate proper technique for 1 and 2 rescuer CPR for infants, children, and adults, including use of an AED, following American Heart Association guidelines.
    3. Perform first aid procedures for basic medical emergencies, following American Heart Association guidelines.


  
  • HST 115 - Clinical Patient Care for the Medical Office


    This course provides the student with an introduction to the field of medical assisting and basic clinical procedures in the ambulatory care setting.  Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to perform vital signs and anthropometric measurements, prepare exam rooms and trays, assist with exams, procedures, and treatments.  Students will learn and demonstrate therapeutic communication techniques in order to provide patient education and complete patient medical histories.  This course  provides an overview of the human body, including normal function, pathophysiology, the diagnostic measures and treatments used to treat pathology, and medical terminology and abbreviations associated with body systems and procedures.  Additionally, students will identify the signs of child abuse and complete mandated reporter training, providing evidence of certification.  The importance of identifying, maintaining, and performing proper infection control, including medical and surgical asepsis, according to CDC regulations, is also emphasized throughout this course. 

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform vital signs and anthropometric measurements.
    2. Prepare for and assist during patient examinations and procedures.
    3. Complete patient medical histories and educate patients about treatment plans and procedures, utilizing therapeutic communication techniques.


  
  • HST 160 - Health Promotion & Wellness


    Students will learn communication techniques to motivate patients to facilitate change of habits and behaviors that impede health and wellness.  This course examines various health and wellness challenges patients face including social, financial, and emotional barriers which often present detrimental challenges to maintaining a healthy lifestyle.  Students will explore topics related to holistic health and wellness promotion including, but not limited to stress management, nutrition and its impact on health, harm reduction for at-risk behaviors, and optimizing the work-life balance.  Emphasis will be placed on the application of the transtheoretical model to coach patients o optimize wellness and decrease their health-related risks.  Students will have the opportunity to conduct a self-assessment of their own lifestyle which will provide them with the tools needed to educate and coach patients in the promotion of health and wellness.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify habits, behaviors, and choices detrimental to health and well-being and discuss appropriate changes to reduce health-related risks.
    2. Assess common barriers (e.g., social, financial, and emotional) that impede health and wellness and formulate a plan to help a patient manage these.
    3. Apply the transtheoretical model (stages of change) to various lifestyle situations including, but not limited to stress management, poor nutritional choices, and improving work-life balance.
    4. Utilize basic patient health coaching methods to optimize wellness and health promotion with all patients, particularly at-risk populations.


  
  • HST 161 - Women’s Health


    The elective course introduces the student to the developmental, physical, psychological, social, socioeconomic, cultural, and political influences related to women’s health care.  Students will be introduced to various healthcare resources available to meet the needs of women.  Activities throughout this course are designed to promote critical thinking and will assist students to analyze and evaluate information to create positive health care environments for women.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the physical needs and healthcare issues of women throughout the life cycle.
    2. Identify the psychological needs of women.
    3. Identify cultural factors which influence health care of women.
    4. Evaluate healthcare resources to promote health in women.

     

  
  • HST 162 - Personal and Community Health


    This elective course introduces the student to the health issues and problems related to individuals and communities.  This course explores aspects of wellness/health promotion and factors which impede wellness/health.  Throughout the course, the student will explore various topics, including, but not limited to:  mental health, stress, nutrition, physical activity, body image, drug and alcohol use, social relationships, sexuality, reproductive choices, communicable diseases including sexually transmitted diseases, chronic diseases, aging, personal safety, and violence/injury prevention.  An exploration of current events related to community health topics assists the student to develop an understanding of issues related to wellness/health racing consumers.  This course will allow students to gain a better understanding of their physical, emotional, and social needs and to develop strategies to promote their overall health and well-being.

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    PED 162
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify factors to promote health/wellness for individuals and the community.
    2. Identify factors which impede health/wellness for individuals and the community.
    3. Identify steps to improve personal safety, and to prevent violence and injury.
    4. Locate and analyze current events related to community health topics.
    5. Assess their individual levels of wellness; identifying lifestyle changes they intend to make to improve their overall wellness.


  
  • HST 201 - Clinical Patient Care - Laboratory


    This course introduces the student to basic microbiology, hematology, and urinalysis procedures performed in the ambulatory care setting.  Students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to obtain specimens and perform CLIA waived tests, phlebotomy, and urinalysis.  This course will provide an understanding of quality control and quality assurance issues related to the medical laboratory, and students will be able to perform a quality control measure and differentiate between normal and abnormal test results.  Lab safety, proper use of personal protective equipment, and following CDC and OSHA guidelines, is emphasized throughout the course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. State safety precautions and demonstrate ability to perform safety measures in the laboratory.
    2. Define terms related to urinalysis and phlebotomy.
    3. Perform venipuncture and capillary puncture procedures.
    4. Obtain specimens and perform CLIA waived tests and urinalysis.
    5. Define quality control and quality assurance and perform a quality control measure.
    6. Differentiate between normal and abnormal test results.


  
  • HST 206 - Medical Office Administration & the EHR


    This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform administrative procedures to effectively prepare them to work within the ambulatory care setting.  Students will learn the fundamentals of telemedicine and how to work within the electronic health record and the guidelines of the law.  Simulated exercises throughout the course will provide students with the skills necessary to work within practice management and electronic management record systems.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate professional correspondence in all communication.
    2. Establish and maintain provider and patient appointment schedules.
    3. Utilize health record systems while protecting the integrity of the medical record.
    4. Identify financial management plans, insurance, and codes to bill for services.


  
  • HST 207 - Capstone for Health Careers


    A capstone course that reviews the knowledge base, didactic theory, and skills applicable to the field of healthcare.  Preparation of professional portfolio, cover letters, resume and interview skills for professional employment in healthcare included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HST 100 Seminar in Health Sciences

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Utilize professionalism in communications.
    2. Create a portfolio, including a resume and cover letter suitable for healthcare employment.
    3. Discuss strategies to navigate and succeed in a new career environment.
    4. Evaluate areas of strength and weakness in preparation for professional interviews.


  
  • HST 208 - Medical Law & Ethics for Healthcare Professionals


    This course introduces medical ethics and laws related to the healthcare profession.  Students gain an understanding of medical ethics which set the standard of conduct for healthcare professionals.  Laws pertaining to healthcare, including civil and criminal law, and statutory and regulatory requirements of the healthcare professional will be emphasized.  Bioethical topics will be introduced, and students will gain the ability to apply ethical principles, theories, and requirements of the law to ethical dilemmas.  A focus on differentiating between personal and professional ethics and how personal morals impact professional performance will aid the student in the ethical decision making process.  

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define and apply ethical principles and theories to ethical dilemmas and bioethical issues faced by healthcare professionals and their patients.
    2. Compare and contrast the scope of practice, education, training, credentialing, licensing requirements, and standard of care for various providers and allied healthcare professionals.
    3. Define medicolegal terms.
    4. Identify laws impacting the practice of healthcare.


  
  • HST 210 - Pharmacology


    This course provides an introduction to the clinical concepts of pharmacology, relevant and useful to a variety of health science curricula. Students will gain an understanding of the major drug classifications, uses, side effects, adverse effects, contraindications, and interactions used to treat and prevent disease, and maintain homeostasis for each of the body systems. Basic principles of medication administration, pharmaceutical mathematics, and the use of the scientific reasoning and method during the drug development and approval process from clinical trials, testing, to market approval of the process of drug development to FDA approval.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: BIO 101 Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology, BIO 102 Foundations of Biology for Anatomy & Physiology, BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I, or permission of chair

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe methods of drug classification, controlled substance schedules, and pregnancy categories.
    2. Describe the FDA approval process for new medications, and the regulations related to medications, herbs, and supplements.
    3. Identify medication rights, guidelines, routes, and techniques of safe medication administration.
    4. Identify drug classifications, indications for use, side effects, contraindications, and how drugs affect the various body systems, including:  nervous; urinary; cardiovascular; immune; respiratory; gastrointestinal; endocrine; reproductive; musculoskeletal; integumentary; and the eye and ear.
    5. Demonstrate ability to apply knowledge of mathematical computations to solve equations related to medication dosages.
    6. Demonstrate how scientific reasoning and scientific method are applied, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and application of data analysis/scientific data are applied during the drug development, clinical trial, and drug approval phase.

     

  
  • HST 211 - Clinical Patient Care - Advanced Skill


    Practical application of advanced technical procedures in medical assisting specifically oriented to the various medical specialties.  Students will gain the knowledge and skills specific to performing electrocardiograms (EKGs), mobility aids (crutch walking, wheelchair/walker use), visual acuity/color vision and auditory testing, wound care, sterile technique, and pharmacology basics.  The medical assistant’s role in using screening tools coordinating care, and providing patient education will also be emphasized.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform and prepare patients for diagnostic tests and medical procedures.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency with using healthcare screening tools.
    3. Demonstrate safe medication preparation, administration, and documentation.


  
  • HST 212 - Crisis Intervention


    Crisis Intervention management will explore how to build the needed skills, knowledge, and confidence base to better understand and assist those who are in crisis.  The course will provide an understanding of how to maintain / intellectual control during a crisis situation, de-escalation techniques, and intervention on an interpersonal level, including awareness, understanding, calming, and prevention.  Coping techniques / stress management for emergent and chronic crisis events.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain different types and sources of a person experiencing a crisis.
    2. Analyze strategic failures leading to a crisis.
    3. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a crisis response plan.
    4. Create a patient/client crisis management plan using best principles and practices.


  
  • HST 247 - Healthcare Internship


    This course will guide the student while in an approved fieldwork experience designed for health studies majors.  Students will participate in a supervised fieldwork experience where they will apply health-based theory, method, and skills.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Internship Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform the expected requirements of the position, while staying within scope of practice as a healthcare intern.
    2. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills.


  
  • HUM 104 - Introduction to Classical Mythology


    This course is designed to introduce the basic substance of the stories which constitute classical Greek mythology.  The course is also meant to provide experience in reading and understanding those stories in their original context - so far as that can be determined - in order to discern how they have continued to influence Western art and culture to express the values of that art and culture.  Key traditional interpretative methods will be examined and applied to the Greek myths.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define the conventions and methods of classical Greek mythology.
    2. Recognize and analyze nuance and complexity of meaning through critical reflections on text, visual images, or artifacts.


  
  • INT 215 - Special Event Interior Design


    This course addresses major trends and successful business practices in Special Event Management and Interior Design to provide the knowledge and tools to improve your effectiveness and profitability as a special event designer/manager/owner/operator.  Students will learn special event design materials and tool usage, special event centerpiece design and construction with a special focus on weddings, trade show booth displays and construction, table settings and material selection and related special even Décor props design and construction.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    EVE 215
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1. Students are to be taught the special event business and more specifically the interior designs that go along with that business that make it special.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Create and manage a successful special events enterprise.
    2. Build special event clientele.
    3. Effectively select special event venues.
    4. Financially manage a profitable special event.
    5. Identify and prioritize special event goals and objectives.
    6. Identify potential challenges to creating a successful special event cabinet.
    7. Choose materials for, design and construct table centerpieces; special focus on weddings.
    8. Employ effective color coordination.
    9. Design and create islands of Décor.
    10. Create professional floral arrangements for special events.
    11. Employ and devise creative special event concepts.
    12. Research special event interior design ideas and experiences.


  
  • INT 220 - Principles of Floral Design


    This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the hands-on skills and theory required for career success in event function and commercial/residential floral design.  Students will understand the elements, principles, forms, styles and techniques of floral design.  Students will learn to identify flowers and interior foliage plants, create specialty floral items and develop knowledge of sound business management practices and careers in the floral industry.  Students will learn floral marketing, pricing and sales.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    EVE 220
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Gain familiarity with basic floral supplies and equipment.
    2. Practice the proper care and handling of fresh flowers.
    3. Understand and utilize the basic elements and principles of design.
    4. Create professional centerpiece arrangements with permanent flowers.
    5. Be exposed to and create asymmetrical arrangements.
    6. Have a working knowledge of the major foliage available to floral designers.
    7. Obtain the skill-set to work with and without floral foam.
    8. Develop expertise in the creation of a composite flower - Glamellia.
    9. Obtain proficiency at creating a round bridal bouquet; a cascade bridal bouquet; corsages and boutonnieres.
    10. Develop a familiarity with contemporary design techniques.
    11. Obtain the ability to select and recommend appropriate flowers for an arrangement.
    12. Experience and perform floral creations that maximize visual value.
    13. Develop pricing, marketing and selling plans for the sale of floral arrangements.


  
  • ITA 101 - Beginning Italian I


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Exhibit basic proficiency in the understanding and use of Italian.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctive features of the cultures associated with Italian.


  
  • ITA 102 - Beginning Italian II


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ITA 101 Beginning Italian I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Exhibit basic proficiency in the understanding and use of Italian.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctive features of the cultures associated with Italian.


  
  • LAW 110 - Survey of Paralegalism


    Role of the paralegal and attorney.  Introduction to jurisprudence and functions of administrative agencies. Local, state, federal courts.  Introduction to contracts, torts, negligence, criminal procedure, real property law, law office management.  Legal terminology.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize the jurisdictional structure of the New York State court system.
    2. Recognize the jurisdictional structure of the local court system.
    3. Recognize the original and appellate distinctions of the judicial system.
    4. Prepare legal documents pursuant to NYS statutory law.
    5. Apply the rules learned to the preparation of legal documents.


  
  • LAW 200 - Real Property Law


    Comprehensive survey of law of real property, emphasizing practical application to a paralegal function.  Analysis of form of deeds, bonds, notes, mortgages, assignments, discharges, purchase of contracts, leases and options.  Training in searching title, basic understanding of abstracts of title, real property litigation, estates, condemnation and foreclosure.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define the legal terminology regarding the ownership, acquisition and conveyance of Real Estate.
    2. Articulate an understanding regarding the distinction between Personal and Real Property.
    3. Understand the Law of Fixtures by identifying various legal texts used in fixture law.
    4. Understand the process of transferring title to Real Estate; including the use of deeds, mortgages, promissory notes, real estate contracts, and closing statements and prepare such statements.
    5. Close the Real Estate transaction.
    6. Articulate the difference between a buyer representation and a seller representation.
    7. Understand the role of the County Clerk Records in the Real Estate Transaction by recording various documents.


  
  • LAW 207 W - Legal Writing and Research


    Development of legal research and drafting skills through use of digests, reporter systems, and other features of law libraries.  Analysis of various types of legal documents for clarity, composition, conciseness.  Practice in research and drafting of legal documents.  Writing Emphasis Course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism and ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of legal research by preparing an assignment using the Westlaw database and preparing a legal brief.
    2. Demonstrate an ability to identify and argue legal issues by responding to a classroom legal fact pattern in written and oral format.
    3. Illustrate an understanding in drafting legal documents by preparing legal briefs, courtroom briefs and legal position papers.


 

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