Jun 15, 2024  
Website Catalog (In Development) 
    
Website Catalog (In Development)

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • MUS 105 - Music Theory I


    A beginning course in music theory, including the rudiments of music, harmonic analysis including inversions through the dominant seventh chord, passing tones and part writing in root position of all diatonic triads excluding the diminished chord.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Visually and aurally distinguish between seven types of scales, Major and minor keys, and Major, minor, Augmented, and diminished triads.
    2. Identify and build the seven different church modes.
    3. Correctly build the Major and relative minor key signatures in the Circle of Fifths/Fourths.
    4. Successfully identify the harmonic chords in both Major and minor keys.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of music theory and the creative process inherent therein.


  
  • MUS 106 - Music Theory II


    Continuation of Music Theory I including part writing of all diatonic chords in first and second inversion, harmonic analysis of all non-harmonic tones including inversions of the dominant seventh chord and transposition and scoring for brass instruments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 105 Music Theory I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Visually and aurally distinguish between all cadences and non-chord tones.
    2. Construct and discuss the differences between small form types.
    3. Correctly build seventh chords in both Major and minor keys.
    4. Successfully analyze and compose counterpoint examples in First and Second species.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of music theory and the creative process inherent therein.


  
  • MUS 107 - Music Theory III


    Continuation of Music Theory II including writing and analysis of the dominant seventh chord, the diminished seventh chord, applied dominants, chromatic third relationships, modulation to related and foreign keys, mode mixture, Neapolitan 6th chord, Augmented Sixth chords, analysis of form including Sonata Form, Rondo, Theme and Variations and an introduction to Species Counterpoint.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 106 Music Theory II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Visually and aurally distinguish between Neapolitan and all three types of Augmented Sixth chords.
    2. Construct and discuss the differences between Italian, French, and German Augmented Sixth chords.
    3. Correctly build secondary dominant and secondary leading time chords in both Major and minor keys.
    4. Successfully analyze a piano sonata that includes mode mixture and borrowed chords.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of music theory and the creative process inherent therein.


  
  • MUS 108 - Music before 1800: Medieval to Classical


    Students will develop an understanding of music from the Middle Ages through 1800 A.D.  With active listening and discussion of the important historical and cultural influences, the development of music in the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical Periods will be examined.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of music in the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical periods.
    2. Recognize and analyze nuance and complexity of meaning through critical reflections on text, visual images, or artifacts.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of music in the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical Period and the creative process inherent therein.
    4. Identify important composers and specific compositions representing all important genres.


  
  • MUS 109 - Ragtime to rock: American Popular Music


    A survey of American popular music including folk songs, musical theater, jazz, country, rock, rhythm and blues, and bluegrass.  This course will familiarize the student with popular music which helped shape the American culture and reflect important social, historical and political events.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of popular music.
    2. Recognize and analyze nuance and complexity of meaning through critical reflections on text, visual images, or artifacts.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of popular music and the creative process inherent therein.
    4. Identify the origins and explain development of all major genres of popular music.


  
  • MUS 111 - 19th Century Music


    Important musicians and musical styles of the Romantic Period.  Emphasis on developments in piano literature, the symphony orchestra and opera.  Listening to selected recordings and attendance at local concerts.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of music in the Romantic Period.
    2. Recognize and analyze nuance and complexity of meaning through critical reflections on text, visual images, or artifacts.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of music in the Romantic Period and the creative process inherent therein.
    4. Identify the important movements and individual composers of the century and the contributions of each to stylistic progress.


  
  • MUS 112 - 20th Century Music and Beyond


    This course will cover the many and varied streams of stylistic development from 1900 on, beginning with the transition out of a Romantic style.  It will follow both evolutionary and revolutionary trends, with an emphasis on American composers.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of music in the 20th Century and beyond.
    2. Recognize and analyze nuance and complexity of meaning through critical reflections on text, visual images, or artifacts.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of music in the 20th Century and beyond and the creative process inherent therein.
    4. Describe the transition out of a Romanticism-based aesthetic into a wider range of styles and motivations.


  
  • MUS 113 - Spirituals to Hip Hop: American Music of the African Diaspora


    This course is an introduction to the history of the music of the African diaspora.  It is designed to introduce students to tools for critical listening and concepts for study, applied to the rich and multifaceted musical cultures of black Americans.  We will examine the contributions of musicians of African descent to western art music as interpreters and creators, as well as to the genres of ragtime, blues, jazz, gospel, soul, R&B, disco, hip-hop and rap.  We will focus on the musical forms, content, and styles of these repertoires, and locate them in their historical, political, and cultural contexts with specific references to the inequalities of gender, race, and class.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of American music of the African diaspora and the creative process inherent therein.
    2. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class, and gender.
    3. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    4. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    5. Within a given field or discipline, students will identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
  • MUS 115 - Ear Training I


    Aural training in melodic dictation and sight singing in two clefs.  Also, discrimination of intervals needed to sight read music.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Sing simple major and minor songs using standard solfege techniques.
    2. Sing major and minor triads, major and minor intervals of Major 2nd to a Perfect 5th, as well as major scales, and minor scales including natural, harmonic, and melodic minor.
    3. Write four measure, two-part examples of melodic dictation, and simple four-measure examples of rhythmic dictation.


  
  • MUS 116 - Ear Training II


    A continuation of MUS 115 Ear Training I.  Emphasizes dictation in two parts in various clefs and further develops interval and rhythmic discrimination.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 115 Ear Training I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Sing medium level major and minor songs using standard solfege techniques.
    2. Sing and master singing in alto and other clefs.
    3. Sing and identify intervals of major 6ths, 7ths, and tri-tones, and be able to sight sing using kodaly hand signals.
    4. Sing various levels of chord progressions and be able to write Soprano/Alto/Bass examples of melodic dictation.
    5. Master four measure examples of rhythmic dictation.


  
  • MUS 117 - Ear Training III


    A continuation of MUS 116 Ear Training II.  Will stress the development of dictation in three parts, modulation, and sight singing.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 116 Ear Training II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Sing and identify all intervals.
    2. Sing more advanced musical examples employing modulation.
    3. Sing advanced chord progressions, as well as chords in root, first, and second inversions.
    4. Write four measure soprano/alto/tenor/bass examples, as well as four measure rhythmic dictation employing syncopation.


  
  • MUS 120 - Piano Class I


    Group piano lessons are given which will allow students the opportunity to develop basic piano skills and develop proper technique on the instrument.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Studio Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Play an elementary to a late elementary piano solo.
    2. Play beginning scales, chords, arpeggios.
    3. Sight read at an elementary level.
    4. Play from a beginning lead sheet.


  
  • MUS 121 - Piano Class II


    This course is a continuation of Piano Class I and further develops the necessary piano skills required to perform elementary to intermediate piano literature.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 120 Piano Class I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Studio Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Play an intermediate to late intermediate piano solo.
    2. Play 12 major scales, chords and arpeggios.
    3. Sight read at an intermediate level.
    4. Harmonize melodies with I, IV, V, I.
    5. Transpose short excerpts at the elementary level.
    6. Play from a lead sheet.


  
  • MUS 160 - Recording and Production I


    An introduction to digital audio recording and editing and associated technologies.  This course will cover basic microphone types and techniques, fundamental principles of sound and psychoacoustics, digital audio formats, signal flow, and gain structure.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours, 2 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Record, import, and edit digital audio files in a Digital Audio Workstation.
    2. Recall and compare digital audio file format standards and properties.
    3. Identify different types of microphones, their characteristics, and their applications in the recording studio.


  
  • MUS 161 - Recording and Production II


    An introduction to MIDI recording and editing in a Digital Audio Workstation with an emphasis on tempo-based operations and electronic sound design techniques, including synthesis, sampling, and signal processing.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours, 2 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Record and edit MIDI tracks in a Digital Audio Workstation.
    2. Implement virtual instruments in a multitrack Digital Audio Workstation session.
    3. Apply EO, dynamics processing, and time-based effects.


  
  • MUS 162 - Beat Production I


    This course serves as an introduction to the process of composing and arranging instrumental beats using MIDI controllers and Digital Audio Workstation software.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Lab Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Construct and modify rhythmic MIDI sequences in a Digital Audio Workstation.
    2. Prepare and use audio files as loops and samples in instrumental beats.
    3. Create and record simple harmonic progressions using MIDI.
    4. Explain how copyright laws apply to sample-based music and describe the process obtaining permissions to license samples.


  
  • MUS 163 - Beat Production II


    This course serves as a continuation of the topics and techniques introduced in MUS 162 with an added focus on sound design, creative strategies for composition and production, active listening, and exploring historical and contemporary stylistic characteristics of sample-based music.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Lab Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and emulate techniques and stylistic characteristics of sample-based music.
    2. Design custom virtual instrument patches and samples.
    3. Add vocals or live instrument tracks to sample-based and MIDI-based arrangements.
    4. Publish beats with license agreements on an online beat marketplace.


  
  • MUS 170 - Music and Computers


    A hands-on introduction to how computers assist in music notation, music sequencing, and MIDI data entry.  Topics include: audio synthesis, MIDI and audio editing, audio recording, creating a publisher ready score and Finale note entry and sequencing.  A strong understanding of music notation is required.  Music Theory I is recommended but not necessary.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Discuss different ways musicians use computers as a music production tool including the preparations required by the musician and specific minimum configurations required from a computer before it can be used for various purposes.
    2. Complete a paper comparing different software programs and explain which one would meet their musical needs and how they would guide others.
    3. Use a computer to create complex sheet music involving time signature changes, changes in modality, use of various notation alternatives such as rhythmic notation and accurately making use of articulations, expressions, lyrics and interpretive features used in the professional publishing of sheet music and scores. (This is a writing component using notation software, FINALE).
    4. Use Pro Tools to create a basic audio project using audio interface, a MIDI interface and basic signal routing within the ProTools environment.
    5. Discuss various resources professional musicians currently use to share and continue to expand their skill with music software to continue their self-learning.


  
  • MUS 184 - Songwriting


    An introduction to the process of creating and marketing an original song that is suitable for recording and publication.  Topics include: chord progressions, hooks, style, form, melody, introductions and endings, demos, copyright, marketing and music publishing.  Music Theory I is highly recommended for this course but not necessary if a student has a basic understanding of music fundamentals.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Write a song suitable for recording.
    2. Negotiate the selling and promotion of copyrighted music.
    3. Record a rough demo of their music.


  
  • MUS 185 - Beginning Guitar


    Emphasis on Music Fundamentals, scales, chords, reading rhythms and learning to accompany singers.  Students must own their own instruments.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Play at least fifteen different chords.
    2. Read basic musical rhythms in treble clef.
    3. Demonstrate correct picking and fingering techniques.
    4. Discuss and demonstrate chord and scale theory.


  
  • MUS 186 - Guitar Ensemble


    Provide students the opportunity to perform music for the guitar in a group setting.  Emphasis will be on group and individual playing.  The music played will be chosen with respect to the historical literature available.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Studio Hours
    Note
    May be repeated for credit 3 times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Participate in a concert that demonstrates the students’ ability to rehearse and perform guitar ensemble repertoire.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate concert etiquette.


  
  • MUS 190 - The College Choir


    The College Choir is a non-audition mixed-voice choir open to all SUNY Broome students.  The choir rehearses and performs a variety of repertoire from different time periods and musical genres.  College Choir is required for all students taking Applied Music: Voice.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Studio Hours
    Note
    (May be repeated 3 times for credit)

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Participate in a concert that demonstrates the students’ ability to rehearse and perform choral music.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate concert etiquette.


  
  • MUS 191 - Music Performance


    Students develop basic performance and musicianship skills by participating in recitals, concerts or approved music classes associated with SUNY Broome Community College’s Music Performance groups and music program.

    Credits: 1
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times for credit.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have been involved in an approved community-based musical ensemble that will have further developed their performance abilities in either vocal or instrumental music.


  
  • MUS 194 - Voice Class I


    Provides any student the opportunity to learn correct vocal production, breath control, diction, articulation and musical interpretation of art songs.  Emphasis is on tonal production and group and individual singing.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Sing simple class songs, as well as a more advanced solo song/aria employing standard techniques for good vocal production.
    2. Sing with proper breath support, and will demonstrate frontal and pharyngeal resonance, proper diction, and vowel equalization.
    3. Sing songs or arias with an understanding of proper vocal pedagogy.


  
  • MUS 195 - Jazz Ensemble


    The Jazz Ensemble is open to all members of the SUNY Broome community.  It focuses on the rehearsal and performance of jazz, Latin, and pop instrumental music for big band.  Instrumentation includes piano, bass, drums, saxophones, trumpets, trombones, and guitar.  The Jazz Ensemble performs a public concert at the end of each semester.

    Credits: 1
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Participate in a concert that demonstrates the students’ ability to rehearse and perform big band jazz repertoire.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate concert etiquette.


  
  • MUS 196 - String Ensemble


    The String Ensemble is open to all members of the SUNY Broome community.  This ensemble performs works written or arranged for string orchestra.  When appropriate, this group will also include select woodwinds, brass and percussion.

    Credits: 1
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Participate in a concert that demonstrates the students’ ability to rehearse and perform string ensemble repertoire.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate concert etiquette.


  
  • MUS 197 - Applied Music I


    For students in their first semester.  To enable instrumental and vocal students to study privately with a teacher and develop their musical performance abilities.  Not a course for beginners.  A minimum of 12 lessons required per semester.  Cost of lessons is included in SUNY Broome tuition if student qualifies for financial aid.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate freshman level performance skills and techniques in their respective applied area (voice or instrumental) that meet, or exceed the requirements established at transfer institutions.


  
  • MUS 198 - Applied Music II


    Continuation of MUS 197 Applied Music I, for second semester students.  A minimum of 12 lessons required per semester and continued musical growth and maturity in solo and ensemble performance is expected.  Cost of lessons is included in SUNY Broome tuition if the student qualifies for financial aid.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 197 Applied Music I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate freshman level (second semester) vocal or instrumental performance skills and techniques in their respective applied areas that meet, or exceed the requirements established at various transfer institutions.


  
  • MUS 199 - Intermediate Guitar


    Continuation of beginning guitar.  Emphasis on picking techniques, fingerings, chords, music readings and performance.  There will also be a greater emphasis on technique.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 185 Beginning Guitar

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Play movable chord shapes along the neck.
    2. Read and perform treble clef melodies along the neck.
    3. Read complex musical rhythms in treble clef.
    4. Demonstrate advanced flatpicking and fingerstyle techniques.
    5. Discuss and demonstrate chord and scale theory in relation to rock, blues, jazz, and classical styles.


  
  • MUS 201 - College Band


    College band is required of all woodwind, brass and percussion majors and open to the campus community.  The band performs two major concerts during the year as well as providing music for various college functions.  

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Studio Hours
    Note
    May be repeated three times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Participate in a concert that demonstrates the students’ ability to rehearse and perform concert band repertoire.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate concert etiquette.


  
  • MUS 260 - Recording and Production III


    Building on the concepts introduced in the first two courses, Recording and Production III focuses on organizing and conducting studio recording sessions.  Topics covered include:  signal routing in the studio, technical ear training and critical listening, and editing and mixing multitrack Digital Audio Workstation projects.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MUS 160 Recording Production I and MUS 161 Recording Production II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Track, edit, and mix a full band session for a pop/rock song.
    2. Implement advanced microphone techniques in the recording studio.
    3. Apply advanced editing and mixing techniques in a Digital Audio Workstation.


  
  • MUS 261 - Recording and Production IV


    As the final course in the sequence, students apply skills and knowledge from the previous courses to advanced recording and production projects with a focus on independent organization and execution.  Topics covered include:  basic sound reinforcement, roles of recording and production personnel, techniques for recording different ensembles and musical genres, and on-location recording outside of the studio.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 260 Sound Engineering III

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Arrange and produce an independent recording project.
    2. Record vocal and instrumental ensembles.
    3. Demonstrate on-location mobile recording techniques.
    4. Master audio tracks and prepare them for distribution.


  
  • MUS 290 - Chamber Singers


    Chamber Singers is a select vocal ensemble of twelve to twenty-four singers performing choral masterpieces from all periods of music, including madrigals, spirituals, jazz arrangements, twentieth-century choral music, and contemporary choral music.  Utilizing small ensemble techniques, the group performs a cappella and accompanied music in concerts at high schools, nursing homes, churches, and service organizations in and around the local area.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  MUS 190 The College Choir

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Participate in a concert that demonstrates the students’ ability to rehearse and perform in a small vocal ensemble.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate concert etiquette.


  
  • MUS 294 - Voice Class II


    Continuation of Voice Class I and for students who have performed in high school musicals, chorus and/ or those who have studied privately.  This is a group situation in which vocal literature appropriate to individual and group singing will be sung.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 194 Voice Class I or permission of instructor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Continue to sing moderately complex class songs as well as a more advanced solo song/aria employing standard techniques for good vocal production.
    2. Demonstrate singing with proper breath support, and will demonstrate frontal and pharyngeal resonance, proper diction, and vowel equalization.
    3. Continue to sing more advanced songs or arias with an understanding of proper vocal pedagogy.


  
  • MUS 295 - Special Topics in Music


    Course will be an in depth study of a specific topic in music.

    Credits: 1-3
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours; 1-3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    The specific learning outcomes will vary according to the particular course/subject taught.  The specific outcomes developed will all support and be grounded in the general Music Program outcomes.  (i.e. Articulate the intrinsic constructs of music as they relate to music theory, music history and musical styles and practices of major composers from the Renaissance through the post-modern era as it pertains to the special topics course.)

  
  • MUS 296 - Internship


    An internship for individual students with local arts, educational, or business organizations.  The students will gain professional work experience in preparation for careers related to music.  Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and keep a journal of tasks completed at their internship site.

    Credits: 1-3 Variable
    Hours
    3-9
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Integrate their experience with the workings of arts/business/educational organizations into developing a larger perspective of their chosen area of music.
    2. Apply the knowledge gained within a particular field related to their career path.
    3. Learn to budget time in relation to required tasks.
    4. Establish a network of contacts in their chosen area.
    5. Develop a list of references for future employment.


  
  • MUS 297 - Applied Music III


    Continuation of MUS 198 Applied Music II, for third semester students.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 198 Applied Music II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate sophomore level (first semester) vocal or instrumental performance skills and techniques in their respective applied areas that meet or exceed the requirements established at various transfer institutions.


  
  • MUS 298 - Applied Music IV


    Continuation of MUS 197 Applied Music III, for fourth semester students.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 297 Applied Music III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate sophomore level (second semester) vocal or instrumental performance skills and techniques in their respective applied areas that meet or exceed the requirements established at various transfer institutions.


  
  • MUS 299 - Independent Study: Music


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of music.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 semester hours of college level work in music

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Dependent on the specific approved activity.

  
  • OCE 226 - Oceanography


    Oceanography is the study of fundamental principles of ocean science.  A wide range of subjects will be presented including marine organisms, ocean currents, waves, geophysical fluid dynamics, plate tectonics, the geology of the ocean floor, tides, coastal processes, and the biology of diverse ecosystems such as deep-sea vents, coral reefs, and estuaries.  The laboratory portion of the course takes place at partner institutions such as the University of South Carolina, Belle W. Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences in Georgetown, South Carolina.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to oceanography, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore marine phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling.
    2. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to oceanography, including application of scientific data, concepts, and models in marine science.
    3. Explain the interconnection between our oceans and global climate.
    4. Describe anthropogenic pressures on ocean resources and the environmental issues related to our oceans.


  
  • PED 103 - Backpacking (CV)


    A series of laboratories and lectures that focus on outdoor education and the recreational activity of backpacking. Students learn to select, care for, and properly use the essential equipment required for backpacking and some low-cost alternatives to more expensive items. This course also focuses on environmental education, including the safety aspects of backpacking and taking care of our environment, stressing low ecological impact. Students participate in hikes and may have the opportunity for an overnight backpacking trip.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    15 Class Hours, 15 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate fundamental skills and techniques of basic outdoor skills while participating in hiking exercises.
    2. Discuss the history, etiquette, strategies, current research, sustainability, and safety precautions associated with backpacking.
    3. Evaluate hiking conditions, including safe wilderness preparedness, weather and environmental conditions, choosing appropriate equipment, and planning.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of any impact we have on the natural environment while hiking and how to minimize that impact.


  
  • PED 106 - Badminton (CV)


    Instruction and practice in the various strokes.  Rules, terminology and equipment.  Strategy for singles and doubles.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 11 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and identify the five basic shots in the game of badminton.
    2. Demonstrate the five basic shots in the game of badminton.
    3. Have an understanding of the rules and scoring of a badminton game.
    4. Identity and execute the two basic service strokes/Drop and High clear.
    5. Have an appreciation of badminton as a game that allows for a wide range of expertise and conditioning, from leisurely played in back yard game to a highly competitive athletic event.


  
  • PED 110 - Basic Ice Skating (CV)


    A course in basic ice skating technique that moves from less difficult to more difficult performance skating sequences.  Students will undergo an assessment of skills at the beginning of the course and will be given instructions and practice time for improvement of skills.  Speed of performance as well as execution will be stressed.  Will fulfill the C-V requirement.  Students will need to bring skates or rent them from the BCC Rink where the course is taught.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Job Hours, 1 Credit
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the wellness benefits of this life-time recreational activity.
    2. Execute basic ice skating skills.
    3. Develop proper body alignment and posture.
    4. Recognize ice skating terminology.
    5. Identify safety concerns regarding ice skating.
    6. Demonstrate basic care and use of equipment.


  
  • PED 111 - Varsity Track and Field I


    This course is designed to be offered to first year varsity track and field athletes.  Successful completion of this course requires regular attendance at both practices and competitions.  Students are expected to demonstrate an applicable level of track and field skill along with an appropriate level of effort.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the fundamental skills used in Track and Field.
    2. Discuss the strategies and etiquette associated with Track and Field.
    3. Discuss the health-related benefits of athletic participation, including mental health benefits.
    4. Describe the relationship between nutrition and athletic performance.


  
  • PED 113 - Lifeguard Training


    Provides the necessary minimum skills to become certified as a lifeguard by the American Red Cross.  Introduction to lifeguard procedures, supervision, rescue techniques, swimming skills, facilities, and spinal injury management.  Provides practice of water skills, rescue techniques, swimming speed and conditioning.  For lifeguard certification by the American Red Cross, students must meet skill and time requirements and pass a written final exam.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Ability to swim 500 yards continuously, using these strokes in the following order:  200 yards of front crawl using rhythmic breathing and a stabilizing propellant kick, 100 yards of breaststroke; 200 yards of front crawl or breaststroke using rhythmic breathing (may be a mixture of front crawl and breaststroke); ability to swim 20 yards using front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive to a depth of seven to ten feet, retrieve a 10 lb. object, return to the surface and swim 20 yards to the starting point with the object.

    Note:  Adult CPR and standard first-aid are additional requirements for certification by the American Red Cross and are not included in this course.  These courses must be completed before the end of the term, for Red Cross lifeguard training certification to be completed.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Become a certified Lifeguard with the American Red Cross.
    2. Hold current certification in Adult CPR and standard First-Aid.
    3. Successfully pass water and written final exam in Lifeguard training.


  
  • PED 118 - Solutions in Fitness and Wellness


    Students participate in an individualized fitness program.  Each student will be tested for fitness levels in cardio-respiratory, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition.  Results of the profile will help determine a workout routine for classroom activity.  Discussions on chapter topics (including Wellness topics) and tests will assist students in making healthy lifestyle choices.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Studio Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Know and understand the 5 components of fitness.
    2. Develop the skills and knowledge to pass a selective physical fitness test.
    3. Demonstrate improvement in at least one weakness as defined in the pre-assessment profile.
    4. Recognize and apply the fitness principles as it relates to the improvement or maintenance of one’s overall health and wellbeing.


     

  
  • PED 119 - Solutions in Fitness and Wellness


    Students participate in an individualized fitness program.  Each student will be tested for fitness levels in cardio-respiratory, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition.  Results of the profile will help determine a workout routine for classroom activity.  Discussions on chapter topics (including Wellness components) and tests will assist students in making healthy lifestyle choices.  PED 119 has one more hour of activity than PED 118, and more emphasis on taking command by making healthy decisions about workouts.  There is usually an improvement grade built in for motivational purposes.

    Credits: 1.50
    Hours
    12 Class Hours, 33 Studio Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Know and understand the 5 components of fitness.
    2. Develop the skills and knowledge to pass a selective physical fitness test.
    3. Demonstrate improvement in at least one weakness as defined in the pre-assessment profile.
    4. Recognize and apply the fitness principles as it relates to the improvement or maintenance of one’s overall health and wellbeing.

     

  
  • PED 120 - Foundations of Exercise


    A Lab/Lecture course designed for students interested in a career in personal training, exercise supervision and instruction.  The many components of Fitness will be discussed in relationship to health, wellness, and athletic attributes.  The course is designed to expose students to Sport Sciences as they relate to human exercise.  Students integrate physical fitness principles and health components to formulate a personal wellness plan relative to their needs and those of their peers, with a goal to positively impact health, fitness and wellness.  This class includes both theory and practice through a lecture and laboratory experience.  The course will provide students the opportunity to learn about changes that occur in the body during exercise and prepare them for the NASM Certified Personal Trainer Certification.  There is an extra fee associated with this course for the NASM certification.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and differentiate between health related and skill related components of fitness.
    2. Conduct fitness assessments, develop fitness and wellness programs, and perform a variety of different exercise formats in order to help others learn proper exercise techniques.
    3. Identify concepts and structures of basic anatomy, physiology, human movement, biomechanics, nutrition, metabolism, and kinesiology principles.
    4. Recognize the relationship between physical activity and risk for disease, including the importance of lifestyle choices, exercise psychology, behavior and how they relate to overall health.


  
  • PED 124 - Track & Field (CV)


    This is an introductory course to the running, jumping, and throwing events included in Track and Field.  Students will understand the events that comprise a track and field meet, participate in the events, and discuss the importance and health benefits of regular exercise.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the running, jumping, and throwing events in Track and Field.
    2. Understand the skill progressions and training methods involved in Track and Field.
    3. Develop an understanding of the importance of regular physical activity and health benefits from participation. 


  
  • PED 127 - Jogging (CV)


    Jogging as a possible leisure time activity.  Physiological benefits, improvement of technique and basic principles of training.  Individual works at own level and sets own goals.  Distance usually worked:  2 miles.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 12 Laboratory Hours per semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have knowledge of fundamental skills, techniques, related to jogging.
    2. Have proficiency in execution of skills covered.
    3. Have an understanding of strategies, safety and etiquette associated with jogging.
    4. Have an understanding of the mental and physical health benefits to be derived from jogging.
    5. Have an appropriate level of proficiency in personal health as it relates to components such as cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, body composition, balance, coordination and agility.


  
  • PED 130 - Martial Arts (CV)


    This beginning level Martial Arts course will discuss philosophy and a brief history of Martial Arts.  Basic skills and self-defense techniques will be practiced.  Practice will include techniques and free sparring with no body contact.  This course will have an emphasis on physical conditioning and mental discipline.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours per semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of physical conditioning and mental discipline in regards to Martial Arts.
    2. Demonstrate proper kicking, striking, blocking, and elbow techniques.
    3. Perform basic sparring, stances, and footwork required in Martial Arts.
    4. Identify self-defense and kata forms.


  
  • PED 140 - Dance Pilates (CV)


    A cardiovascular course designed to use techniques that build the core musculature of the body.  Aerobic dance routines will be utilized to increase the activity levels to a point where fitness will increase.  This is an active, participatory course.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate proper breathing techniques.
    2. Identify a series of appropriate warming up exercises.
    3. Perform correct maneuvers and sequence of exercises that strengthen muscles and increase flexibility and cardiovascular function.
    4. Recognize when over-exertion and overuse can occur and take steps to avoid injury.
    5. Show how to go through a proper cool down.


  
  • PED 141 - Yoga (CV)


    In this class, yoga postures are practiced to align, strengthen and promote flexibility in the body.  Breathing techniques and meditation are also integrated.  Students can expect an emphasis on simplicity, repetition, and ease of movement.  Full-body relaxation and balance are the goals, as we make a full circuit of the body’s range of motion with standing postures, twists, backbends, forward folds, and hip openers.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours; 22 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate proficiency at the poses covered in class (at the beginner level).
    2. Increase their dynamic flexibility.
    3. Identify some of the major muscles used in a given pose.
    4. List the correct progressions into a given pose.


  
  • PED 146 - Cardio Cross Training (CV)


    This course is designed to offer the students a wide variety of cardiovascular fitness activities to enhance physical fitness.  Activities include: High/Low impact, yoga, Zumba, kickboxing, cardio confusion, Cross fitness, HIIT, Insanity, cardio drumming and many more group fitness options. 

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours per semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the importance of a warm up, cool down, and target heart rate.
    2. Demonstrate ability to assess heart rate before, during, and after aerobic exercise.
    3. Identify ways to increase and decrease heart rate and intensity during aerobic exercise.
    4. Recognize the warning signs of over exertion, overuse and injury.



     

  
  • PED 150 - Personal Nutrition


    Students will learn the basic principles of good nutrition; how energy nutrients work within their body and how they can use nutrition to improve their overall health.  They will also be able to utilize this information to decipher the current nutrition recommendations being addressed in the media.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    15 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the role of nutrients in the human body.
    2. Apply knowledge of nutrition to a personal life style, nutrition plan, weight control and activity, and/ or athletic performance.
    3. Explain the relationship between diet and: Health, disease and weight control.
    4. Make a personal assessment of their dietary practices and proposals.
    5. Identify claims regarding food and additives.
    6. Apply the concepts of reliable research and consumer behaviors to one’s advantage.


  
  • PED 160 - History and Philosophy of Physical Education and Sport


    This course is devoted to the study of physical education and sport based on major historical events and associated philosophies that have shaped physical education and sport from ancient times to present.  We will examine basic concepts and current issues within physical education, athletics, fitness, and wellness.  Future trends will be explored. 


     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify historical events, leaders, educators and philosophies in the evolution of Sports and Physical Education.
    2. Analyze past, current, and future trends in Physical Education and Sport.
    3. Describe the basic concepts and issues related to the various sub disciplines in Physical Education and Sport.
    4. Evaluate career options available in the field of Physical Education and Sports Studies.
    5. Create a personal philosophy with regard to Physical Education and Sports Studies.
    6. Locate information effectively using tools appropriate to their need and discipline.
    7. Evaluate information with an awareness of authority and validity.

     

  
  • PED 161 - Sport and Society


    This course is an introduction to the field of sport sociology.  Consequently, the first objective is to provide students with the knowledge of important concepts, methods, and theoretical approaches that define this subdiscipline.  The second objective is to familiarize the students with sociological perspective to studying sport as a socio-cultural phenomenon, and to examine the often-controversial relationships between gender, race, class, and sexuality and the institution of sport.  The third objective is to develop critical thinking through analyzing the social, political, cultural and historical context of sport in the United States and other societies.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of important concepts, methods and theoretical approaches that define the sociology of Sport.
    2. Apply a sociological perspective to sport as a socio-cultural phenomenon, and examine the often-controversial relationships between race, gender, class, and sexuality and the institution of sport. 
    3. Analyze the social, political, cultural and historical context of sport in the United States and other societies.
    4. Evaluate information with an awareness of bias.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical dimensions of information use, creation, and dissemination.


  
  • PED 162 - Personal and Community Health


    This elective course introduces the student to the health issues and problems related to individuals and communities.  This course explores aspects of wellness/health promotion and factors which impede wellness/health.  Throughout the course, the student will explore various topics, including, but not limited to:  mental health, stress, nutrition, physical activity, body image, drug and alcohol use, social relationships, sexuality, reproductive choices, communicable diseases including sexually transmitted diseases, chronic diseases, aging, personal safety, and violence/injury prevention.  An exploration of current events related to community health topics assists the student to develop an understanding of issues related to wellness/health racing consumers.  This course will allow students to gain a better understanding of their physical, emotional, and social needs and to develop strategies to promote their overall health and well-being.

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    HST 162
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify factors to promote health/wellness for individuals and the community.
    2. Identify factors which impede health/wellness for individuals and the community.
    3. Identify steps to improve personal safety, and to prevent violence and injury.
    4. Locate and analyze current events related to community health topics.
    5. Assess their individual levels of wellness; identifying lifestyle changes they intend to make to improve their overall wellness.

     

  
  • PED 168 - Exploring Healthy Lifestyles


    This course is a theoretical classroom approach to assessing and evaluating healthy pathways in life.  Students will explore and analyze the components of diet and exercise that can be chosen which may lead to a happier and healthier life.  Emphasis is placed on making educated decisions and using the self-motivation and discipline necessary to make changes leading to a more active healthy lifestyle.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    15 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the components of diet and exercise and their effects on physical and mental health.
    2. Understand how to create a plan to lead to a more active and healthy lifestyle.
    3. Explore multiple exercise and physical activity options and the value of regular exercise as it relates to overall wellness.
    4. Develop an understanding of the importance of regular physical activity and health benefits from participation.


  
  • PED 169 - Tennis (CV)


    Instruction and practice in the basic strokes - forehand, backhand, serve and volley.  Rules, terminology and equipment.  Strategy for singles and doubles.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 11 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the basic strokes and serve in tennis.
    2. Apply the rules and etiquette of Tennis in both singles and doubles.
    3. Understand the skill progressions, tactics and strategy, and modifications that can be used in Tennis.


  
  • PED 171 - Principles of Training and Conditioning


    Students will learn the principles of physical fitness and training, as well as the effects of training on various systems of the body.  With this knowledge, they will organize, assemble, and present their own personal life-long fitness programs.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    15 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the Health related components of fitness.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of the components of a strength and conditioning program, including proper technique and execution of exercises.
    3. Design an effective program by assessing personal fitness levels and developing a personal fitness program, including components of a strength and conditioning program.


  
  • PED 172 - Volleyball (CV)


    A basic course in the fundamentals of power volleyball.  Team strategy, history and rules.  Drills and competitive play.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 12 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the rules and regulations of volleyball.
    2. Execute the basic skills of volleyball: forearm pass, set, and (underhand) serve in a game like setting.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of correct skill selection and decision making-making abilities.
    4. Facilitate game- play in controlled environment.
    5. Work cooperatively as a small group as well as with the larger class as a whole.
    6. Work to challenge each other to improve their skills in a competitive and cooperative environment.


  
  • PED 173 - Fitness Walking (CV)


    Fitness Walking is a safe form of aerobic exercise which can be incorporated into one’s life style and individual fitness program.  Blended class requires proper shoes and foul weather gear as needed.

    Totally online class requires each student to have a FitBit.

    Credits: (1-1/2)
    Hours
    12 Class Hours, 33 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply the components of an effective physical fitness program, utilizing walking as a primary activity.
    2. Improve physical conditioning by participating in a regular walking program.
    3. Perform basic fitness walking techniques.
    4. Apply proper technique to set pacing for safe and effective walking for fitness.
    5. Understand the importance of a balanced lifestyle and the role wellness plays in it.


  
  • PED 175 - Weight Training


    Introduction to the weight room including free weights, weight machines, and lifting equipment. Components of fitness, principles of training, strength development, lifting techniques and spotting are topics covered within the course. Students will develop individualized strength training programs and participate in the programs they create.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 12 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the components of a strength training program through development of an effective personal program.
    2. Perform and assess proper lifting and spotting techniques for basic exercises in the weight room.
    3. Identify, through performing exercises to work each of the major muscle groups, including the use of repetition and sets.
    4. Describe the FITT principle, progressive overload, and other principles of training as they pertain to strength training.


  
  • PED 181 - Adventure Activities (CV)


    Adventure Activities involves innovative warm-ups and conditioning exercises within a group setting as the group works together to problem-solve, develop trust through activities and work to solve challenges in adventure settings.  Through the stages of development, the student will gain an understanding of how to build more effective groups, demonstrate modeling and cooperation and learn healthy risk-taking behaviors.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the definition of Adventure activities and the importance of including this non-stereotypical curriculum in a Physical Education setting.
    2. Demonstrate leadership, decision making techniques, and group dynamic skills necessary to accomplish problem solving activities.
    3. Demonstrate professional behavior and practice safety procedures, while participating in class.
    4. Identify ways to modify activities for diverse populations.


  
  • PED 187 - Team Sports


    Classroom activities and experiences are designed to provide students with knowledge of the concepts associated with skill development in team sports.  Students will participate in and develop team plays, passing and scoring in net/wall sports.  Students will demonstrate game performance skills in four exemplar sports.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and apply proper techniques and basic skills in team sports.
    2. Demonstrate proper educational techniques, including modifications, for teaching team sports.
    3. Identify rules, regulations, safety protocols, and sportsmanship for team sports.


  
  • PED 188 - Rhythms and Dance (CV)


    This course is designed to introduce students to various forms of dance such as folk, square, social, popular, and creative.  The forms of dance will be presented in developmentally appropriate units.  Emphasis will be on learning the dance patterns and then performing them proficiently.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 26 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform basic locomotor movements, combinations, rhythms, and steps.
    2. Identify the rhythmic and musical differences between social, improvisational and prescribed dance genres.
    3. Explain the importance of dance in a physical education curriculum.


  
  • PED 210 - Exercise Assistant Internship


    With supervised assistance, students will obtain knowledge, and develop skills, while working in a fitness center.  Placements will include a collegiate setting (22.5 hours), and also include one local fitness setting in the community (22.5 hours).  (45 hours total in internship)

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PED 119 Solutions in Fitness


     

    Credits: 1.5
    Hours
    45 total for internship
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Effectively describe job training, job duties and responsibilities.
    2. Investigate and report on procedures followed for employee training, evaluation and advancement.
    3. Describe in depth exactly what was learned within the professional experience.
    4. Describe and track in writing a personal log of experiences, professional development and personal challenges and successes.
    5. Apply skills from professional learning to career experience.

     

  
  • PED 211 - Varsity Track and Field II


    This course is designed to be offered to second year varsity track and field athletes.  Successful completion of this course requires regular attendance at both practices and competitions.  Students are expected to demonstrate an applicable level of track and field skill along with an appropriate level of effort.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PED 111 Varsity Track and Field I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the fundamental skills used in Track and Field.
    2. Discuss the strategies and etiquette associated with Track and Field.
    3. Discuss the health-related benefits of athletic participation, including mental health benefits.
    4. Describe the relationship between nutrition and athletic performance.


  
  • PHI 102 - General Philosophy


    This course introduces philosophy by examining some of its major areas, including metaphysics (theories concerning the nature of reality), epistemology (theories concerning the nature of human knowledge), ethics (theories of morality), and logic.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define the conventions and methods of philosophy.
    2. Recognize and analyze nuance and complexity of meaning through critical reflections on text, visual images, or artifacts.


  
  • PHI 201 - Ethics: Moral Philosophy


    An introduction to the major theories of ethics in Western philosophy and includes thinkers such as Aristotle, Kant, Bentham and others.  Contemporary moral issues are discussed to illuminate proper moral reasoning.  Ethical questions considered may include, but will not be limited to:  How should we act to be considered moral?  Do we have an obligation to minimize suffering, ensure that our actions can be universalized or embrace our culture’s standards of behavior?  Is morality objective, relative, dependent on a deity or created by humans?

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define the conventions and methods of philosophy.
    2. Recognize and analyze nuance and complexity of meaning through critical reflections on text, visual images, or artifacts.


  
  • PHI 203 - Philosophical Issues in American Education


    Philosophy of selected American educators, with attention on the historical development of the American educational system.  Brief review of educational philosophies from antiquity to the present, including Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau.  Analysis of educational issues and of key terms in education from philosophical perspective.  The nature of the individual, the school, society, and the underlying philosophical interrelations that may exist.  An examination of the role of diversity, equity, inclusion and social/racial justice in American education.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define the conventions and methods of philosophy.
    2. Recognize and analyze nuance and complexity of meaning through critical reflections on text, visual images, or artifacts.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identify involving race, class, and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual group, and systemic levels.
    • Identify the historical importance of the philosophy of education in American education.
    • Explain the individual philosophies of the major educational philosophers.
    • Identify the philosophies that influence educational reform in American schooling.


  
  • PHI 299 - Independent Study: Philosophy


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of philosophy.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, the independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 semester hours of college level work in philosophy

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Course outcomes will be determined by the instructor with the consent of the department chair and Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
  • PHS 112 - Interactions with the Natural World


    Explore the relationships between living organisms and their physical environment in this activity-based course.  Study Earth’s atmosphere and seasons and explore the resulting adaptations of living things, for example through photosynthesis and respiration.  Investigate rocks and minerals as the building blocks of the solid Earth and cells as the basic unit of life.  Biologic and earth science concepts are integrated to show the prehistoric and modern interactions among Earth’s atmosphere, its rocks and minerals and its life.  Students are expected to become personally involved with in-class and at-home activities and projects.  Learning is accomplished by experimentation and discussion within cooperative groups; the laboratory becomes the classroom.  Appropriate for Elementary Education and Early Childhood majors.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling.
    2. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including application of scientific data, concepts, and models in the natural sciences.


  
  • PHS 116 - Global Warming: Energy and the Environment


    Learn about the causes and effects of global warming and other environmental threats including ozone depletion and acid rain.  How does the way we use energy affect our changing global climate?  How much energy does it take to drive our cars or light, heat and cool our homes?  How can we save energy and will saving energy make a difference?  Discover positive things we can do as a society and as individuals to help reduce human impact on the climate.  Investigate the sources of the energy we use every day.  Energy sources include: fossil fuels, nuclear, and alternative sources such as solar, wind, biomass, hydropower and geothermal energy.  Current scientific topics may be introduced by both students and instructors.  Laboratory activities include hands-on experiences, field trips and energy use analysis.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Use the concept of rates to describe various processes and problems.
    2. Define velocity, acceleration and displacement.
    3. List Newton’s Laws of motion and predict motion of objects using Newton’s Laws.
    4. Define and use the concepts of work and energy to solve problems.
    5. Use the concept of a model.
    6. Describe and solve problems using the concepts of gravity, electric charge, and magnetic force.
    7. Describe the origin and treatment for particulate and gaseous air pollution.
    8. Define and use the basic principles of thermodynamics to describe the operation of various plants and the treatment of thermal pollution.
    9. Describe the operation of a nuclear power plant and the possible consequences thereof.
    10. Describe the energy technology of the future and the possible consequences thereof.
    11. List and discuss the problems associated with the alternatives to conventional motor vehicles.
    12. Describe a sound wave, the human ear, and noise pollution.
    13. Discuss the prospects for mass transportation.
    14. Describe remote sensing of materials.
    15. Discuss the prospects for materials recycling.


  
  • PHS 117 - Exploring Everyday Phenomena


    This course uses activities that engage the students in hands-on learning of common physical concepts by experimentation.  The course will improve students’ perspectives and comfort with science while promoting scientific literacy.  There will be no distinction between lab and lecture since the activities are an integral part of the teaching and learning process in the course.  The methods and ideas of the course will usually be based on the use of commonly available materials.  Group-based activities include observations and measurements, solids, liquids, gases, heat, simple machines, magnets, static electricity and electrical devices.  Appropriate for Elementary Education and Early Childhood majors.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling.
    2. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including application of scientific data, concepts, and models in the natural sciences.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to use simple common tools to solve physical and chemical problems.


  
  • PHS 291 - Special Topics in Physical Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Physical Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
  • PHS 292 - Special Topics in Physical Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Physical Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
  • PHS 293 - Special Topics in Physical Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Physical Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
  • PHS 298 - Physical Science Senior Seminar


    This course is a capstone course for students in the LAAS program who plan to go on to major in one of the physical sciences.  Students will learn how to search for, read, and interpret scientific papers, and then present that information to others in a formal setting.  This will prepare students for their science program at a 4-year school by becoming better consumers and producers of scientific information through journal articles and presentations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PHS 113 Astronomy - Exploring the Universe, PHS 114 Meteorology: Investigating the Weather, or PHS 115 The Dynamic Earth

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to search a scientific journal database for information specific to their interest.
    2. Understand how to read and interpret scientific paper.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to convey complicated topics in an understandable way to their peers.
    4. Summarize the information learned from an oral presentation and ask relevant questions.
    5. Conduct a formal presentation on a current topic in physical science.


  
  • PHY 090 - Preparatory Physics


    In this course, students will learn how to apply basic numerical, algebraic, and trigonometric procedures to the solution of physical problems.  Topics are selected from the fields of mechanics, heat, wave motion, electricity, optics, and electromagnetic radiation.  Numerous laboratory exercises and in-class activities are integrated into the course to reinforce understanding of the physical principles.  The course is designed for students who have not had high school physics, or need a basic introduction to physics before taking higher level physics or technology courses.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to understand and apply the basic concepts and models of physics to experiments and applications related to the real world.
    2. Perform calculations with inputs of differing accuracy and state the result with the appropriate number of significant figures.
    3. Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of data measurement, units, and unit conversions.


  
  • PHY 118 - Physics For The Health Sciences


    This course is designed to cover topics in physics specifically related to the health science field.  The topics covered include linear motion, Newton’s Laws, torques, energy, momentum, conservation laws; temperature and heat, changes of state; electric fields, Ohm’s law, DC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, motion of charges in magnetic fields; wave motion, electromagnetic spectrum.  Basic principles are applied to solve realistic problems using algebra and elementary trigonometry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or higher

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling; and application of scientific data, concepts, and models in Physics.
    2. Describe, in qualitative terms, the laws of Physics and related concepts.
    3. Relate fundamental Physics principles to observations and situations encountered in the Health Sciences.
    4. Interpret and draw inferences using those mathematical models (functions, graphs, tables) commonly encountered in a physics for health sciences course.
    5. Employ methods of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve application problems commonly encountered in a physics for health sciences course.


  
  • PHY 161 - General Physics I


    A study of classical mechanics, including kinematics in one and two dimensions, forces and the accelerations they produce, the conservation laws for energy and momentum, rotational motion, the properties of solids and fluids, thermal physics, and the thermodynamics.  Basic principles are applied to solve realistic problems using algebra and elementary trigonometry.  Primarily for students majoring in Liberal Arts and Technologies.  Laboratory experiences will provide you with problem-solving techniques, measurement skills, and applications of theory.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry, its equivalent or higher

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling; and application of scientific data, concepts, and models in Physics.
    2. Write and solve algebraic motion (Newton’s laws of motion) problems.
    3. Solve problems involving the equilibriums of forces and torques using simultaneous equations.
    4. Solve problems involving gravitational potential energy, and conservation of total mechanical energy.
    5. Solve problems involving thermal equilibrium and heat transfer.


  
  • PHY 162 - General Physics II


    This is the second course of an algebra-based sequence in physics.  Your study of sound and light will reveal them as examples of waves, and will include study of optical instruments.  Electricity and magnetism introduces you to the basic properties of charges and currents, producing electric fields and magnetic fields.  You will progress to understand electric energy as one essential component of our standard of living.  Some selected topics in modern physics are also covered, including the study of atoms and their nuclei.  Laboratory experiences will provide you with problem solving techniques, measurement skills and applications of theory.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PHY 161 General Physics I

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Solve problems involving the reflection, refraction, and dispersion of waves, and geometrical optics.
    2. Describe the phenomena of interference, diffraction, and polarization.
    3. Solve problems involving the flow of electrical charge and the transfer of electric energy in single-loop and in multi-loop circuits.
    4. Use basic concepts of relativity to solve problems involving high-speed motion.
    5. Describe the processes of radioactive decay, and solve problems with the idea of radioactive half-life, the processes of nuclear fission and fusion, and nuclear reactions.


  
  • PHY 181 - Physics for Engineers & Scientists I


    Engineering Physics, sometimes called “University Physics,” uses calculus in the development of principles.  The topics include the description of motion and the causes of motion, with the ideas of force, energy, power, and momentum; equilibrium and rotation; and heat and its effects.  This course is designed for students studying engineering, computing, science, or mathematics.  Laboratory experiences will provide you with problem solving techniques, measurement skills and applications of theory.  It is recommended that students have a general understanding of physics concepts before entering this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 181 Calculus I, its equivalent or higher

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling; and application of scientific data, concepts, and models in Physics.
    2. Write and solve algebraic motion (Newton’s laws of motion) problems.
    3. Compute vector sums, scalar products, and vector cross products.
    4. Use energy and work-energy principle to solve mechanics problems with constant and position-dependent forces.
    5. Solve problems involving the equilibrium of forces and torques using simultaneous equations.
    6. Solve problems involving gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, and elastic potential energy, and conservation of total mechanical energy.
    7. Solve projectile and circular motions, using elementary differential and integral calculus.
    8. Solve problems involving thermal equilibrium and heat transfer.


  
  • PHY 182 - Physics for Engineers & Scientists II


    This continuation of PHY 181 covers the nature of sound and light and their behavior; electric and magnetic forces and fields; electric circuits and electric energy transfer; and electromagnetic induction.  Topics include electric fields due to point charges and point distributions, Coulomb’s Law, Gauss’ Law, the Biot-Savart Law, Ampere’s Law, Faraday’s Law, inductance and self-inductance, DC and AC circuits, capacitance, dielectrics, magnetic force, and torque, the wave equation with standing waves in strings and resonant air columns, simple harmonic motion, the Doppler effect, and geometric optics including reflection, refraction, diffraction, and interference in lenses and thin films.  This is the second semester of University Physics taught at most major Engineering schools. Laboratory experiences will provide you with problem-solving techniques, measurement skills and applications of theory.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: PHY 181 Physics for Engineers & Scientist I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate scientific reasoning applied to the natural world, including an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of data analysis or mathematical modeling; and application of scientific data, concepts, and models in Physics.
    2. Analyze and solve problems with topics including sound and light waves, electric and magnetic forces and fields, and DC and AC circuits.
    3. Communicate effectively in laboratory reports, following accepted reporting formats to present laboratory results cogently and succinctly.


  
  • PHY 281 - Physics for Engineers & Scientists III


    This elective is the third and last physics course for Engineering and Science majors.  It covers Einstein’s theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, and nuclear physics.  Students majoring in Electrical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, and Physics should consider taking this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PHY 182 Physics for Engineers & Scientists II:  Sound, Light, Electricity and Magnetism and MAT 182 Calculus II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Note
    (This course is only offered as enrollment warrants)

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Distinguish between the photoelectrical effect, Compton effect, and pair production.
    2. Solve problems involving x-rays and electron diffraction.
    3. Interpret de Broglie waves in terms of probability distribution.
    4. Use the Schrödinger equation to give a quantum description of a confined particle.
    5. Give an account of Rutherford scattering and use Bohr’s postulates to solve problems in atomic physics.
    6. Describe quantization of angular moments.
    7. Explain the normal and anomalous Zeeman effects and describe the Stern-Gerlach experiment.
    8. Describe the principles of nuclear radiation measuring devices and high energy accelerators.
    9. Explain the contributions to nuclear binding energy.
    10. Derive radioactive growth and decay laws.
    11. Explain simple decay schemes.
    12. Describe methods of neutron production, velocity measurement, and moderation.
    13. Solve problems of relativistic motion.


  
  • PMD 211 - Foundations in Advanced Prehospital Care


    This initial course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic covers foundational preparatory concepts that enable them to enter the clinical setting, hone their EMT skills and be safe. The course includes advanced provider roles and responsibilities, field safety, and the components of our EMS system. The course also includes general cellular physiology & pathophysiology including acid-base balance, basic and advanced airway management, field history taking & patient assessment skills, introductory pharmacology & routs of administration and their associated skills, and concludes with an in-depth discussion of pulmonology pathophysiology and advanced treatment modalities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: Valid New York State Department of Health EMT - Basic certification

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 1.5 Laboratory Hours; 2 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. List the roles and responsibilities of personnel within an EMS system, and how these roles and responsibilities differ.
    2. Write the importance of personal wellness and wellbeing of the EMS provider.
    3. Justify how to serve as a healthy role model for peers.
    4. Consistently demonstrate safe and effective behaviors in the initial response phase of an emergency.
    5. Consistently demonstrate collecting and documenting a thorough and accurate field patient history and subjective assessment.
    6. Consistently perform and document efficient field medical and trauma patient physical assessments.
    7. Discuss general cellular physiology and pathophysiology including acid-base balance.
    8. Consistently demonstrate safe and efficient establishment and maintenance of a patient’s airway.
    9. Consistently demonstrate safe and appropriate ventilation of a patient including ongoing assessment of oxygenation.
    10. Safely and precisely obtain access to the venous circulation.
    11. Safely and precisely administer medications.
    12. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently formulate and implement a treatment plan for the patient with respiratory problems.


  
  • PMD 212 - Advanced Prehospital Care of Cardiovascular & Special Population Patients


    This second course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic covers an in-depth discussion of cardiovascular pathophysiology and advanced treatment modalities including basic ECG interpretation. In-depth discussion of pathophysiology and advanced treatment modalities for special populations include; gynecological & obstetrics patients and neonatal & pediatric patients. An introduction to hazardous materials awareness concludes this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PMD 211 Foundations in Advanced Prehospital Care

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Lab Hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
                a.  A cardiovascular emergency
                b.  A gynecological emergency
    2. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system.
    3. Consistently demonstrate assessment and management of a patient experiencing normal or abnormal labor and delivery.
    4. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the:
                a.  Neonatal patient
                b.  Pediatric patient
    5. Recognize and evaluate hazardous material emergencies, call for appropriate resources, and safely manage patients in the cold zone.


  
  • PMD 213 - Advanced Prehospital Trauma Care


    This third course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic covers more in-depth preparatory concepts including the history of EMS and Injury & Illness prevention strategies.  The course also includes the operational topics of Ambulance Operations and Crime Scene awareness.  The majority of this course is devoted to a foundational discussion of trauma pathophysiology and advanced trauma treatment modalities including hypoperfusion, head, face, neck, thoracic, abdominal and burn trauma.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: PMD 212 Advanced Prehospital Care of Cardiovascular & Special Population Patients

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. Restate primary injury prevention strategies as an effective way to reduce death, disabilities and health care costs.
    2. Analyze human hazards at a crime scene and from a potentially violent patient.
    3. Describe safe and minimally intrusive operations at crime scenes.
    4. Safely manage a patient who is the victim of a sexual assault recognizing the patient’s physical and emotional needs along with the preservation of the crime scene evidence.
    5. Consistently demonstrate safe ambulance operation.
    6. Consistently demonstrate simple triage and rapid transport principles at a mass casualty incident.
    7. Integrate principles of injury kinematics to enhance patient assessment and predict the likelihood of injuries.
    8. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for:

              a.  Shock (hypoperfusion)
              b.  Hemorrhage
              c.  Suspected or obvious head injury
              d.  Face injury
              e.  Suspected or obvious neck injury
              f.   Suspected or obvious spinal injury
              g.  Thoracic injury
              h.  Suspected or obvious abdominal injury
              i.   Burn injury

  
  • PMD 214 - Advanced Prehospital Care of Medical Emergencies


    This fourth course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic is an introduction to various medical pathophysiology and advanced medical treatment modalities for neurologic, endocrinologic, toxicologic, environmental, allergy & anaphylaxis and behavioral medical patients.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PMD 213 Advanced Prehospital Trauma Care

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
              a.  A seizure
              b.  A cerebral vascular accident
              c.  A transient ischemic attack
              d.  A diabetic emergency
              e.  An acute coronary syndrome of various etiologies
              f.  A neurological problem
              g.  An endocrine problem
              h.  A toxic substance exposure
               i.  An environmentally induced or exacerbated medical condition
               j.  An allergic reaction
              k.  An anaphylactic reaction
    2.  Consistently demonstrate safe, empathetic competence in caring for patients with behavioral emergencies.

  
  • PMD 221 - Paramedic Foundations and Comprehensive Physical Exam


    This sixth course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s or this first course in a Critical Care’ Technician’s progression to Paramedic covers foundational paramedic level concepts.  Early in the course general cellular pathophysiology is expanded on with and in-depth discussion of hypoperfusion and various shock states.  Physical and emotional developmental milestones are reviewed along with effective communication strategies.  Additional advanced airway assessment tools and skills are developed.  An in-depth pharmacology knowledge is cultivated and the course concludes with the development of comprehensive history taking and physical examination skills.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. Recognize, classify, and determine proper management of the types of shock.
    2. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with pharmacology knowledge and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement an appropriate pharmacologic management plan.
    3. Consistently apply therapeutic communication principles to effectively communicate with any patient while providing care.
    4. Recall and integrate physiological, psychological, and sociological changes throughout human development with assessment and communication strategies for patients of all ages.
    5. Recognize, classify, and properly manage a difficult patient airway including:
        a.  Surgical establishment of a patient airway
        b.  Use of capnography to assess and adjust the ventilation of a patient
    6. Integrate appropriate alternative techniques to obtain a patient’s medical history.
    7. Explain the pathophysiological significance of normal and key abnormal physical exam findings.
    8. Consistently integrate advanced principles of history taking and physical exam techniques to perform a comprehensive patient assessment.
    9. Consistently and accurately collect, organize and state patient information in verbal form, either in person or over the radio following accepted formats.
    10.  Consistently and accurately collect, organize, and clearly write patient information on patient documentation forms.


  
  • PMD 222 - Paramedic Care of Cardiovascular & Special Patient Populations


    This seventh course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s or this second course in a Critical Care Technician’s progression to Paramedic covers the synthesis of information in order to make sound clinical decisions.  In-depth discussion of geriatric emergencies is followed by advanced cardiac pathophysiology and skills including 12 lead interpretations.  Neonatology and pediatrics emergencies and the skills necessary to care for them are reviewed.  The course concludes with a brief discussion of the recognition of abuse.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PMD 221 Paramedic Foundations and Comprehensive Physical Exam

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. Systematically apply accepted clinical decision making skills to formulate a field impression and treatment plan.
    2. Consistently integrate advanced diagnostic techniques and skills for the patient with cardiovascular disease.
    3. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the unique emergencies of the:

              a.  Geriatric patient
              b.  Pediatric patient
              c.  Patient who has sustained abuse or assault

  
  • PMD 223 - Paramedic Trauma Care


    This eighth course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s or this third course in a Critical Care Technician’s progression to Paramedic covers advanced preparatory concepts such as well-being of the paramedic, roles and responsibilities, medical legal and ethical issues.  The majority of this course is devoted to pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of a trauma patient and concludes with complex trauma scenarios requiring efficient synthesis of knowledge and skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: PMD 222 Paramedic Care of Cardiovascular & Special Patient Populations

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the paramedic’s professional and community responsibilities with respect to:
              a.  Continuing education
              b.  Continuous EMS improvement
              c.  Injury prevention
    2.  Recall and discuss common out-of-hospital issues with respect to:
              a.  Laws and regulations
              b.  Medical ethics
              c.  Personal ethics
              d.  On- and off-line medical control
              e.  Patient advocacy
    3.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
              a.  Multi-system trauma
              b.  Extensive soft tissue trauma
              c.  Suspected spinal injury
              d.  Complex musculoskeletal injury

  
  • PMD 224 - Paramedic Care of Medical Emergencies


    This ninth course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s or this fourth course in a Critical Care Technician’s progression to Paramedic covers the body’s defenses against disease and injury including discussion of the immune and inflammatory responses.  The majority of this course is devoted to pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of medical patients and concludes with complex medical scenarios requiring efficient synthesis of knowledge and skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: PMD 223 Paramedic Trauma Care

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1. Describe the components of the body’s physical barriers, immune and inflammatory systems and their responses when activated.
    2. Recall the body’s response to acute and chronic stress.
    3. Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:

              a.  A neurological problem
              b.  An endocrine problem
              c.  An allergic or anaphylactic reaction
              d.  A gastroenterological problem
              e.  A renal or urologic problem
              f.  A toxic substance exposure
              g.  A hematopoietic system disease
              h.  An environmentally induced or exacerbated medical condition

  
  • PMD 225 - Paramedic Operations, Pediatric Emergencies, Integrated Care


    This tenth course in an Emergency Medical Technician’s or this fifth course in a Critical Care Technician’s progression to Paramedic covers assessment based management and patients who present unique challenges for the paramedic.  Also, included are acute interventions for the chronic patient and an awareness of general rescue operations.  This course will re-emphasize and hone pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of pediatric patients and concludes with a comprehensive review of all paramedic objectives including complex patient care scenarios.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: PMD 224 Paramedic Care of Medical Emergencies

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Synthesize pathophysiological and psychosocial principles to adapt the assessment and treatment plan for diverse patients and those who face physical, mental, social and financial challenges.
    2.  Describe various special medical devices that might be encountered while caring for an acute chronic care patient and explain how to trouble shoot common devices.
    3.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for:
              a.  Acute deterioration of a chronic care patient
              b.  Common complaints
              c.  Acute pediatric patient
    4.  Restate standards and guidelines that help ensure safe and effective ground and air medical transport.
    5.  Describe and be able to implement the principles of rescue operations to safely rescue a patient from:
              a.  Water
              b.  Hazardous atmospheres
              c.  Trenches
              d.  Highways
              e.  Hazardous terrain

  
  • POS 111 - Public Policy


    This course offers students an analytical survey of policy formulation and implementation in the United States, together with an examination of the impact of policy upon individuals and groups in American society.  Topics covered will include:  policy making processes, policy analysis, federal and state policies, rationality and irrationality in public policy, incrementalism, special interests, public choice, and institutional influences.  Satisfies the civic education requirement for programs that require it.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
  • POS 116 - International Business Environments


    An overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic factors that influence the trade related interaction of nations and the operations of global business enterprises.  Trade theory, economic integration, global sourcing, export-import basics, cultural awareness, and other current topics relating to international business will be covered.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BUS 116
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.


  
  • POS 201 - Introduction to American Government


    An in-depth overview of American national government: constitutionalism, federalism, Civil Liberties and Civil Rights, Congress, Presidency, political philosophy and political parties, the Supreme Court, national elections, and political behavior.  An examination of national laws and policies and their effect on citizens.  Students will apply learned concepts to contemporary issues and events.  This course is strongly recommended for students who want to develop a deeper understanding of their role and responsibilities as citizens and want to make a difference.  Satisfies the Civic Education requirement for programs that require it.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


  
  • POS 204 - American State and Local Government


    Examination of how state and local governments function nationwide and how they are similar/dissimilar in their approach to governing.  State and local government structures and policies will be studied and compared from state to state.  A close examination of those structures and policies and their disparate effect on citizens.  Students will apply learned concepts to contemporary issues and events.  This course is strongly recommended for students who want to develop a deeper understanding of their role and responsibilities as citizens.  Satisfies the Civic Education requirement for programs that require it.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe major political science concepts and theories.
    2. Apply the methods political scientists use to explore social phenomena.
    3. Describe the historical and contemporary societal factors that shape the development of individual and group identity involving race, class and gender.
    4. Analyze the role that complex networks of social structures and systems play in the creation and perpetuation of the dynamics of power, privilege, oppression, and opportunity.
    5. Apply the principles of rights, access, equity, and autonomous participation to past, current, or future social justice action.
    6. Identify the consequences of racism in the United States at the individual, group, and systemic levels.


 

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