Sep 22, 2020  
2016-2017 Official General Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Official General Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    CIV 299 - Independent Study


    The student undertakes an independent project in his/her specialty under the guidance of a faculty member.  Only one independent course allowed per semester.  Consideration may be given to a project involving a work assignment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Departmental approval

    Credits: (1-4)
  
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    CLT 110 - Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Technology


    Overview of the field of Clinical Laboratory Technology and its role within healthcare organizations.  Designed to acquaint the student with the clinical laboratory and the professional role of practitioners within the health care delivery system.  Review of professionalism, safety and regulatory issues, introduction to values, ethics, and interpersonal communication in these settings.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the roles and elements in the organizational structure of a typical healthcare facility.
    2.  Describe the roles of health care practitioners in healthcare facilities and laboratories, including thier academic preparation, professional credentials, and contributions as part of the healthcare team.
    3.  Explain basic concepts of communication and identify professional communication sufficient to serve the needs of patients and the public.
    4.  Identify policies and procedures for maintaining laboratory safety, including those related to infection control, electrical, chemical, radiation and biological hazards, and fire safety.
    5.  Describe the impact of regulatory compliance on individuals and healthcare organizations, including licensure, HIPAA, CLIA, OSHA, and others.
    6.  Apply ethical standards to potential situations in the helathcare setting, including patient confidentiality.
    7.  Explain the importance of professional conduct in healthcare, including communication, collaboration, and a commitment to lifelong learning.

     

  
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    CLT 120 - Clinical Laboratory Techniques and Practices


    Introduction to basic skills and equipment used in the clinical laboratory.  Orientation to elements of quality control, laboratory mathematics, clinical assay techniques, safety, and collection and handling of specimens for laboratory analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 110 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Technology and approval of CLT advisor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe safety regulations and best practices in the laboratory.
    2.  Identify and explain the use of common laboratory equipment.
    3.  Perform common laboratory mathematical calculations.
    4.  Describe what a quality assurance program is and identify common components.
    5.  Discuss the function of hematology, chemistry, microbiology, urinalysis, immunology and immunohematology labs in regard to: (a.) type of specimen analyzed (b.) type of testing performed.
    6.  Review the policies and procedures of the SUNY Broome Community College's Clinical Laboratory Technician Program.

  
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    CLT 200 - Histological Techniques


    An introduction to the principles of histologic techniques used in the clinical laboratory.  Course content includes preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting, and staining of tissues for the purpose of microscopic examination.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Co-requisite:  CLT 200L Histological Techniques Lab

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of the morphology of the microscopic anatomy of the human body and correlate it with general function.
    2.  Relate the functions of those cells, tissues, and organ systems to their structures.
    3.  Identify the basic tissues, the major organs, and the cells that compose them, when shown glass slides and photomicrographs.
    4.  Describe variations from normal histological structure (histopathology).
     

  
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    CLT 200L - Histological Techniques Lab


    Laboratory activities that provides a practical preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting, and staining of tissues for the purpose of microscopic examination.  Also includes evaluation of stained tissues preparations and identification of common cellular structures, laboratory safety and review of relevant regulations.
     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I and approval of CLT advisor

    Corequisite:  CLT 200 Histological Techniques

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice histological techniques used in the clinical laboratory, including preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting, and staining of tissues for the purpose of microscopic examination.
    2.  Perform basic evaluation of quality of stained tissues preparations.
    3.  Adhere to laboratory safety practices and regulations relevant to the clinical histology laboratory.

  
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    CLT 201 W - Hematology and Coagulation


    A comprehensive study of the hematopoietic and coagulation systems, including the normal physiology and classic pathology of both systems.  Emphasis is on the theory, performance, interpretation and clinical significance of routine and special test procedures. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 4 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the general principles and techniques of basic manual hematology procedures.
    2.  Perform a CBC on an instrument and review and interpret data from the instrument.
    3.  Perform peripheral blood smear differentials.
    4.  Describe and recognize cellular morphology changes associated with various disease states.
    5.  Integrate hematology panel results with other patient data through the interpretation of case studies.
    6.  Define the process of hemostasis, explain how the coagulation laboratory accesses it, and be able to interpret the laboratory tests used in that assessment.

  
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    CLT 202 - Urinalysis & Body Fluids


    A study of the physiologic processes which result in the formation of urine and body fluids.  Emphasis on the analysis of fluids and interpretation of the clinical significance of test results.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the collection and handling procedures for urine and body fluids.
    2.  Understand the observational and physical measurements of urine and body fluids required by the clinical laboratory.
    3.  Describe the chemical screening methods used on urine and other fluids analyzed by the urinalysis department.
    4.  Describe the preparation and performance of a urine microscopic analysis.
    5.  Identify commonly seen urinary crystals, cells and casts.
    6.  Identify the primary functions of the major components of the kidney and urinary tract.
    7.  Know the structure and function of the nephron.
    8.  Correlate urinalysis test data with specific disease states and state the clinical significance of test results.
    9.  Describe the performance and clinical significance of a CSF and other body fluid cell count.

  
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    CLT 204 - Fundamental Phlebotomy


    Training and experience in the practice of phlebotomy, teaching students to recognize and use blood collection equipment, practice standard precautions, and perform procedures of routine venipuncture and skin puncture.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I or BIO 101 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the best practices for interaction with patient, patient advocates, and other healthcare staff.
    2.  Perform a successful venipuncture and dermal puncture, including correct order of draw and safety measures.
    3.  Differentiate supplies and procedures for all patient types, including newborns through geriatric adults.
    4.  Identify the most common additives used in blood collection, explain their reasons for use, and correlate the tube color with the additive and associated tests.
    5.  Name and explain frequent causes of phlebotomy complications and discuss the problems caused by breaking sterile and antiseptic techniques.

     

  
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    CLT 206 - Immunohematology


    An introduction to the field of blood banking, including the study of theoretical knowledge of blood groups and blood grouping, component and transfusion therapies, transfusion reactions, and allo- and auto-antibody formation.  In laboratory sessions, the student performs ABO and Rh grouping, antibody identification, and compatibility testing.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 216 Immunology or BIO 216 Immunology, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2.  Display appropriate professional behavior.
    3.  Demonstrate logical approaches to problem solving - selecting appropriate units and crossmatching them with unknown patient specimens.
    4.  Describe classic problems inherent to blood transfusion and the solutions currently in use.
    5.  Apply basic principles of genetics to immunohematology.
    6.  Apply basic principles of immunology to blood group serology.
    7.  Describe and perform the testing procedures performed in the clinical immunohematology laboratory, including Coombs' (antiglobulin) testing, ABO testing, Rh testing, other blood group testing, alloantibody screening, elutions, RBC autoantibody testing, compatibility testing, and traditional and gel technology.
    8.  Explain the process of donor selection, describe the processes of blood or blood component donation, including apheresis.
    9.  Explain the clinical significance of abnormal and disease states related to immunohematology, including drug-induced red blood cell destruction, polyagglutination, transfusion reactions, and Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn (HDN) and list the procedures relevant to each.
    10.  Describe and perform transfusion test procedures, including procedures related to component therapy.
    11.  Discuss medicolegal aspects of bloodbanking and the medicolegal responsibilities of a immunohematologist.

  
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    CLT 207 - Clinical Chemistry & Serology


    Designed to cover principles, analytical methods, and clinical significance of clinical chemistry as performed in the medical laboratory, including theoretical principles of serological and molecular methodologies.  The relationship of physiochemical of body function in health and disease including the renal, liver, digestive, and respiratory systems.  Emphasis on those clinical tests which evaluate the function of these systems related to metabolism, protein synthesis, pH, blood gases, electrolyte balance, enzymes, and hormones.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  CLT 216 Immunology as a Prior or Concurrent Requirement

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the general principles and techniques of basic manual and automated chemistry procedures through class discussion and examinations.
    2.  Correlate clinical chemistry data with normal and abnormal physiological states and identify the clinical significance of test results.
    3.  Describe the mechanisms and performance of basic serological techniques and immunological assays.
    4.  Select the appropriate testing methodologies for evaluation of infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.
    5.  Evaluate the clinical significance of clinical serology testing, including infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.

  
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    CLT 207L - Clinical Chemistry & Serology Lab


    Designed to cover principles, analytical methods, and clinical significance of clinical chemistry as performed in the medical laboratory, including theoretical principles of serological and molecular methodologies.  The relationship of physiochemical of body function in health and disease including the renal, liver, digestive, and respiratory systems.  Emphasis on those clinical tests which evaluate the function of these systems related to metabolism, protein synthesis, pH, blood gases, electrolyte balance, enzymes, and hormones.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequistie:  CLT 126 as a Prior or Concurrent Requirement

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the general principles and techniques of basic manual and automated chemistry procedures through class discussion and examinations.
    2.  Correlate clinical chemistry data with normal and abnormal physiological states and identify the clinical significance of test results.
    3.  Describe the mechanisms and performance of basic serological techniques and immunological assays.
    4.  Select the appropriate testing methodologies for evaluation of infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.
    5.  Evaluate the clinical significance of clinical serology testing, including infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.

  
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    CLT 208 - Pathogenic Microbiology


    An introduction to microorganisms of importance in human health and disease.  Topics include the morphology, isolation, identification, and clinical significance of pathogens, the interrelationships of microorganisms and human hosts, and the prevention and control of infectious diseases.  Emphasis on bacteriology; includes survey of mycology, parasitology and virology.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I

    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 209 Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory or CLT 210 Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    MLT 208
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the history of microbiology and the significance of the microbial world.
    2.  Describe classification systems for organisms and apply that knowledge to microorganisms.
    3.  Summarize the basic principles of infection and resistance and their application to transmission of infectious disease.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the biology of microorganisms, including microbial anatomy, genetics, metabolism, growth, and control of growth.
    5.  Explain the mechanisms employed for control of microbial growth and describe the various assays used to evaluate effectiveness of antimicrobial agents, including antibiotic sensitivity testing.
    6.  List the characteristics of representative organisms of clinical significance, including their significant disease states, target populations, means of transmission, means of prevention and/or treatment, virulence factors, identifying symptoms and organismal characteristics.

  
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    CLT 209 L - Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory


    An overview of the basic clinical microbiology techniques, including collection and processing of clinical specimens, media used for isolation and identification of organisms common to human flora, aseptic techniques, staining procedures, susceptibility testing, and isolation techniques.  This course also includes a review of the main components and functions of the human immune system.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    MLT 209 L
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Follow proper safety guidelines in the microbiology laboratory at all times.
    2.  Demonstrate logical approaches to problem solving by identifying unknown cultures.
    3.  Describe the elements which comprise the immune system and summarize the mechanisms of the human immune system.
    4.  Discuss in general terms the biological mechanisms of immunizations, immunological screening for congenital infections, and evalation of immune abnormalities.
    5.  Perform procedures in the laboratory using aseptic techniques, including selection of media, Gram staining, isolating organisms, performing biochemical and serological identifications, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, evaluating smears, and culturing and evaluating cultures of human specimens.

  
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    CLT 210 - Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory


    A comprehensive study of diagnostic methods for identification of normal and pathogenic microorganisms from clinical materials by appropriate laboratory techniques.  Emphasis on cultural, microscopic and biochemical characteristics, chemical significance, collecting and processing of clinical specimens, diagnostic tests, and susceptibility tests.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    MLT 210
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Follow proper safety guidelines in the microbiology laboratory at all times.
    2.  Demonstrate logical approaches to problem solving by identifying unknown cultures.
    3.  Perform all basic procedures generally done in the clinical microbiology laboratory using septic techniques, including selection of media, Gram staining, isolating organisms, performing biochemical and serological identifications, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.
    4.  Evaluate cultures and direct microscopic examinations of human specimens to identify the host and microbial elements and to indicate the clinical significance of those elements.

  
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    CLT 214 - Specialized Phlebotomy


    Advanced techniques in collecting venous blood and capillary blood specimens.  Topics include anatomy and physiology as related to specimen collection; properties of arterial blood versus venous blood; specialized collection equipment; specialized collection techniques; requisitioning, specimen transport and specimen processing, and quality assurance.  Competency required in the performance of routine venipuncture and microblood drawing techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    MLT 214
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successsful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify parts of the body according to their proximity to one of the body planes.
    2.  Identify the veins of the arms, hands, legs and feet on which phlebotomy is performed.
    3.  Explain the functions of the major constituents of blood.
    4.  Define hemostasis, and explain the basic process of coagulation and fibinolysis.
    5.  Discuss the properties of arterial blood versus venous blood, and describe the difference in collection methods.
    6.  Describe the phlebotomist's role in collecting and/or transporting types of patient specimens which are analyzed in the clinical laboratory.
    7.  Identify the additives used in blood collection, and explain their reasons for use.
    8.  Identify the evacuated tube color associated with the additives.
    9.  Describe substances which can interfere in clinical analysis of blood constituents and ways in which the phlebotomist can help avoid these occurrences.
    10.  List and select the types of equipment needed to collect blood by a variety of techniques.
    11.  Identify potential sites for venipuncture and capillary puncture.
    12.  Identify alternate venipuncture collection sites and describe the limitations and precautions of each.
    13.  Describe the legal and ethical importance of proper patient/sample identification.
    14.  Describe the types of patient specimens that are analyzed in the clinical laboratory.
    15.  List the general criteria for suitability of a specimen for analysis.
    16.  List the circumstances that would lead to recollection or rejection of a patient sample.
    17.  Explain the importance of timed specimens, fasting specimens, and stat specimens.
    18.  Demonstrate understanding of requisitioning, specimen transport and specimen processing.
    19.  List the most common types of laboratory procedures performed in the various sections fo the clinical laboratory department.
    20.  Desribe the system for monitoring quality assurance in the collection of blood specimens.
    21.  Identify policies and procedures used in the clinical laboratory to assure quality in the obtaining of blood specimens.
    22.  Describe the laboratory criteria for identifying an appropriate request for specimen collection.
    23.  Relate legal responsibilities of the laboratory and phlebotomist to the need for physicians' requests for all specimen collection and testing.
    24.  Explain methods for processing and transporting blood specimens for routine and special testing within the hospital.
    25.  Explain methods for processing and transporting blood specimens for testing at reference labs.
    26.  Describe potential clerical and technical errors that may occur during specimen processing.
    27.  In regard to processing and transporting of blood specimens, describe the general effects of time on test quality and patient care.
    28.  Describe the conditions that must be met if blood specimens and laboratory tests are to be used as legal evidence.
    29.  Describe instructions to be given to patients in preparation for glucose tolerance tests, bleeding times and other procedures normally performed by the phlebotomist.
    30.  Discuss the importance of appearance and grooming for phlebotomists.
    31.  Define the different terms used in the medicolegal aspect for phlebotomy and discuss policies and protocol designed to avoid medicolegal problems.
    32.  Prepare an acceptable blood smear.
    33.  Recognize unacceptable blood smears.
    34.  Describe the purpose and procedure for performing bleeding times.

  
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    CLT 215 - Phlebotomy Practicum


    A practical application of phlebotomy techniques in a clinical laboratory setting or health care environment.  The course focuses on safety, quality control, communication, interpersonal skills, and ethical considerations relating to patients.  Clinical hours:  160 hours total.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy and CLT 214 Specialized Phlebotomy, and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 5
    Cross-listed
    MLT 214
    Hours
    10.6 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Successfully complete phlebotomy practicum objectives as listed in the Phlebotomy/MLT program policy manual.
    2.  Perform a minimum of 100 successful unaided venipuncture collections.
    3.  Describe and perform the correct procedure for capillary collection methods on infants and adults.
    4.  Observe and describe the organization and functioning of a typical clinical laboratory.

  
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    CLT 216 - Immunology


    An introduction to the basic concepts in immunology, including development of the immune system, innate immunity, immunoglobulin structure and genetics, antigen-antibody reactions, the major histocompatibility complex and antigen presentation, T cell receptors, T cell activation and effector functions, anergy and apoptosis, adhesion molecules, phagocytic cell function, immune responses to infections organisms and tumors, autoimmune diseases, allergies, immune deficiencies and AIDS.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 131 Human Biology I and BIO 132 Human Biology II

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BIO 216 and MLT 216
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List the elements of the immune system and describe their roles in defense.
    2.  Describe the structure of immunoglobulins and discuss the mechanism for generation of antibody diversity.
    3.  Discuss the nature of antigens and the characteristics that contribute to immunogenicity.
    4.  Describe, in detail, the normal and abnormal functions of the human immune response, including antigen recognition by T cell lymphocytes, development of T and B cells, T cell-mediated immunity, immunity mediated by B cells and antibodies, innate immunity and the complement system.
    5.  Explain the mechanisms and pathogenesis of disorders of the immune system, including immunodeficiencies, hypersensitivities, autoimmune disorders, and immunoproliferative abnormalities.
    6.  Describe clinical implications of the immune response such as immunization, transplant rejection, tumor immunity, and the immunity of pregnancy.
    7.  Evaluate clinical cases to apply information to assess diagnoses, symptoms, etiology, prognosis, possible treatments, and other case-related information.
    8.  Describe the lab tests used to assess immune function and status, and propose and evaluate clinical significance of appropriate laboratory testing results.

  
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    CLT 240 - Clinical Affiliation I


    Performance of procedures in clinical chemistry, immunology-serology, and immunohematology in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 206 Immunohematology, CLT 207 Clinical Chemistry, CLT 216 Immunology, CLT 221L Serological Techniques and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    MLT 240
    Hours
    10.7 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    2.  Using established criteria, identify and evaluate patient specimens for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    3.  Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    4.  Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    5.  Recognize factors that affect procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits.
    6.  State how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    7.  Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    8.  List the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    9.  Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    10.  Demonstrate the methodologies used in technical training in the clinical laboratory at a level consistent with a new graduate. 
    11.  Evaluate the technical training provided to  the student in the clinical environment.
    12.  Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the department policy manual.

  
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    CLT 241 - Clinical Affiliation II


    Performance of procedures in urinalysis, body fluid analysis, phlebotomy, hematology, and coagulation in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CLT 201 Hematology and Coagulation, CLT 202 Urinalysis/Body Fluids, CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    14 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Collect and process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    2.  Using established criteria, identify and evaluate patient specimens for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    3.  Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    4.  Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    5.  Recognize factors that affect procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits.
    6.  State how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    7.  Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    8.  List the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    9.  Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    10.  Demonstrate the methodologies used in technical training in the clinical laboratory at a level consistent with a new graduate.
    11.  Evaluate the technical training provided to students in the clinical environment.
    12.  Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the department policy manual.

  
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    CLT 242 - Clinical Affiliation III


    Performance of procedures in microbiology in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical Hours: 40 hr/week for 2 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology, CLT 210 Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory, and permission of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    MLT 242
    Hours
    5.3 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    2.  Identify and evaluate patient specimens using established criteria for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    3.  Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    4.  Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    5.  Recognize factors that affect procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits.
    6.  State how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    7.  Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    8.  List the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    9.  Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    10.  Demonstrate the methodologies used in technical training in the clinical laboratory at a level consistent with a new graduate.
    11.  Evaluate the technical training provided to students in the clinical environment.
    12.  Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the department policy manual.

  
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    CLT 250 - Human Histology


    The study of microscopic anatomy dealing with the structures of cells, tissues, and organs, with a focus on their recognition, structural aspects, and basic functions.  The course covers light microscopy techniques, cell anatomy, basic tissue types, and common histochemical stains, and applies these to the study of organs as systemic arrangements of tissues performing a specific function, such as respiration, digestion, reproduction, etc.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 131 Human Biology I and BIO 132 Human Biology II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    45 Class Hours, 30 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Know the parts, proper use and maintenance of a standard light microscope.
    2.  Recognize appearance and organization of human cells and tissue:

    • Gross Morphologies:
      -  Identify the organs of human body systems
      -  Identify cell types from major organs of the body
    • Cell and Tissue Morphology:
      -  Identify types of epithelium cells and relate them to function
      -  Identify types of muscle cells and tissues and relate them to function
      -  Identify types of connective tissues and relate them to function
      -  Identify cells and tissues of the central nervous system and relate them to function
      -  Identify cells and tissues of the peripheral nervous system and relate them to function

    3.  Describe the relationship between tissue composition and function.
    4.  Differentiate between various stains with regard to their use and appraisal.

    • Recognize the following stains and the tissue components they stain:
      -  hematoxylin, Periodic Acid Schiff, and trichrome

    5.  Evaluate unknown tissue samples to determine the identity of the stain and the tissue, and to assess whether the tissue is normal or abnormal.
    6.  Describe typical Quality Assurance and Quality control procedures routinely used.
    7.  Evaluate the quality of prepared and stained tissues.

  
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    CLT 252 - Advanced Histological Techniques


    A lab-oriented course designed to teach students the theory and techniques involved in preparing tissue for histological evaluation and study.  Discussions and lab exercises are designed to teach the chemical basis and physical principles of fixation, processing, and staining animal tissue specimans for light microscopy.  The focus will be on routine paraffin techniques, but will include frozen section techniques, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 200 Introduction to Histological Techniques

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    45 Class Hours, 30 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all initial tissue preparation and processing.

    • Demonstrate the ability to read and follow directions.
    • Demonstrate accuracy and competency in receiving, recording and identifying tissue specimens brought into the lab.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of operational principles and components of equipment common to the histology lab.
    • Utilize the principles of fixation, decalcification, dehydration, clearing, and infiltration for the successful processing of tissue specimens.
    • Explain proper decalcification methods for different applications.
    • Demonstrate proper use and care of histological equipment, including microtomes, processors, and staining equipment.

    2.  Prepare, process, stain, and section tissue samples.

    • Demonstrate proper orientation while embedding paraffin processed tissue specimens for routine paraffin sectioning.
    • Section paraffin embedded tissues and fresh frozen tissue specimens with precision and accuracy.
    • Accurately prepare solutions and stains using good laboratory practice applying concepts of chemistry and mathematics.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the theory and chemistry of staining techniques by successfully preparing stained tissue sections for light microscopic evaluation using routine and special staining procedures.
    • Clearly explain the difference between progressive and regressive staining.
    • Differentiate nuclear and cytoplasmic components of tissues during routine hematoxylin and eosin staining.
    • Successfully monitor and evaluate quality control data.

    3.  Describe the theory and practice behind various specialized histological practices.

    • Explain the difference between histology and cytology.
    • Explain what cytotechnology is and demonstrate knowledge of how to prepare slides for cytological examination.
    • Perform immunohistochemistry laboratory protocols.
    • Define and explain primary and secondary antibodies, immunohistochemistry detection systems and chromagens.
    • Compare immunohistochemical techniques such as direct and indirect staining.
    • Explain concepts and describe techniques for in situ hybridization.

    4.  Practice proper laboratory safety procedures.

    • Demonstrate knowledge of chemical and biohazard safety practices.
    • List the procedures, benefits and advantages of chemical recycling.


  
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    CLT 258 - Histotechnology Practicum


    Performance of procedures in histological technology in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine histological procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on cell and tissue morphology, tissue fixation, tissue processing, use and care of a microtome, routine and special histochemical procedures, as well as an introduction to cryotomy, immunohistochemistry,  in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CLT 250 Human Histology, CLT 252 Advanced Histological Techniques

    Credits: 8
    Hours
    20 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice accepted procedures for the histology laboratory.

    • Demonstrate knowledge of types of histological specimens usually submitted for gross and microscopic examination.
    • Document and maintain lab records.
    • Promote and contribute to universal bio-safety regulations as well as lab safety.
    • Practice quality control in the histology laboratory as required.

    2.  Perform common tissue processing methods.

    • Demonstrate knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as related to histotechnology.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of normal histology of human organs.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of diagnostic terminology.
    • Evaluate, accept, identify and label histologic specimens.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of tissue processinig methods, including a variety of fixatives used and how each relates to a specific entity or disease process to be diagnosed.
    • Practice proper tissue processing protocols and embedding methods for paraffin block embedding with an understanding of proper dehydration, clearing and infiltrations reagents and methods.

    3.  Operate and maintain common histological equipment.

    • Operate and maintain a tissue processor.
    • Operate and maintain a microtome.
    • Process, embed, cut, stain, and coverslip all assigned specimens.
    • Section, stain and coverslip frozen tissue specimens with a knowledge of cryostat function and maintenance.
    • Operate and troubleshoot common laboratory equipment such as chemical recyclers, autostainers, and coverslippers.
    • Prepare and stain slides for cytological examination.

    4.  Evaluate processed, sectioned, and stained tissue.

    • Recognize properly differentiated hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections.
    • Effectively troubleshoot hematoxylin and eosin stains.
    • Effectively troubleshoot special stains.
    • Evaluate histologic specimens for quality of preparation and staining.


  
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    CLT 295 - Seminar in Laboratory Technology


    A capstone course that reviews the knowledge base, didactic theory, laboratory skills applicable to the clinical lab, and ethical evolution of the profession.  Preparation of professional portfolio, practice for certification examinations, and preparation of public education presentation included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  CLT 240 Clinical Affiliation I, CLT 241 Clinical Affiliation II, CLT 242 Clinical Affiliation III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize and utilize professionalism in all communications and submissions.
    2.  Create a personal portfolio, including a resume and cover letter suitable for clinical laboratory employment.
    3.  Review of all content areas of histotechnology.
    4.  Discuss strategies to navigate and succeed in a new career environment.
    5.  Review test taking strategies with computer adaptive testing.
    6.  Evaluate areas of strength and weakness in preparation for national certification examinations.
    7.  Discuss key issues within the field in a way that would make sense to a lay audience.

  
  •  

    CLT 296 - Seminar in Histotechnology


    A capstone course that reviews the knowledge base, didactic theory, laboratory skills applicable to the histology lab, and ethical evolution of the profession.  Preparation of professional portfolio, practice for certification examinations, and preparation of public presentation included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CLT 250 Human Histology and CLT 252 Advanced Histological Techniques

    Corequisites:  CLT 258 Histotechnology Practicum

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize and utilize professionalism in all communications and submissions.
    2.  Create a personal portfolio, including a resume and cover letter suitable for clinical laboratory employment.
    3.  Review of all content areas of histotechology.
    4.  Discuss strategies to navigate and succeed in a new career environment.
    5.  Review test taking strategies with computer adaptive testing.
    6.  Evaluate areas of strength and weakness in preparation for national certification examinations.
    7.  Discuss key issues within the field in a way that would make sense to a lay audience.

     

  
  •  

    CLT 298 - Special Topics


    The study of a topic relevant to the Clinical Laboratory Technologies that is beyond the scope of the existing course offerings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Department approval

    Credits: 1-2
    Cross-listed
    MLT 298
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define core concepts in the topic content area.
    2.  Discuss the relevance of the special topic to the field of Clinical Laboratory Technologies.
    3.  Demonstrate knowledge in the specified content area.
    4.  Differentiate the significance of the special topic.
    5.  Critique contrasting perspectives on the special topic.

  
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    CLT 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of clinical laboratory technology.  Independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of courses currently offered by the department.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member with approval by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Departmental approval

    Corequisites:  CLT 240 Clinical Affiliation I, CLT 241 Clinical Affiliation II, CLT 242 Clinical Affiliation III

    Credits: 1-5
    Cross-listed
    MLT 299
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2.  Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
  •  

    COL 105 - Academic Planning Seminar


    An orientation course for first semester Liberal Arts and Human Services Division students. Students will reflect upon their personal and academic goals, develop learning strategies to enhance their academic success, and acquire a working knowledge of campus services and procedures.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    COM 100 - Introduction to Mass Media


    This entry level course offers students an overview of the components of American mass media.  The topics discussed in this course include medias history, structure, economics, regulations and dynamics, as well as the use of verbal and visual imagery.  Radio, television, newspapers, magazines, film, and the closely related advertising and public relations field are surveyed.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the theory behind communication and the differences between intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, and mass communication theories.
    2.  Relate the theory and history of mass media to its continually changing role in global society.
    3.  Understand the differences between various methods of mass communication and how the role of technology has impacted those methods.
    4.  Explain the difference between various theories of mass communication and be able to explain how they inter-relate.
    5.  Possess the ability to produce a class project specifically highlighting one or more of the mass media methods covered in class.

  
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    COM 107 - Color Theory


    An introduction to the complex language of color, including the investigation of additive and subtractive systems in traditional and electronic applications.  Students gain practical knowledge and visual sensitivity, giving them self-confidence in applying color to graphic presentations and three-dimensional forms.  Emotional, symbolic, and cultural significance of color is explored through visual examples in historical and contemporary contexts.  Knowledge applicable to painting, printmaking, illustration, website design, fashion design, interior design, landscape design, architecture, sculpture, and product design.  Coursework includes experimentation with various materials, lectures, discussions, and presentations.

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    ART 107
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Studio Hours
  
  •  

    COM 112 - Beginning Photography


    Basics of camera design and operation, plus the fundamentals of photographic visualization and composition; line, form, color, light and shadow.  Darkroom procedures, film processing, basic printmaking, selecting printing techniques.  (Students can sign-out cameras and other supplies from the Communications Department thus reducing the overall costs for photo supplies).

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 112
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Control camera, composition, and photographic approach (sharp focus, shallow D.O.F., blur motion, frozen image, etc.)
    2.  Make choices regarding film, paper, lens, filters and light to achieve a good quality photograph as a final product.

  
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    COM 115 - Writing for the Media


    This course is an introductory study of the elements necessary for all media-based writing.  Students will be exposed to standard industry formats used in newspaper, magazine, public relations, print advertising, and internet media.  Students will learn to work against a deadline as they would in a staff writer position.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Eng 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the history of written communication mediums and how they have both evolved and changed over time.
    2.  Describe the role that technology has played in changing how people gain access to written communication mediums over time.
    3.  Understand the basic functions and tasks of various positions in the advertising, news reporting, and public relations industries.
    4.  Have a working knowledge of basic grammatical and citational styles and formats when completing their assignments.
    5.  Produce a class project specifically highlighting one or more of the written communication mediums and print industries covered in class.

  
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    COM 116 - Broadcast Journalism


    This course will explore the theory and practice of creating video content for broadcast mediums.  Primary emphasis is on the foundational skill of writing for broadcast presentation.  Includes copy for news stories, commercials, and public service spots.  Topics include writing video stories to specific time requirements, developing video stores, and shooting, writing and editing TV news stories.  Understanding will be stressed upon newscast content, time budgets, creativity, learning the value of each news story, placement, story stacking, on-camera interview skills, the art of productive questioning, story editing, and writing to work with a story's video.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the creative and technical aspects involved in developing stories and commercials for television broadcast.
    2.  Be proficient in writing broadcast voice-over's (VO's), voice-over/sound-on-tape's (VO/SOT's), and news packages.
    3.  Understand the reasons behind, and gain the ability to write their content to specific time lengths.
    4.  Qualitatively improve their writing, editing, and story-telling skills over the course of the semester.
    5.  Deliver oral presentations of broadcast stories and commercial spots.
    6.  Speak and present information for the greater public as it relates to broadcast production.
    7.  Understand resource budgeting and time management as it relates to broadcast production.
    8.  Understand the skill sets necessary to succeed in other news/broadcast-related production courses (COM-260: Television Production Practicum or COM-265: Advanced Television Production Practicum).

  
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    COM 124 - Introduction to Computer Graphics


    The study of Visual Communication theory relating to applied arts fields such as, advertising and editorial design, animation, gaming, and web design.  Students are introduced to vector and raster graphic programs on Macintosh computers, and learn how to develop initial thumbnail sketches into final design comprehensives.  Other topics include digital photography, scanning, image manipulation, color correction, and typography.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 105, BIT 108 or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 125
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
  
  •  

    COM 125 - Introduction to Audio Theory and Production


    The particular focus of this entry level class will be the fundamentals of sound and recording, and the use of digital sound recording equipment.  Students will conceptualize, record and produce a variety of forms of digital audio presentations including: advertisements, documentaries, interviews, as well as television and film production sound.  The successful student will be well versed with Adobe Audition sound editing and creation programs and their applications.  Additionally, there is a strong course emphasis on creating sound and sound effects designed for use in Foley Science, or the art of adding sound to film.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the fundamental principles behind the perception of sound and its effect on the human sense of hearing.
    2.  Discern the differences between analog and digital methods used to record sound throughout the 20th and 21st centuries and be able to explain them.
    3.  Know the difference between various digital audio formats and the role of compression/decompression algorithms (codecs) in each of them.
    4.  Possess the ability to record their own digital audio files, either in the studio or in the field, and be able to export their files to a PC or Macintosh-based workstation.
    5.  Gain a fundamental understanding of digital audio editing software (specifically, Adobe Audition) and be able to produce short projects of varying length using the digital audio files they have recorded over the course of the class.

  
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    COM 130 - Introduction to Video Theory and Production


    This entry level course introduces student to single-camera video production techniques; including operation of digital video cameras and recorders, as well as the basic usage of sound and lighting.  Students will also be instructed on the use of non-linear editing equipment.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the stuent will be able to:

    1.  Possess a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of image composition and visualization, and how images are captured in the medium of digital video.
    2.  Understand video as a time-based multimedia format and be able to explain how the theory of intermittent motion applies to video capture.
    3.  Understand the role of proper lighting and be able to follow and practice standard safety protocols when working individually or in a group setting.
    4.  Explain the different roles of single-system sound and dual-system sound and be able to incorporate each into their individual video productions.
    5.  Produce a series of short individual video projects that creatively highlight the technical lessons and topics covered in class.
    6.  Possess the ability to produce short individual video projects using a digital non-linear editing system.

  
  •  

    COM 145 - Contemporary Film Analysis


    Topics covered within the class are cinematography, narrative vs. non-narrative structure, symbolism, genre, realism vs. expressionism, composition, and editing style.  Course work consists of analysis of contemporary issues through screening and discussion of film/cinema work from numerous historical periods.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Produce a cohesive written discourse analyzing specific aspects of a motion picture production relative to a specific topic of study.
    2.  Understand the fundamental differences between analyzing specific aspects of a motion picture and simply reviewing or summarizing its major plot points.
    3.  Recognize and identify different styles of filmmaking and how these styles have changed over the 20th and 21st centuries.
    4.  Draw parallels between narrative storytelling styles and techniques in film as well as in other communication mediums (i.e. - literature).
    5.  Demonstrate a working ability to identify contemporary social issues and themes presented by each of the filmmakers and assess its impact on the narrative of the selected film.

  
  •  

    COM 150 - Public Relations


    This course is designed to provide the communications major with a clear picture of the functions of the public relations industry and cite practical applications of public relations principles.  Practical examples will be used with emphasis on communications technology presently used throughout the world.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the professional function of the public relations industry and its effect on society.
    2.  Understand the historical significance of several successful and unsuccessful public relations campaigns throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
    3.  Possess the ability to create public documents and issue them via specific mass media forms to the general public.
    4.  Gain specific knowledge on how technology has changed the way that the public relations industry as a whole communicates with itself and the general public as a whole.
    5.  Work as part of a group problem solving team in response to a specific real-world example of a public relations campaign.

  
  •  

    COM 154 - Media and Society


    An in-depth examination and analysis of the impacts and effects of the mass media upon society and the converse societal influences upon the media.  Includes such issues as media concentration, portrayal of violence, stereotyping, the publics right to know, among others.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 100 or SOS 110

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    SOS 155
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    COM 200 - Image Theory for Film, Photography, and Television


    This course offers the student a chance to study many of the important theories behind image production and its effectiveness.  The class will survey the work of several significant photographers, filmmakers, and television artists.  There is an emphasis on the formal elements of the still and moving images and their psychological and aesthetic effects.  Students will have the chance to discuss the history and development of visual image production spanning from the pre-technological era to the present, with a view toward understanding the universal nature of the need for visual and conceptual expression among all mediums. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 100 Introduction to Mass Media

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand how meaning is created through the manipulation and production of still and moving images.
    2.  Identify several fundamental theories behind the creation of visual aesthetic and the effect this aesthetic has on the intended audience.
    3.  Understand the various technological advances that have changed the way meaningful and artful expression is created and be able to provide an example of each.
    4.  Possess the ability to critically and concisely produce a written or oral evaluation of work of still or motion-based imagery based on its ability to convey and express a central idea or thesis to its audience.
    5.  Understand how ideas are communicated and conveyed by imagery, and how it is compared to other forms of non-visual expression.

  
  •  

    COM 201 - Digital Audio Production


    This course is the study of production and post-production techniques used for audio-for-video.  Study will include: basic sound reproduction, multi-track recording, mixing, Foley sound, signal processing and Automated Dialogue Replacement (ADR).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 125 Introduction to Audio Theory and Production

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Produce and evaluate sound for film and video.
    2.  Edit and correct the sound in a film or digital video.
    3.  Enhance the sound of a video production.
    4.  Be familiar with the terms and techniques in various forms of sound production.

  
  •  

    COM 202 - Commercial Photography


    Students will gain practical experience as to the theory behind and application of commercial photography and illustration.  Projects will be relative to today's marketing and societal needs.  Lighting and composition will be heavily stressed.  Photographic format will be slide film.  Lab cost to student approximately $135 for supplies and processing.  Must have camera.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 112 Beginning Photography or ART 212 Intermediate Photography, or by portfolio acceptance by instructor

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 202
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Possess a working knowledge of both digital and film photography, and each of their unique applications in both the technical and economic aspects of commercial photography.
    2.  Have acquired competence in standard and advanced lighting techniques for still life, including three-point lighting and flash photography.
    3.  Understand how to correctly stage still life subjects in a commercial setting, as well as the ability to follow standard safety protocols when working in a darkroom or laboratory environment.
    4.  Compile a portfolio of their individual work completed over the course of the semester.
    5.  Have acquired experience in sharing their work with their peers and instructor(s) in a group-oriented environment (i.e. - participate in peer and instructor evaluated critiques of their assignments).

  
  •  

    COM 203 - Color Photography


    This course explores the fundamentals of color photography and offers students a working knowledge of the technical and aesthetic attributes of the most commonly used color photographic applications.  Students will learn color and slide film development and printing, as well as digital color applications and editing.  35mm medium format and other areas will be explored as well.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 203
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the concepts of color theory to the proper exposure color film.
    2.  Create color photographic prints of appropriate density and correct color balance.
    3.  Judge the effects of different types of light on color film.
    4.  Visually organize and balance the elements of a photograph.

  
  •  

    COM 205 - Introduction to Filmmaking


    This course offers the student an introduction to the craft of filmmaking and motion picture production.  Within the course the student will receive a hands-on approach to the principles of cinematography, including formats, film stocks, lighting, and camera operation.  Topics covered will include production techniques involved in single-system filmmaking, basic editing, screening techniques, and shooting film for video transfer and post-production. 

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Possess a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of cinematic composition and visualization, and how images are captured in a time-based medium.
    2.  Have competence in basic camera operation and etiquette, including basic loading and unloading of a standard 16mm motion picture camera.
    3.  Understand how to correctly operate cinematic and/or video image capture and editing equipment in a single or group setting, as well as the ability to follow standard safety protocols when working individually or in a group setting.
    4.  Recognize and identify different crew positions on a film set and the individual function of each.
    5.  Compile a series of individual or group projects in a time-based medium, either in digital video or 16mm film.

  
  •  

    COM 210 - Advanced Video Production


    In this advanced level course students will use prior knowledge gained in other courses in order to further their understanding of video production.  Students will gain an advanced understanding of techniques such as camera operation, shooting, lighting and sound recording as well as an understanding of various post-production work.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 130 Introduction to Video Theory and Production

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of video production etiquette, including proper camera operation and handling, as well as image composition and cinematography.
    2.  Demonstrate their proficiency in non-linear video editing on multiple operating platforms.
    3.  Have practical and theoretical knowledge in advanced lighting practices, in both the environments of field production and studio production.
    4.  Have competence in video post-production, including titling and digital special effects.
    5.  Understand transcoding and interactive DVD authoring, as well as the ability to produce their assignments completed in class into a demonstration reel for employment or further studies.

  
  •  

    COM 211 - Digital Photographic Imaging


    This course is an introduction to the digital manipulation of images, primarily using the Adobe Creative Suite package of applications, which includes Adobe Photoshop.  Students will create images - either in film-based media or digital - and manipulate them in Adobe Photoshop to create cohesive pieces of personal and artful expression.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explore artisitc expression and style through the use of a digital workflow.
    2.  Develop digital photographic images through a comprehensive process - from image capture, through editing to final output (printing).
    3.  Recognize and appreciate diverse digital photographic expression.
    4.  Produce a portfolio of digital images demonstrating creativity and personal vision.

  
  •  

    COM 212 - Intermediate Photography


    Systems of precise exposure and processing control.  Advanced black and white darkroom techniques.  Introduction to color theory, processes and printing.  Functional portfolio development.  Introduction to digital electronic imaging.  (Students can sign-out cameras and other supplies from the Communications Department thus reducing the overall costs for photo supplies).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 112 Beginning Photography, or by portfolio acceptance and permission of instructor

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 212
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Operate a twins-lens camera, control negative density and print contrast making use of the zone system.
    2.  Know how to light and operate "strobe lights."

  
  •  

    COM 215 - Intermediate Filmmaking


    This concentrated, advanced-level course examines digital filmmaking as a cinematic form of visual storytelling for the 21st Century.  Students will be introduced to the art of filmmaking using inexpensive Digital Video as the medium.  Each student will write, shoot, and edit a high production value short film using the school's digital cameras and editing equipment.  The primary emphasis is telling a story visually by producing, directing, and supervising cinematography, lighting, grip, editing, and sound recording.  Also, students will learn all of the basic positions and responsibilities on a professional independent film set.  Prior experience in visual production or photography is helpful but not required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  COM 205 Introduction to Filmmaking

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the operation of several different high-definition video recording cameras, including standard camera peripherals.
    2.  Edit their work into a cohesive, narrative whole using a PC or Macintosh-based digital non-linear video editing system.
    3.  Recognize and identify different crew positions on a film set, their individual functions, as well as the assigned tasks of each.
    4.  Possess a working knowledge of advanced techniques in cinematic staging and lighting, including the use of portable lighting kits, studio lighting, and practical lighting.
    5.  Compile a series of individual or group projects in a time-based medium, either in standard-definition or high-definition digital video, into a demonstration reel for employment or further studies.

  
  •  

    COM 216 - Advanced Filmmaking


    This advanced level course offers the student further instruction in the art of digial filmmaking.  Students will experience industry standard production techniques using various filming equipment.  This course of study will allow the student to concentrate on topics such as: lighting, pre- and post-production practices, grip, sound and editing methods, as well as shot layout, blocking, directing and cinematography.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  COM 215 Intermediate Filmmaking

     

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Possess a working knowledge of the individual workflow of data, and its effect on a time-based filmmaking or video project.
    2.  Understand advanced editing techniques using a digital non-linear editing system, including special effects, tilting, and color correction.
    3.  Understand the standard operation and maintenance of a commercial studio lighting rig.
    4.  Compile a series of short individual projects, or a single individual project of considerable length in a digital time-based medium, either in standard-definition or high-definition digital video.
    5.  Produce their body of work into a demonstration reel for employment or further studies.

  
  •  

    COM 222 - Advanced Photography


    Advanced Photography is a lecture/laboratory course that offers students with previous photography education or experience the opportunity to further explore photography as an expressive tool.  The scope and approach of the course is the study and application of advanced methods of working with a photographic camera, as well as processing film and prints with photochemistry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART/COM 112 Beginning Photography and ART/COM 212 Intermediate Photography

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 222
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use a light meter and gray card to calculate scene brightness ratios.
    2.  Adjust film speed ratings to compensate for camera or lighting factors.
    3.  Adjust film development times to compensate for lighting conditions.
    4.  Determine personal film speed.
    5.  Print "problem" negatives by making alterations in the prints.
    6.  Develop a vocabulary to critique basic photographic principles.
    7.  Recognize and appreciate diverse photographic expression.

  
  •  

    COM 226 - Advanced Computer Imagery


    A continuation of Visual Communication theory that students were introduced to during ART 125/COM 124. Through more advanced visual design problems, students will develop their conceptual problem-solving skills relative to applied arts fields such as advertising and editorial design, animation, gaming, and web design. Advanced digital imagery techniques will be introduced using Photoshop CC, in addition to page layout theory using Adobe InDesign CC.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART 125/COM 124 Introduction to Computer Graphics, ART 115 Beginning Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 226
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the field of Graphic Design more fully.
    2.  Develop skills on the computer in professional design oriented programs.
    3.  Create a professional portfolio of work relevant to the field.
    4.  Discuss the field of Graphic Design and its future.

  
  •  

    COM 228 - Animation I


    Animation I introduces the student to the beginning concepts of classical animation.  The focus is the investigation of two-dimensional animation using the program of Macro-media Director MX.  Topics covered are writing for animation and history of animation, in addition to basic animation concepts such as character development, storyboarding, audio/music timing and screening.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Art 125 Introduction to Audio Theory and Production

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 228
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Illustrate a working knowledge of quality visual storytelling.
    2.  Demonstrate a competent application of the animation principles in a time-based visualization.
    3.  Demonstrate a competent application of foundation drawing skills.
    4.  Apply animation computer software knowledge to other digital art forms.

  
  •  

    COM 230 - Motion Graphics


    This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of motion graphics through the use of the Adobe Creative Suite package of applications, which includes Adobe After Effects and Adobe Illustrator.  This is a hands-on course, as well as being theory-based in its approach.  Students will learn all aspects of vector-based motion graphics for film, video, and web-based post-production applications. 

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop a storyboard for time-based media.
    2.  Create basic animation sequences using vector-based drawing tools.
    3.  Execute frame-by-frame animations using a timeline.
    4.  Script basic commands for interactivity.
    5.  Design a user-friendly environment.

  
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    COM 240 - Mass Media Research


    This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in media research.  The course will introduce students to a variety of mass media research methods, such as library and internet research, and content analysis.  It is the objective of this course to engage students within the research process by immersing them in the function and creation of various forms of media, with an emphasis on Documentary Films.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 100 Introduction to Mass Media

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the role of research in the field of mass media and its effects on media production and dissemination.
    2.  Understand the difference between primary and secondary sources, and be able to evaluate the appropriateness and reliability of an information source based upon a pre-established set of criteria.
    3.  Know the difference between qualitative and quantitative research data, and how to appropriately report findings on each in an academic or professional setting.
    4.  Possess the ability to perform research as both an individual and as a member of a group.
    5.  Produce a significant written project containing original research based upon the qualitative and quantitative research methods described in class.

  
  •  

    COM 250 - Communication Internship I


    Placement in a communications related job.  Involves in addition to job requirements, directed reading, meetings with the intern supervisor, and written assignments.  Most Internships are not paid positions.

    Credits: Variable (1-3)
    Note
    By advisement only

  
  •  

    COM 255 - Communication Internship II


    Students will find placement in a communications related job.  Like Internship I, this course of study will involve in addition to employment requirements; directed reading, meeting with their intern supervisor and written assignments.  The work load and responsibility in this second level internship will be greater and on a broader scale than the first Internship.  Most internships are not paid positions.  This Internship may be taken twice for credit.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  COM 250 Communications Internship I

    Credits: Variable (1-3)
    Note
    By advisement only

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Gain placement in a communications related field in one of the local new production, audio production, video production, print media, or public relations firms.
    2.  Have completed a working and functional resume that will enhance their ability to gain future employment.
    3.  Gain the time management and interpersonal skills to schedule regular meetings with their intern supervisor and faculty advisor.
    4.  Apply the skills learned during their academic internship directly to their various aspects of classroom study.
    5.  Maintain a health, positive working relationship with the employers that they are placed with and maintain the etiquette of good professional communication when contacting prospective employers inquiring about possible future internship or permanent placement.

  
  •  

    COM 256 - Special Topics in Communication


    This course is an in-depth examination of a critical topic, skill, or creative process in Communications and Media Arts.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    COM 260 - Television Production Practicum


    This advanced level course gives the student a chance to put prior course knowledge that has been acquired to use producing half hour format news/information shows for television airing.  Both equipment control and performance will be stressed in the lecture part of the class, while the application of these concepts will be put to practical use within the studio setting.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Gain a fundamental working knowledge of standard television production terms and definitions.
    2.  Demarcate between the two different types of studio production crews (above the line and below the line crew positions) and be able to give examples of each.
    3.  Possess the knowledge to shoot footage on location and be able to edit it down within the production facility to be presented as part of a traditional half-hour news program.
    4.  Effectively plan a video shoot on location anb be able to properly prepare to document an event outside of the studio environment.
    5.  Understand the role of the on-camera personality and develop a comfortable relationship in transitioning between on-camera and off-camera roles in the production environment.

  
  •  

    COM 265 - Intermediate Television Production Practicum


    This intermediate-level course is a broadcast production class where students are immersed in the roles of directing, reporting, and producing as they pertain to both commercial and broadcast television.  This is a Lecture/Laboratory style course, which will provide for further hands-on experience in studio production, but with an emphasis on story/show genesis and creative execution as it relates to cast and crew direction.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 260 Television Production Practicum

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate well-developed studio skills and etiquette.
    2.  Work in both leadership and crew positions.
    3.  Create News Packages from inception to final post-production and broadcast.
    4.  Demonstrate their accrual of real-world experience in working with the general public.
    5.  Be prepared for both academic internships and immediate employment with various broadcast news stations.

  
  •  

    COM 270 - Communication Internship III


    Students will find placement in a communications related job.  This course of study will involve dedicated study time in addition to employment requirements: directed reading, meeting with their internship supervisor and written assignments.  The work load and responsibility in this second level internship will be greater and on a broader scale than the first internship.  Most internships are not paid positions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 255 Communication Internship II

    Corequisite:  COM 275 Communication Internship IV

    Credits: Variable (1-3)
    Hours
    Variable Class Hours
    Note
    By Advisement Only

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Gain placement in a communications related field in one of the local new production, audio production, video production, print media, or public relations firms.
    2.  Complete a working and functional resume that will enhance their ability to gain future employment.
    3.  Gain the time management and interpersonal skills needed to schedule regular meetings with their intern supervisor and faculty advisor.
    4.  Apply skills learned during their academic intership directly to their various aspects of classroom study.
    5.  Maintain a healthy, positive working relationship with the employers that they are placed with and maintain the etiquette of good professional communication when contacting prospective employers inquiring about possible future internship or permanent placement.

  
  •  

    COM 275 - Communication Internship IV


    Students will find placement in a communications related job.  This course of study will involve dedicated study time in addition to employment requirements: directed reading, meeting with their internship supervisor and written assignments.  The work load and responsibility in this second level internship will be greater and on a broader scale than the first internship.  Most internships are not paid positions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 255 Communication Internship II

    Credits: Variable (1-3)
    Hours
    Variable Class Hours
    Note
    By Advisement Only

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Gain placement in a communications related field in one of the local news production, audio production, video production, print media, or public relations firms.
    2.  Complete a working and functional resume that will enhance their ability to gain future employment.
    3.  Gain the time management and interpersonal skills needed to schedule regular meetings with their intern supervisor and faculty advisor.
    4.  Apply the skills learned during their academic internship directly to their various aspects of classroom study.
    5.  Maintain a healthy, positive working relationship with the employers that they are placed with and maintain the etiquette of good professional communication when contacting prospective employers inquiring about possible future internship or permanent placement.

  
  •  

    COM 285 - "X" - LACM Special Topics


    Credits: Variable (1-3)
  
  •  

    COM 286 - "X" - LACM Special Topics


    Credits: Variable (1-3)
  
  •  

    COM 287 - "X" - LACM Special Topics


    Credits: Variable (1-3)
  
  •  

    COM 299 - Independent Study in Communications/Media Arts


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a special area of communication.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, an independent course of study is to be a continution of those skills already gained through the students coursework.  The option exists to run this course receiving from 1-3 credits as needed.  Topics and subject matter are variable.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 semester hours of College level work in Communications/Media Arts

    Credits: (1-3)
    Note
    By advisement only

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Produce a short-form or longer-form academic project (visual, aural, or written) of considerable scope and depth relative to their independent study in Communications/Media Arts.
    2.  Apply the skills and knowledge learned in their independent study to other areas of academic study both within and beyond the scope of the Communications/Media Arts Program.
    3.  Demonstrate the ability to enter into an agreed academic contract with forseeable and measureable responsibilities and goals, as well as quantifiably meet those responsibilities and goals.
    4.  Possess the necessary time management and leadership skills to meet with the faculty advisor that agrees to oversee their independent study on a regular and punctual basis.

  
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    CRJ 105 - Introduction to Corrections


    Overview of the corrections components of the criminal justice system, tracing the history of corrections in the United States. Relationships and interdependencies of corrections with the court and law enforcement components of the criminal justice system and a discussion of the theoretical basis for the four major types of correctional models.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the major periods of corrections history and explain why each is important.
    2.  Explain the role of corrections in the context of the larger criminal justice process.
    3.  List the goals of sentencing and relate these goals to specific sentencing practices.
    4.  Identify the requirements needed for career entry into institutional and community corrections.
    5.  Explain the roles of local, state, and federal penal institutions and identify problems and solutions within such institutions.
    6.  Write a report on their experience touring the operation of a local correctional facility.

  
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    CRJ 111 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    This course provides the student with a foundation for integrated instruction throughout the criminal justice curriculum.  The content of advanced criminal justice courses are introduced in this course, as well as a review of the process in which individuals become suspects, suspects become defendants, some defendants are convicted and become probationers, inmates and parolees.  Innovative programs involving policing, the courts, prosecution, sentencing and corrections treatment is reviewed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Writing placement score equivalent to ENG 110 College Writing I or better

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain what the criminal justice system is and how the components of the criminal justice system work together and affect each other in carrying out their respective missions.
    2.  Identify the major means of measuring crime in the United States and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each method.
    3.  Identify the major views of criminology and explain in general terms what each perspective is.
    4.  Demonstrate that they know the origins of American Criminal Law, explain the difference between Common Law and Statutory Law, and explain the concept of stare decisis.
    5.  Explain the English origins of early American policing and the development of policing in the United States to the present.
    6.  Explain the historical functions of police in terms of the three major eras of policing and identify the power, purpose, and structure of current police practices.
    7.  Define the Constitutional guidelines on police conduct as they relate to arrest, search and seizure, confessions, and police liability.
    8.  Describe the American court structure to include the appellate process, courtroom players, and the purpose of the adversarial process.
    9.  Explain the history and purpose of punishment.
    10.  Explain and justify the innovative approaches to punishment in society today.
    11.  Define the difference between jails and prisons and explain the functions and purposes of both.
    12.  Define in general terms the theories related to delinquency and the structure of the American juvenile justice system.

  
  •  

    CRJ 115 - Juvenile Justice System


    Overview of the juvenile system, including the history, process, status and philosophy of the juvenile court.  Law enforcement handling of juveniles, various theories of delinquency causation, correctional programs and alternative methods of dealing with juvenile offenders.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the differences between delinquency, statusus offenses, and inadequate parental care.
    2.  Explain the theories behind delinquent behavior.
    3.  Map out the functions of the police in regard to juvenile delinquency.
    4.  Describe the welfare and probation services made available to delinquent children and their parents.
    5.  Demonstrate the legal issues involved in dealing with delinquent behavior as it relates to the criminal justice.
    6.  Identify service providers that deal with treatment plans to reunite families and prevent further juvenile misconduct.
    7.  Give examples of juvenile misconduct.
    8.  List the programs in schools that are available to help prevent school violence.
    9.  Explain the prosecutorial decision making process in juvenile court.
    10.  Describe the "parens patriae" concept.
    11.  List juvenile community-based alternatives to prison-bound wayward youth.
    12.  List and explain the different goals of juvenile corrections.

  
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    CRJ 125 - Criminal Law


    Essential elements of the various crimes under the criminal law.  The concepts of culpability and criminal defenses recognized under the criminal law as they relate to murder, rape, robbery, burglary, arson, assault, drug offenses, disorderly conduct and harassment.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List and give examples of different guilty mental states.
    2.  Describe the elements of the crimes listed above, using a statute from the text, the Model Penal Code, or the New York State Penal Code.
    3.  Explain and give examples of affirmative defenses.
    4.  Write arguments from the perspective of the prosecution and the defense about how the law should be applied in a particular case, including arguments about fairness and precedents.
    5.  Demonstrate verbally how prosecutors and defense attorneys might argue the cases covered in class.

  
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    CRJ 127 - Gaming Surveillance and Security


    Gaming Surveillance and Security in reference to measures taken at casinos to protect an establishment's money, property, and patrons.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CAS 127
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain what surveillance in gaming operations is.
    2.  Identify different surveillance techniques.
    3.  Understand the difference between proactive and reactive surveillance operations.
    4.  Successfully work a CC Camera.
    5.  Successfully identify different types of covert cameras.
    6.  Properly execute surveillance skills.
    7.  Be familiar with basic con strategies such as suspicious activity, advantage play, cheating techniques, card counting.
    8.  Explain the difference between internal theft and player theft.
    9.  Understand threat assessment and risk assessment.
    10.  Identify Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Threats inside a Casino.
    11.  Prepare and implement a basic Protection Plan.
    12.  Implement covert counter measures to risk or threat.
    13.  Explain the concept of Loss Prevention and Shrinkage.
    14.  Detect and deter employee thefts.
    15.  Identify and understand the basic concept of an audit.
    16.  Understand search and seizure rules of law in regard to casino gaming floor versus the guest hotel room.
    17.  Properly secure casino floor exits, and monitor parking garages.
    18.  Clearly write an incident report.
    19.  Execute proper relationship with law enforcement and court system.

  
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    CRJ 130 - Introduction to Security


    Organization and management of the security function in industry, business, government and institutions.  The protection of personnel, facilities and other assets, as well as administrative, legal and technical problems of loss prevention and control.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the different organizational structures in security organizations and to explain their various strengths and weaknesses.
    2.  Demonstrate strategies for monitoring and preventing loss in various settings.
    3.  Demonstrate strategies for protecting personnel in various settings.
    4.  Complete written reports regarding loss prevention efforts, reported losses, and safety concerns.
    5.  Explain the legal considerations that must be taken into account in establishing best practices in security operations.

  
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    CRJ 204 - Criminal Courts and Sentencing


    This course describes the court and sentencing process in U.S. criminal courts.  Special attention is paid to how judges sentence offenders.  This course will evaluate mandatory and discretionary sentences, intermediate sanctions, and current legislative proposals for sentencing changes.  Students will examine the court steps following an arrest and the process leading to adjudication and sentencing.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be familiar with the criminal court process.
    2.  Understand the criminal sentencing guidelines in state and federal courts.
    3.  Understand mitigating factors commonly offered by defense counsel during a criminal sentencing process.
    4.  Be familiar with the discretion of judges, prosecution and defense counsel during the court process.
    5.  Understand the facets of court personnel.
    6.  Have learned the evolving approaches to specialized courts.
    7.  Understand criminal defense work in the United States and how indigent defendants obtain counsel.
    8.  Identify the various courtroom and administrative functions of a judge.

  
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    CRJ 205 W - Correctional Law


    Overview of correctional law as it relates to prisons, probation, parole, capital punishment, juvenile justice, and sentencing based on leading court cases on these components of the corrections system.  Emphasis is placed on the principles of law governing these decisions as they relate to New York Correctional Law.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List the Constitutional rights of inmates, parolees, probationers, and juvenile offenders.
    2.  Identify the situations in which an office could be held liable for his/her behavior.
    3.  Explain court cases addressing the rights of convicted offenders.
    4.  Describe and demonstrate best practices by corrections officers.

  
  •  

    CRJ 206 - Correctional Treatment and Rehabilitation


    Covers methods used to improve correctional outcomes through evidence-based practices for those in jail, prison, on probation or parole.  Problems such as addiction and mental health of offenders, juveniles and those "at risk" in a facility or under community supervision will be addressed.  Focus on practices beyond traditional custody that show potential to reduce recidivism as a means of breaking the criminal cycle and controlling social and financial cost of incarceration.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain how corrections treatment and rehabilitation fits into the primary correctional goal of public protection.
    2.  Explain the ethical and legal concerns of any person or agency involved in the supervision and treatment of offenders and juveniles.
    3.  Describe the most common evidence-based practices used in the field.
    4.  Explain what evidence-based practices have proven most effective in fostering positive change.
    5.  Explain what constitutes success in treatment and how can it be measured.

     

  
  •  

    CRJ 212 W - Criminal Procedure and Constitutional Law


    The right to counsel, search and seizure, confessions, lineups, electronic surveillance, probation and parole.  Writing Emphasis Course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the structures of the federal and state court stystem; explain the different meanings of jurisdiction; explain sources of individual rights; and explain the doctrine of incorporation.
    2.  Outline the steps that take place from the time of arrest to final disposition.
    3.  Recite from memory a definition of probable cause and distinguish the difference between probable cause, reasonable suspicion, proof beyond a reasonable doubt, absolute certainty, a hunch, and explain how probable cause is established.
    4.  Explain what the Exclusionary Rule is and explain why it has been instituted in American policing; identify exceptions to the Exclusionary Rule; and list possible alternatives to the Exlusionary Rule.
    5.  Explain the justification for a "stop and frisk"; distinguish the difference between a "stop" and a "frisk" and identify what each is; and properly conduct a "stop and frisk".
    6.  Define an arrest as a seizure of a person; explain the elements of an arrest; explain when arrests are permissible for felonies and misdemeanors; explain the amount of force that can be used in making an arrest; and conduct a lawful arrest.
    7.  Identify the requirements necessary for conducting a lawful lineup before and after an arrest; identify the requirements necessary for conducting a lawful show-up; identify the requirements necessary for conducting a lawful photo array; and create a legally defensible photo array and use the array in conducting an investigation.
    8.  Explain the difference in legal requirements for conducting house searches and vehicle searches, list the steps police can take after a vehicle stop, explain the limits of vehicle searches; and conduct a vehicle search and inventory.
    9.  Explain the three concepts that do not fall under the Fourth Amendment prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures and explain the legal requirements for conducting electronic surveillance.
    10.  Explain the background of the Miranda v. Arizona decision; identify the two-pronged test for giving the Miranda Warnings, and recite the Miranda Warnings.
    11.  Explain the Constitutional Rights of criminal defendants at trial and identify the Constitutional Amendments that apply.

  
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    CRJ 215 - Police Administration


    Fundamentals of organization, supervision and overall management of police and civilian personnel.  Designed to supply a background for the students in dealing with the complexities involved in the management aspect of various police agencies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CRJ 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain how the history of law enforcement in the United States has evolved into what it is today and discern trends that point toward new eras of policing in the future.
    2.  Identify the roles of positive and negative politics in the operations of American policing and identify the sources of power for policing initiatives in the past.
    3.  Explain how motivational theories relate to formal and informal organizational designs in police departments and how they contribute to the police culture.
    4.  Describe the qualities of a leader as this applies to administrators, managers, and supervisors, and identify those characteristics common to good leaders.
    5.  Explain the different functions of line and staff personnel.
    6.  Demonstrate through actual practice the skills that are required for reflective and empathic listening and understanding.
    7.  Identify the characteristics of a good mission statement, define what a goal is, and create a personal mission statement that reflects understanding of the principles of singling out important activities from those that are unimportant.
    8.  Define stress-coping skills and identify the harmful effects of stress.
    9.  Explain the potential legal liabilities associated with hiring, training, retaining, disciplining, and terminating employees and identify Constitutional personnel procedural protections afforded to police employees in the performance of their duties.
    10.  Explain the planning and decision-making process and complete a group decision-making project that reflects the value of group decisions over individual decisions.
    11.  Describe the various fiscal management methods common to law enforcement.
    12.  Identify effective evaluation processes for police operations and programs administered by law enforcement.

  
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    CRJ 216 - Police Operations


    This course gives students a glimpse of what students can expect to learn at a police academy while covering topics such as traffic stops, radar operation, accident investigation, arrest procedures, searching, and police report writing.  Emphasis is placed on the ethical considerations in police work and distinguishing media myth from police work reality.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CRJ 111 Administration of Justice

    Credits: 3
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Make a safe traffic stop.
    2.  Explain acceptable police behaviors in typical ethical traps.
    3.  Recite the law enforcement phonetic alphabet and police "10-Code".
    4.  Calculate speed by means of a stopwatch.
    5.  Determine minimum speed from skid marks.
    6.  Diagram a simple accident scene using standard police procedures.
    7.  Safely direct traffic.
    8.  Explain how police radar functions, including the echo effect and Doppler Effect.
    9.  Conduct a standard field sobriety test.
    10.  Explain how blood alcohol is measured.
    11.  Demonstrate the process for field note taking and effective report writing.
    12.  Conduct a field interview.
    13.  Properly pat down, detain, search, arrest, and handcuff a suspect.
    14.  Conduct a background investigation.
    15.  Recite the Miranda warnings.
    16.  Explain safe weapons handling (and when possible, demonstrate safe weapons handling).
    17.  Explain New York's Penal Law of deadly force.
    18.  Identify resources common to most communities that may be used to assist the police function.
    19.  Explain the process for responding to crimes in progress.
    20.  Complete an "Academy Notebook".

  
  •  

    CRJ 218 - Police Community Relations


    This course explores the relationship of the police to the community including the role of police in contemporary society; abuses of discretion; past, present and future trends in policing; problem identification and solving; and ethical issues facing policing in a free society.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify basic terminology used in police community relations.
    2.  Identify the difference between public relations and police community relations.
    3.  Describe the important relationships within police organizations.
    4.  Discuss the changing roles of police officers in the 21st century.
    5.  Discuss the role of the media and its impact on police community relations.
    6.  Demonstrate effective interactions with the media.
    7.  Demonstrate the steps in the escalation and management of conflict.
    8.  Discuss means for successful community involvement in the police organization.
    9.  Discuss and identify the necessary strategies for police community relations in the new millennium.
    10.  Compare and contrast community policing with problem-oriented policing.
    11.  Explain the problem-solving paradigm used in policing.
    12.  Demonstrate techniques for interacting effectively with members of the community.
    13.  Survey members of the public regarding their interactions with the police, and report their results to the class in writing and verbally.

  
  •  

    CRJ 225 - Security Administration


    Administration of public and private security efforts: problems in protection program development and evaluation, functions of various levels of personnel, company/organizational relations, documents and personnel access control, detection systems, devices, and equipment, emergency and disaster planning, new directions in the field of security.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the problems in protection program development and evaluations.
    2.  Explain the functions of various levels of personnel within an organization.
    3.  Assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of various detection systems, devices, and equipment.
    4.  Describe the new directions in the field of security.
    5.  Prepare a written disaster plan for an organization.

  
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    CRJ 230 - Criminal Investigation


    Basic principles of investigation as they relate to the collection, preservation, identification and examination of physical evidence.  Techniques for locating and interviewing witnesses and interrogating suspects.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours (Additional tuition and fees)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the different tools of a criminal investigator and explain how they are used and under what circumstances these tools would be used.
    2.  Conduct an interview of a "witness" and record the interview through note-taking.
    3.  Write a report based on information given to the student that answers the questions:  who, what, when, where, how, and why.
    4.  Draw a simple diagram using at least two methods of documentation.
    5.  Take crime scene photographs using proper exposure methods and documentation practices.
    6.  Demonstrate the acceptable methods for collection of different types of evidence, including glass, hairs and fibers, body fluids, and controlled substances.
    7.  Explain the legal requirements for taking statements in interviews and interrogations.
    8.  Demonstrate proper documentation and recording techniques for interviews and interrogations.
    9.  Identify instruments and technology used in the gathering and analyzing of information, including "spike mikes", pin hole cameras, and infrared photography.
    10.  Identify sources of information, including the Internet, public records, business records, and informants and what those records will reveal.
    11.  Demonstrate stationary and moving surveillance techniques.
    12.  Identify the various fingerprint patterns and demonstrate methods of collecting fingerprints from smooth, metallic surfaces, from paper, and other surfaces and explain the chemistry involved in each of those techniques.
    13.  Explain the basic premise for ballistic and tool mark identification.
    14.  Conduct a simple drug identification test and explain the chemistry involved.
    15.  Do a simple plaster casting of a footprint.
    16.  Explain the processes used in questioned document examination.

  
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    CRJ 235 - Corrections Administration


    A survey of the theories and practices of penology in correctional institutions.  The physical, educational, and social aspects of incarceration are studied relative to their impact on correctional clients.  Principles of management relative to correctional services are explored.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the differences between organizational leadership and organizational management.
    2.  List and define the five traditional functions of management and explain how corrections administration compares with other public administration careers.
    3.  Prepare questions for and conduct an interview with a local correctional administrator.
    4.  Identify best practices in areas of personnel, budget, planning and public relations.
    5.  Prepare oral and written responses to real life problems faced by corrections supervisors and administrators.

  
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    CRJ 240 - Community Corrections


    An introduction to the history, philosophy, and practices of probation, parole, intensive supervision, community corrections, and other non-institutional corrections treatment settings.  The philosophy of community treatment is explained and procedures and processes of supervision as they pertain to the offender are examined.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List and describe the various alternatives to incarcerations programs and evaluate whether such programs can be successful.
    2.  Write a fictional pre-sentence investigation report using the NYS format using sound and logical construction.
    3.  Engage in a mock interview of a resistant offender using motivational interviewing techniques.
    4.  Write a report on their experience touring the operation of a local probation department.
    5.  Explain techniques for the supervision of general and special offender populations including use of technology such as electronic monitoring and drug testing equipment.

  
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    CRJ 245 W - Criminology


    A study of the general field of criminology considering the general theories of crime causation and the impact crime has on society.  Policy implications related to prevention, treatment of victims, and legal intervention are reviewed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain what criminology is.
    2.  Explain the differnece between criminology and criminal justice and explain the relationship between the two.
    3.  Distinguish the different models used for research in criminology.
    4.  Explain the major sources and origins of criminal law.
    5.  Give a legal definition of crime.
    6.  Identify the various sources of crime statistics used in the United States and explain the strengths and weaknesses of each.
    7.  Describe the factors relating to victimization and the role of ecological, household and victim demographic characteristics.
    8.  Explain the difference between classical criminology and positive criminology.
    9.  Compare and constrast biosocial and psychological theories of crime causation.
    10.  Explain the link between intelligence and crime.
    11.  Discuss the three branches of social structure theory.
    12.  Identify the major social process theories.
    13.  Explain the basic elements of social conflict theory.
    14.  Identify characteristics of serial killers and mass murderers and explain differences between these two classes of killers.

  
  •  

    CRJ 246 - Victimology


    This course allows students to study and explore various types of victims, their role in victimization, their relationship to the offender, and the methods in which victimization is reported.  The role of the law enforcement officer, victim's advocacy groups, the function of victim impact statements, and victim's rights will also be examined.  The sources of trauma, motivational issues of offending, response patterns to vicimization, secondary trauma effects of victimization, and community and media response will be explored.

    This Criminal Justice course may be used to fulfill a Social Science elective.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the origins of victimology.
    2.  Compare and contrast the information available from different sources of crime statistics.
    3.  Explain different theories of how and why people become victims of crimes.
    4.  Demonstrate both conflicts and cooperation between victims and law enforcement.
    5.  Describe the challenges faced by victims in the legal system, in their families, in the political system, and in the society at large.
    6.  Describe the role of the victim in the criminal justice system, from the beginning to the end of a case.
    7.  Explain how that role has been evolving over time.
    8.  Assess the strengths and weaknesses of various types of victim reparations.
    9.  Attend a trial, hearing, arraignment, or a victim's advocacy group, and describe the experience from the perspective of a victim.

  
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    CRJ 255 - Special Topics in Criminal justice


    The specific area to be covered will be based upon identified needs and interests of criminal justice students.  This course also provides a forum for professional individuals in the criminal justice field with a particular expertise to share their knowledge and skills with students.  Special topics have included Criminalistics, Police Community Relations, Drug Law, Current Legal Issues, and Domestic Violence.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CRJ 111 Administration of Justice

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    The objects for this course will vary, depending on the material being covered.

  
  •  

    CRJ 260 - Organized Crime


    Role of legal system in organized crime control, preventative methods, political influences; white collar crime, methods of intelligence gathering; relationships of organized crime to community social structure.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CRJ 111 Administration to Justice, or permission of chairperson

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the historical reasons for the rise of organized crime across countries and across history.
    2.  Explain the role of money and extortion in organized crime.
    3.  Explain how and why there have been historical shifts as different enterprises have developed, grown, and gained prominence in the area of organized crime.
    4.  Explain how organized crime interacts with and thrives only in interaction with legitimate society.
    5.  Describe the role of the legal system in addressing organized crime.
    6.  Assess the strengths and weaknesses of various strategies for preventing and addressing organized crime.
    7.  Explain how organized crime is involved in white collar crime and other offenses.

  
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    CRJ 295 - Criminal Justice Internship


    Designed as a field experience for students in selected settings (Public Defender, Police Agencies, etc.).  Weekly seminars to augment experiences with operations, procedures and policies.  Flexible scheduling hours TBA.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Third semester criminal justice student status, 2.5 GPA, and acceptance by a local criminal justice agency

    Credits: 3
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain, in writing and verbally, how the Criminal Justice theories they are learning is being put to use in the field.
    2.  Demonstrate to the satisfaction of their field supervisor that they can carry out assigned tasks in a thorough and timely manner.

  
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    CRJ 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project concerned with advanced level work beyond the scope or breadth of regular courses.  A specific area or topic is investigated under the direction of a faculty member.  Must be approved by department chairperson and Dean.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CRJ 111 Administration of Justice and 6 credits in CRJ courses

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    The objects for this course will vary, depending on the material being covered.

  
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    CSS 106 - College Success Seminar


    This course is designed to assist students in understanding the theory and application of academic strategies.  Topics will include learning theory, test taking, note taking, reading text material, college writing, and other topics related to college success.  This course forms a Learning Community with SOS 101.  All the study strategies will be applied to the course content in SOS 101.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  SOS 101 Contemporary World Issues

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CST 090 - Computer Science I


    Topics include careers in Computer Science and exploration into the different areas of Computer Science.  Students will learn what the differences are between the analog and digital worlds.  Students will learn to write and edit professional papers, review professional articles related to Computer Science, learn to use proper email etiquette, gather and plot scientific data, and evaluate Internet Sources for accuracy.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain what Computer Science is, the major areas it encompasses, and the career paths provided by the programs in the Computer Science department.
    2.  Critically examine, discuss and summarize professional papers written by experts in the Computer Science field.  This includes reading, writing and preparing professional presentations for class.
    3.  Distinguish between the analog and digital worlds by giving examples of items that fit into each world.  Additionally, they will be able to discuss conversions available to switch between analog and digital worlds and back.
    4.  Distinguish between microprocessors, small systems and larger computer systems.
    5.  Prepare papers, charts and plots, and professional presentations using available software and the skills they have learned.

  
  •  

    CST 091 - Computer Science II


    This course is a continuation of Computer Science I (CST 090) and focuses on data storage, organization and manipulation (in terms of databases).  Includes topics such as binary, hexadecimal, decimal (numeric bases) as well as conversions to and from different bases.  Computer logic fundamentals, and Introduction to Microprocessors including the history, clock speeds, bus sizes, machine language, assembly language and high level languages.  Robotics is discussed as a practical example of digital electronics.  Internet Research of Computer Science topic to develop and present professional papers in a team environment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 090 Computer Science I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss what databases are and how they can be used to store, manipulate or organize data.
    2.  Discuss the precision and control afforded by digital electronics as compared to analog systems.
    3.  Discuss and summarize professional papers written by experts in the Computer Science field.  This includes reading, writing and preparing professional presentations for class.
    4.  Convert integers and real numbers between different bases.
    5.  Discuss differences and similarities of SSIC and LSIC.
    6.  Discuss differences between machine language, assembly language and high level programming languages for microprocessors and small systems.
    7.  Develop written and oral communication skills as a member of a successful team project.

  
  •  

    CST 092 - Network Basics I


    This course focuses primarily on the hardware associated with computer networking.  The organization and operation of local area networks is examined.  Detailed coverage of the hardware devices used to connect computers on a LAN is examined.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain how Ethernet networks allow two computers to communicate.
    2.  Discuss different network topologies and their advantages and disadvantages.
    3.  Demonstrate how to setup a local area network using hubs, switches, and routers.
    4.  Explain how addressing works and is performed on a local area network.
    5.  Discuss the basic purpose of the TCP/IP network protocol suite.

  
  •  

    CST 093 - Network Basics II


    This course focuses primarily on the software associated with computer networking.  The organization and operation of wide area networks is examined.  Detailed coverage of the software protocols that carry information between computers is examined.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 092 Network Basics I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the purpose of all layers of the TCP/IP network protocol suite.
    2.  Demonstrate how to use different network utilities.
    3.  Discuss the operation of client-server networking and network operating systems.
    4.  Explain the operation of common network applications FTP, Telnet, email, and web browsing.
    5.  Demonstrate useful network activities, such as capturing and analyzing network traffic and securing a network.

  
  •  

    CST 102 - Computer Skills and Literacy


    This course will help develop computer skills to enable a student to be successful in college (Super Useful Computer Concepts Every Student Seeks).  Topics include use of BCC Computer System, development of professional papers using Microsoft Word, creation of presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint, searching for and validating information found on the Internet, maintenance of computer files, maintenance of a Computer System, learning styles and time management.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the 150% Rule and "attempted credits".
    2.  Use professional Time Management techniques to balance school, work, and personal demands.
    3.  List and demonstrate the steps necessary to maintain a personal PC.
    4.  Use Outlook to send/receive e-mails with attachments.
    5.  Explain the use of Learning Management Systems for on-line course presentation.
    6.  Use Word to create/edit/save professional outlines and research papers.
    7.  Use PowerPoint to create/edit/save unique, creative, educational and entertaining presentations.
    8.  Use Excel to create an expense budget.
    9.  List and demonstrate the usefulness of career assessments (Strong's, Myers-Briggs, Colors).
    10.  List and demonstrate Learning Styles/Differentiated Learning and their specific "style".
    11.  Use Library resources to research and develop college-level research papers.
    12.  List and demonstrate academically reviewed/authorized search engines.
    13.  Properly cite sources using both MLA and APA citation formats.
    14.  Create both a hardcopy and e-format resume.
    15.  List and demonstrate the use of Publisher for creating a composite business presence.
    16.  List and demonstrate the use of Visio for creating industry-standards' layouts and designs.

  
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    CST 103 - General Security Concepts


    A first, introductory course in computer and network security concepts and techniques.  No knowledge of networking is required.  Topics include operating system security, authentication, attacks, auditing, cryptography, physical security, and disaster recovery.  Numerous case studies are presented and studied.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the legal and ethical issues associated with information security.
    2.  Describe the various operating security features (including authentication).
    3.  Explain the different types of malicious code and attacks on computers.
    4.  Understand how to perform auditing.
    5.  Be familiar with the basics of cryptography.
    6.  Understand the relationship between physical security and disaster recovery.

  
  •  

    CST 104 - Remote Security Methods


    This second security course builds on the material introduced in CST 103 General Security Concepts.  Detailed examinations of many different remote access methods are undertaken.  These methods include RAS (via PPP over a modem), VPN (virtual private networking), secure email and file transfers, secure web access, wireless security, and instant messaging.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 103 General Security Concepts

    Corequisite:  CST 208 Introduction to Networking

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe unsecure and secure ways of doing web, email, and ftp.
    2.  Describe the operation and features of a typical router.
    3.  Explain the operation of a VPN tunnel, including the protocols used, and the essentials of encryption and hashing.
    4.  Understand how to setup an RAS server.
    5.  Understand the basics of file and directory access security.
    6.  Be familiar with wireless networking and instant messaging.

  
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    CST 105 - Computer Applications


    This is an introduction course to computer concepts and application software.  Topics include word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, the Internet and computer Operating Systems.  Microsoft Office will be used in the laboratory to develop academic, professional, and business applications.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    Credit will not be given for both CST 105 and CST 106.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use PowerPoint to create and present presentations.
    2.  Create a résumé, cover page, envelopes, labels, and tables.
    3.  Use the Internet to access course material.
    4.  Communicate using mail facilities.
    5.  Create and develop a solution to a problem using a spreadsheet for analysis.
    6.  Create a relational database.
    7.  Evaluate a computer configuration.
    8.  List and develop an understanding of computer ethics in today's society.
    9.  Create an integrated document with spreadsheets and/or databases.

  
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    CST 106 - Computers in Technology


    An introductory course on the use of computers for technology students.  Software packages will be used in problem solving and communications.  Topics will include basics of computer operations, hardware, word-processing, spreadsheets, e-mail, information transfer, presentation managers, the Internet, ethical issues and programming concepts.  For students of technology. 

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    Credits will not be given for both CST 105 and CST 106.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use PowerPoint for presentations.
    2.  Create résumés, reports, envelopes, labels, and tables.
    3.  Use Equation Editor to create equations with proper symbols.
    4.  Create forms and newsletters.
    5.  Use the Internet to research technical topics.
    6.  Communicate using different facilities.
    7.  Create a spreadsheet for technical analysis.
    8.  Evaluate a computer configuration.
    9.  Discuss computer ethics in today's society.
    10.  Collaborate and research with other team members.
    11.  List and demonstrate ten core presentation techniques in PowerPoint.
    12.  List and demonstrate ten core concepts for document preparation in Word.
    13.  State verbally and in written documentation, eight core requirements for creating formal documents.
    14.  Properly cite sources using both MLA and APA citation formats.
    15.  Create equations with proper symbols within a word processing document.
    16.  Use and contrast four different communication facilities.
    17.  List and demonstrate ten core concepts in Excel.
    18.  State verbally and in written documentation, seven core issues in computer ethics today.
    19.  State verbally and in written documentation, twelve key components to a computer system.
    20.  Present a final team project in an area related to your field of study (Civil, Mechanical, or Industrial Technology).

  
  •  

    CST 109 - Computer and Malware History


    This course explores the history of the personal computer industry, and relates the evolution of computers with that of networking and the emergence of malicious code, Internet attacks, and identity theft.  The relationship between all three is explored in depth so that the student has a clear understanding of the environment in which they will be performing additional study and eventually, actual work activities.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Examine the history and development of various computing architectures.
    2.  Explore the advances in Intel microprocessor architecture and its impact on operating system power and vulnerability.
    3.  Study the progression of malicious code and its spread through computer networks, including the world wide web.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the evolution of the Intel microprocessor family and its relationship to the evolution of malicious code.
    2.  Understand how the power of the personal computer is related to the microprocessor used inside it.
    3.  Explain how the emergence of networking and the world-wide-web led to many of the computer security issues facing us today.
    4.  Explain how microprocessor technology, computer networking, and operating system vulnerabilities all combine to enable the evolution and spread of malicious code.
    5.  Describe how computers and the Internet combine to enable identity theft and other illegal activities.

  
  •  

    CST 113 - Introduction to Programming


    Introduction to the fundamentals of programming using an Integrated Development Environment (IDE).  Topics may include data types and variables, decisions and conditional statements, repetition/loop structures, file processing and formatting of output.  Lab assignments emphasize program development using a modular design and self-documentation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  A computer course or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate using Visual Studio to compile, debug and run programs.
    2.  Demonstrate the use of good problem-solving skills for program development.
    3.  Create projects that use assignment statements, arithmetic computation, decisions and loops.
    4.  Demonstrate the use of good problem-solving skills for program development.
    5.  Demonstrate how to use standard requirements for programs to develop well written programs.
    6.  State, verbally and in writing, at least 3 core bugging techniques.
    7.  Demonstrate the use of at least 3 different repetition structures.
    8.  Demonstrate the use of the decision structure using if statements and the switch structure correctly.

 

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