Nov 26, 2022  
Website Catalog (In Development) 
    
Website Catalog (In Development)

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    LAW 240 - Corporate Law


    Types, uses and organization of the corporation, antitrust and securities law, mergers and consolidation, liquidation and dissolution.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the differences of the legal liabilities of the Corporation, Partnership, and Sole Proprietorship by preparing a chart which compares and contrasts those differences.
    2. Illustrate the Corporate formation process by preparing a Corporation application for filing in New York State.
    3. Use and demonstrate an understanding of the rules established by the Business Corporation laws of New York while meeting with a client.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the jurisdictional rules relevant to a Corporate entity by correctly filing a Corporate legal cause of action.


  
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    LAW 250 - Municipal Law


    Structure and operations of local government in New York State.  Evolution of local government in New York during the first two centuries of its existence.  Laws, ordinances, and operations.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the existence of local municipal law ordinances, rules and regulations.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of New York State government.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal responsibility attaching to the various sections of New York State Government.


  
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    LAW 251 - Federal Civil Procedure


    Federal court system, rules of civil procedure including pleading, motions, depositions, litigation procedures and the role of the paralegal.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the rules of Civil Federal Procedure.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the function and structure of various pleadings used in the Federal Court system.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the preparation of 3 Federal Court documents.


  
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    LAW 252 - Applied Real Estate


    Role of the paralegal in Real Estate transactions including agreements, abstracts, preparation of documents, contracts, and closing procedures.  Students conduct a "mock" real estate transaction.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the commencement of the Real Estate transaction.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the paralegal role in the compilation of the Real Estate Closing legal file.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the paralegal role in the closing process of both a residential and a Commercial Real Estate closing.


  
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    LAW 253 - Computers in the Law Office


    Computer applications including hardware and software, financial management, word processing, real estate practice packages, computerized research, litigation support, and document management.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the current software as used to assist the law office in the litigation process.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the current software regarding the administration of the Law Office.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the computer in the research and resolution of legal files.


  
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    LAW 260 - Labor-Management Relations (Labor Law)


    Labor-management relations in the public and private sectors.  Taft-Hartley Act, National Labor Relations Act and Wagner Act, unfair labor practices, labor contracts, arbitration and mediation, availability of injunctions in labor disputes.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the public and private sector labor management goals and responsibilities.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the negotiation process regarding contract formation between labor and management.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the various labor management related legislation which affects the relationship.


  
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    LAW 270 - Vehicle and Traffic Law


    Regulations of traffic within the state of New York. Emphasis on violations and traffic-related misdemeanors resulting from violation of the rules of the road and court proceedings resulting there from.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of various New York vehicle and traffic statutes.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the Courts role in handling various violations of the Vehicle and Traffic Law.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the Paralegal in the creation of and the handling of the Vehicle and Traffic file.


  
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    LAW 280 - Litigation and Trial Preparation


    Intake procedure, systems and analysis, concepts of jurisdiction and venue, parties to an action, pleadings, pre-trial procedures, motions and special practice, special proceedings, trials, judgments and appeals.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of case file selection by preparing and getting a passing grade in a classroom simulation project which requires a selection of case files based upon law firm requirements.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of legal confidentiality by reading and preparing position papers on confidentiality case studies.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the pleadings known as complaint and answer by preparing a complaint and answer in acceptable legal format.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the stages of a litigation proceeding by drafting, in proper format, various documents used to commence and proceed in a trial setting.


  
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    LAW 290 - Landlord-Tenant Relations


    Problems faced by landlords and tenants, private housing, live-in arrangements, covenants, leases, warranties.  Tenant and landlord rights and obligations.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of the selected research project and how the project enhances the student's understanding the area of law researched.


  
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    LAW 295 - Paralegal Practicum


    Designed for students without previous exposure to the legal field to observe and study operations, policies, and procedures performed by paralegals in various settings, (private firms, public agencies, commercial corporations, etc.).  Students will be placed in the legal environment with emphasis on attorney and paralegal interactions and paralegal relations with areas outside the office (clients, municipal agencies, other firms, commercial institutions, other legal agencies, etc.).  Final report integrating the practical and theoretical aspects of their experiences.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  30 credits from program, at least 12 LAW credits or chairperson approval

    Credits: 4
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the selected internship/practicum location by engaging in the workplace for a time frame of 100-125 hours during which time all rules, company policies, and company quality levels will be met or exceeded.  These levels will be ascertained by the instructor prior to the beginning of the internship/practicum and will continue throughout the internship/practicum.
    2. Illustrate an understanding of time sensitive work product by being assigned a time sensitive project and responding within the time frame with legally acceptable work produce.


  
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    LAW 299 - Independent Study: Paralegal


    An individual student project in paralegal studies which is beyond the scope or requirements of the courses offered by the program.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member or attorney, and approved by the program coordinator.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism, plus at least 3 credits LAW 200 level or higher

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    • The learning outcomes for this course will vary, depending on the material being covered
    • In each case the student will be able to demonstrate successful completion of the learning activities specified in the Independent Study Contract.


  
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    LIT 200 - Introduction to Literature


    An overview of the major literary genres and approaches to interpretation.  Students will practice the process of literary analysis in oral and written forms.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of literary work.


  
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    LIT 210 - Studies in United States Literature I


    A study of United States literature from Pre-Colonial times through the 19th century, exploring recurrent themes and motifs in the works of both newly discovered and long-recognized authors.  Emphasis on engaging student curiosity, eliciting student response, and fostering student development of critical analysis and interpretation through close reading of texts, class discussion, and formal and informal writing assignments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 211 - Studies in United States Literature II


    A study of United States literature from the late 19th century to the present, exploring recurrent themes and motifs in the works of both newly discovered and long-recognized authors.  Emphasis on engaging student curiosity, eliciting student response, and fostering student development of critical analysis and interpretation through close reading of texts, class discussion, and formal and informal writing assignments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 214 - Studies in British Literature I


    History and development of British literature from the Middle Ages to the 18th century.  Selections of literary merit from prose, drama, poetry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 215 - Studies in British Literature II


    History and development of British literature from the beginning of the 18th century to the middle of the 20th.  Selections of literary merit from prose, poetry, drama.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 217 - World Literature I


    A multi-genre course surveying world literature from approximately 1300 B.C. to the 1500 A.D.  The course has a strong humanities component and is designed to engage students in the lives and histories of the people and cultures who created and enjoyed these poems, stories, and plays.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 218 - World Literature II


    A multi-genre course surveying world literature from approximately 1600 A.D. into the 20th century.  The course has a strong humanities component and is designed to engage students in the lives and histories of the people who wrote these poems, stories, and plays as well as those who read, witnessed, and enjoyed them.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 220 - The Short Story


    Close reading and analysis of stories produced in different times and places.  Attention to the relationships among author, text, reader, and context in the making of meaning.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 233 - World Drama


    A survey of world drama produced in both Western and non-Western cultures.  Examination of dramatic theories and techniques, and consideration of dramatic themes common to diverse cultures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 235 - Shakespeare


    Shakespeare as both dramatist and poet.  Emphasis on selected comedies, histories and tragedies.  Consideration of the playwright's life and times.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 240 - The Poetic Experience: Sight and Sound


    This course exposes students to poetry from different countries and cultures, to important aspects of poetic language, and to diverse poetic forms.  Students will read, discuss, and write about poetry, and strive to understand what poetry portrays of human experience.  Students will also write poems about their own experience.  In doing so, students will learn how poems are built or structured.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 250 - Women and Literature: Other Perspectives


    Critical analysis and evaluation of literary works by and about women produced in diverse socio-political contexts.  Emphasis upon the relationship between the text and its cultural setting and upon other, non-traditional critical perspectives, including feminist perspectives.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 253 - Psychological Investigation in Literature


    The application of Jungian, Freudian, and other psychological theories and insights to selected short stories, novels, and poems to promote more penetrating appreciation of characters' motivations and actions and the literary work in general.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 260 - Detective Fiction


    A critical study of one of the most popular literary forms of our time, designed for armchair detectives.  Starting with Poe, Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes), and other classics in the field, the course traces the development of the detective story from its puzzle-solving beginnings to the modern psychological novel of crime and detection.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 263 - Children's Literature


    Close reading and analysis of a diverse selection of literature written for children including short fiction, novel, and poetry.  Emphasis on the use of critical theories in investigating diverse interpretations of the texts and in exploring revelatory connections between the literature and contemporary human experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 267 - An Introduction to Science Fiction


    This course will survey science fiction works from various genres such as poetry, the novel, and the short story.  It will provide students with a historical overview of the field of science fiction by exposing them, through readings and lectures, to works from the 19th and 20th centuries.  Titles chosen will reflect their importance in the literary development of science fiction over the last two centuries.  The essence of the course will consist of close readings and analyses of the texts for their artistic qualities as well as their representations of social trends and ideas.  Students will learn how to do research on the Internet, as it is one of the foremost domains of current cyber fiction.  One section of the course will deal with the history of science fiction in the cinema.  Students will come away from the course with an understanding of hard science fiction, utopias and dystopias, cyber fiction, the pulps, fantasy fiction, the Golden Age, and speculative fiction.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 270 - Twentieth-Century Working-Class Literature of North America


    An examination of literature in which 20th century North American working-class writers explore working-class life.  Emphasis upon the investigation of broad themes, such as the role of work in the shaping of values and identity and the impact of work upon human relationships.  Multi-ethnic and multi-racial perspectives; issues of gender and sexuality. Attention given to the sociocontexts in which works were produced.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 274 - Introduction to African American Literature


    This survey course will introduce students to African American literature from Colonial America to the present.  Various genres, representative works, and major writers will be examined in terms of development, theme, structure, and context.  This will be a study of African American literature as both artistic and cultural expression.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 275 - London and Literature (WE)


    The influence of Great Britain on American culture is deep and wide.  In this course we will explore major English works and the city and culture that is depicted in them.  Using literature and supporting historical and sociological documents, we will unravel the mystery of British literature and engage in a journey of exploration.  Course will be followed by a short study tour in London, England.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ENG 110 College Writing I or its equivalent as a prerequisite

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 277 - Introduction to Irish Literature


    A survey of Irish literature in several genres-novels short stories, poetry, drama, essays, and criticism from the nineteenth century to the present.  Students will read and critically analyze the work of major figures, such as Maria Edgeworth, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and Seamus Heaney, and of figures who are less well-known.  Close attention will be paid to the ways in which Irish literary works respond to the pressures of Irish history and culture.  A research paper is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 285 - Autobiography


    An examination of a variety of autobiographies from various times, cultures, and backgrounds.  Emphasis on detailed literary analysis of style, content, and context.  Students will be expected to engage in memoir writing and other various personal writing exercises to better appreciate and critique the autobiographical experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 290 - Banned Books


    This course will survey literary works from several genres, including drama, novels, poems, and stories that have been censored or banned at one time and may still be prohibited in some places.  The titles will be chosen for their importance to the study and interpretation of literature and to censorship history.  Emphasis will be placed on close reading of the texts and on research into the artistic, political, and social reasons for their censorship.  Some of the reading material will come from free Internet sources such as The Gutenberg Project and Banned Books Online.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 291 - Folklore and Fantasy


    This course will examine the roots and flowering of the modern genre of fantasy.  Beginning with myth such as that found in Genesis and The Odyssey and fairytales such as "Beauty and the Beast," proceeding through the great heroic tale tradition of Beowulf and King Arthur, we will arrive at the great fantasy works of the last hundred years.  We will use literary critical analysis to form a definition of fantasy that we can use as a touchstone with which to examine hybrids such as the Star Wars Epic and works yet to come.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LRS 106 - College Success


    The goal of this course is to help students to become more aware, active, and capable learners.  Emphasis will be on a core of specific study strategies based on learning theory, such as reading academic texts, making notes from texts and lectures, managing study time effectively, and taking exams successfully.  Students will apply these strategies to their own courses.

    Credits: 3
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an ability to navigate and use SUNYBROOME resources list.
    2. Identify various theories of learning and demonstrate their application of it.
    3. Be familiar with collegiate culture and comply with appropriate classroom protocol.
    4. Acknowledge the importance of community building skills.
    5. Identify and practice/apply/evaluate a variety of study strategies to enhance learning and success.
    6. Create an academic plan that will include transfer and or career goals.
    7. Demonstrate self-empowerment and overall self-efficacy.
    8. Be aware of the Financial Aid/Academic Standards of Progress and the status of their continued eligibility.
    9. Critically analyze, synthesize and evaluate the course content as it applies to their own individual life experiences. 


  
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    LRS 108 - Study Management & Memory and Exams


    Establish general principles of academic success, relationship between outside work and study, scheduling and organizing time, and evaluation of individual learning styles.  Introduction of theories of memory, methods of review, strategies for taking objective and essay examinations related to test anxiety.  The instructor will have the flexibility to determine, for each class, the amount of time required for each topic based upon student's needs.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Construct a schedule to include times for outside activities, work, class and study.
    2. Use knowledge of their individual learning styles to develop strategies for succeeding in class.


  
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    LTR 092 - Academic Literacy


    A content literacy course providing instruction and practice in reading and writing comprehension strategies, with an emphasis on critical thinking.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1. To provide students with reading and writing comprehension strategies using a wide variety of content rich material.
    2. To broaden students' understanding of the mutual/ beneficial relationships between reading comprehension and appropriate written response.
    3. To engage students in the evaluation of multiple literacies, thereby enhancing critical thinking capabilities.
    4. To heighten students' metacognitive awareness, promote self-regulation and enhance comprehension strategies.


  
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    LTR 110 S - Critical Literacy


    A course designed to improve comprehension and language usage efficiencies required in collegiate level performance.  Emphasis on inferential thinking beyond the literal level.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Evaluate critical literacy and inferential thinking strategies in order to challenge the neutrality of multiple literacies.
    2. Formulate written responses to readings using appropriate rhetorical modes.
    3. Strategically incorporate multiple literacies into research to bridge comprehension gaps.
    4. Practice and develop strategies for producing informed oral arguments.
    5. Continue to develop and refine self-regulation and comprehension strategies according to purpose and course content.


  
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    MAT 089 - Mathematical Literacy Supplement


    In conjunction with Mathematical Literacy II (MAT 127), mathematical and statistical reasoning are explored through topics in everyday life.  We will investigate concepts through group problems and class discussions.  It integrates fluency with numbers, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning, modeling, and communicating quantitative information.  This course is intended for students who do not plan to pursue a STEM degree.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  MAT 127 Mathematical Literacy II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Investigate and solve problems using percentages, percent change, proportions, measures of central tendency, and dimensional analysis.
    2. Investigate and create linear models.
    3. Draw conclusions from geometry and formulas.


  
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    MAT 091 - Mathematical Literacy I


    Mathematical concepts are investigated through group problems and class discussions based on real-life contexts of citizenship, personal finances, and medical literacy.  It integrates fluency with numbers, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning, modeling, and communicating quantitative information.  This course is intended for students that do not plan to pursue a STEM degree.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 093 (2-credits) Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Use quantitative situations in real life.
    2. Make sense of large numbers, scientific notation.
    3. Estimate and calculate percentages.
    4. Know order of Operations.
    5. Perform multi-step calculations.
    6. Convert between percents, ratios, and decimals in context.
    7. Know probability (percent and proportion).
    8. Use ratio and proportion to make sense of large numbers.
    9. Know relative and absolute change.
    10. Picture data with graphs.
    11. Know measures of central tendency.
    12. Know ratios and proportions.
    13. Index numbers as a way to comparing the relative size of a variable over time.
    14. Convert units.
    15. Know meaning and use of variables.
    16. Know Geometry and use formulas to make financial decisions.
    17. Solve proportions.
    18. Solve linear equations.


  
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    MAT 093 - Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra


    4 Credit Version:  Arithmetic of real numbers.  Percent, ratio and proportion.  Basic geometric concepts.  Language of algebra and solving equations.  Evaluating formulas and algebraic expressions.  Perimeter, volume, and area applications.  Graphing, solving and applications of linear equations and solving inequalities.

    2 Credit Version:  Arithmetic of real numbers.  Percent, ratio and proportion.  Basic geometric concepts.  Language of algebra and solving equations.  Perimeter, volume, and area applications.

    This course is designed to provide the skills necessary for students to successfully complete MAT 096, MAT 113, MAT 115, MAT 117, MAT 119.

    Credits: 4 or 2
    Hours
    4 or 2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:
    Perform skills in four categories: Arithmetic, Algebra/Basic Geometry, Graphing and Problem Solving/Estimation.

    Note: Throughout the course the students are expected to solve applied problems related to the topics of the course.

    2 Credit Version:

    1. Understand signed numbers and absolute value, and be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide integers.
    2. Evaluate numerical expression using exponents.
    3. Perform operations using decimals.
    4. Understand square roots and evaluate expressions using order of operations correctly.
    5. Obtain factors and the prime factorization of integers.
    6. Recognize, use and understand the commutative, associative, and distributive laws of addition and multiplication.
    7. Write fractions in equivalent forms, and add, subtract, multiply and divide arithmetic fractions.
    8. Convert among decimals, fractions and percents, and order numbers in various forms.
    9. Solve fraction and decimal application problems.
    10. Solve ratio, general percent, and percent increase/decrease applications.
    11. Solve sales tax, discount and simple interest applications.
    12. Solve basic linear equations.
    13. Define square root and evaluate numerical expressions with square roots.
    14. Perform arithmetic operations with square roots.
    15. Interpret graphs and charts with appropriate scales.
    16. Calculate the mean, median and mode of a data set.
    17. Relate the sides and angles of similar and congruent figures and solve applications involving similar figures.
    18. Understand and use the Pythagorean Theorem.
    19. Find the perimeter and area of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles and compound shapes.
    20. Find the circumference and area of a circle.
    21. Perform unit conversions.
    22. Classify angles.
    23. Find the volume of cylinders, spheres and rectangular prisms.

    4 Credit Version:

    1. Understand signed numbers and absolute value, and be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide integers.
    2. Evaluate numerical expression using exponents.
    3. Perform operations using decimals.
    4. Understand square roots and evaluate expressions using order of operations correctly.
    5. Obtain factors and the prime factorization of integers.
    6. Recognize, use and understand the commutative, associative, and distributive laws of addition and multiplication.
    7. Write fractions in equivalent forms, and add, subtract, multiply and divide arithmetic fractions.
    8. Convert among decimals, fractions and percents, and order numbers in various forms.
    9. Solve fraction and decimal application problems.
    10. Solve ratio, general percent, and percent increase/decrease applications.
    11. Solve sales tax, discount and simple interest applications.
    12. Solve linear equations.
    13. Solve equations with rational numbers, rational equations with monomial denominators that reduce to linear equations, and recognize no solution and identity equations.
    14. Formulate and solve problems involving linear equations and linear functions.
    15. Formulate and solve mixture problems.
    16. Solve linear literal equations.
    17. Solve and graph solutions of linear inequalities.
    18. Graph points on the rectangular coordinate system and graph linear equations in two variables.
    19. Graph lines using the intercepts.
    20. Find the slope of a line using a graph of a line and find the slope of a line given two points.
    21. Find equations of lines given a slope and a y-intercept and graph the equations using the slope and y-intercept.
    22. Find equations of lines given a point and a slope and find equations of lines given two points.
    23. Identify parallel and perpendicular lines from their equations.
    24. Find equations of parallel and perpendicular lines.
    25. Graph linear inequalities in two variables.
    26. Define and evaluate functions using function notation.
    27. Define square root and evaluate numerical expressions with square roots.
    28. Perform arithmetic operations with square roots.
    29. Evaluate variable (including rational variable) expressions given values for the variables.
    30. Define and simplify expressions containing negative exponents.
    31. Convert between scientific notation and standard notation and use it to solve problems using scientific notation.
    32. Interpret graphs and charts with appropriate scales.
    33. Calculate the mean, median and mode of a data set.
    34. Relate the sides and angles of similar and congruent figures and solve applications involving similar figures.
    35. Understand and use the Pythagorean and Theorem.
    36. Find the perimeter and area of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles and compound shapes.
    37. Find the circumference and area of a circle.
    38. Perform unit conversions.
    39. Classify angles.
    40. Find the volume of cylinders, spheres and rectangular prisms.

     

  
  •  

    MAT 095 - Metric Conversion and Dosages


    Common fractions and decimal fractions.  Metric computations.  Apothecary and household systems.  Conversions of metric, apothecaries and household units.  Calculations of dosage.  Designed to meet the mathematics proficiency required for clinical nursing course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Mathematics II or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent and Placement by the Nursing Department

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Add/Subtract/Multiply/Divide whole numbers, fractions and decimals.
    2. Round decimals to required place value.
    3. Simplify complex fractions.
    4. Apply factor/label method to dosage problems.
    5. Convert in metric system.
    6. Convert in apothecary system using Roman numeral to 50.
    7. Convert in household system.
    8. Convert among all three systems.
    9. Apply all symbols and abbreviations used in all three systems.
    10. Apply the "required" equivalents.
    11. Interpret dosage problems, read labels and accurately perform all clinical calculations.
    12. Calculate oral medications.
    13. Calculate Parenteral medications.
    14. Do all the calculations by hand as well as using a calculator.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2. Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3. Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4. Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5. Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.


  
  •  

    MAT 096 - Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry


    Polynomials; factoring; functions; rational expressions; linear, quadratic and rational equations; graphs of basic functions; linear systems; topics in geometry; general angles in degrees and radians; right triangle trigonometry.  This is a self-paced model where each student completes the given objectives working in a computer classroom setting.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:
    Perform skills in four categories: Algebra, Geometry/Trigonometry, Graphing and Problem Solving/Estimation.

    Note:  Throughout the course the students are expected to solve applied problems related to the topics of the course.

    1. Solve 2 by 2 linear systems by graphing, substitution, and elimination.
    2. Solve 3 by 3 linear systems by elimination.
    3. Solve applications problems involving 2 by 2 and 3 by 3 systems of linear equations.
    4. Define and identify polynomials.
    5. Add, subtract, and multiply polynomials.
    6. Factor a monomial from a polynomial and factor expressions that are quadratic in form with a leading coefficient of 1.
    7. Factor expressions that are quadratic in form with a leading coefficient not equal to 1.
    8. Factor expressions that are the sum and difference of cubes.
    9. Factor expressions that can be factored by grouping.
    10. Divide polynomials by monomials.
    11. Divide polynomials by binomials using long division.
    12. Solve polynomial equations by factoring.
    13. Solve applications involving polynomial equations.
    14. Simplify algebraic monomials inside a square root.
    15. Simplify nth roots.
    16. Simplify nth roots of variable expressions.
    17. Solve quadratic equations by the square root property, completing the square, and the quadratic formula.
    18. Solve application problems with quadratic equations.
    19. Multiply, divide, add, and subtract algebraic fractions.
    20. Simplify complex fractions.
    21. Solve rational equations that reduce to linear or quadratic form.
    22. Solve and evaluate literal equations.
    23. Solve application problems with rational equations.
    24. Define a function, evaluate functions at a given value, and determine the domain and range of a function.
    25. Apply the vertical line test, compare the graphs of functions and non-functions and determine the domain of a rational function.
    26. Graph a parabola by finding the vertex, intercepts, and axis of symmetry.
    27. Graph a circle given its equation in standard or general form and state the center and radius of the circle.
    28. Use completing the square to graph circles and parabolas.
    29. Find values of the six trigonometric functions using right triangles, and evaluate the six trigonometric functions of general angles measured in degrees.
    30. Know the exact trigonometric ratios in a 30º-60º-90º triangle and 45º-45º-90º triangle.
    31. Evaluate inverse trigonometric values to degree measure.
    32. Find reference angles for angles measured in degrees.
    33. Convert between radians and degrees.
    34. Evaluate the six trigonometric functions of general angles measured in radians.
    35. Evaluate inverse trigonometric values to radians.
    36. Solve applications using right triangle trigonometry.





     

  
  •  

    MAT 097 - Intravenous Medications and Pediatric Dosage


    Calculations of intravenous medications, calculations involving drop factors, flow rate and infusion time.  Calculations of pediatric dosage in divided dosages and dosages based on body weight.  Calculation of minimum fluid requirements.  Designed to meet the mathematics proficiency required for second year nursing program.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Mathematics II or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent and Placement by Nursing department

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Calculate IV medications and solutions.
    2. Perform calculations involving drop factors.
    3. Perform calculations involving flow rate and infusion time.
    4. Accurately calculate a pediatric dosage according to body weight (in kg.)
    5. Accurately calculate pediatric dosage in divided dosages.
    6. Interpret and calculate the minimum fluid requirements for pediatric clients.
    7. Do all the arithmetic calculations by hand as well as using a calculator. 

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2. Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3. Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4. Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5. Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.


  
  •  

    MAT 115 - Mathematics for General Education


    This course is designed to satisfy the SUNY General Education Requirements at the baccalaureate level.  Its purpose is to enhance a student's quantitative literacy and critical thinking.  The course topics illustrate the relevance of mathematics in society.  Prescribed topics include introductory statistics, modeling with functions, and financial mathematics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 091 Mathematical Literacy I or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, 4-credit or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Investigate and solve problems using financial mathematics.
    2. Create and use graphs of functions to model real-world applications.
    3. Organize and draw conclusions from data sets.

     

  
  •  

    MAT 118 - The Mathematics of Sustainability


    The Mathematics of Sustainability is a liberal arts mathematics course that satisfies the SUNY General Education Requirement.  Using the concept of sustainability as it relates to social, economic and environmental capitol, students will investigate relevant issues that involve applications of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and statistics.  The students will learn different ways to present and interpret numerical and statistical data.  In addition, they will investigate mathematical models and simulations in a variety of applications.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand and use mathematical models as they apply to current topics in sustainability.
    2. Generate and interpret displays of data in the form of tables, graphs and charts.
    3. Complete calculations using mathematical formulas and mathematical equations with and without the use scientific calculators.


  
  •  

    MAT 119 - Mathematics for Elementary Education I


    An exploration of order of operations, fractions, equations of a single variable, graphing lines; visual display of data using charts and graphs, descriptive statistics, data analysis, hypothesis testing; area and perimeter of plane figures, volume and surface area of solids.  Students are expected to explain the material as though to a target audience.  Course uses a project-based instruction methodology.  Intended only for elementary education majors, this course is the first course in a two course sequence (with MAT 120) for completion of SUNY General Education Math requirement.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Math II or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Add, subtract, multiply, divide rational numbers, and explain why the basic arithmetic operations of fractions work.
    2. Evaluate arithmetic expressions according to the algebraic hierarchy.
    3. Adding, subtracting and multiplying polynomials.
    4. Solve equations of a single variable.
    5. Solve literal equations of a single variable.
    6. Define and graph a linear function of a single variable.
    7. Identify, interpret, and discuss line charts, bar charts, line graphs, and pie charts.
    8. Construct line charts, line graphs, and bar charts.
    9. Relate a shape to its place in the geometric hierarchy.
    10. Identify various quadrilaterals and triangles.
    11. Use formulas to calculate the perimeter and area of various polygons.
    12. Use formulas to calculate the circumference and area of a circle.
    13. Use the Pythagorean Theorem.
    14. Calculate the perimeter of simple and compound planar regions.
    15. Use formulas to calculate the surface area and volume of a cone, a cylinder, a prism and a sphere.
    16. Calculate the volume and surface area of simple and compound solids.
    17. Solve application problems involving area, perimeter, surface area and volume.
    18. Explain the difference between central tendency and dispersion.
    19. Calculate the mean, weighted mean, median, and mode and recognize the appropriate use of same to help describe a data set.
    20. Calculate percentiles and relate them to a set of data.
    21. Calculate the range and standard deviation for a set of data and recognize these as measures of dispersion.
    22. Explain what a z-score measures and calculate the z-score for a given score.
    23. Test a hypothesis about the mean of a population.
    24. Complete and present projects.
    25. Participate in cooperative learning activities.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement. 
    In context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2. Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3. Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4. Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5. Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.


  
  •  

    MAT 120 - Mathematics for Elementary Education II


    Simple probability, odds, expected value; patterns, symmetry, tilings, sequences, and pattern block manipulation; functions of one or more variables with graphs and applications; right triangle trigonometry; sine, logarithmic, exponential, quadratic and logistic curves.  Students are expected to explain the material as though to a target audience.  Course uses a project-based instruction methodology.  Intended only for elementary education majors, this course is the second course in a two course sequence (with MAT 119) for completion of SUNY General Education Math requirement. (Writing Emphasis Course)

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 119 Mathematics for Elementary Education I and ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

    1. Identify the sample space and event spaces in probability experiments.
    2. Draw tree diagrams and tables to solve probability problems.
    3. Calculate simple theoretical and experimental probabilities.
    4. Calculate compound theoretical and experimental probabilities using trees and multiplication principle.
    5. Determine odds.
    6. Calculate expected value.
    7. Write recursion formulas and explicit formulas for various sequences.
    8. Recognize and write recursive and explicit formulas for arithmetic, geometric, Fibonacci and, optionally, polygonal umber sequences.
    9. Hexiamonds, Polyominoes, Pentominoes, and Tetrahexes.
    10. Tile a plane using various combinations of regular polygons.
    11. Identify various types of plane tilings.
    12. Identify symmetry in a pattern.
    13. Identify and create the various types of border patterns.
    14. Build designs with pattern blocks.
    15. Evaluate functions of one or several variables.
    16. Review solving equations of a single variable.
    17. Recognize and appropriately use degree and radian measure.
    18. Solve applications using right triangle trigonometry.
    19. Recognize the graphs of the sine, logarithmic, exponential, quadratic and logistic curves.
    20. Calculate angles using inverse trigonometric functions.
    21. Algebraically solve equations in a single variable, including sine, logarithmic, exponential and logistic curves.
    22. Recognize applications of sine, logarithmic, exponential, quadratic, and logistic curves.
    23. Complete writing assignments.
    24. Conduct research using professional journals and the Internet.
    25. Complete and present projects.
    26. Participate in cooperative learning activities.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement. 
    In context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2. Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3. Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4. Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5. Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.


  
  •  

    MAT 124 - Statistics I


    Sampling theory, organization and presentation of data, measures of central tendency, variance, standard deviation, exploratory data analysis, correlation and regression, normal distributions, student's t-distributions, binomial distributions, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, use of a statistical software package. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra (4 credit) or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the various methods of collection, organization, and interpretation of data.
    2. Construct and interpret displays of data using technology.
    3. Use simulations and understand the role of probability in statistical procedures.
    4. Analyze and use sample data to make inferences about population parameters and applying appropriate methods.


  
  •  

    MAT 127 - Mathematical Literacy II


    Mathematical and statistical reasoning are explored through topics in everyday life.  It integrates quantitative literacy with percents, probability, mathematical modeling, and statistical thinking.  Concepts are investigated with hands-on activities using medical, environmental, and financial examples.  Communicating mathematics will be developed in this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 091 Mathematical Literacy I, MAT 093 (4-credits) Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1. Scaling factors and area unit conversion.
    2. Calculating interest rates and estimation.
    3. Calculating with percentages.
    4. Applied uses of percentages.
    5. Understand Absolute and relative change.
    6. Understanding designs of statistical studies.
    7. Reading visual display of data.
    8. Understanding visual display of data.
    9. Using spreadsheet to organize data.
    10. Reading, interpreting, and creating bar and pie charts.
    11. Understanding and calculating weighted averages.
    12. Understanding linear models with words, tables, graphs, and equations.
    13. Understanding piecewise linear models.
    14. Approximating data with linear models, scatter plots and lines of best fit.
    15. Understanding basics of exponential models.
    16. Modeling situations with exponential equations.
    17. Interpreting and applying different statistical methods and calculations (optional).


    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply the various methods of organization and interpretation of data.
    2. Solve applications involving ratios and percentages.
    3. Develop and use linear, piecewise and exponential models to solve real-life applications.
    4. Use estimation and unit conversion to develop number sense.


  
  •  

    MAT 130 - Applied Algebra and Trigonometry


    Designed for students in the Engineering Technologies only, the course covers algebra and trigonometry emphasizing computational skills and graphing using application problems from technology fields.  Topics include: function definition, graphs, exponents, logarithms, trigonometric identities, complex numbers and vectors.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and graph linear functions, polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions and logarithmic functions.
    2. Solve applications involving linear functions, polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions.
    3. Solve equations and manipulate expressions involving polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions.
    4. Use graphing calculator technology to solve problems.


  
  •  

    MAT 133 - College Algebra for Business


    This course provides the Business, or other non-STEM student, with basic algebraic concepts necessary to continue in non-STEM related mathematics courses.  Topics include algebraic operations on expressions involving polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; graphing linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions by hand; using technology for transformations of above functions; using technology for linear, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic regression; theory and applications of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; solving polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic equations.  The use of graphing calculators is an integral part of the course; their use throughout the course will facilitate understanding of salient concepts. 

    This course may not be used as a substitute for MAT 136 or any major requiring MAT 136 as a prerequisite.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and graph linear, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions with and without the use of a graphing calculator.
    2. Solve applications involving linear, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions.
    3. Perform algebraic operations on expressions involving linear, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions.
    4. Solve equations and inequalities involving linear, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, radical, and rational functions with and without the use of a graphing calculator.


  
  •  

    MAT 136 - College Algebra and Trigonometry I


    Rational exponents; radicals; polynomial long division; rational expressions; solving quadratic equations and inequalities; polynomial functions; absolute value equations and inequalities; complex numbers; operations of functions; inverse functions; properties of exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; reference angles; radian measure; graphs of sine, cosine, and tangent; basic trigonometric identities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and graph functions, such as: linear functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, absolute value functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions and trigonometric functions.
    2. Solve applications involving linear functions, polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions.
    3. Solve equations and inequalities and perform algebraic operations on expressions involving polynomials, rational functions, absolute values, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions.


  
  •  

    MAT 146 - Applied Business Calculus


    Review of analytic geometry of lines and parabolas; functions, and their graphs; limits and continuity; differentiation rules and applications; integration techniques and applications; exponential and logarithmic functions and applications.  Recommended for Social Science, Health Science and Business students.  Not for Mathematics majors or Science majors in the A.S. Degree program.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 133 College Algebra for Business

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine limits and continuity of functions
    2. Differentiate polynomial, rational, logarithmic, exponential functions using computational and intuitive methods.
    3. Integrate polynomial, rational, logarithmic, exponential functions using computational and intuitive methods.
    4. Solve business and economic applications of differentiation and integration.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of the concept of a limit, a derivative, and an integral.

     

  
  •  

    MAT 148 - Applied Technical Mathematics I


    This is a course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry with technical applications.  Topics include:  operations in the real number system, expressions and functions, first-degree equations, properties of lines, systems of linear equations, trigonometric functions, geometry (perimeters, areas, volumes of common figures), polynomials, exponents, algebraic products and factoring, algebraic fractions and operations, rational expressions, radical expressions, quadratic equations, and graphs of functions.  This course requires MAT 096 Elementary Algebra & Trigonometry or equivalent background knowledge.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Interpret and draw inferences from appropriate models such as formulas, graphs, tables, or schematics.
    2. Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically, or verbally as appropriate.
    3. Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.


  
  •  

    MAT 156 - Algebra and Trigonometry for Calculus


    Graphs of rational functions, asymptotes, exponential and logarithmic equations, conic sections, matrix arithmetic and matrix solutions to systems of equations, determinants,  trigonometric identities and equations, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, vectors, polar graphs, parametric graphs, polar form of complex numbers, powers and roots of complex numbers, limits of functions using tables.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and graph polynomial functions, rational functions, conic sections, basic parametric equations, and basic polar equations.
    2. Solve logarithmic equations, exponential equations, systems of linear equations using matrices and apply trigonometric identities to solve trigonometric equations.
    3. Solve applications involving Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, vectors, and systems of linear equations and inverse trigonometric functions.
    4. Convert between polar and rectangular form of complex numbers, and compute powers and roots of complex numbers.

     

  
  •  

    MAT 160 - Applied Calculus I


    Designed for students in the Engineering Technologies only, this course covers the mechanics of calculus using application problems from technology fields.  Topics include:  equations of tangent lines; limits; differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions; product rule, quotient rule, and chain rule; implicit differentiation; related rates; maxima and minima; differentials; the definite integral and applications to finding area, center of gravity, volume of revolution and work done; numerical integration.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine limits and continuity of functions using computational and technological methods.
    2. Differentiate polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential functions using computational, intuitive and technological methods.
    3. Integrate polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential functions using computational, intuitive and technological methods.
    4. Solve applications of differentiation and integration.

     

  
  •  

    MAT 181 - Calculus I


    A university parallel calculus course covering functions, limits and continuity.  Differentiation and integration of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential functions using computational and intuitive methods.  Applications including curve sketching, rectilinear motion, related rates, maxima and minima.  Summation, integration and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications of the definite integral.

    NOTE:  Students may not use more than one of the following to meet graduation requirements:  MAT 146, MAT 160, MAT 181.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 156 Algebra & Trigonometry for Calculus or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine limits and continuity of functions.
    2. Differentiate polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential functions using computational and intuitive methods.
    3. Integrate polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential functions using computational and intuitive methods.
    4. Solve applications of differentiation and integration.


  
  •  

    MAT 182 - Calculus II


    Exponential and logarithmic functions from an integral viewpoint, the calculus of inverse functions.  Techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions and trigonometric substitution.  Improper integrals. Sequences, detecting convergence, and L'Hospital rule.  Infinite series, tests for convergence, power series, Maclaurin series and Taylor series.  Polar curves, parametric equations and conics in calculus.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 181 Calculus I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Employ various integration techniques and solve elementary differential equations.
    2. Analyze convergence behavior, create and use series.
    3. Draw graphs and use Calculus on functions with alternative representations.
    4. Compute limits using L'Hopital Rule.


  
  •  

    MAT 224 - Statistics II


    Review of probability fundamentals, discrete random variables and probability distributions.  The F distributions, chi-squared distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation, nonlinear and multiple regression, the analysis of categorical data, nonparametric procedures, use of a statistical software package.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 124 Statistics I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Calculate and use statistics from discrete probability distributions.
    2. Use chi-squared and F distributions to conduct tests of hypotheses.
    3. Create and perform analysis with linear and multiple regression models.
    4. Conduct ANOVA tests.
    5. Conduct non-parametric tests.


  
  •  

    MAT 245 - Design of Experiments


    This course is an introduction to the most common types of statistical designs and analyses of experiments.  Topics include single-factor experiments with randomized blocks, Latin squares, incomplete blocks, two-factor experiments, 2^k designs, fractional designs, response surface techniques, and other selected topics.  Technology will be used throughout the course. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 224 Statistics II or MAT 260 Applied Probability and Statistics

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Create appropriate experimental designs to analyze situations.
    2. Test hypotheses with contrasts.
    3. Use response surface methods.


  
  •  

    MAT 250 - Discrete Mathematics


    Sets, functions, mathematical induction, relations, partially ordered sets, combinatorics including permutations, the pigeonhole principle, binomial and multinomial coefficients, recurrence relations, generating functions, the principle of inclusion-exclusion.  Graph theory, including paths and connectedness, minimum length paths, Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, graph isomorphisms, trees, planar and nonplanar graphs.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 182 Calculus II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Interpret and write proofs of propositions from various fields of Mathematics using a range of proof styles and structures.
    2. Use basic principles of various discrete mathematical structures that are built from set theory.
    3. Apply basic theorems and principles of counting and probability to various problems.
    4. Apply basic theorems and principles of graph theory to various problems.


  
  •  

    MAT 260 - Applied Probability and Statistics


    Descriptive statistics, probability and random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, joint distributions, sampling distributions, confidence interval estimates, hypothesis tests on means, categorical populations, and the form of distributions, linear regression analysis on bivariate and multivariate data, single factor ANOVA, randomized block experiments, all with a strong emphasis on engineering applications and the use of statistical software to simulate, model, and analyze data.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 181 Calculus I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform appropriate hypothesis tests and interpret the results.
    2. Use density functions and probability distributions to analyze and describe random variables and distributions.
    3. Use statistical software and/or simulations to organize, describe, and analyze distributions and data sets.
    4. Construct and interpret appropriate confidence intervals.


  
  •  

    MAT 264 - Linear Algebra


    Linear equations and matrices, vector spaces, inner product spaces, linear independence, linear transformations.  Determinants and Cramer's rule, systems of homogeneous equations, Gram-Schmidt process and diagonalization. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors and applications.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 182 Calculus II w/Analytic Geometry

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate competence with basic ideas of linear systems and matrices.
    2. Demonstrate understanding of vectors and vector spaces.
    3. Apply matrix algebra to linear transformations.
    4. Use the techniques of Linear Algebra in a variety of real-life applications.


  
  •  

    MAT 266 - Introduction to Real Analysis


    This course provides a rigorous introduction to the concepts of axiomatics, sets, measures, functions, sequences, series, integration/differentiation and metric spaces.  Emphasis will be placed on writing mathematics clearly, especially regarding proofs.  Recommended for Mathematics majors or Computer Science and Engineering Science students as advised.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 281 Calculus III or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Interpret and prove various theorems from set theory within the axiomatic structure of number sets.
    2. Identify various traits of sets of real numbers and real-valued functions.
    3. Prove various results about sets of real numbers and real-valued functions.
    4. Define multiple types of convergence for sequences of numbers or functions and write proofs of convergence using various convergence theorems.
    5. Generalize the basic theory of the course to the idea of more general metric spaces.


  
  •  

    MAT 281 - Calculus III


    Triple integrals with cylindrical and spherical coordinates.  Vector geometry and vector calculus in two and three dimensions.  Calculus of multivariable functions: gradient, extrema and optimization (with and without constraints).  Line and surface integrals. Green's theorem and Stokes' theorem.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 182 Calculus II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Graph, differentiate, and integrate functions of multiple variables.
    2. Use methods of Calculus to graph and investigate the graph of functions of multiple variables.
    3. Apply the techniques of Calculus to vector and vector functions.
    4. Use integration over various coordinate systems.


  
  •  

    MAT 282 - Differential Equations w/Linear Algebra


    First and second order differential equations.  Matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and systems of linear equations.  Linear independence, the Wronskian, and differential operators.  Homogeneous and nonhomogeneous linear differential equations with constant coefficients.  Methods of undetermined coefficients, and variation of parameters.  Systems of linear differential equations, Laplace transforms, and power series solutions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 182 Calculus II or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Interpret and/or create mathematical models via differential equations for various physical situations.
    2. Solve homogeneous and nonhomogeneous differential equations of first, second or higher order using various methods.
    3. Use basic linear algebra techniques as tools to aid in solving differential equations.


  
  •  

    MAT 299 - Independent Study


    The student undertakes an independent project in his/her specialty under the guidance of a faculty member.  Only one independent study course allowed per semester.  Consideration may be given a project involving work assignment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Department Chairperson Permission

    Credits: (1-4)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
  •  

    MDA 102 - Medical Assisting Science


    This course provides the medical assisting student with an introduction to the healthcare field and the role of the medical assistant in the ambulatory care setting.  Students will gain an uderstanding of the qualifications and duties, professional affiliation, scope of practice, professional conduct, and requirements necessary to become a medical assistant.  This course emphasizes the physical and psychosocial changes which occur throughout the lifespan and the skills necessary to assist patients to adapt to these changes.  Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts of communication and the ability to effect methods to overcome barriers to effective communication in order to establish effective therapeutic relationships.  The development of self-awareness and professional identity is emphasized.  This course is designated as a service learning course.  This component requires completion of a service learning project to benefit the campus/community and a reflection paper, designed to promote the development of leadership, communication, team collaboration skills and professional identity.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. State and explain the role of the medical assistant in the ambulatory care center, including scope of practice, the importance of professional conduct within the healthcare setting, and requirements to obtain the medical assisting degree and certification as a Certified Medical Assistant through the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA).
    2. Explain the physical and psychosocial changes which occur throughout the life-span and the skills required to assist patients to adapt to these changes.
    3. Expain basic concepts of communication, including verbal and nonverbal communication, barriers to effective communication and the methods to overcome these barriers in order to establish effective therapeutic relationships.
    4. Demonstrate self-awareness and recognition of the influence of their own style of communication, values, emotions, behaviors and coping mechanisms within interpersonal relationships and the impact these have upon their personal and professional development.
    5. Demonstrate ability to effectively work, communicate, and collaborate with others and ability to reflect upon personal and professional growth and development of a professional identity as a Medical Assistant through completion of a service learning project and written reflection.

     

  
  •  

    MDA 104 - Keyboarding and Medical Word Processing


    Introduction to and development of basic keyboarding skills on computer keyboards and beginning word processing.  Students will have the opportunity to learn keyboarding and word processing functions and apply that knowledge to build typing speed and accuracy.  Emphasis will be on application to medical correspondence, reports, and developing presentations.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Produce an error-free document while striving to key at least 30 words per minute.
    2. Create and present a professional presentation.
    3. Produce error-free, correctly formatted medical correspondence.
    4. Identify and define terms and concepts related to the basic operation of computers and Internet.
    5. Demonstrate how to send, receive, and reply to email.


  
  •  

    MDA 114L - First Aid


    This course focuses on the provision of basic first aid and CPR to respond to emergency situations.  Emphasis is on the recognition and response to medical emergencies within the community or healthcare setting and ability of the student to successfully perform first aid/CPR skills.  Course will include American Heart Association Professional Level Basic Life Support and American Heart Association Heartsaver First Aid certifications, which are valid for 2 years.

    This course requires additional fees for the CPR and First Aid Certification Cards.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform universal precautions procedures, as outlined by the CDC.
    2. Demonstrate proper technique for 1 and 2 rescuer CPR for infants, children, and adults, including use of an AED, following American Heart Association guidelines.
    3. Perform first aid procedures for basic medical emergencies, following American Heart Association guidelines.


  
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    MDA 115 - Medical Assisting Procedures I


    This course provides the medical assisting student with an introduction to basic clinical procedures in the ambulatory care setting.  The importance of identifying, maintaining, and performing proper infection control, including medical and surgical asepsis, according to CDC regulations, is emphasized throughout this course.  Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to perform vital signs and anthropometric measurements, complete patient medical histories, prepare exam rooms and trays, assist with exams, procedures, and treatments, and prepare and administer medications, including medication dosage calculations.  Students will gain the ability to perform sterilization procedures, work within a sterile field, and perform wound and dressing care.  Students will learn and demonstrate through role-plays, effective therapeutic communication techniques to educate patients about following treatment plans, and preparing for, during, and post procedures and treatments.  This course provides an overview of the human body, including normal function, pathophysiology, the diagnostic measures and treatments used to treat pathology, and medical terminology and abbreviations associated with body systems and procedures.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 106 Medical Terminology, BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    For Medical Assisting students

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define and apply the principles of standard precautions, medical/surgical asepsis, and personal protective equipment, following CDC regulations.
    2. Perform vital sign and anthropometric measurements.
    3. Prepare for and assist during patient examinations and procedures.
    4. Perform sterilization procedures, work within a sterile field, and perform wound care/dressing changes.
    5. Identify medication uses, calculate doses, and administer medications via various routes.
    6. Educate patients about treatment plans and procedures, utilizing effective therapeutic techniques.


  
  •  

    MDA 201 - Medical Assisting Procedures II


    This course introduces the medical assisting student to basic microbiology, hematology, and urinalysis procedures performed in the ambulatory care setting.  Students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to obtain specimens and perform CLIA waived hematology, chemistry, urinalysis, immunology, and microbiology tests.  Students will learn and demonstrate proper steps for venipuncture and capillary puncture.  This course will provide students with an understanding of quality control and quality assurance issues related to the medical laboratory and they will be able to perform a quality control measure.  The ability to differentiate between normal and abnormal test results, and maintain results using flow sheets is covered in this course.  The importance of lab safety, proper use of personal protective equipment, and following CDC, and OSHA guidelines is emphasized throughout the course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MDA 115 Medical Assisting Procedures I

    Prior or Concurrent:  BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 4 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    For Medical Assisting students

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. State safety precautions and demonstrate ability to perform safety measures in the laboratory.
    2. Define terms related to urinalysis, hematology, basic chemistry, immunology, and microbiology.
    3. Obtain specimens and perform CLIA waived hematology, chemistry, urinalysis, immunology, and microbiology tests.
    4. Perform venipuncture and capillary puncture procedures.
    5. Define quality control and quality assurance issues related to the medical laboratory and perform a quality control measure.
    6. Differentiate between normal and abnormal test results, and maintain results using flow sheets.


  
  •  

    MDA 206 - Medical Office Management


    This course provides the Medical Assisting and Medical Administrative Skills Certificate student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform administrative procedures to effectively prepare them to work within the ambulatory care setting.  Students will learn how to create, organize, file, store, and maintain medical records, within guidelines of the law; establish and maintain appointment schedules; complete inventories and routine office maintenance, and order supplies.  This course will provide students with the skills to interact with third-party payers, navigate the varied requirements of managed care, perform diagnostic and procedural coding, and verify eligibility for service.  Simulated exercises throughout the course will provide students with the skills necessary to work within practice management and electronic management record systems.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MDA 102 Medical Assisting Science, MDA 104 Keyboarding and Medical Word Processing, or with Chair permission.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    For Medical Assisting and Medical Administrative Skills Certificate students only

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Create, organize, file, store, and maintain patient medical records, while protecting the integrity of the record, applying HIPAA rules, and demonstrating sensitivity to the Patient's Bill of Rights.
    2. Demonstrate professional telephone techniques and record messages accurately.
    3. Establish and maintain appointment schedules and demonstrate ability to schedule patient appointments.
    4. Demonstrate ability to utilize practice management software and electronic health record systems.
    5. Describe and perform coding procedures, while utilizing medical necessity guidelines.
    6. Identify third-party plans and perform managed care requirements.


  
  •  

    MDA 207 - Advanced Medical Office Management


    This course provides the Medical Assisting student with advanced office management skills to effectively prepare them to work within the ambulatory care setting.  Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to perform accounting, banking, billing, collections, and human resource/office management tasks.  Students will gain the ability to develop professional correspondence, education, and marketing materials.  This course will provide students with the skills necessary to become effective leaders and supervisors within their field.  An emphasis on the development of sensitive and culturally appropriate communication skills is included throughout the course.  Simulated exercises throughout the course will enhance course objectives.  This course is designated as a service-learning course.  This component requires completion of a service-learning project to benefit the campus/community and a reflection paper, geared to promote the development of leadership, marketing, and educational material development skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MDA 102 Medical Assisting Science and MDA 206 Medical Office Management

    Co-requisite:  MDA 102 Medical Assisting Science

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 laboratory Hours
    Note
    For Medical Assisting students only

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the students will be able to:

    1. Define accounting terms and perform billing and bookkeeping procedures.
    2. Describe and perform banking procedures.
    3. Describe billing and collection procedures, precautions related to payments, and information contained within the patient billing record.
    4. Demonstrate ability to perform human resource/office management, and supervisory tasks.
    5. Demonstrate ability to engage in culturally sensitive and developmentally appropriate communication.
    6. Develop professional correspondence, educational, and marketing materials.


  
  •  

    MDA 208 - Medical Ethics, Law and Economics (WE)


    This course provides an introduction to medical ethics and laws related to the healthcare profession.  Students will gain an understanding of medical ethics, including ethical principles and theories, which set the standard of conduct and care for providers and other healthcare professionals, including allied healthcare workers.  An understanding of the laws pertaining to healthcare, including civil and criminal law, and statutory and regulatory requirements of the healthcare professional will be emphasized.  Bioethical topics will be introduced and students will gain the ability to apply ethical principles, theories, and requirements of the law to ethical dilemmas.  A focus on differentiating between personal and professional ethics and how personal morals impacts professional performance will aid the student in the ethical decision making process.  This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.  This component requires approximately 2,000-2,500 words (8-10 pages) of formal writing, including revisions to improve writing ability, utilizing APA style.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define and apply ethical principles and theories to ethical dilemmas and bioethical issues faced by healthcare professionals and their patients.
    2. Describe and be able to compare and contrast the scope of practice, education, training, credentialing, licensing requirements, and standard of care for various providers and allied healthcare professionals.
    3. Define and describe medicolegal terms and the various laws impacting the practice of healthcare, including responsibilities of the healthcare professional to comply with requirements of the law.
    4. Differentiate between personal and professional ethics and discuss how personal morals impact professional performance and the ethical decision making process.
    5. Prepare written papers which adhere to APA style, the professional writing style of a career in the healthcare field.


  
  •  

    MDA 211 - Medical Assisting Procedures III


    Study of body systems and disease, cell and tissue damage, inflammation and healing, immune response, and infectious disease in relation to patient care and the human response.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II, MDA 115 Medical Assisting Procedures I, MDA 201 Medical Assisting Procedures II, MDA 206 Medical Office Management, for Medical Assistants and BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I or BIO 101 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, for Medical Administrative Skills Certificate, Medical Transcription, or Health Studies Students

    Co-requisite: MDA 211L Medical Assisting Procedures III Laboratory (for Medical Assisting Degree majors only or consent of chairperson)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and understand terms related to the disease and disabilities studied in this course, cell and tissue damage, inflammation and healing, immune response, and infectious diseases.
    2. Explain the causes and classification of diseases and disability.
    3. Identify the pathophysiology processes involved in the following major body systems:  cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, nervous, reproductive, integumentary, and mental health.


  
  •  

    MDA 211 L - Medical Assisting Procedures III Laboratory


    Practical application of advanced technical procedures in medical assisting specifically oriented to the various medical specialties.  Practice of the techniques of orthopedics, cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, obstetrics and gynecology, andrology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, and diagnostic imaging.  The medical assistant's role in preparation for screening, and assisting with emergencies and providing patient education is emphasized.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 132 Anatomy & Physiology II, MDA 115 Medical Assisting Procedures I, MDA 201 Medical Assisting Procedures II, MDA 206 Medical Office Management

    Corequisites:  MDA 211 Medical Assisting Procedures III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. List and discuss common diseases and diagnostic tests for body systems discussed.
    2. Perform and assist with advanced technical procedures within a variety of specialties, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    3. State the fundamental principles of evacuating a healthcare setting and demonstrate ability to devise and implement emergency preparedness plans, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    4. Educate patients effectively about a variety of diseases, diagnostic tests, and procedures through verbal and written communication.
    5. Demonstrate proficiency with development of patient educational materials which demonstrate clear and accurate patient instruction for diseases processes, procedures, self-exams, and follow-up care.
    6. Demonstrate ability to complete accurate documentation of patient care.


  
  •  

    MDA 245 - Directed Practice Seminar (WE)


    This course provides the student with theoretical knowledge and skills to be successful during externship and gaining employment as a medical assistant.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  MDA 246 Clinical Practicum I, MDA 247 Clinical Practicum II, or with authorization from the Chairperson

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Note
    For Senior Medical Assisting students

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the essentials of an externship and list the responsibilities of the student during externship.
    2. Demonstrate essential skills in seeking employment in the medical assisting field.
    3. Complete the certification process to become a Certified Medical Assistant through the American Association of Medical Assistants.
    4. Identify strategies for becoming involved in the medical assisting professional community.


  
  •  

    MDA 246 - Clinical Practicum I


    This course provides the medical assisting student with supervised practical experience in a variety of healthcare facilities, such as general and specialty physician offices, medical centers, and other ambulatory care facilities.  Students will complete 2 rotations throughout the 15 week semester.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HST 210 Pharmacology, MDA 201 Medical Assisting Procedures II, MDA 206 Medical Office Management, MDA 207 Advanced Medical Office Management

    Corequisites:  MDA 211 Medical Assisting Procedures III and MDA 211L Medical Assisting Procedures III Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    8 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform clinical/administrative procedures expected of a medical assistant, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    2. Demonstrate ability to respond to emergency situations by performing appropriate first aid skills, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    3. Complete and document externship hours as required by accreditation and department standards.
    4. Demonstrate professional behavior expected of the medical assistant during externship, including ability to follow policies and procedure of the healthcare facility, course, department, and college.


  
  •  

    MDA 247 - Clinical Practicum II


    This course provides the medical assisting student with supervised practical experience in a variety of healthcare facilities, such as general and specialty physician offices, medical centers, and other ambulatory care facilities.  Students will complete 2 rotations throughout the 15 week semester.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HST 210 Pharmacology, MDA 201 Medical Assisting Procedures II, MDA 206 Medical Office Management, MDA 207 Advanced Medical Office Management

    Corequisite:  MDA 211 Medical Assisting Procedures III and MDA 211L Medical Assisting Procedures III Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    8 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Perform clinical/administrative procedures expected of a medical assistant, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    2. Demonstrate ability to respond to emergency situations by performing first aid skills, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    3. Complete and document externship hours as required by accreditation and department standards.
    4. Demonstrate professional behavior expected of the medical assistant during externship, including ability to follow policies and procedures of the healthcare facility, course, department, and college.


  
  •  

    MEC 110 - Introduction to Mechatronics


    This course introduces electro-mechanical systems and how these systems are controlled.  Students will learn to interpret specifications and codes, acquire and analyze system data and calibrate input/output devices.  Students will also gain practical experience with digital logic and analog interfacing in mechatronic systems and troubleshoot basic control and alarm systems.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the basic components of mechatronic systems and describe how these components interact.
    2. Utilize high-level graphical programming tools.
    3. Identify career opportunities in the field of mechatronics.
    4. Perform basic electro-mechanical calculations related to energy, power, and efficiency.
    5. Demonstrate the use of Boolean algebra, logic simplification, and circuit troubleshooting.
    6. Demonstrate the use of analog and digital mechatronic system controls.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to interface electromechanical systems with microprocessors and microcontrollers.


  
  •  

    MEC 260 - Mechatronics Pneumatic & Hydraulic Technology


    This course introduces pneumatic and hydraulic technologies and their common applications in the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors.  The course presents fundamentals of electro-hydraulic/pneumatic pumps, compressors, regulators, valves, cylinders, and fluid power involving pressure.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MEC 110 Introduction to Mechatronics

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify basic fluid mechanics principles and how they apply to fluid power equipment.
    2. Identify and apply fluid power symbols to design a fluid power system.
    3. Design and build a basic hydraulic and pneumatic system.
    4. Design and build controls and feedback for a fluid power system.
    5. Troubleshoot and repair hydraulic and fluid power systems.


  
  •  

    MEC 270 - Clean Energy Technology


    This course examines mechatronics and its clean energy applications related to industry and system maintenance standards.  Control systems for clean energy production and storage will be examined, and explore how solar fields, wind farms, and energy storage systems are controlled and integrated into the electric power grid.  Laboratory experiences will include date collection and analysis of energy data obtained from clean energy production systems and application of PLC troubleshooting procedures to improve efficiencies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MEC 110 Introduction to Mechatronics

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe how solar, wind, and energy storage systems are integrated into the electric power grid.
    2. Acquire data from various mechatronic systems to improve efficiencies.
    3. Interpret electrically schematic diagrams, control flowcharts, and user manuals.
    4. Apply knowledge of Direct Digital Control (DDC) systems for use in Building Management Systems (BMS).
    5. Troubleshoot problems with AC and DC motors, variable frequency drives (VFDs).


  
  •  

    MET 112 - Metrology


    The study of the science of measurement systems and measurement.  Accuracy, precision and reliability compared. Standards, including surface finish.  Students learn to use the steel rule, calipers, micrometers, fixed gauges, feeler gauges, radius gauges, gauge blocks and surface plates, height and planer gauges, V-blocks, toolmaker's flat, mechanical indicating equipment, visual gauges, air gauges, toolmaker's microscope, optical flats and angle measuring equipment.  Calibration of instruments and appropriate record keeping.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the principles of dimensional measurement.
    2. Know the methods and skills necessary to perform practical measurements in industry.


  
  •  

    MET 113 - Engineering Drawing I w/CAD


    An introductory course in the fundamentals of engineering drawing and the basics of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD).  Manual drafting techniques are integrated with extensive use of AutoCAD.  Topics include use of the drawing instruments, geometric construction, freehand sketching, orthographic projection, sectional and auxiliary views and proper dimensioning techniques.  CAD topics include file management; command structure; creating, editing and manipulating drawing elements; dimensioning.  Students will gain an understanding of engineering drawing concepts by applying them in both manual drafting and AutoCAD assignments.

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    CIV 113
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Know the importance of engineering drawing and the requirements of this graphic language.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to construct an acceptable freehand sketch.
    3. Be competent in the use of manual drafting tools and techniques.
    4. Develop technically correct orthographic projections using proper projection techniques and the latest ASME Y14.5M standards.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to dimension a moderately complex part using proper dimensioning techniques.
    6. Generate different types of sectional views and choose which type of section is most appropriate for a given part.
    7. Understand the reasons and concepts of auxiliary views.
    8. Demonstrate the ability to create part drawings using AutoCAD in a timely fashion.


  
  •  

    MET 116 - Engineering Drawing II w/CAD


    A second course in engineering drawing emphasizing the principles of descriptive geometry, working drawings, tolerancing methods, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, with an introduction to solid work or other CAD software.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 113 Engineering Drawing I w/CAD

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand solid work's basic parametric modeling process by demonstrating the ability to create quality solid models.
    2. Apply technical sketching skills of part and assembly concepts.
    3. Generate detailed orthographic and axonometric drawings in a standard industrial format using the latest ASME standards.
    4. Understand and apply the principles of descriptive geometry.
    5. Develop a complete set of working drawings including identification numbers, bill of materials and engineering change documentation.
    6. Have a thorough understanding of fits and tolerances.
    7. Define typical thread notes and fastening techniques.
    8. Apply geometric dimensioning and tolerance symbols and interpret their meaning on an engineering drawing.


  
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    MET 121 - Manufacturing Processes I


    A basic study of manufacturing materials and processes, such as:  cutting-tool materials and cutting fluids, electrical discharge machining, properties of materials, drilling and related hole making processes, joining processes and equipment, producing and processing ferrous and non-ferrous metals.  Laboratory exercises provide an opportunity for actual practice in the operation of selected manufacturing equipment.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Calculate speed, feed, and depth of cut for material removal operations using the "Machinery's Handbook."
    2. Apply standard safety procedures for a manufacturing environment.
    3. Identify and perform the basic material removal processes:  facing, turning, drilling, boring, honing and milling.
    4. Improve your skills for working effectively in a team environment.
    5. Communicate the steps required to manufacture a product using industry standard terms.
    6. Accurately use basic measurement tools such as calipers, micrometers, gage blocks, and attribute gages to achieve the desired sizes of parts and/or part features.
    7. Understand the fundamental methods of fusion and solid state welding.
    8. Have a better understanding of how raw materials are turned into useful products.


  
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    MET 122 - Manufacturing Processes II


    A continuation of the basic study of manufacturing processes.  The nature of metals and alloys, heat treatment, various casting processes and the processing of metals by hot and cold working techniques.  Special topics include screw thread systems and their measurement, indexing, gear terminology and manufacturing methods, tapers and computer numerical controlled machining.  Laboratory exercises parallel classroom topics and will provide the students with an opportunity to practice some of these manufacturing methods.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 121 Manufacturing Processes I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Improve their skills for working effectively in a team environment.
    2. Be familiar with the control unit on a typical CNC machine tool to store, load and edit programs.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in CNC programming basic parts and be able to de-bug the CNC program if there is a problem.
    4. Understand when and how to use looping (subprograms) in CNC programming.
    5. Be knowledgeable with gear terminology, types of gears and understand how to calculate simple speed ratios.
    6. Understand the fundamental types of heat treatment processes used on steel.
    7. Understand the difference between expendable-mold casting processes and multiple-use mold casting processes.
    8. Understand what indexing is and where it is used in the manufacture of parts.
    9. Understand the difference between Hot and Cold working processes.


  
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    MET 134 - Statics


    Instruction will be directed to the study of static force systems in equilibrium as applied to engineering technology.  Topics of study will include:  force distribution, moments, system equilibrium, free-body diagrams, friction, centroids, graphic statics, and moment of inertia. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry or departmental approval

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CIV 124
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the nature of rigid bodies, and the fact that they represent an idealization of real bodies.
    2. Understand the nature of forces and moments, and will be capable of recognizing forces and moments acting on bodies.
    3. Apply the principles of static equilibrium to the analysis of structures and machines.
    4. Experimentally verify the laws of friction, and be capable of applying them to a variety of cases.
    5. Locate centroids and centers of gravity, and compute moments of inertia.


  
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    MET 164 - Quality Systems


    The total quality concepts including organizational, planning, monitoring and continuous improvement of the quality function in a business environment.  Students will become familiar with the planning process including defining the process, customers' needs, process measurement, analyzing data and quality improvement methods and philosophies.  Topics also covered in this course include an introduction to statistical quality control and engineering ethics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the concept of quality in products and services, and customer satisfaction.
    2. Understand total quality management and its principles and practices in continuous process improvement.
    3. Use the mathematics of collection, organization and interpretation of data to produce graphical displays.
    4. Apply the basic concepts of statistics to manufacturing processes in order to conduct, analyze and interpret quantitative data.
    5. Produce control charts as a method of analysis and presentation of a particular variation in a process.
    6. Use Minitab statistical software package for its wide range of data analysis and graphics capabilities.


  
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    MET 211 - Mechanical CAD


    Introduction to Mechanical CAD.  CAD command structure, screen controls, and use of menus to create, edit, and manipulate geometry for 2D and 3D models.  Use of special features for the production of fully detailed layout drawings from 2D and 3D models.  File management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 116 Engineering Drawing II w/CAD or Department Chairperson approval

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply technical sketching skills of parts and assembly concepts.
    2. Understand Mechanical CAD as a 3D feature based associative, parametric solid modeling system for part and assembly design.
    3. Have a thorough understanding of and apply the constructive solid geometry concepts and Boolean operations used in 3D modeling.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to utilize CAD to create quality solid models in a timely fashion.
    5. Perform basic design changes and modifications.
    6. Generate detailed working drawings in a standard industrial format using the latest ASME standards.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to create a model using the college's 3D modeler and its software package.


  
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    MET 220 - Programming CNC Machine Tools


    An introductory course in the fundamentals and some of the advanced principles of CNC Milling/Turning.  Topics to include: Introduction to NC/CNC Machinery (history, input media and tooling), New Part Production Set-up, Typical Controller Operations (store, load and edit programs) and Manual Part Programming of CNC machine tools using the industry standard "G" and "M" Codes.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 122 Manufacturing Processes II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Set up a CNC machine (load and touch off tools, load programs).
    2. Be familiar with the controls of a typical CNC machine.
    3. Program basic linear and circular part geometry.
    4. Know when and how to use subprograms, cutter compensation and canned cycles.
    5. Make necessary corrections to programs and machine set-up to run quality parts.


  
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    MET 223 - Computer Integrated Machining


    A continuation of Programming CNC Machine Tools.  The emphasis of this course is on "Computer Assisted Part Programming."  The course is designed to include students who have had no exposure to computer operations, but have knowledge of machine shop operations including CNC machine tools.  MasterCAM and CadKey software are introduced.  CAD software will be used to construct geometry database files of various parts.  CAM software will be used to choose the machining process, assign tool parameters, define the tool path, give path verification, develop the post processor, and to transfer the CNC code to the CNC machine tool.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 220 Programming CNC Machine Tools

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Create basic 2D and 3D geometry using MaterCAM X.
    2. Assign toolpaths to cut parts using MasterCAM X.
    3. Create programs using the MasterCAM X-Fanuc post.
    4. Transfer programs to a CNC machine.
    5. Operate a CNC machine.


  
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    MET 234 - Dynamics


    Motion and Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration, Kinematics of Linear and Curvilinear Motion, Dynamics of Linear and Curvilinear Motion, Energy, Impulse and Momentum, Kinematics of Mechanisms.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 134 Statics, CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Use mathematical and graphical techniques to analyze the motion of bodies and simple mechanisms.
    2. Apply the principles of equilibrium to the analysis of the forces acting on accelerating bodies.
    3. Determine the magnitudes of work, Kinetic energy, and potential energy interchanges.
    4. Possess an elementary understanding of impulse and momentum, and be capable to analyzing their interchanges.


  
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    MET 235 - Strength of Materials


    Normal, shear, bearing, thermal, and torsional stresses and strains.  Stress-strain curves. Shearing forces, bending moments, shearing stresses and deflection of beams.  Columns and pressure vessels.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 134 Statics, CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Calculate direct normal, shear, and bearing stresses.
    2. Understand stress vs. strain graph and be able to determine yield strength, ultimate strength, and modulus of elasticity.
    3. Understand design factor and be able to design a member under direct stress.
    4. Design circular members under torsion and apply stress concentration factors.
    5. Develop shear force and bending moment diagrams for simple and cantilever beams.
    6. Apply bending stress and shear stress equations relative to beam design.
    7. Operate industry standard mechanical testing machines.
    8. Produce clear, concise, and accurate lab reports.


  
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    MET 238 - Mechanical Design


    Application of the principles of strength of materials to the design of machine elements.  Design and analysis of shafts, gears, bearings, weldments, and mechanical assemblies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MET 235 Strength of Materials and MAT 160 Applied Calculus I

    Corequisites:  MET 280 L Capstone Project

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the nature of combined stress, and be capable of recognizing combined stress in elements of structures and machines.
    2. Design a range of machine elements (shafts, gears, bearings, etc.) based upon strength and functional requirements.
    3. Consider machining, assembly, and other manufacturing requirements in the design process.
    4. Have experience in the design of mechanical assemblies.
    5. Integrate fluid mechanical, and thermodynamic principles into the analysis and design of machines.


  
  •  

    MET 243 - Fluid Mechanics


    The study of fluid statics and dynamics.  Topics include fluid forces, flow measurement, the steady flow energy equation, viscosity, laminar and turbulent flow, frictional losses, pipeline systems, introduction to turbomachinery, drag and lift.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 134 Statics, CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply the principles of equilibrium to fluid systems.
    2. Design series piping systems for conditions of steady flow.
    3. Select an appropriate pump for fluid-handling systems.
    4. Have had experience testing pumps, fans, and piping systems as part of a team.
    5. Prepare laboratory reports to the level of standard professional conventions.


  
  •  

    MET 244 - Thermodynamics


    A study of the property and energy relationships in non-flow and steady flow applications.  Topics include ideal gas relationships, real working substances, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic cycles, and available energy.  The cycle concept is applied to steam power, internal combustion engines, gas turbines, refrigeration, and heat pumps.  Consideration is also given to combustion analysis and heat transfer.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PHY 161 Physics I and MAT 160 Applied Calculus

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the behavior of single and two-phase substances, and be capable of determining their response to thermal and mechanical energy transfers.
    2. Give an elementary explanation of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, and will understand the implications of these laws for technology, society, and the environment.
    3. Apply the Laws of Thermodynamics to the analysis and design of heat engines and thermal devices.
    4. Have had experience testing heat engines and thermal devices as part of a team.
    5. Prepare laboratory reports to the level of standard professional conventions.


  
  •  

    MET 254W - Materials Science for Technologists


    Course includes overview of engineering materials with emphasis on non-metallic materials.  Atomic bonding, crystalline and non-crystalline materials, including ceramics, polymers, and composites.  Phase equilibrium, microstructures, strengthening and toughening mechanisms.  Course reviews current mechanical engineering applications of these materials.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    To provide an understanding of "the generic phenomena and behavioral characteristics of materials" by studying the relationship between the internal structure, and the properties and performance of engineering materials.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand the composition-structure-processing-properties relationship of metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites.
    2. Know the structural make-up of individual atoms and be able to predict the predominant bond type.
    3. Define the atomic arrangement of crystalline material and understand the importance of crystal imperfections.
    4. Have the ability to interpret isomorphous, eutectic, and eutectoid phase diagrams.
    5. Understand the statistical nature of brittle failure in ceramics.
    6. Describe the structural response of polymers and FRP's to applied stresses.
    7. Have produced clear, concise, and accurate lab reports.
    8. Have completed a research paper on a materials topic and have delivered an oral report.


 

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