Sep 22, 2020  
2016-2017 Official General Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Official General Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    BIO 118 W - Principles of Biology II


    A continuation of Principles of Biology I.  To give science majors a working foundation of biology to prepare them for transfer to a four-year institution and upper level biology courses.  The biological principles covered include, but not limited to: Cellular Structure and Function, Molecular Biology, and Genetics.  The underlying themes of unity and diversity of living organisms will be used to amalgamate the topics covered.  Scientific methodology will be emphasized in both laboratory and lecture using current publications to support discussion as well as developing and executing scientific experimentation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 117 Principles of Biology I or equivalent

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of basic cell morphology and function, molecular biology, Mendalian genetics and molecular genetics.
    2.  Apply the scientific method to plan and carry out laboratory exercises.
    3.  Apply knowledge of the scientific method in analysis of current scientific literature.
    4.  Utilize knowledge of Mendelian genetics and molecular genetics in problems of inheritance and the role of mutation in organisms.
    5.  Demonstrate the ability to read, compose, analyze,and critique scientific writing.

  
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    BIO 119 - Art of Science


    The Art of Science is an introductory course that explores the fundamentals of scientific and medical illustration.  Learn how to visually investigate and represent plants, animals, microbes and insects while you heighten your appreciation and understanding of the natural world.  Create simple diagrams of plants and anatomical structures, as you delve into the mysterious worlds of botany, anatomy, physiology and entomology.  Learn how to make colorful and informative visuals that could be used in textbooks, journals, museum displays, web sites, videos, educational software, or anatomical diagrams for medical professionals.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 119
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Objective of the Course:

    1.  Develop an appreciation for the relationship of art and science
    2.  Synthesize information, think critically and solve critical thinking problems; write clear, well organized essays or research papers that demonstrate synthesis.
    3.  Apply principles of scientific inquiry, differentiate a theory from a hypothesis, and differentiate fact from opinion in regard to biological sciences.
    4.  Define and correctly use scientific terminology in regard to biological organisms and processes.
    5.  Work well independently and in small groups.  Show self-direction and motivation, and contribute to group work.
    6.  Students will demonstrate the ability to acquire and communicate scientific data, ideas, and interpretations through written, oral, and visual means.
    7.  Students will produce written reports that clearly and accurately describe and illustrate the background, methods, data, and interpretations relevant to a particular project.
    8.  Maintain a sketchbook/journal documenting the creative process.
    9.  Establish a drawing process.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Articulate and appreciate the fundamental relationships between botany, zoology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology and entomology.
    2.  Reflect on the history of scientific illustration and the shift from classical scholarship to direct observation.
    3.  Describe several basic principles associated with botany, zoology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology and entomology.
    4.  Discuss relationships between art and science, including their personal relections about the value of exploring these relationships for both artists and scientists.
    5.  Explain essential considerations for making decisions about effective illustration (i.e., choice of medium, scaling, form, value, scientist goals) and provide constructive critique of illustrations.
    6.  Create detailed and realistic illustrations in a range of media that clearly convey essential scientific information about the subjects.
    7.  Implement the formal visual communication elements of line, shape, value, texture and space.
    8.  Appreciate and implement several visual communication mediums, including, but not limited to, pencil, ink, watercolor and digital drawing.
    9.  Understand copyright requirements, archival techniques, transfer methods, typography and techniques for presenting information.
    10.  Prepare a portfolio of their work.
    11.  Produce written reports that clearly and accurately describe and illustrate the background, methods, data, and interpretations relevant to a particular project.
    12.  Maintain a sketchbook/journal documenting the creative process.
    13.  Establish a drawing process.

  
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    BIO 120 - Human Sexuality


    Explores information about sexual attitudes, relationships, sexual anatomy, contraception, sexually transmitted disease, sexual physiology and dysfunction.  Course aims to make students feel more comfortable thinking and talking about sex and to prepare them to make rational decisions about this important aspect of their lives.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

    1.  Differentiate between the concepts of sex and sexuality and discuss their intimate relationship.
    2.  Explore the historical aspects of sexuality in order to better understand our modern perspectives.
    3.  Discuss the basic biological functions and dysfunctions of male and female sexuality.
    4.  Open communication channels in the area of sexuality to allow for meaningful free exchange of ideas pertaining to this most important area of human life.
    5.  See how subject matter could be applied to our everyday lives.

  
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    BIO 121 - Basic Nutrition


    This course presents a challenging science-based nutrition core curriculum that reviews the role of nutrition in health promotion/disease prevention, and provides an overview of the interrelationships between diet, therapeutic nutrition, and various acute/chronic medical conditions.  With an emphasis on normal anatomy and physiology and the metabolism of nutrients, the following topics will be studied:  the functions and sources of nutrients, digestion, absorbtion, and utilization of food; normal and therapeutic nutrition; and various foods, preferences, and customs, as well as dietary guidelines.  Topics relating to dietary policies, procedures and regulations will also be covered.  Other topics of student interest will be addressed as they arise.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BHM 101
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List specific nutrients and identify foods necessary to maintain and promote health.
    2.  Understand normal anatomy and physiology.
    3.  Describe how the body ingests, digests, absorbs, and metabolizes nutrients.
    4.  Understand the role of nutrition assessment and intervention in a variety of disease states.
    5.  Plan adequate menus based on appropriate menu planning principles.
    6.  Describe regulations governing food and labor.
    7.  Recognize some reliable sources of information in nutrition, and be able to share nutritional concepts with others.
    8.  Demonstrate understanding of patient's rights and ethical principles as related to medical nutrition therapy and nutrition support.

  
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    BIO 131 - Anatomy & Physiology I


    Normal structure (gross and microscopic) and function of the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.  Emphasis on physiology in lectures and on anatomy in laboratory, stressing those aspects which have greatest relevance to the student's curriculum.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the anatomical terms utilized in describing the human body, planes, and cavities as well as the structural organization of the body.
    2.  Describe the structure, function, and reproduction of cells.
    3.  Describe the structure and function of the various types of tissues, membranes, and glands in the human body.
    4.  Describe the structure and specialized functions of the skin and its derivatives, including its relation to homeostasis.
    5.  Discuss the structure and functions of the skeletal system, including its histology, the ossification process, and its role in maintaining calcium homeostasis.
    6.  Explain the structure and function of muscle tissue and be able to relate the neural, electrochemical, and physical events of muscle contractions to body movements.
    7.  Demonstrate an understanding of the major divisions of the nervous system, their component structures, and the various homeostatic mechanisms which operate under nervous control.
    8.  Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and physiology of the somatic senses as well as the special senses.

  
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    BIO 132 - Anatomy & Physiology II


    A continuation of BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I covering the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive and endocrine systems.  Emphasis on physiology in lectures and on anatomy in laboratory, stressing those aspects which have greatest relevance to the student's curriculum.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I or permission of chairperson

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and function of the circulatory and lymphatic systems.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and function of the respiratory system and the associated blood chemistry.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and function of the digestive system, including the uses of digested nutrients in the various metabolic pathways.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and function of the urinary system and its role in maintaining fluid-electrolyte balance.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of the structure and function of the endocrine and reproductive systems, including the effects of hormone levels on organs and tissue growth such as the menstrual and ovarian cycles.

  
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    BIO 140 - Pathophysiology


    Symptoms, syndrome and etiology of pathogenic processes affecting the function and structure of the body.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 132 Human Biology II or permission of chairperson

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the general underlying principles common to many disease processes.
    2.  Describe the normal anatomy and physiology of various organ systems.
    3.  Discuss specific disease processes within the traditional organ systems.
    4.  Comprehend the medical terminology and procedures used in the diagnosis of specific diseases and conditions.

  
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    BIO 150 - General Microbiology


    An introduction to a basic understanding of the biology of microorganisms, with a focus on bacteria.  Course topics include biochemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, microbial ecology, microbial genetics, applied microbiology, microbial control, epidemiology, pathogenesis and microbial disease.  Laboratory exercises reinforce those principles discussed in lecture.

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the basic biology of microorganisms.
    2.  Utilize classical microbiological methods to assess and analyze microbes in the laboratory.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of microbes in the welfare of humans, including the role of microorganisms in the environment, in food, and in disease.
    4.  Prepare a presentation describing important pathogenic bacteria.

  
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    BIO 155 - DNA and Biotechnology


    This course covers the basics of DNA allowing the student to understand today's rapidly expanding field of biotechnology. Topics will include: the human genome project, genetic testing, gene therapy, DNA and crime, genetic engineering, agricultural and industrial applications of biotechnology.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  One semester of college biology or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the processes and methods used to manipulate living organisms or the substances and products from these organisms for medical, agricultural, and industrial purposes.
    2.  Describe the implications of biotechnology in such areas as gene therapy, medicine, agriculture, marine bilogy, and forensics.

  
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    BIO 170-180 - Special Topics in Biology


    Special courses covering particular topics in the biological sciences beyond the scope of the normal course offerings.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of Department Chairperson and one semester of college biology.

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    1.  Dependent on the area of study.

  
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    BIO 200 - Ecology: The Everglades


    A scientific yet sensitive look at one of the world's rare and endangered wilderness areas.  Everglades ecology is studied through an extensive wilderness camping experience in Everglades National Park, involving a minimum of 90 hours of classroom and field instruction.  Offered during the January Intersession.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  One semester of college biology and permission of department chairperson

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

    1.  Have knowledge of general ecological principles.
    2.  Have knowledge of the use of scientific methodology in the study of ecology.
    3.  Have knowledge of the uniqueness of the everglades as an ecosystem.
    4.  Have knowledge of the importance of wilderness areas as a vital component of the world community.
    5.  Have knowledge of the influence and impact of the human population on these areas.
    6.  Have knowledge of one's self.

  
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    BIO 202 - Biology Seminar


    The course is designed specifically for students interested in pursuing careers in the biological sciences.  Students will be asked to critically analyze both current and historical readings, experiments and controversial topics within the field.  An emphasis will be placed on showing the special niche of the biological sciences within the context of both the physical and social sciences.  A weekend field trip is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 117 Principles of Biology I and permission of Department Chairperson

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Lecture Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Critically analyze both current and historical readings, experiments, and controversial topics within the field.

  
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    BIO 211 - Self-organizing Systems


    Introduction to the fundamental principles involved in the self-organization of living systems, extending from molecules, to cells, tissues, organisms and social systems.  Focus on developing an understanding of emergent properties, based on computational investigations of processes such as diffusion, protein folding and clustering.  Analytical procedures for characterizing self-organizing systems.  Needed by Engineering Science students transferring to BU in Bioengineering.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 181 Calculus and BIO 111 General Biology I or consent of instructor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Lecture Hours
  
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    BIO 212 - Ecology


    An introduction to basic principles of ecology, including ecosystem ecology, evolutionary ecology, major terrestrial and aquatic biomes, population and community ecology.  Labs have an emphasis on those ecosystems found in the N.E. U.S.  Field studies will emphasize the use of the scientific method and approaches used by ecologists in the field.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 117 Principles of Biology I

    Corequisite:  BIO 212L Ecology Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    ENV 212
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of ecology.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of ecosystems.
    3.  Analyze and discuss current scientific literature.
    4.  Apply basic ecological principles to explain the interactions of organisms with their environment and with each other.
    5.  Apply basic ecological principles in planning and conducting field and laboratory studies.

  
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    BIO 216 - Immunology


    An introduction to the basic concepts in immunology, including development of the immune system, innate immunity, immunoglobulin structure and genetics, antigen-antibody reactions, the major histocompatibility complex and antigen presentation, T cell receptors, T cell activation and effector functions, anergy and apoptosis, adhesion molecules, phagocytic cell function, immune responses to infections organisms and tumors, autoimmune diseases, allergies, immune deficiencies and AIDS.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, BIO 131L Human Biology I Laboratory and BIO 132 Human Biology II, BIO 132L Human Biology II Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    MLT 216 and CLT 216
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List the elements of the immune system and describe their roles in defense.
    2.  Describe the structure of immunoglobulins and discuss the mechanism for generation of antibody diversity.
    3.  Discuss the nature of antigens and the characteristics that contribute to immunogenicity.
    4.  Describe in detail, the normal and abnormal functions of the human immune response, including antigen recognition by T lymphocytes, development of T and B cells, T cell-mediated immunity, immunity mediated by B cells and antibodies, innate immunity, and the complement system.
    5.  Explain the mechanisms and pathogenesis of disorders of the immune system, including immunideficiencies, hypersensitivities, autoimmune disorders, and immunoproliferative abnormalities.
    6.  Describe clinical implications of the immune response such as immunization, transplant rejection, tumor immunity, and the immunity of pregnancy.
    7.  Evaluate clinical cases to apply information to assess diagnoses, symptoms, etiology, prognosis, possible treatments, and other case-related information.
    8.  Describe the lab tests performed used to assess immune function and status, and propose and evaluate clinical significance of appropriate laboratory testing results.

  
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    BIO 218 - Ornithology


    An in-depth study of the world of birds indigenous to the Northeast as well as a look at how humans have affected the survival of many avian populations. The course will cover the anatomy and physiology of birds; their habitats and behavior, including field identification of birds by sight and sounds.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 112 or BIO 200

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Lecture Hour, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe evolutionary adaptations of the class Aves.
    2.  Describe the interrelationships between birds and their environment.
    3.  Conduct visual and auditory field identifications.
    4.  Analyze human impact on bird populations.

  
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    BIO 298 - Biology Senior Seminar


    This course is a capstone course for students in the LAAS program who plan to go on to major in the biological sciences.  Students will learn how to search for, read, listen to and interpret scientific papers, and to present scientific information to others in a formal setting.  This will prepare students for their science program at a 4-year school by helping them to become better consumers and producers of scientific information.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 117 Principles of Biology I or BIO 118 Principles of Biology II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to search a scientific journal database for information specific to their interest.
    2.  Understand how to read and interpret scientific papers.
    3.  Demonstrate the ability to convey complicated topics in an understandable way to their peers.
    4.  Summarize the information learned from an oral presentation and ask relevant questions.
    5.  Conduct a formal presentation on a current topic in biology.

  
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    BIO 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project in a biological field which is beyond the scope of requirements of the courses offered by the department.  Conducted under the direction of a Biology faculty member.  Only one independent study course allowed per semester.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  4 credits of college level work in biology and approval of Department Chairperson

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    1. Dependent on the area of study.

  
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    BIT 100 - Keyboarding


    Development of basic keyboarding techniques and skill building activities in order to attain speed and accuracy in keying exact copy by touch for 5 minutes with a maximum of 5 errors.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  For international students, ENG 107 English as a Second Language Advanced I or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Operate the computer keyboard and other machine parts by touch.
    2.  Assume proper position at the computer for ease of operation and to minimize fatigue.
    3.  Demonstrate developed skill, accuracy, and confidence in using the computer keyboard and software.
    4.  Demonstrate developed rhythmic, even stroking.
    5.  Have completed and submitted all lessons, Cortez Peters assignments, and supplementary drills in order to achieve maximum success.
    6.  Have submitted TWO acceptable timings at a minimum speed of 21 gross words per minute with 3 or fewer errors for 3 minutes.
    7.  Have submitted TWO acceptable timings at a minimum speed of 31 net words per minute with 5 or fewer errors for 5 minutes.
    8.  Apply proofreading techniques.  Any timed writing copy containing proofreading errors will not be considered for credit.

  
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    BIT 101 - Computer Keyboarding


    Development of basic skills in keying exact copy by touch for three minutes with a maximum of three errors on a personal computer.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  International Students, ENG 107 English as a Second Language Advanced I or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Operate the computer keyboard and other machine parts by touch.
    2.  Assume proper position at the machine for ease of operation and to minimize fatigue.
    3.  Have developed skill, accuracy, and confidence in using the keyboard.
    4.  Have developed rhythmic, even stroking.
    5.  Submit an acceptable timing at a minimun speed of 20 gross words per minute with 3 or less errors for 3 minutes to receive an S grade.
    6.  Apply proofreading techniques.  Any timed writing paper containing proofreading mistakes will not be considered for credit.

  
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    BIT 104 - Keyboarding Speed Development


    Individualized goal setting for reaching speed and accuracy standard necessary for entry-level employment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 100 Keyboarding or equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Assume the proper position at the keyboard.
    2.  Key by touch.
    3.  Key with rhythmic, even stroking.
    4.  Complete error analysis forms that prescribe drill repairs.
    5.  Show improvement in timed writing speed and accuracy levels.

  
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    BIT 105 - First Year Experience


    An orientation course for first semester students in the Department of Business Information Technology.  Students will be introduced to college and departmental policies and procedures, academic advisement and registration, and campus services.  Students will learn tools and techniques for academic success and for keeping pace with trends and issues in information management, information technology, and office administration.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Connect with resources that support their academic, career and personal goals.
    2.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of college rules, regulations and systems.
    3.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of academic advisement and registration.
    4.  Develop a personal academic plan.
    5.  Discuss key skills necessary for academic success.
    6.  Assess and understand your current strengths and areas for growth.
    7.  Access information on trends, issues, and career possibilities in the areas of information technology, information management, and office administration.

  
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    BIT 106 - Electronic Portfolios


    Learn how electronic portfolios can help you to organize and market your work experience, education, skills, hobbies and volunteer activities in an easy to use web based format.  This course will focus on the creation of biographies, resumes, description of skills and work samples to help you market yourself and gain a competitive edge on the job market or in applying to four year institutions.

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    TEC 106
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Prepare students to market themselves by reflecting on their achievements and goals.
    2.  Understand the impact of technologies such as electronic portfolios and social networking as part of showcasing skills, reflection, networking and lifelong learning.
    3.  Utilize service learning to learn about possible career paths while providing a service for the community.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Utilize career searching database tools available at BCC and other college libraries.
    2.  Understand the importance of reflection as part of lifelong learning.
    3.  Perform written critiques of their peers which include criticism on writing content, style and visual design.
    4.  Market themselves to employers or admissions representatives utilizing their electronic portfolio as a background of their best work.
    5.  Craft professional resumes to target various employers/audiences.
    6.  Network with alumni, students and employers via social networking sites such as LinkedIn.

  
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    BIT 108 - Introduction to the PC and Windows


    Basic computer literacy for home, office and educational computer users.  Understand the fundamentals of your desktop, laptop or netbook's hardware and software.  Use operating system features to manage your documents, desktop, multi-media files, and network connections.  Learn how to protect and maintain your computer with basic system maintenance and security software.  Understand how to use the Internet to download software, patches and upgrades, and to troubleshoot computer problems.  Learn how to use your computer to connect to and use resources such as online courses and social networking sites.

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define and use the basic components of a PC and basic features of Windows.
    2.  Perform basic file management including organizing, searching, deleting, compressing and backing up with local drives, network drives, and portable drives.
    3.  Define and use desktop, Internet and multi-media tools for customizing the desktop, scheduling tasks, managing start menu options, organizing media files, and using a Web browser.
    4.  Define and perform basic system maintenance including security settings, user accounts, restore points, disk formatting, defragmenting, installing and uninstalling software.
    5.  Describe security threats such as viruses, spyware, spam, and phishing and use tools to prevent them including safe practices, anti-virus and anti-spyware software, firewalls, patrolling software.
    6.  Connect to and use online resources such as Course Management Systems, email, and social/professional networking sites.

  
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    BIT 110 - Business English


    A comprehensive and functional review of language fundamentals.  Students learn to speak and write clearly and correctly by developing proficiency in English language basics.  Topics include parts of speech, sentence and paragraph structure, spelling, grammar usage, and punctuation.  Internet-based grammar and writing resources will be introduced and integrated.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply English grammar rules and identify and use the eight parts of speech in sentence structure.
    2.  Apply basic sentence construction -- including simple, compound, and compound-complex sentences.
    3.  Apply the basic punctuation rules.
    4.  Apply the basic capitalization rules.
    5.  Apply the basic number rules.
    6.  Be proficient in the use of the Gregg Reference Manual and should be able to apply the appropriate rules to the exercises in the Gregg Reference Manual worksheets.

  
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    BIT 111 - Information Literacy


    A survey of methods to trace and locate sources of information, both in printed material and electronic sources, and determine their authenticity, validity, and reliability.  After evaluation of source quality, students will report and integrate information considering the ethical and legal aspects of source use.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Access information competently using a variety of databases and searches.
    2.  Refine this process for searching for articles and sources for a bibliography.
    3.  Evaluate the validity and reliability of the source.
    4.  Sort diverse format items into approprate catgories.
    5.  Merge the information environments into a complete listing.

  
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    BIT 114 - Grammar Update


    To review basic sentence structure, grammar, business vocabulary and punctuation as related to the business world.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Note
    Does not correlate with any one 5-week segment of BIT 110.

  
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    BIT 120 - Document Formatting


    Introduction to general, medical, and legal vocabulary and the techniques of keyboarding documents for general, medical, and legal offices.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 100 or the equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    BIT 129 - Office Suite Mastery


    Preparation for the Microsoft Specialist proficiency test to become a certified specialist in an area of the office suite.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BIT 130 - Word Processing Applications


    Continuation of speed and accuracy development.  Word processing functions using professional word processing software.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 100 Keyboarding or ability to key exact copy at 36 net words per minute by touch for 5 minutes with a maximum of 5 errors

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Operate the computer keyboard by touch and assume proper posture at the terminal for ease of operation and to minimize fatigue.
    2.  Demonstrate skill, accuracy, and confidence in operating computer equipment.
    3.  Demonstrate the use of Word to create, edit, format, and print documents.
    4.  Use selected functions of Word to produce mailable business communications such as letters, tables, and reports.

  
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    BIT 140 W - Business Communication


    Practical application of language usage skills with emphasis on correct approach to and effective strategies for writing and editing business media.  Focus topics include effective and proper use of business media (e-mail and internet correspondence, memoranda, letters, outlines, short reports, and other relevant business documents), effective use of reference materials (Gregg Reference Manual and internet-based reference resources), expansion of spelling and vocabulary repertoire, use of critical thinking and problem solving skills in the writing and editing of assigned business cases, and principles of document formatting/design.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 100 Keyboarding

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate correct usage in the mechanics of the English language (punctuation, numbers, spelling, plurals, possessives, hyphenations, abbreviations, and proper wording) both in written and oral communications according to the rules given in the Gregg Reference Manual.
    2.  Master the writing of communications dealing with inter- and intra-office and outgoing correspondence.
    3.  Submit all written communications projects in appropriate word-processed format.
    4.  Demonstrate effective written performance on all classwork, homework, and/or project assignments, at least eight of which (selected at random) will be graded during the semester.
    5.  Develop oral communication skills in order to communicate effectively within his/her professional environment.
    6.  Demonstrate effective communications abilities on all assigned oral communications projects.

  
  •  

    BIT 142 - Social Media for Professional Use


    The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the basic functionality of several social media applications such as blogs, microblogs, mobile applications, cloud applications, and social networks (personal and professional).  Students will explore appropriate use of social media in the professional setting for such purposes as collaboration, productivity, communication, and marketing.  We will also examine social media analytics for the purpose of measuring and increasing consumer engagement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Familiarize students with the basic funtionality of several Social Media applications such as blogs, microblogs, mobile applications, cloud applications, and social networks (personal and professional).
    2.  Guide students through an exploration of the appropriate use of social media in the professional setting for such purposes as collaboration, productivity, communication, and marketing.
    3.  Educate students in the use of social media analytics for the purpose of measuring and increasing consumer engagement.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe how Social Media has influenced communication, productivity, collaboration and marketing for businesses and organizations.
    2.  Compare and contrast Social Media tools for the purposes of communication, productivity, collaboration and marketing.
    3.  Select and utilize mobile applications as they relate to business-related use of Social Media.
    4.  Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of Social Media tools as used by individuals, businesses and organizations.
    5.  Demonstrate the appropriate use of Social Media as required in a business or organizational setting.
    6.  Demonstrate different ways to troubleshoot issues that arise with use of Social Media tools.
    7.  Select and utilize analytics tools for the purpose of measuring and increasing consumer engagement through Social Media.
    8.  Assess how Social Media can impact both personal and business branding.

  
  •  

    BIT 143 - Social Media Campaigns: Targeting and Analytics


    This course will enhance students' social media knowledge by focusing on the skills needed to plan and implement a successful social media campaign strategy.  Students will study best practices, apply market and customer search, write copy specifically for social media, work with a wide range of campaign administrative tools, and gather and apply analytical data.  The course will address how to improve and protect brand awareness and increase traffic to targeted distinations.  Students will use a variety of social media methods and platforms, such as geotargeting customers via Facebook and YouTube, identifying brand influencers through Twitter, and refining keyword marketing via Google AdWords.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the various social media platforms being employed for effective campaigns.
    2.  Demonstrate which social media tools are the most effective for your specific campaign objective, be it traffic flow increase, branding, dissemination of information and public relations messaging, or the purchase of products and services.
    3.  Assess when to incorporate new or emerging social media platforms.
    4.  Analyze how social media content can "go viral" and determine how this can boost a campaign.
    5.  Identify admin tools associated with various social media marketing services, and how to use these tools to setup a campaign.
    6.  Compare and Contrast the three primary methods of pricing online media - CPC, CPM, and CPA.
    7.  Compose a variety of targeted campaigns based on geography, interests, age group, keywords, income, and other core demographics.
    8.  Describe the pitfalls that come with use of social media by learning to protect and moderate brand pages, and how to respond when your brand is attacked online.
    9.  Develop effective content for social media including, written copy, video, and imagery.
    10.  Measure the effectiveness of social media campaigns with analytical data and use of targeting pixels.
    11.  Utilize social media management tools such as HootSuite.

     

  
  •  

    BIT 160 - Intro to Computerized Financial Information Processing


    Students will learn to utilize a PC and selected software to process personal financial information in order to prepare a budget, checks and a check register, bank reconciliation statement, determine the savings of purchasing with cash, and compute and prepare simple tax forms.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 or the equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    BIT 169 - Mastering the Internet and the WWW


    This course is ideal for students in a broad range of disciplines who wish to become acquainted with the Internet and the world wide web.  Develop the knowledge and skills necessary to send and receive e-mail messages, access the internet, use a graphical browser, transfer and manage files, experience various resource discovery and information retrieval tools, and compile reports that includes images and text. Complete your reports with references cited using the latest information from the online MLA or APA style manuals.  Explore the technical requirements for a home system and the impact the Internet has made on society.  Get ready to become part of the Internet community by designing and creating a personal web page.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 Computer Keyboarding or the equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    BIT 170 - Introduction to the Internet


    Travel the information superhighway with skills taught in this course.  You will learn to send and receive E-mail messages, access the Internet, search for and retrieve information, and use a graphical browser.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 Computer Keyboarding or the equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the primary uses and structure of the Internet.
    2.  Analyze common Internet-related legal, ethical, and etiquette issues.
    3.  Competently utilize Internet-related terminology.
    4.  Competently utilize several Internet tools.

  
  •  

    BIT 171 - Internet-Based Research


    Exploration of additional Internet resources.  Hands-on experience with various resource discovery and information retrieval tools.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 170 Introduction to the Internet or the equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Refine queries to locate information.
    2.  Evaluate and identify valid sources of information on the World Wide Web.
    3.  Apply a variety of search tools and create research strategy, and analyze search results.
    4.  Evaluate web pages for validity, reliability, authenticity.
    5.  Have searched and navigated subject guides to compile information.
    6.  Have conducted two research projects involving retrieval, analysis, and application of information to a current business problem.

  
  •  

    BIT 172 - Creating Personal Web Pages


    Learn the basics of designing and creating your own web page using the composer feature of a popular web browser.  Enhance your web page by incorprating images you create with the use of a digital camera and scanner.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 170 Introduction to the Internet or equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    BIT 173 - Basics of Website Creation


    Potential Web authors should start here!  Develop the foundation for Web site creation including HTML, CSS, Web standards,  graphics, and basic Web editors.  Understand the tools needed to incorporate tables, links, graphics, image maps, and more into your Web documents.  Apply what you have learned to the creation of a Web site as a final project.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 170 Introduction to the Internet or the equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the HTML standards and specifications.
    2.  Apply Page Validation in order to build valid XHTML 1.0 Standard pages.
    3.  Create and design the framework and content for a Web site.
    4.  Use sound writing principles to prepare a copy for a Web site.
    5.  Use HTML/XHTML to create basic Web sites.
         5.1  Define and use HTML basics including tags, elements, attributes and values, comments, headings.
         5.2  Incorporate Hex colors into Web pages.
         5.3  Describe the importance and how to use Web-safe fonts.
         5.4  Create simple tables.
         5.5  Use Row and Column spans to customize tables.
         5.6  Create unordered and ordered lists.
         5.7  Create links within the page or to any document on the Web.
    6.  Use Dreamweaver to create basic Web sites.
         6.1  Set up site and project files.
         6.2  Create the page layout.
         6.3  Add content to pages.
         6.4  Control the size, style and color of fonts with CSS.
         6.5  Describe local vs. remote locations and how to publish the Web site.
    7.  Use Photoshop to manipulate and add basic graphics to a Web page.
         7.1  Change the size of graphics.
         7.2  Optimize graphics for the Web.
    8.  Demonstrate the features of a Web site to an audience.

  
  •  

    BIT 180 - Computers and Communications


    An introduction to the computer functions and concepts vital for individuals pursuing careers involving communications and/or multimedia production.  A variety of software tools will be explored.  Students will be exposed to the PC/Windows environment, the Internet, computer graphics and animation, image editing, principles behind audio and video production, and Web site design basics.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define key terms and concepts relating to computer-generated multimedia.
    2.  Describe key functions and features of text, images, video, audio, and animation.
    3.  Identify, compare, and discuss capabilities and limitations of common software tools used in multimedia projects.
    4.  Understand the recent history of technologically-based communication and the current issues related to it.
    5.  Define key terms and concepts relating to computer hardware, computer networks, and the Internet.
    6.  Create a multimedia proposal and presentation.

  
  •  

    BIT 182 - Designing Effective Web Pages


    Experienced web designers will enhance their ability to create attractive, useful web sites by exploring the elements of good design.  Issues such as audience identification, clarification of need, development of content, efficiency in use of files based on type and size, and an introduction to human factors in improving design will be explored.  A popular commercial web authoring package will be used to create an attractive and effective web site as a final project.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 173 Basics of Website Creation, or BIT 176 Using Web Editors, or the equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    BIT 185 - Raster-Based Software Tools for Web/Print Publishers


    An introduction to Photoshop, the industry standard software program for creating and modifying raster/ bitmap graphics.  Students will learn to create, scan and edit images and text for print, multimedia, and web design.  An emphasis will be placed on image manipulation, photo restoration, digital illustration, the use of slices and rollovers, and even how to create simple animations.  Students will also become introduced to tools for creating vector graphics and type.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    BIT 186 - Interactive Web Sites


    Use Adobe Dreamweaver to create Web sites that incorporate graphics, animations and interactivity.  Create, apply and edit cascading style sheets.  Add navigation, menus, widgets, rich media and image maps.  Create forms.  Learn techniques for search engine optimization, Web analytics, remote publishing, and Web site maintenance.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 173 Basics of Website Creation

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use the Adobe Dreamweaver interface.
         1.1  Identify elements of the Dreamweaver interface.
         1.2  Use the Insert bar.
         1.3  Use the Property inspector.
         1.4  Use the Assets panel.
         1.5  Use the Files panel.
    2.  Add content to a web site by using Dreamweaver.
         2.1  Define a Dreamweaver site.
         2.2  Create, title, name, and save a Web page.
         2.3  Add text to a Web page.
         2.4  Insert images and apply alternative text on a Web page.
         2.5  Link Web content, using hyperlinks, e-mail links, and named anchors.
         2.6  Insert rich media, such as video, sound, and animation in Flash format.
         2.7  Insert navigation bars, rollover images, and buttons created in Adobe Fireworks on a Web page.
         2.8  Build image maps.
         2.9  Import tabular data to a Web page.
         2.10  Import and display a Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel document to a Web page.
         2.11  Create forms.
         2.12  Add Widgets.
    3.  Organize content by using Dreamweaver.
         3.1  Set and modify document properties.
         3.2  Organize Web page layout with absolutely-positioned div tags and CSS styles.
         3.3  Modify text and text properties.
         3.4  Modify images and image properties.
         3.5  Create Web page templates.
         3.6  Use basic HTML tags to set up an HTML document, format text, add links, create tables, and build ordered and unordered lists.
         3.7  Add head content to make a Web page visible to search engines.
         3.8  Use CSS to implement a reusable design.
    4.  Evaluate and maintain a site by using Dreamweaver.
         4.1  Conduct basic technical tests.
         4.2  Identify techniques for basic usability tests.
         4.3  Identify methods for collecting site feedback.
         4.4  Present Web pages to others (such as team members and clients) for feedback and evaluation.
         4.5  Manage assets, links, and files for a site.
         4.6  Publish and update site files to a remote server.

  
  •  

    BIT 190 - Animation for the Electronic Media


    This course will introduce the student to the core principles of animation and how to use these principles to create animations for electronic presentations and web pages.  Topics such as basic drawing, single frame and flip book animation styles, story boarding and composition will all be covered.  Using Macromedia Flash and Microsoft PowerPoint students will learn how to add animations to their presentations and websites by creating animations with sound, buttons, and action.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    BIT 197 W - Cooperative Work Experience


    Cooperative work experience is provided for individuals pursuing a certificate program through the Business Information Technology department. On-the-job experience will be related to specific educational background and career goals of the student. Opportunities will be available in a variety of areas. Cooperative Work Experience students will meet with the coordinator on a regular basis. Meetings will address resum

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  12 earned credits in the department

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply skills and knowledge learned in the Business Technologies program (software, telephone, human relations skills, etc.) to on-the-job experience.
    2.  Prepare a resume in proper format, with emphasis on 100 percent accuracy.
    3.  Prepare daily journals, while on the job, of activities performed--skills and human relations.  Journals will be checked by internship coordinator at midpoint and at the end of the internship.
    4.  Submit weekly report of on-the-job experiences to internship coordinator.
    5.  Complete all time reports.
    6.  Submit a final paper as defined in internship letter.
    7.  Compose cover letters and thank-you letters to site supervisors.

  
  •  

    BIT 200 - Spreadsheets with Business Applications


    Creation of spreadsheets, use of database functions and preparation of charts, using functions and features appropriate for business documents.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prequisite:  BIT 101 Computer Keyboarding or the equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify basic spreadsheet terms, techniques and features.
    2.  Use the spreadsheet in solving business-related problems.
    3.  Import and export files to create office documents.
    4.  Create lists and filters using the database function.
    5.  Use the special functions of Excel appropriate for office work.
    6.  Create and print different types of charts common to business communications.

  
  •  

    BIT 201 - Introduction to Spreadsheets


    Use of basic spreadsheet functions for business-related applications.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 Computer Keyboarding or the equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    BIT 202 - Intermediate Spreadsheets


    Use of spreadsheet and chart functions for business-related applications.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 201 Introduction to Spreadsheets

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    BIT 203 - Advanced Spreadsheets


    Use of advanced features to enhance business-related applications for database, spreadsheets, and charting functions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 202 Intermediate Spreadsheets

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    BIT 205 - IT for Entrepreneurs


    Learn how to harness information technology to streamline your business processes, access information in real time, utilize cheaper, quicker and more efficient communications, automate day to day tasks, and have a 24-7 presence on the Web.  This course will jump start your ability to use new and existing technologies without relying on IT professionals for basic aspects of your information needs.  It will also increase your knowledge and vocabulary of information technology trends so that you can communicate more effectively with IT contractors.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to apply software skills to business projects in the areas of word processing, spreadsheet analysis, database management, presentation software, and Web 2.0 tools.
    2.  Define and discuss the vocabulary of core information technology functions including software applications, hardware, networking, and Internet applications.
    3.  Write reports that demonstrate a competency in acquiring and evaluating data and the ability to interpret and communicate information for business intelligence.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to define the components of a simple network and troubleshoot simple problems.
    5.  Demonstrate the ability to organize, maintain, secure and backup files across a network, and develop a basic business continuity plan.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to work in a team environment to research and present information about a new or emerging information technology.
    7.  Demonstrate the ability to use web applications for business processes and communications.
    8.  Demonstrate the ability to use mobile devices for business processes and communications.

  
  •  

    BIT 206 - IT for Service Industries


    This course examines technology strategies for service industries using case studies, interactive exercises, software tutorials, and service industry projects.  Students will gain experience with industry specific software as well as spreadsheets for business planning, modeling and analysis.  Topics will include service industry technology, meeting and event technology, planning, modeling, and analysis using spreadsheets and the application of emerging technologies to business strategies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the core terminology associated with computing essentials.
    2.  Identify the characteristics of information technology and information systems.
    3.  Identify the different types of information systems used in service industries.
    4.  Use analysis tools in spreadsheet software to solve problems throughout the business.
    5.  Use modeling tools in spreadsheet software to value inventories and current assets, summarize transactions, calculate working capital, analyze cash flows, estimate profitability and perform break-even analysis.
    6.  Apply emerging technologies to business strategies.
    7.  Complete an information technology project related to their field of study.

  
  •  

    BIT 207 - IT for Criminal Justice and Emergency Services


    This course examines information technology tools and strategies for criminal justice and emergency service industries using case studies, interactive exercises, software tutorials, and industry-based projects.  Students will gain experience with word processing, database management systems, presentation software, spreadsheets, and industry specific software.  Students will be introduced to cloud, analytic, mobile and social technologies study the use and impact of these technologies within the context of criminal justice and emergency services.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the core terminology associated with computing essentials.
    2.  Identify the characteristics of information technology and information systems.
    3.  Identify the different types of information systems used in criminal justice and emergency services.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to apply software skills to CJES projects in the areas of word processing, spreadsheet analysis, database management, and presentation software.
    5.  Demonstrate the ability to use cloud, analytic, mobile and social technology.

     

  
  •  

    BIT 208 - IT for Health Care Professionals


    This course examines information technology, tools and strategies for health care professionals using case studies, interactive exercises, software tutorials, and health care industry-based projects.  This course will introduce concepts, techniques and terminology essential to further studies in the field of health care data analytics.  Students will gain experience with spreadsheets and database management systems including an introduction to relational query languages.  Students will also be introduced to the core pillars of data analytics:  cloud, analytic, mobile and social technologies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learing Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the core terminology associated with computing essentials within the medical and health care industry.
    2.  Define the core terminology associated with spreadsheets, database management systems, and relational query languages.
    3.  Define the core terminology associated with an introduction to cloud, analytic, mobile and social technologies.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to apply software skills to heatlh care related projects in the areas of spreadsheet analysis, database management, and SQL.
    5.  Demonstrate the ability to use cloud, analytic, mobile and social technology.

  
  •  

    BIT 210 - Machine Transcription


    Emphasis on increasing skill in proofreading and editing a variety of documents and transcribing recorded materials.  Continuing development of knowledge of business vocabulary, grammar usage, punctuation, and spelling.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIT 110 Basic Transcription and BIT 130

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    BIT 240 - Desktop Publishing Using InDesign


    Learn the basics of page layout typography, placement of images and desktop publishing.  Learn graphic industry standard software to create business cards, letter head, flyers, brochures and other publications that are not only informative but eye-catching.  Integrate your InDesign projects with materials created in Photoshop and Illustrator.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 108 Introduction to the PC and Windows or the equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply graphic design techniques, principles of layout and design, and desktop terminology and applications.
    2.  Use a professional desktop publishing package to design, create, and print a variety of documents such as flyers, brochures, and newsletters.
    3.  Combine text and graphics in the creation of the publications.
    4.  Use panels, styles, layers, frames, and tables.
    5.  Prepare output on both hard and electronic copy.
    6.  Integrate data and images from other software applications into the finished publication.

  
  •  

    BIT 245 - Page Layout Using QuarkXPress


    Learn to use this powerful page layout and design software to deliver print, Web, and Flash output.  This course teaches students to use software tools productively and covers the essential techniques of creating layouts, using typographic tools, editing images, working with transparency, building tables, creating and applying color, using master pages, and preparing output for print, PDF, Web and Flash.  Integration with the Adobe Creatvie Suite will also be covered.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 108 Introduction to the PC and Windows or the equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Set up a workspace, tools, and palettes in QuarkXpress to increase productivity.
    2.  Create new projects including appropriate layout.
    3.  Produce professional type by applying concepts of typography.
    4.  Import and edit images.
    5.  Incorporate transparency, tables, and color into projects.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to use master pages.
    7.  Prepare output for print, PDF, Web and Flash.
    8.  Integrate QuarkXpress with the Adobe Creative Suite.

  
  •  

    BIT 250 - Integrated Microsoft Office


    Integrated Microsoft Office will acquaint students with operating systems, word processing, database management, spreadsheet applications, and presentation graphics.  Students will prepare business documents by embedding and linking files.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 Keyboarding or the equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the use of word processing functions with Microsoft Word.
    2.  Prepare database applications using Microsoft Access.
    3.  Apply a basic understanding of spreadsheets using Microsoft Excel.
    4.  Create presentation graphics using Microsoft PowerPoint.
    5.  Develop basic business documents using the above software applications.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to integrate files prepared using the above software applications.

  
  •  

    BIT 251 - Introduction to Microsoft Word


    Learn to use this popular word processing package to prepare simple letters, memos, and reports.  Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to create, store, and print routine business and/or personal documents efficiently.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 Computer Keyboarding or the equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply word processing functions to business documents.
    2.  Use the word processing software to create business and personal documents including letters, memos, tables, and reports.
    3.  Create, edit, save, retrieve, and print documents created in Microsoft Word.

  
  •  

    BIT 252 - Introduction to Microsoft Excel


    Use this popular software to prepare worksheets and charts.  Learn to create and use multiple worksheets, link workbooks, create lists and macros, and use templates.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 or the equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    BIT 253 - Introduction to Microsoft Access


    Use this popular database software to prepare tables and reports.  Create and use queries to sort and select records.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 or the equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    BIT 254 - Introduction to PowerPoint


    Learn to create simple text charts, data charts, speaker notes, handouts, and a screen show using a sophisticated graphics software package.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 101 Computer Keyboarding or the equivalent

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create, edit, show and print slides using a professional presentation package.
    2.  Create title and bulleted list slides as well as slides using charts to present information.
    3.  Incorporate clip art into slides.
    4.  Add sound and transitional elements to a slide show.
    5.  Add a build effect to a bulleted-list slide.
    6.  Develop an outline for a 10-12 minute slide show presenting information on a topic of their choice.
    7.  Select and create appropriate slides to present information.
    8.  Apply simple design elements to make more attractive and effective slides.
    9.  Present the information to an audience using the slide show to enhance the presentation making it more interesting and effective.

  
  •  

    BIT 255 - Integrated Business Office Applications


    Advanced office functions including integrating word processing, database, spreadsheets and presentation graphics.  Preparation of business documents.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 130 Word Processing Applications

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the advanced features of word processing.
    2.  Use the features of the presentation graphics program to create a series of slides.
    3.  Present the slideshow using presentation graphics software to others.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to integrate files prepared in the above applications.

  
  •  

    BIT 260 - Introduction to Database Management


    Concepts and functions of database management for practical business applications.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create and maintain database tables using business applications.
    2.  Perform queries and filter records.
    3.  Build and modify forms.
    4.  Create and modify reports.
    5.  Integrate database documents with other software.
    6.  Apply the above mentioned database functions to solve business requests and situations.

  
  •  

    BIT 264 - Database Languages


    Database query languages enable business analysts, Web developers, and application developers to tap into data from multiple sources.  This course will cover the use of SQL (Structured Query Language) on multiple platforms such as DB2, Oracle, and MySQL.  Database fundamentals including terminology, the basics of database design and creation, and the basics of database security will also be covered.  New technologies such as analytic databases and NoSQL will be introduced within the context of their significant and growing use in bag data and real-time web applications.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: BIT 260 Introduction to Database Management

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Teach database languages which enable business analysts, Web develops and application programmers to tap into data from multiple sources.
    2.  Cover the use SQL on multiple platforms.
    3.  Teach the fundamentals of database terminology, design, creation and database security.
    4.  Introduce new technologies in the field of database languages such as analytic databases and NoSQL.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Differentiate between various database systems.
    2.  Use SQL as a data definition and data manipulation language.
    3.  Troubleshoot underlying query errors in information management systems.
    4.  Describe database security needs and tools for implementation of security measures.
    5.  Design and create a relational database system.
    6.  Use NoSQL to extract data for data analytics applications.
    7.  Utilize an analytic database in a business intelligence application.

  
  •  

    BIT 265 W - Project Management


    This course is designed to prepare students in planning, organizing, and executing the steps in project development.  Students will develop teamwork and time-management skills to carry a project through its life cycle.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define project management.
    2.  Detail the phases and processes of initiating a project.
    3.  Apply successful team building skills.
    4.  Proceed through the steps involved in the planning stage.
    5.  Follow steps in project control.
    6.  Monitor a project.
    7.  Work with the support systems of project management.
    8.  Work successfully in a team environment, using all the necessary tools to complete a project.
    9.  Submit weekly updates to instructor on assigned projects.

  
  •  

    BIT 266 - Visual Web Development


    Develop dynamic Web sites using the .NET visual development environment.  This course will cover client-side scripting with JavaScript including data validation and window manipulation.  The course will also use drag and drop technology to enhance Web sites with AJAX controls, ASP.NET script, database connections, and Web services.

    Software:  Microsoft Visual Web Developer Express

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 186 Interactive Web Sites

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe, define, and use a visual Web development environment.
         1.1  Describe the environment in which a Web application runs.
         1.2  Define the components of the environment in which a Web application runs including the Internet, Web servers, browsers, network communications, resource identifiers, and markup language.
         1.3  Use a visual development environment and the tools available in such an environment to create a Web site.
         1.4  Create Web pages by using HTML/CSS/XML in a visual development environment.
         1.5  Define the terms "server-side" and "client-side".
    2.  Create Web pages with hand-coded client-side scripting.
         2.1  Use basic JavaSCript commands including functins, variables, selection, and looping.
         2.2  Use object-based JavaScript commands including properties, methods, and events.
         2.3  Construct Web pages that include the use of JavaScript for data validation and window manipulation.
         2.4  Use a debugger to test, trace, and debug JavaScript.
    3.  Use "drag-and-drop" components within the Microsoft .NET Framework to create server-side scripts.
         3.1  Describe how JavaScript complements server-side programming languages and platforms, like ASP.NET.
         3.2  Create a simple AJAX-enabled application using AJAX controls.
         3.3  Create a simple front-end to an underlying database using drag-and-drop technology and simple server-side scripting.
         3.4  Use Web service wrappers to connect to popular Web services like Amazon, Digg, and Flickr.
    4.  Use built-in tools to publish Web pages to a Web host.

  
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    BIT 270 W - Personal and Professional Development


    A course designed to complement the hard/technical skills information technology students possess.  Focus on soft skills; topics include: defining personal direction, discovering personal and professional strengths, setting and achieving goals, handling stress and anger, understanding self-esteem, handling criticism, becoming a positive thinker, and taking appropriate control of personal and professional situations, disciplining thinking, learning to think critically, understanding the power of motivation, overcoming the fear of failure, defining and visualizing success, managing resources (time and money), and communicating assertively with all individuals.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and set personal professional goals.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of effective time management techniques.
    3.  Demonstrate knowledge of communication styles and assertiveness techniques.
    4.  Project a positive self-image.
    5.  Develop an understanding of the role self-esteem plays in personal and professional success.
    6.  Demonstrate knowledge of effective non-verbal communication.
    7.  Work at the maintenance of good relationships at work through application of techniques presented.
    8.  Develop an understanding of cultural diversity and ethics and their impact on the workplace.
    9.  Recognize the part that a good attitude plays in preparing for, obtaining, maintaining, and advancing in your chosen career field.
    10.  Apply the rules of Business Etiquette and Protocol to workplace situations.
    11.  Discover ways to project a professional image through their dress and work space.
    12.  Plan and organize meetings that work.
    13.  Plan and participate in a business dinner.
    14.  Place an emphasis on customer service.

  
  •  

    BIT 275 - Advanced Business Communication


    An integrated, interactive course that enables students to further develop written communication skills and to develop professional presentation skills.  Students will have the opportunity to develop and demonstrate effective written, verbal, nonverbal, and presentation skills through the development of a variety of business communication media.  Topics include developing business-oriented presentations in areas including employment communication (individual, team interviews, portfolio presentation), crisis communication, persuasive communication, informational communication.  (Students will further refine their skills in using reference material by researching information for each presentation.  In addition, they will integrate electronic technology by using PowerPoint software for each formal presentation they make.  Presentations will be videotaped and evaluated by peers and instructor.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 110 Business English, BIT 140W Business Communication, or departmental approval

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Credit Hours
  
  •  

    BIT 276 - Data Analytics I


    This course will introduce students to data analysis and its applications in business analytics and business intelligence.  Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to find, interpret, and convert raw unstructured data for use within spreadsheet, statistical, and database tools.  An emphasis will be placed on using statistical tools useful for decision making, data modeling, and data visualization.  Students will have the opportunity to apply techniques learned to other fields of study through individualized projects in social, political, scientific, engineering or health information analytics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIT 200 Spreadsheets for Business Applications, BIT 260 Introduction to Database Management, MAT 181 Calculus or MAT 146 Applied Calculus, BUS 115 Business Statistics or MAT 124 Intro to Statistics

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Introduce students to data analysis and its applications in business analytics and business intelligence.
    2.  Teach processes, tools and techniques to convert raw unstructured data for use within spreadsheet, statistical, and database tools.
    3.  Teach how to use statistical tools and software packages for decision making, data modeling, and data visualization.
    4.  Demonstrate how techniques learned can apply to other fields of study such as social, political, scientific, engineering or health information analytics.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the core terminology associated with data analysis.
    2.  Find, interpret, and convert raw unstructured data for use within spreadsheet, statistical, and database tools.
    3.  Use statistical tools for decision making, data modeling, and data visualization.
    4.  Apply data and text mining techniques and programs to unstructured data through the use of tools such as Google Chart API, R, Mathematica, Excel.
    5.  Use predictive analysis tools to forecast solutions to business opportunities.
    6.  Apply techniques learned to an individualized project in business, social, political, scientific, engineering or health information analytics.

  
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    BIT 278 - Data Analytics II


    This course provides an overview of data mining and predictive analytics, including large scale, enterprise level analytics.  The course structure follows the stages of a typical data mining project, from reading data, to data exploration, data transformation, modeling, and effective interpretation of results.  This course demonstrates how to develop models to predict categorical and continuous outcomes, using such techniques as neural networks and decision trees.  Students will have the opportunity to apply techniques learned to other fields of study through individualized projects in social, political, scientific, engineering or health information analytics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 276 Data Analytics I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Provides an overview of data mining and predictive analytics, including large scale, enterprise level analytics.
    2.  Teach students the stages of a typical data mining project, from reading data, to data exploration, data transformation, modeling, and effective interpretation of results.
    3.  Teach students how to develop models to predict categorical and continuous outcomes, using such techniques as neural networks and decision trees.
    4.  Demonstrate the application of techniques learned to other fields of study in social, political, scientific, engineering or health information analytics.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the core terminology associated with data mining and predictive analytics.
    2.  Apply data mining techniques and processes to unstructured data through the use of enterprise level tools such as SPSS-Modeler in order to solve business related problems through data modeling and the effective interpretation of results.
    3.  Define and solve problems using predictive analysis techniques such as decision trees and neural networks.
    4.  Apply techniques learned to an individualized project in business, social, political, scientific, engineering or health information analytics.

  
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    BIT 280 W - Office Administration


    This course is designed to help students understand the modern administrative practices of office management.  Emphasis is placed on planning and organizing office operations, leadership and human relations in the office; familiarization with the budget process, and controlling office operations, including office systems, work measurement, and standards; managing travel arrangements.  Decision-making skills are developed through problem analysis techniques.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply basic concepts in administrative office management, including understanding traditional office management practices; basic management principles/leadership, motivation, and problem-solving skills; managing office systems and envrionmental/health-related issues.
    2.  Discuss the concepts of managing a diverse workforce, including recruiting, supervising, training, appraising and promoting personnel; analyzing office jobs, salaries, benefits, workplace issues, ethics and business etiquette.
    3.  Identify the role of various administrative services, including managing office space, ergonomics, office automation, and telecommunications.
    4.  Describe the function of administrative office systems, office productivity, and budgeting.

  
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    BIT 285 - Vector-Based Software Tools


    Take an in-depth look at one of today's most popular software programs for computer illustration and its use in print and digital media.  Students will be introduced to the tools available in Adobe Illustrator, how to work with objects, clipart web-graphics (bitmaps) color and more.  Students will work with basic shapes including editing and painting and will learn to draw with precision using the pen tool as well as use the brush types to enhance their work.  The art of blending, layering and air brushing will be taught.  Students will also learn how use Photoshop and Illustrator to enhance projects.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 185 Raster-Based Software Tools for Web/Print Publishers

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    BIT 286 - Database Driven Web Sites


    Develop database driven Web sites in an open source cross platform development environment using Apache, PHP and MySQL.  This course covers the fundamentals of server-side scripting, database query creation, basic database design, and writing PHP scripts that use SQL to interact with MySQL.  Additional topics will include debugging and error management, basic security methods, and an introduction to working with Web servers.

    Software:  A Web Server Application (Apache)
                   PHP
                   MySQL
                   A Web Browser
                   PHP-Capable WYSIWYG Application (such as Adobe Dreamweaver)
                  
                   (All required software is available at no cost)

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 186 Interactive Web Sites

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss and compare available Web technologies for dynamic Web site creation.
         1.1  Describe the use of server-side backend databases in Web sites and Web applications.
         1.2  Describe how server-side scripting fits into the client/server model.
         1.3  Describe the role of a Web server in hosting and processing Web requests.
         1.4  Discuss and contrast data entry and validation techniques in client-side vs. server-side programming.
         1.5  Discuss and contrast client-side with server-side security issues.
         1.6  Describe technologies used in dynamic Web sites including open source languages and packages, proprietary languages and packages, and enterprise Web development and distributed Web applications.
         1.7  Compare and contrast open source and proprietary server software.
    2.  Create dynamic Web sites by embedding server-side script into HTML code.
         2.1  Write server-side script that includes variables, constants, conditionals, operators, arrays, and loops.
         2.2  Write server-side script that handles an HTML form.
         2.3  Write server-side script that validates form data.
         2.4  Save or FTP server-side files to the appropriate location on a Web server.
    3.  Use SQL to create databases and tables, insert rows, select data, delete data, perform joins, create and index, and define transactions.
         3.1  Define the basic structure of a relational database system.
         3.2  Define and create a table in a relational database system.
         3.3  Define and create a relationship between two or more tables in a relational database system.
         3.4  Perform select queries on the data in a relational database system.
         3.5  Perform update queries on the data in a relational database system.
         3.6  Define and implement transactions in a relational database system.
         3.7  Use a database interface to run SQL commands.
    4.  Create a Web front-end to an underlying database.
         4.1  Build a server-side interface for interacting with a relational database table.
         4.2  Embed script to connect a Web page to a relational database.
         4.3  Execute simple queries from a Web page.
         4.4  Retrieve query results into a Web page.
         4.5  Update records in a database table through a script.
    5.  Perform error handling and debugging for a database driven Web site.
         5.1  Define the various kinds of errors that can occur when developing dynamic Web sites and describe their likely causes.
         5.2  Perform debugging techniques to find errors.
         5.3  Utilize techniques that can be used to handle errors gracefully.

  
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    BIT 288 - Mobile Web App Development


    Learn to design and create Web apps for mobile devices such as iPad, iPhone and Android, using collaborative, open-source mobile environments on both PC and Apple based platforms.  The focus will be on both design and development skills necessary to create functional, effective, and responsive Web pages and Web apps using standard Web technologies, including CSS3, HTML5 and JavaScript.  Techniques such as progressive enhancement and feature detection will be utilized as well as JaveScript APIs for functionality such as geolocation, device orientation, and handling touch events.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 173 Basics of Website Creation

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 288
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  To design and create Web pages and Web apps for mobile devices such as iPad, iPhone and Android, using collaborative, open-source mobile development and environments on both PC and Apple based platforms.
    2.  To focus on both design and development skills necessary to create functional, effective, and responsive apps using standard Web technologies, including CSS3, HTML5 and JavaScript.
    3.  To present and practice mobile Web app design and development techniques such as progressive enhancement, feature detection, geolocation, device orientation, and touch events.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a working vocabulary for the tools and concepts related to the development of mobile Web apps.
    2.  Differentiate between Web apps and native apps.
    3.  Create effective designs for Web apps and mobile devices.
    4.  Use HTML/CSS/JavaScript to create and debug Web apps for mobile devices.
    5.  Create Web apps that integrate device features such as geolocation, accelerometers, and touch gestures.

  
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    BIT 290 - Special Topics in Business Technologies


    Topics in this course will acquaint the students with current advances and techniques in business, communications, and information technologies.  Course topics may include Intranet, creation of multimedia documents, qualitative research methodology, and digital audio transcription technology.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Departmental approval

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    BIT 293 - Special Topics in Business Information Technology


    Topics in this course will acquaint the students with current advances and techniques in business, communications, and information technologies.  Course topics may include Intranet, creation of multimedia documents, qualitative research methodology, and digital audio trascription technology.

    Credits: 3
    Note
    The courses offered may be laboratory or lecture format

  
  •  

    BIT 297 W - Internship


    Career-related experience that complements academic preparation in the business technologies area.  Interns receive on-the-job experience in a business setting and meet with the internship coordinator as scheduled.  Meetings will address resumes, cover letters, interview techniques, appropriate dress and professionalism.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Departmental approval

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply skills and knowldege learned in the Business Technologies program (software, telephone, human relations skills, etc.) to on-the-job experience.
    2.  Prepare a resume in proper format, with emphasis on 100 percent accuracy.
    3.  Prepare daily journals, while on the job, of activities performed--skills and human relations.  Journals will be checked by internship coordinator at midpoint and at the end of the internship.
    4.  Submit weekly report of on-the-job experiences to internship coordinator.
    5.  Complete all time reports.
    6.  Submit a final paper as defined in internship letter.
    7.  Compose cover letters and thank-you letters to site supervisors.

  
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    BIT 299 - Independent Study


    Under the guidance of a faculty member, the student will undertake a study, project, or research involving an advanced concept or problem relating to her/his major field of study.  Only one independent study course is allowed each semester.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Approval of faculty member and Department Chairperson

    Credits: (1-4)
    Hours
    1-4 Class Hours
  
  •  

    BNK 168 - Principles of Banking


    A core course that examines all aspects of banking.  A comprehensive introduction to today's diversified bank services.  Bank accounting, pricing, profitability, personnel and security functions.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be familiar with and demonstrate a competency in the following by use of classroom interaction and verbal responses, written exams, homework reviews and student projects:

         a.  Banking--history and evolution
         b.  The documents and language of banking
         c.  Bank relationships with depositors
         d.  The deposit function
         e.  Check processing and collection
         f.  Bank bookkeeping
         g.  Bank loans and investments
         h.  Trust department services
         i.  Specialized services--to importers, exporters, individuals, and other banks
         j.  Bank regulation and examination
        

  
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    BNK 184 - Banking/Real Estate/Mortgage Practicum


    Designed for students without previous exposure to the financial industry chosen.  Student will observe and study operations, policies and procedures performed by employees in various settings (private, public agencies, commercial corporations, etc.).  Emphasis placed on client, professional support and competition interaction (both front and back office).  Students may be placed with companies specializing in Banking/Credit Union Services and/or Real Estate Sales and/or Mortgage Brokerage.  Final report integrating the practical and theoretical aspects of their experiences.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  15 credits of coursework, 9 in Business or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply theory learned in the classroom within the Banking/Real Estate/Morgage setting.
    2.  Demonstrate working knowledge of the focus areas established at the time of placement.

  
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    BUS 100 - Accounting I


    Introduction to accounting principles and procedures necessary to complete the accounting cycle.  The course includes journals, ledgers and financial statements.  Accounting for merchandising transactions, control of cash, internal control, and payroll.  Course includes computerized accounting applications.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Record transactions using a general journal, and post the transactions to running balance ledger accounts.
    2.  Complete the end-of-period procedures, including worksheets, financial statements, adjusting and closing entries, after-closing trial balance, and reversing entries.
    3.  Record transactions for a merchandising concern using special journals, post the transactions to general ledger control and subsidiary ledger accounts, and prepare the supporting schedules for the general ledger control accounts.
    4.  Prepare and analyze an Income Statement and a Classified Balance Sheet for a merchandising concern.
    5.  Identify the six principles of internal control and apply them to the control of cash.
    6.  Prepare a bank reconciliation and prepare the necessary journal entries to reconcile the accounts.
    7.  Perform the computations to prepare a payroll and make the journal entries to record the payroll and the employer's payroll taxes.

  
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    BUS 101 - Accounting II


    An expansion of the fundamental concepts and procedures of accounting.  The course includes inventory valuation, receivables, payables and cash flows.  The acquisition, depreciation and disposal of plant assets.  Accounting methods and procedures relating to partnerships and the corporate form of business organization.  Manufacturing with emphasis on the special problems and additional accounting procedures to measure, control, and report factory production costs.  Course includes computerized accounting application.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 100 Accounting I or BUS 111 Financial Accounting

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

         Accounting II is designed to be the second course for those seeking careers in accounting and to provide a core of basic information about the financial operations of business for those seeking careers in other areas of business.

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform calculations necessary to determine an ending inventory and analyze the impact of inventory errors on financial statements.
    2.  Analyze and interpret procedures applied to notes, interest and uncollectible accounts.
    3.  Analyze and interpret procedures applied to acquisition, depreciation and disposal of plant and equipment.
    4.  Analyze and interpret procedures applied to partnerships and corporations.
    5.  Analyze and interpret procedures applied to manufacuring operations.
    6.  Analyze and record receivable and payable transactions.
    7.  Analyze and interpret value and record of assets.
    8.  Demonstrate the different methods of recording equity.
    9.  Compare an accrual income statement and a statement of cash flows.
    10.  Explain the conceptual differences between Financial Accounting and Managerial Accounting.

  
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    BUS 107 - The Freshman Experience


    An introduction to college life and the world of business for the beginning student in the Department of Business.  College and departmental policies and procedures, academic advisement and registration, study skills, transfer and employment, College and departmental resources.  Study of current trends and issues using a daily or weekly business publication.  Required course for all first semester business students.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
  
  •  

    BUS 108 - Accounting for a Service Business


    Introduction to basic accounting procedures.  Topics include journals and ledgers, fundamental financial statements, cash and credit transactions, internal control over cash, bank reconciliation's and adjustments to cash.  Merchandise transactions, special journals, estimating and recording credit losses, payroll procedures, and journal entries.  Includes a major project using the computerized accounting program Quickbooks Pro.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Note
    (May not be used as a prerequisite for BUS 101, see BUS 100)

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define accounting terms used in business.
    2.  Record business transactions for a service-based business using Quickbooks Pro.
    3.  Prepare and analyze financial statements.
    4.  Through the successful completion of written assignments and computer assignments, demonstrate an understanding of the accounting cycle.
    5.  Successfully complete assignments that show the students understanding of internal control systems.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to record proper entries and prepare a payroll.
    7.  Through the successful completion of assignments and a major project, demonstrate a thorough understanding of Quickbooks software and the accounting process for a small business.

  
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    BUS 109 - Workplace Readiness


    Emphasis will be on resume development, job search techniques, interview preparation, and workplace etiquette.  The method of instruction will include lecture, discussion, and role playing.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop a professional resume.
    2.  Utilize contemporary job search techniques.
    3.  Explain the importance of pre-interview preparation including knowledge about the firm's history, product information, and salary expectations.
    4.  Prepare for job interviews by understanding the interview process from the employer's perspective; including the importance of appropriate dress and interview demeanor.
    5.  Discuss the need to become a responsible, knowledgeable employee with positive work attitudes.

  
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    BUS 110 - Introduction to Business


    General background of modern business practices through the study of organization and management, production, human resources, accounting and finance, marketing, and the information needed for control and management decisions in business and society.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a knowledge of business vocabulary through classroom discussion and assignments.
    2.  Outline the philosophy, objectives, and responsibilities of business and its environment.
    3.  Describe the private enterprise system and explain how competition and entrepreneurship contribute to the system.
    4.  Identify common ethical dilemmas in the workplace.
    5.  Identify the major global challenges that businesses of the 21st century will face.
    6.  Explain the factors that drive supply and demand.
    7.  Describe each of the four types of market structures in the private enterprise system.
    8.  Summarize the three basic forms of business and the advantages and disadvantages of each form.
    9.  Define management and identify the skill set necessary for managerial success.
    10.  Explain the importance of human resource management.
    11.  Explain the marketing concept.
    12.  Outline the basic steps in developing a marketing strategy.
    13.  Define leadership and compare different leadership styles.
    14.  Explain the role of management information systems in business.
    15.  Explain the importance of accounting and its importance to the firm's stakeholders.
    16.  Identify the functions performed by a firm's financial managers.

  
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    BUS 111 - Financial Accounting


    A comprehensive introduction to financial accounting concepts and techniques intended to provide a basic understanding of the accounting cycle, elements of financial statements, and interpretations.  Elements examined include the creation of financial statements, accounting as an information system, accrual concepts, merchandising operations, inventory, internal control, cash, receivables, long-lived assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity, investments, cash flows, and financial analysis.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the environment of accounting.
    2.  Prepare and explain financial statements.
    3.  Analyze liquidity, debt-to-equity, and asset utilization.
    4.  Measure and categorize revenues and expenses.
    5.  Extrapolate financial performance measures to project future results.
    6.  Compare an organization with other firms and industry.
    7.  Report and analyze inventory, receivables, long term assets including intangibles, payables, long-term liabilities and stockholders equity.
    8.  Understand basics of the annual report, debt vs equity financing.

  
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    BUS 112 - Quantitative Business Methods


    Quantitative analysis of contemporary business problems.  The course includes percentages, ratios, markup/markdown, cash and trade discounts.  Simple and compound interest, consumer credit and insurance.  Present value, future value, and annuities. An introduction to statistics and graphical analysis.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Prepare a bank reconciliation.
    2.  Solve for any unknown in base, rate, and portion problems.
    3.  Calculate the percent of change.
    4.  Calculate trade discounts.
    5.  List and explain discount and credit periods used by businesses.
    6.  Calculate an outstanding balance for partial payments.
    7.  Calculate markups based on selling price and cost.
    8.  Calculate bank discounts and proceeds for simple interest bearing notes.
    9.  Compute effective interest rates.
    10.  Compare simple interest with compound interest.
    11.  Perform future value and present value applications using the BA II Plus Calculator.
    12.  Prepare a loan amortization table.
    13.  Compute average daily balance and finance charges on open ended credit instruments.
    14.  Calculate the total deferred payment price and finance charges on installment loans.
    15.  Identify and explain the various types of life insurance.
    16.  Identify and compute measures of central tendency.

  
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    BUS 113 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship


    Designed for students who are considering a new business venture.  Emphasis is placed on exploring and identifying what entrepreneurship is, understanding the challenges of entrepreneurship, recognizing and analyzing business opportunities, start-up issues, marketing, management, capital acquisition, forms of business organization, and other issues of relevance to the new entrepreneur.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define entrepreneurship and identify the role that entrepreneurs play in the economy today.
    2.  Explore and evaluate entrepreneurship opportunities.
    3.  Through classroom discussion and case analysis, identify the marketing efforts needed to achieve entrepreneurial success.
    4.  Identify the start-up issues that entrepreneurs face.
    5.  List financing options that are available to entrepreneurs.
    6.  Identify advantages/disadvantages of different forms of business organizations.
    7.  Thorough classroom discussion and case analysis, demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the function of management and its overall impact on the success of the business.

  
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    BUS 114 - Entrepreneurship Law


    Entrepreneurship Law is designed to introduce the student to the constantly changing legal environment surrounding the operation of a business entity.  The Securities Dealer) broker-dealer or a bank affiliate.  The Series 6/Series 63 course will effectively prepare them for the qualifying exams (Series 6-Federal, Series 63-NYS).  Requires broker/dealer sponsorship to sit for federal/state exams.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List and recognize the sources of the legal regulatory environment.
    2.  Detail the structure of the Court system as related to litigating a legal entrepreneurial issue.
    3.  Understand and be able to articulate the legal distinctions of the various types of business formations.
    4.  Prepare an enforceable contract.
    5.  Understand and be able to identify and respond to pending and existing legislation which will affect the entrepreneurial environment.
    6.  Detail the risks and responsibilities surrounding Tort Law.
    7.  Detail the nature and depth of the business owner's legal liability in the business workplace by preparing the requirements of an insurance policy.
    8.  Understand the ever changing role of E-Commerce by locating and detailing various e-commerce sites.

  
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    BUS 115 - Business Statistics


    Concepts and mechanics of measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, probability, sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation and other statistical techniques as they relate to general problems in business and economics.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the uses and potential misuses of statistical calculations and procedures in business applications.
    2.  Calculate measures of central tendency and dispersion, and understand their use in business applications.
    3.  Recognize common statistical symbols.
    4.  Calculate basic probabilies.  Understand related terminology and applications.
    5.  Calculate normal and binomial probabilities and understand how to use them in business applications.
    6.  Understand sampling theory, applications, and procedures.
    7.  Calculate interval estimates for large and small samples and proportions, as well as understand how the estimates are used in applications in business and economics.
    8.  Perform the calculations necessary to do one or two tailed hypothesis tests for large and small samples and proportions, and understand the application of these to problems in business and economics.
    9.  Perform the calculations necessary to estimate sample size for various sampling situations.
    10.  Perform regression and correlation calculations, and understand the applicattion of these to problems in business and economics.
    11.  Be proficient in the use of Excel or other software to perform various statistical calculations, including those for descriptive statistics, probabilities, and single/multiple regression and correlation.
    12.  Demonstrate critical thinking skills in the recognition and solution of business problems using statistical methods and procedures.

  
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    BUS 116 - International Business Environments


    An overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic factors that influence the trade related interaction of nations and the operations of global business enterprises.  Trade theory, economic integration, global sourcing, export-import basics, cultural awareness, and other current topics relating to international business will be covered.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    SOS 116
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Analyze data on the global nature of economic and business activity.
    2.  Utilize the basic strategies for entering foreign markets to assess decision-making by international business enterprises.
    3.  Critique political and economic systems encountered by international business.
    4.  Discuss cultural differences among nations and within nations along with the challenges these differences create for international business.
    5.  Apply international trade theory to cases involving international business.
    6.  Analyze and discuss current issues relating to globalization of markets and production and the consequences for businesses, workers, communities, and national policy.
    7.  Work with and interpret examples of protectionism as to their rationale and consequences for businesses, workers, communities, and national policy.
    8.  Research various international organizations and regional trade groups including the WTO (World Trade Organization) and European Union by using each organizations website.
    9.  Convert currencies and calculate the impact of foreign exchange movements on international business contracts.
    10.  Select appropriate strategy for managing all aspects of an international business including export/import financing.
    11.  Analyze the benefits and costs of different international strategies by using Case Method.

  
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    BUS 118 - Business Law I


    Law as an evolutionary and democratic process.  Topics include torts and criminal law, court structure, ethical issues in business, administrative law, law-of-contracts, legal principles of agency, employment rights and an introduction to business organizations including partnerships.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the basic principles of business law.
    2.  Discuss the court structures in the United States and identify which court to go to for different types of relief.
    3.  Compile the sources of law in the U.S. system.
    4.  Compare torts and negligence law.
    5.  Study and analyze common law contracts.
    6.  Apply basic business law knowlege to personal and business transactions.
    7.  Recognize situations where the services of an attorney should be utilized.
    8.  Discuss legal forms fo business organizations including partnerships.
    9.  Apply critical thinking skills in working through issue spotting and legal analysis.

    Assessment of outcomes measured by exams, papers, and in-class study discussion.

  
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    BUS 120 W - Business Law II


    The law governing the negotiation or transfer of commercial paper, law of sales, law of personal and real property, bailments, secured transactions, landlord-tenant relationships and an introduction to corporate law.  This course is included in the campus general education requirements as a writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain principles of business law.
    2.  Explain advanced topics of law that build on the knowledge gained in Business Law I (BUS 118) including corporation law.
    3.  Discuss the sources of law in the U.S. system.
    4.  Demonstrate a well developed understanding of personal property law.
    5.  Demonstrate a well developed understanding of real property law.
    6.  Demonstrate a well developed understanding of landlord and tenant law.
    7.  Identify and explain the important aspects of the law of bailments.
    8.  Identify and explain the important aspects of the law of sale of goods.
    9.  Utilize basic business law knowledge for personal and business transactions.
    10.  Demonstrate a well developed understanding of the law relative to commercial paper.
    11.  Demonstrate a well developed understanding of the law of secured transactions.
    12.  Recognize situations where the services of an attorney should be utilized.
    13.  Demonstrate critical thinking skills in working through issue spotting and legal analysis.

  
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    BUS 122 - Self-Management


    The course focuses on six self-management skill sets, known as the 6-C's, necessary to ensure effective student performance:  assessing circumstances, establishing behavioral controls, managing complexity, demonstrating commitment, consideration for others, and effective communications.  The course provides exercises and practical examples to help prepare students for college.  The lessons learned are also transferrable to any real-world situation.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Appreciate the value of a college education and improve their chances of retention.
    2.  Accurately assess their own internal strengths and weaknesses, and external threats and opportunities.
    3.  Effectively manage the complexity of college life.
    4.  Recognize how behavior either erodes or engenders success and trust.
    5.  Define and measure their own levels of commitment to their education.
    6.  Communicate more effectively (written, verbal and non-verbal).
    7.  Develop behavioral controls and personal policies that are in alignment with their goals.

  
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    BUS 124 - Financial Fraud Investigation


    Nature, detection, investigation of fraud in organizations of all types and sizes.  Forensic accounting techniques and methods for investigation, inquiry and recognition.  Also includes examination of fraud related to consumers, bankruptcy, divorce, taxes and identity theft.  This course may use computer simulations and outside speakers.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CRJ 124
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define fraud and distinguish between civil and criminal fraud.
    2.  Recognize and identify who commits fraud.
    3.  Identify warning signs of fraud.
    4.  Perform a basic fraud audit.
    5.  Perform net worth calculations on fraud suspects.
    6.  Prepare a fraud report.
    7.  Analyze and solve fraud prevention, detection, and investigation scenarios.
    8.  Recognize financial statement fraud exposures.
    9.  Analyze and compute the effects of financial statement fraud on net income.
    10.  Search for revenue-related, inventory, and cost of goods sold related fraud schemes.
    11.  Identify the various ways in which employees, vendors, and customers steal company assets.
    12.  Identify different bankruptcy, divorce, and tax fraud schemes.

  
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    BUS 128 - The Sustainable Business


    Sustainability is more than "being green."  The sustainable business promotes business accountability and transparency to a wide range of stakeholders including shareholders, investors, employees and community.  This course will examine how large and small businesses can incorporate sustainability into their business strategy to gain the competitive advantage.  The economic, social and environmental responsibility dimensions of sustainability and their effects on profitability will be studied.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    BUS 129 - Consumer Behavior


    Emphasizes the development of how people make purchase decisions in the marketplace. Consumer decision making, learning, brand loyalty and market segmentation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the concepts of consumer behavior analysis.
    2.  Demonstrate the application of marketing concepts within the customer decision making process through discussions and projects.
    3.  Discuss the impact of culture and subculture as a marketing variable.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of consumer behavior research techniques.

  
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    BUS 131 - Personal Finance


    Guidelines for financial planning regarding long-term and short-term installments buying, i.e., homes, autos, etc., credit, insurances, taxes, savings, bud- getting, and investments in real estate, stocks, bonds, IRA's, mutual funds, money market accounts, etc.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create a plan or alter an existing plan for his/her financial goals.
    2.  Stretch his/her income through careful use of budgeting, tax planning, wise use of credit, and careful purchase of housing and vehicles.
    3.  Protect income and assets through effective use of insurance.
    4.  Invest properly for future goal achievement through an understanding based on their Risk Profile.
    5.  Plan for retirement years and estate transfer.

  
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    BUS 135 - Investments


    In depth study of investing in the electronic age.  Selection, analysis, and valuation of stocks, Mutual Funds, REIT's, Unit Investment Trusts, Fixed Income Securities, Government Securities, Options, futures, and retirement/pension choices.  Non-Financial Assets such as collectibles and precious metals as tools of investing.  Using the Internet to gather investment information.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Utilize various research sources (business periodicals, industry publications, investment software, company financial statements, etc.) to assist in the selection and analysis of investment vehicles relative to risk/return, etc.
    2.  Identify main economic and global influences on investment categories to assist in comparing and contrasting various vehicles.
    3.  Understand and utilize the buying and selling procedures of various sources, including securities exchanges, NASDAQ, etc.
    4.  Evaluate various retirement/pension choices as they relate to current/future tax implications, accessibility, retirement needs and estate transfer.

     

 

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