Sep 22, 2020  
2016-2017 Official General Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Official General Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    SPK 203 - Advanced Speaking


    Designed so students can review what they have learned in SPK 110 Effective Speaking, learn advanced techniques for informative and persuasive speaking, learn techniques for special speaking occasions.  Involvement in a debate as a means of perfecting research techniques, impromptu speaking skills and the processes of logical thinking and organizing.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    SPK 299 - Independent Study: Speech


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of speech.  Conducted under the directions of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester hours of college level work in Speech

    Credits: (1-3)
  
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    SPM 110 - Foundations of Sports Management


    An overview of the sports management profession focusing on its foundational aspects and current topics from the field.  Students will learn the relevance of sociological, cultural, historical, political, and psychological concepts to the management of sport.  Students will also learn the necessary professional skills and attitudes of sports managers, and the manner in which the globalization of sport continues to affect the sport management professions.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define sport management and demonstrate understanding of the nature and scope of the sport industry, management competencies required, and industry opportunities by identifying sport management jobs currently available and the qualifications required.
    2.  Explain the importance of a professional perspective and exhibit critical professional skills and attitudes.
    3.  Analyze and discuss the historical aspects of the commercialization of sport and the sport market as evidenced by participation in classroom and online discussions.
    4.  Explain the relevance of ethical, legal, and sociological concepts to the management of sport.
    5.  Identify principles of management theory and determine how these principles impact the effective management and leadership of sport organizations.
    6.  Demonstrate knowledge of the functions and roles of management in sport organizations by researching and reporting on the structure of a sport organization.
    7.  Demonstrate knowledge of the basic characteristics of the main sport management areas including professional sport, intercollegiate athletics, interscholastic athletics, youth and community sport, sport management and marketing agencies and sport tourism by researching and reporting on topics relevant to each area.
    8.  Demonstrate knowledge of selected sport management functions including sport marketing, strategic communication, and finance and economics by identifying actions to be taken by functional managers in various scenarios.
    9.  Analyze and discuss the decision making and actions of sport consumers as evidenced by classroom and online discussions.
    10.  Analyze and discuss the social significance of sport and its role as a vehicle for social transformation as evidenced by classroom and online discussions.
    11.  Demonstrate an appreciation of diversity through use of unbiased language and an inclusive approach to sport communication through observations on information received through various forms of sport media.
    12.  Demonstrate critical thinking skills in the recognition and solution of problems and challenges facing various segments of the industry through case study analysis.

  
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    SPM 189 - Sports Law


    Professional and amateur sports have attained great importance both in the United States and abroad.  Concomitant with this growth is the greater sophistication of the legal issues that affect the operation and regulation of this industry.  This class will provide an overview of the legal principles and business models and rules governing the sports industry and the legal controversies and policy considerations surrounding those rules.

    Cross-listed
    3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of legal issues in the sports industry as evidenced by performance on graded materials.
    2.  Demonstrate an ability to identify and respond to legal issues associated with sports management by answering exam questions and class case studies.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of sports agency and contract law by providing verbal and written answers to questions posed by the professor.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of ethics issues in sports by spotting issues and bringing them to the attention of the class and also providing the law or relevant ethics rule from the code of ethics of the sports organization.

  
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    SPM 279 - Management/Promotion of Sports Events and Facilities


    This course provides students with the theoretical foundations and practical applications for understanding the sporting event industry.  The course will focus on sporting events within a sport facility setting and will include budgeting, marketing, sponsorship, volunteer management, community relations, and all aspects of facility operations.  Students will participate in the development and operational administration of a game or special sport event.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPM 110 Foundations of Sports Management

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define sports event management and demonstrate understanding of the nature and scope of the sporting event management industry, management competencies required, and industry opportunities by identifying regularly held local and regional sporting events and exploring the steps and actions involved in conducting those events.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of the functions and roles of management in sport facility organizations by researching and reporting on the structure of a specific sport facility organization.
    3.  Demonstrate knowledge of the business of developing and operating a sport facility business through case study analysis.
    4.  Demonstrate knowledge of selected sport event management functions including personnel, contracts, risk management, premises liability, crowd management, emergency plans, and ticketing and box office management by identifying actions to be taken by functional managers in various scenarios.
    5.  Demonstrate critical thinking skills in the recognition and solution of problems and challenges facing various segments of the sport event management industry through planning and conducting a sporting event.

  
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    SPM 297 - Sports Management Practicum


    An introductory experience dealing with the management and promotion of sports games and events.  With supervised assistance, students will help plan, organize, promote and conduct athletic events.  Placement is typically in collegiate athletics, but could also be in other sports related venues.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  SPM 110 Foundations of Sport Management, SPM 279 Management/Promotion of Sports Events and Facilities, and SPM 189 Sports Law

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    90 Practicum Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply previous classroom instruction to the job experience and articulate this in writing.
    2.  Investigate and report on procedures followed for athlete training and evaluation.
    3.  Describe, in- depth, in writing, exactly what was learned in the accomplishment of learning objectives.
    4.  Describe, in writing, job training and job duties.
    5.  Develop work skills and obtain knowledge related to career goals and describe these in writing.

  
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    SQC 111 - Acceptance Sampling and Reliability


    A study of acceptance sampling techniques for attributes and reliability analysis.  Operating characteristic curves, lot-by-lot acceptance plans based on LTPD, AOQL and AQL, sequential sampling, continuous sampling.  Introduction to exponential, log-normal, and Weibull distributions, failure rate, MTBF, MTTF, mean life, probability of survival for series, parallel, and complex systems, basics of life testing. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 124 Statistics I or MAT 260 Applied Probability and Statistics, or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon the completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the rationale for acceptance by sampling.
    2.  Construct an operating characteristic curve for an attribute plan.
    3.  Construct lot-by-lot sampling plans using Dodge-Romig LTPD and AOQL tables and ANSI/ASQC Z1.4 tables.
    4.  Develop sampling plans using the Wald Sequential Probability Ratio Test.
    5.  Develop lot-by-lot plans for specified producer and consumer risks and AQL and LTPD values and interpret.
    6.  Construct Sequential Sampling plans and Continuous Sampling plans.
    7.  Define fundamental concepts in reliability.
    8.  Work with the exponential, Weibull, and log-normal distributions.
    9.  Compute failure rate, mean life, MTTF, MTBF.
    10.  Compute the reliability of series, parallel, and series-parallel systems.
    11.  Explain the basic principles of life testing.

  
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    SQC 112 - Metrology


    The study of the science of measurement.  This course will deal with the principles and practice of precision measurement.  Topics to include fixed gages, micrometers, verniers, thread gaging, comparison measurement, optical measuring instruments, calibration and angle measurement.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 124 Statistics I or MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    SQC 113 - Statistical Process Control


    A study of process capability analysis and control chart procedures.  Capability indices, control charts for attributes p, np, c, u.  Short-run control charts.  Control charts for variables x-bar, R, s.  Distinctions made between process capability and process control.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 124 Statistics I or MAT 260 Applied Probability and Statistics

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the differences between specification limits and control limits.
    2.  Construct x-bar, R, s, x, and moving range, charts, and analyze the results.
    3.  Construct p, np, c, and u charts and analyze the results.
    4.  Construct Cusum charts for means and proportions.
    5.  Determine which control charts are appropriate for various applications.
    6.  Construct short run control charts for attributes and variables.
    7.  Define, compute, and interpret process capability indices.
    8.  Discuss rational subgrouping and its effect on analysis.

  
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    SQC 200 - Senior Seminar I


    Guest Speakers discuss common problems quality assurance students encounter.  Student contact with industry is established through field trips.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the general priciples and successful implementation of a QA program.
    2.  Demonstrate how to contact and speak with QA professionals in various industries.
    3.  Identify components of an existing organization's QA program.
    4.  Demonstrate how to assess an existing organization's QA practices.
    5.  Relate theoretical Quality Assurance principles to existing QA practices in various industries.
    6.  Compare QA principles and practices between organizations in the same and in different industries.
    7.  Provide an opportunity for students to question QA professionals concerning issues such as:

    • The position of the QA department in their employers' organizational charts.
    • The best methods for interacting with others within a quality department and among various other departments of an organization.
    • Managing employees who may be very diverse in terms of skills, education, and demographics.
    • The role of communication and teamwork in the pursuit of quality and ideas for facilitating communication and teamwork.


  
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    SQC 201 - Senior Seminar II


    A continuation of the topics covered in SQC 200.  Guest Speakers discuss common problems quality assurance students encounter.  Student contact with industry is established through field trips.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the general principles and successful implementation of a QA program.
    2.  Demonstrate how to contact and speak with QA professionals in various industries.
    3.  Identify components of an existing organization's QA program.
    4.  Demonstrate how to assess an existing organization's QA practices.
    5.  Relate theoretical Quality Assurance principles to existing QA practices in various industries.
    6.  Compare QA principles and practices between organizations in the same and in different industries.
    7.  Provide an opportunity for students to question QA professionals concerning issues such as:

    • The position of the QA department in their employers' organizational charts.
    • The best methods for interacting with others within a quality department and among various other departments of an organization.
    • Managing employees who may be very diverse in terms of skills, education, and demographics.
    • The role of communication and teamwork in the pursuit of quality and ideas for facilitating communication and teamwork.


  
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    SQC 210 - Six Sigma Topics


    This course introduces Six Sigma concepts that complement those found in the other SQC courses.  Topics include: business systems, processes, and performance metrics.  The analysis of customer data and application of QFD studies.  Project planning and control techniques.  Quality improvement tools, multi-vari, CUSUM, and EWMA charts.  Mixture, Taguchi's designs, and evolutionary operations.  Lean concepts, continuous flow manufacturing, cycle-time reduction, total productive maintenance.  Tolerance design and capability analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SQC 113 Statistical Process Control

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define Six Sigma, business systems and processes.
    2.  Define process performance metrics, such as DPMO, COPQ.
    3.  Analyze customer data and translate by Quality Function Deployment (QFD).
    4.  Define project management tools and team formations.
    5.  Use project planning and control tools, such as PERT, CPM.
    6.  Perform quality improvement tools, such as multi-vari charts, mixture experiments, and evolutionary operations.
    7.  Use advanced statistical control techniques, such as CUSUM and EWMA charts.
    8.  Define lean enterprise concepts, such as continuous flow manufacturing and total productive maintenance.
    9.  Define design for Six Sigma tools.
    10.  Perform tolerance design and process capability studies.

  
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    SQC 220 - Senior Practicum


    This course is designed to allow students to integrate their theoretical knowledge with real world situations.  Working in teams, students are assigned to case studies involving actual or fictitious data.  The course emphasizes computer usage, classroom presentations, and written reports.  ISO 9000 Standards and problem solving techniques including Pareto diagrams, process flowcharts, check sheets, brain-storming, cause-and-effect diagrams, and multi-voting schemes are discussed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MET 112 Metrology, SQC 111 Acceptance Sampling Techniques, SQC 113 Statistical Process Control, and MAT 245 Design of Experiments

    Prior or Concurrent:  MAT 245 Design of Experiments, SQC 210 Six Sigma Topics

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply problem solving skills and knowledge gained in other quality assurance classes to real world situations.
    2.  Demonstrate awareness of the contents of ISO 9001.
    3.  Use a computer as a tool for statistical analysis.
    4.  Use the computer to generate reports.
    5.  Function as a member of a working team.
    6.  Participate in team oral presentations.
    7.  Compile team reports.

  
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    SQC 244 - Reliability and Life Testing


    Fundamentals of probability, probability distributions, discrete distributions:  binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, Pascal, continuous distributions: normal, exponential, gamma, log-normal, Weibull.  Introduction to reliability, failure rate, MTBF, MTTF, mean life, probability of survival for series systems and parallel redundant systems, basics of life testing based on preassigned number of failures and preassigned time, SPRT, maintainability, availability, and MTTR.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 124 Statistics I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    SQC 297 - Cooperative Work Experience


    Cooperative education in Quality Assurance may be available.  On-the-job experience may be obtained in an industrial setting whose operations require process control, statistical analysis, problem solving skills, or other tools of Quality Assurance.  To be eligible, a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 with a minimum of 3.0 in MAT and SQC courses, have no "F" grades, and exhibit responsibility through SQC 100/200 orientation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Placement by advisor

    Credits: (1-3)
  
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    STM 100 - Women in STEM


    Despite notable gains in the chemical and biological sciences, women continue to represent a minority in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers.  This course will explore the contribution of women to STEM disciplines throughout history as well as in the local community.  Students will have the opportunity to learn from female professionals who can speak of their personal experiences as women in their education/careers.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the role of women in STEM throughout history.
    2.  Identify the scope of STEM careers and the options available to them at the local, regional, statewide, and national levels.
    3.  Model open-mindedness and respect for gender roles in STEM programs/careers.
    4.  Pursue an education and career in a STEM field.
    5.  Develop leadership skills.

  
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    STM 105 - Freshman Planning Seminar


    An orientation course designed for first semester students in the Liberal Arts Associate in Science program intending to transfer to a four-year school in a science program.  Students will gain an understanding of the community college and the transfer process.  Faculty will lead students in discussions on goal setting, time management and skills for success in Math and Science at the college level.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify campus resources
    2.  Understand the LAAS program as it applies to their future goals.
    3.  Identify several transfer schools of interest.
    4.  Formulate an academic plan for their studies at BCC.
    5.  Identify key faculty at BCC with similar science interests.
    6.  Identify their main learning style.
    7.  Manage their study habits and develop a weekly study plan.

  
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    TEC 101 - Introduction to Engineering Technology


    This course serves as a gateway into the engineering technology profession.  Topics range from overviews of the engineering disciplines to the specifics of formatting a laboratory report.  Computer literacy is important to the engineering profession and successful completion of the course will require proficiency with word-processing, spreadsheets and PowerPoint.  Most engineering problems require mathematical solutions that must be clear, neat, easily followed and accompanied with a clear sketch.  The engineering profession subscribes to a strong code of ethics which will be discussed and then applied to the students in the class.  Throughout the course projects will be assigned requiring team participation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Students will gain an understanding of the three major engineering disciplines (civil, electrical and mechanical).
    2.  Students will understand the necessity for clear neat calculations.
    3.  Students will learn the fundamentals of creating a clear neat sketch of an engineering problem.
    4.  Students will develop proficiency with common office software (Word, Excel and PowerPoint) and their use in engineering applications.
    5.  Students will develop a sense of responsibility based on the code of engineering ethics.
    6.  All students will be required to contribute fully to team projects.


    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Clearly define the difference between the three disciplines of engineering technology at BCC:  Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical.
    2.  Use word-processing software to prepare laboratory reports that includes graphs and equations.
    3.  Setup and format a spreadsheet for simple calculations.
    4.  Use prepared VBA routines to extend the function range of spreadsheet calculations.
    5.  Prepare and present a technical PowerPoint presentation that includes graphics, calculations and graphs.
    6.  Draw neat clear sketches to accompany problem solutions.
    7.  Prepare neat logical solutions to engineering problems.
    8.  Understand the ethical consequences of decisions made during their professional life.
    9.  Work as a productive team participant.

  
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    TEC 106 - Electronic Portfolios


    Learn how electronic portfolios can help you to organize and market your work experience, education, skills, hobbies and volunteer activities in an easy to use web based format.  This course will focus on the creation of biographies, resumes, description of skills and work samples to help you market yourself and gain a competitive edge in the job market or in applying to four-year institutions.

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    BIT 106
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Prepare students to market themselves by reflecting on their achievements and goals.
    2.  Understand the impact of technologies such as electronic portfolios and social networking as part of showcasing skills, reflection, networking and lifelong learning.
    3.  Utilize service learning to learn about possible career paths while providing a service for the community.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Utilize career searching database tools available at BCC and other college libraries.
    2.  Understand the importance of reflection as part of lifelong learning.
    3.  Perform written critiques of their peers which include criticism on writing content, style and visual design.
    4.  Market themselves to employers or admissions representatives utilizing their electronic portfolio as a background of their best work.
    5.  Craft professional resumes to target various employers/audiences.

  
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    THR 101 - Theater Appreciation: The Image Makers


    This course surveys the history and evolution of drama from Ancient Greece to the present time, emphasizing all aspects of the art form including playwriting, acting, directing, scene design, and an analysis of dramatic literature.  Attendance at local productions is required. 

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Appreciate theater as an art form and differentiate it from other art forms.
    2.  Write about and analyze the parts of a play including Aristotle's six parts.
    3.  Define characteristics of theater in various periods of history.
    4.  Explain the organizational process involved in bringing a play to a fully staged theatrical production.
    5.  Recognize the aspects of theater including artistic, production and administrative.
    6.  Define the roles/responsibilities of all the personnel who mount a theater production including directors, designers, actors, etc.
    7.  Practice critical analysis of live and recorded theatrical productions.
    8.  Analyze form, context and aesthetic qualities of dramatic literature and performances.

  
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    THR 102 - Introduction to Musical Theatre


    Chronological history of American Musical Theatre (with contemporary British additions) from 19th century minstrelsy, melodrama, vaudeville and burlesque to the present day Broadway musical.  Interaction of composer, lyricist, librettist, director, choreographer, performers and technicians.  Illustrated by films, slides and live performances.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the evolution of the American musical from the 19th century to the present.
    2.  Identify the roles played by the various migrating groups to America in shaping the art form.
    3.  Recognize and define the roles of the composer, lyricist, and book writer.
    4.  Recognize and define the contribution made to the production by the director, choreographer, stage designer, costume designer, sound designer, etc.
    5.  Explain how musical theater reflects the culture and period in which it occurs.

  
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    THR 109 - Practicum Theater


    Stage design and construction techniques are studied as students engage in problem solution, system design and assist with theater department productions.  Problems in construction and use of theater equipment and facilities; movable scenery and non-permanent stage equipment; sound and lighting systems.  Lecture, discussion, studio work.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the various collaborative roles necessary to produce a play.
    2.  Demonstrate increased knowledge of the carrying through of technical production projects including organization, deadlines, etc.
    3.  Write about and discuss the terminology used in theatrical production.
    4.  Demonstrate a specific collaborative skill in the design, technical or management area of theater.

  
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    THR 110 - Practicum Theater


    Stage design and construction techniques are studied as students engage in problem solution, system design and assist with theater department productions.  Problems in construction and use of theater equipment and facilities; movable scenery and non-permanent stage equipment; sound and lighting systems.  Lecture, discussion, studio work.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the various collaborative roles necessary to produce a play.
    2.  Demonstrate increased knowledge of the carrying through of technical production projects including organization, deadlines, etc.
    3.  Write about and discuss the terminology used in theatrical production.
    4.  Demonstrate a specific collaborative skill in the design, technical or management area of theater.

  
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    THR 111 - Introduction to Acting


    Fundamental principles of acting technique are introduced.  Exercises for body and voice are practiced as well as the skills of concentration, improvisation, imagination, sense memory, objectives, action, obstacles and circumstances.  Excellent for students in disciplines other than theater who wish to explore how acting techniques can enhance their life and work.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use their voice and body (actor's tools) for effective performance skills.
    2.  Practice Stanislavsky's elements i.e. concentration, observation, imagination, etc.
    3.  Demonstrate the elements of a dramatic scene.
    4.  Explore the language and stories of Shakespeare.
    5.  Define the history of the acting profession and the "business" of acting.
    6.  Define the different skills needed for film vs. stage acting.

  
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    THR 112 - Acting II


    This is an intermediate course for those who wish to continue the study of the acting process in greater depth.  "Method" and classical approaches are employed for an actor's approach to a role; text and character analysis of various dramatic genres.  For a basic foundation, students work with the works of major playwrights including Shakespeare.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting or consent of Instructor by audition

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be proficient in the skills of relaxation/concentration/observation/improvisation/imagination.
    2.  Practice voice and movement exercises to help develop their physical "instrument."
    3.  Analyze and write about the elements of dramatic material such as character, objectives, physical and emotional circumstances and actions.
    4.  Identify and write about acting theory as it developed over time including the methods, directors, actors and teachers involved.
    5.  Perform, recite and interpret the heightened language of Shakespeare.
    6.  Create a life for a character from dramatic literature.
    7.  Discuss and write about the development and history of the acting profession.
    8.  Employ a basic knowledge of the "business" of acting.

  
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    THR 114 - Oral Interpretation


    Oral presentation of prose, poetry, drama and comedy performed individually and in groups.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Acquire the performance skills necessary to share a believable, honest and clear interpretation of a literary work with an audience.
    2.  Analyze and understand the meaning of selected works of literature.
    3.  Apply their own life experience to performance of texts.
    4.  Evaluate and critique the oral interpretative skills of others.
    5.  Use constructive collaborative skills as a result of the team spirit needed to work with a group or partner on an interpretative project.

  
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    THR 117 - Creative Dramatics


    Fundamentals of creative dramatics, its use in teaching, recreation and rehabilitation.  Introduction to techniques used and practical application opportunities.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice the elements of drama such as voice/body utilization, imagination, improvisation, etc.
    2.  Utilize interpersonal skills and confidence in their own instincts by applying dramatic techniques.
    3.  Demonstate dramatic techniques as a teaching/learning tool.
    4.  Practice dramatic techniques of improvisation and role playing for the purpose of problem-solving.
    5.  Evaluate the effectiveness of dramatic exercises.
    6.  Conceptualize theatrical productions as a whole.
    7.  Demonstrate knowledge of instructional strategies through practice and creating a lesson plan.

  
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    THR 140 - Announcing for Radio/TV


    Presentation as on-air personality.  Development of visual and vocal techniques relating to presentation of news, interviews, commercials and on-air announcements.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Formulate techniques of effective on-camera presentation, including posture, dress and presence.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of phonetic spellings and pronunciations.
    3.  Utilize voice skills for on-camera/microphone work and differentiate between the two.
    4.  Demonstrate various announcing styles.
    5.  Define and utilize equipment commonly used by announcers.
    6.  Acquire necessary skills to read and perform from scripts prepared by other writers.
    7.  Explain FCC rules that effect announcers.

  
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    THR 151 - Stagecraft I


    Classroom and workshop study relative to technical elements of theater production.  All aspects are introduced and can be practiced including costume design and construction, stage lighting design and mechanics, sound design, props and stage management.  Lecture, discussion and studio work on theater department productions.

    Credits: (1-4)
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 1-4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Assist in designing a model and set for a full-fledged theater production.
    2.  Practice with hand tools commonly found in theater scene shops.
    3.  Aid in constructing scenery from working drawings.
    4.  Choose the appropriate materials and hardware for scenic construction.
    5.  Identify the basic types of theater spaces and their differences in staging.
    6.  Express a basic knowledge of theatrical technology.
    7.  Define the roles and responsibilities of individuals involved in theatrical production.
    8.  Be somewhat proficient in one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.

  
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    THR 152 - Stagecraft II


    Classroom and workshop study relative to technical elements of theater production.  Particular emphasis is on stage management, house management, props and operation of stage crews.  Lecture, discussion and studio work on theater department productions.

    Credits: (1-4)
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 1-4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Assist in designing a model and set for a full-fledged theater production.
    2.  Practice with hand tools commonly found in theater scene shops.
    3.  Aid in constructing scenery from working drawings.
    4.  Study the skills needed to properly fulfill the position of stage manager, house manager, prop master, costume master, etc.
    5.  Identify the basic types of theater spaces and their differences in staging.
    6.  Express a basic knowledge of theatrical technology.
    7.  Define the roles and responsibilities of individuals involved in theatrical production.
    8.  Be somewhat proficient in one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.

  
  •  

    THR 161 - Playwriting


    Students will practice writing for the stage in a format of lecture/seminar and workshop.  Playwriting involves elements of dramatic action, character, plot, structure, story, style, conflict and staging suitability.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Write "conflict," "dramatic action," and "critique" plays in short, summary annotations.
    2.  Critically analyze and interpret theatre as dramatic "action."
    3.  Analyze plays in terms of dramatic components of P.A.S.T.O: Preparation, Attack, Struggle, Turning Point, Outcome.
    4.  Analyze plays from a playwright's point-of-view about story and dramatic action.
    5.  Recognize differences of "style"--lyricism, realism, naturalism, expressionism; epci.
    6.  Properly format a one-act play script and possibly write and revise a one-act play, 15-20 pages.
    7.  Use critical writing skills which comply with and meet standards of writing emphasis.

  
  •  

    THR 165 - Dance for Actors I


    Basic dance techniques, dance characterization, and movement relative to performance in musical theater.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice movement techniques that develop musicality and rhythmic skills.
    2.  Perform choreography that contains simple rhythmic changes.
    3.  Develop greater strength, stretch, and range of mobility.
    4.  Approach all training, practice and performance from an anatomically correct standpoint.
    5.  Expand his/her expressive range of movement and performance.
    6.  Define dance (jazz, ballet, etc.) and its vernacular roots through performing historical and present day styles.

  
  •  

    THR 175 - Dance for Actors II


    Intensive dance techniques, dance characterization, and movement relative to performance in musical theater.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice skills in movement including strength, flexibility, balance, control, musicality, and confidence in dancing in front of an audience.
    2.  Develop musicality and rhythmic skills through performing choreography that contains complex rhythmic changes.
    3.  Explain the history of dance (jazz, ballet, etc.) and its vernacular roots.
    4.  Practice spatial awareness through performing choreography that incorporates directional changes, diverse floor patterns and movements that demand expansion and retraction of the body.
    5.  Define new ways of approaching movement and will be encouraged to utilize these paths to enhance their movement experience.

  
  •  

    THR 201 - Children's Theater


    Analysis of children-oriented plays, development of scripts, rehearsal and performace techniques.  Performance either in campus theater or at area elementary schools for classtime and assembly programs and visiting with children pre/post performance.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice acting techniques particular to performing for children.
    2.  Strengthen their voice and body skills as performers.
    3.  Articulate the characters, period, author and other aspects of selected dramatic material.
    4.  Adapt dramatic material to the needs and skill levels of different age groups.
    5.  Evaluate children's theater plays in order to analyze the dramatic text in action.

  
  •  

    THR 216 - Special Topics in Theater


    Course will allow an in-depth examination of a critical topic, skill, or creative process as it applies to the study of theater. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of theater Coordinator/Chair

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    The Learning Outcomes will differ depending on the topic, skill or creative process that is taught.

  
  •  

    THR 217 - Special Topics


    Course will allow an in-depth examination of a critical topic, skill, or creative process as it applies to the study of theater.

    Possible areas of study would be:

    • auditioning
    • business of acting
    • musical theater performance
    • performance studies
    • theater administration
    • stage management fundamentals
    • directing for film
    • movement for the actor
    • voice for the actor
    • study of individual playwrights
    • dramatic text studies
    • women in theater studies


    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of Theater Coordinator

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    Though the intended learning outcomes would be different for each special topic, they will include those pertainint to BCC's own campus-wide General Education requirements:  Effective Communication, Critical Thinking Ethical Reasoning, Civic Competence, Gobal and Multicultural Perspective, Mathematical Numeracy and Scientific Literacy, Good Health and Fitness Maintenance.

  
  •  

    THR 218 - Acting III


    The purpose is to serve interested students who wish to continue the study of acting in greater depth.  More advanced acting methods and styles are explored and practiced.  Scene presentations are required along with accompanying written analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting, THR 112 Acting II, or permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create an original, crafted performance of a character in a dramatic scene and monologue.
    2.  Incorporate studies in Method theory and process as it relates to acting.
    3.  Articulate a thorough knowledge of the history of the acting profession, its great acting teachers, plays and playwrights.
    4.  Prepare an analysis of a play, scene and character.
    5.  Interpret and perform the heightened language of Shakespeare.
    6.  Practice and incorporate skills in physical actions, relaxation, concentration, observation, improvisation, as well as exercises of Uta Hagen, Lee Strasberg, Jerzy Grotowski, Tadashi Suzuki, etc.

  
  •  

    THR 219 - Periods and Styles of Acting


    The study and practice of period and contemporary styles of acting.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the historical periods and styles of acting.
    2.  Define and write about the playwrights, performers and directors from selected periods and their role in theater history.
    3.  Practice the progression of rehearsal and performance techniques for each period/style of acting.
    4.  Interpret, perform and practice the techniques and styles for a given period for an audience.
    5.  Speak and write on the aspects of any given period/style of acting.

  
  •  

    THR 221 - History of the Theater


    History of theatrical production with selected periods of theater activity as a mirror of social and cultural experience from ancient times to the present.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Good for students from all disciplines.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain and write about aspects of historical periods of theater from the Greek and Roman to the contemporary.
    2.  Speak and write about individual playwrights and their reflection of a given period of history.
    3.  Articulate theater epochs in terms of the styles, movements and plays specific to each period.
    4.  Explain their knowledge of recorded history in general with its political, sociological and artistic movements.
    5.  Use critical writing skills which comply with and meet standards of writing emphasis.

  
  •  

    THR 222 - History of the Theater II


    History of stage production from the 18th Century to the present, with attention to the contribution of dramatic literature and the fine arts to stage development.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    THR 231 - Stage Direction


    Director's art is examined in relation to the physical space, the actors and the texts.  Casting, pictorial emphasis, harmony, rhythm and rehearsal and production procedures are covered.  Students will direct a scene, fifteen minute play or one-act play.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting, THR 112 Acting II or consent of Coordinator

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Select plays and participate in the analyzing of scripts to be produced.
    2.  Demonstrate the importance of organization as well as the development of calendars, set designs, ground plans, costume plots, prop lists, performance cues, and a director's script.
    3.  Direct scenes for various theatrical genres including drama, comedy, Shakespeare, Children's Theater, Musicals, etc.
    4.  Discuss and write about the great theater directors and their methods.
    5.  Demonstrate an awareness of the techniques of movement, blocking, rhythm, tempo, pacing, stage pictures, pantomimic dramatization and focus.
    6.  Identify the basic types of theater spaces and their differences in staging.
    7.  Practice one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.
    8.  View and critique the direction of live stage and film productions.

  
  •  

    THR 246 - Rehearsal and Performance for Stage


    Casting, rehearsing and acting in made-for-stage drama and comedy scripts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting, THR 112 Acting II, or permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Solve problems that naturally arise from a collaborative art such as theater in helping set priorities, tasks, deadlines, rehearsal discipline and process, etc.
    2.  Define the progression of rehearsal and performance techniques from play selection and first read-through all the way to set strike and post mortem.
    3.  Follow the necessary steps of the working "process" that brings a script alive on the stage.
    4.  Carry out specific skills relevant to the function fulfilled in the production such as:  acting, assistant directing or stage managing, costume management, play/period research, house management, set design, construction, lighting, sound, set decorating and props creation.
    5.  Speak and write on the process of rehearsal and performance for a full-fledged semi-professional theatrical production.
    6.  Practice one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.

  
  •  

    THR 255 - Improvisational Acting/ Psychodrama


    Spontaneously developed acting sequences to mirror real-life situations.  Techniques of character, interaction with audiences.  Possible performances at local agencies, schools and pertinent organizations.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Utilize improvisational acting exercises for performance.
    2.  Articulate acting history, theory and vocabulary.
    3.  Demonstrate vocal and movement capabilities in order to perform improvisation.
    4.  Define the introductory exercises of improvisation.
    5.  Interpret the exercises in order to perform effective improvisation.
    6.  Take part in an improvisational ensemble.
    7.  Identify and practice beginning acting exercises as the foundation of improv technique, including warming up.

  
  •  

    THR 256 - Rehearsal and Performance for Stage


    Casting, rehearsing and acting in made-for-stage drama and comedy scripts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting, THR 112 Acting II, or permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Solve problems that naturally arise from a collaborative art such as theater in helping set priorities, tasks, deadlines, rehearsal discipline and process, etc.
    2.  Define the progression of rehearsal and performance techniques from play selection and first read-through all the way to set strike and post mortem.
    3.  Follow the necessary steps of the working "process" that brings a script alive on the stage.
    4.  Carry out specific skills relevant to the function fulfilled in the production such as:  acting, assistant directing or stage managing, costume management, play/period research, house management, set design, construction, lighting, sound, set decorating and props creation.
    5.  Speak and write on the process of rehearsal and performance for a full-fledged semi-professional theatrical production.
    6.  Practice one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.

  
  •  

    THR 266 - Acting for TV, Film, and Commercials


    Proficiency in performing before the camera.  Character analysis, quick study, re-takes, voice-overs, studio projection, facial nuances, and subtlety of mannerism.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate skills and exercises involved in the art and craft of acting for the camera such as listening, concentration, relaxation, energy, spontaneity, character development.
    2.  Dissect and analyze a script with circumstances, character, events and objectives.
    3.  Interpret a script by using sub-text, scoring, intention, etc.
    4.  Analyze and critique the work of those working in the industry.
    5.  Speak and write intelligently on the theories and terminology used in the business of acting for the camera.

  
  •  

    THR 276 - Rehearsal and Performance for Television


    Casting, rehearsing, and acting in made-for-television and film, dramatic and comedy scripts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this coure the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform single-camera acting techniques for acting in film and TV.
    2.  Perform actors' skills for a master shot and close-up shot.
    3.  Utilize on-camera blocking, business, subtext, and reactions.
    4.  Define and practice the differences between stage and film acting.
    5.  Audition for on-camera acting scenes.
    6.  Analyze and critique the work of those working in the industry.

  
  •  

    THR 286 - Shakespeare for Actors


    A beginning course in the actor's approach to working with Shakespeare's characters, language and themes for monologues and scene study.  Students will explore their skills in movement, voice, text analysis and action as it relates to bringing Shakespeare's characters and plays to life.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  THR 111 or THR 112 or consent of Coordinator

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    THR 299 - Independent Study: Theater


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of theater.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester hours of college level work in theater

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes are specified on an individual basis.

  
  •  

    TLC 110 - Telecommunications I


    This course is designed to train students in the organization, architecture, setup, maintenance, hardware, and software aspects of local area networks.  Topics include:  introduction to networks; types and characteristics of different network architectures and network topologies; intra and inter-network devices; network operating systems; peer-to-peer and client/server environments; LAN setup and maintenance, network printing; internal web server.  A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EET 122 Electrical Circuits

    Corequisite:  EET 151 Electronic Systems I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Describe Local Area Network (LAN) organization and operation.
    2.  Describe the purpose and function of various LAN protocols.
    3.  Describe the purpose and function of LAN interconnection technologies.
    4.  Use LANs for data communications.
    5.  Use network analysis software to view, verify, and troubleshoot network traffic conditions.
    6.  Explain general characteristics and devices of a wireless network.
    7.  Work productively as a team, practicing project leadership, interpersonal skills, and conflict resolution in a networked environment.
    8.  Practice problem solving via the planning, organization and delivery of projects in a networked environment.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the organization, operation, set up, and maintenance of a local area network.
    2.  Explain the types and characteristics of different network architectures, topologies, and components.
    3.  Describe the OSI reference model and the functions of LAN protocols.
    4.  Describe the hardware aspects of a LAN:  the purpose and function of LAN intra and interconnecting network devices.
    5.  Set up and use LANs for data communications.
    6.  Explain the general characteristics and devices of a wireless network and configure a small wireless network.
    7.  Practice problem solving, teamwork, and leadership skills, via the planning, organization, and delivery of projects in a networked environment.

  
  •  

    TLC 120 - Telecommunications II


    This course will cover the basics of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) systems.  Topics include:  an overview of TCP/IP networks with a focus on VoIP; an introduction to VoIP; Quality of Service (QoS); VoIP system components; VoIP protocols and VoIP protocol analysis; VoIP architecture and VoIP codes.  A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  TLC 110 Telecommunications I, EET 169 Digital Systems II

    Corequisite:  EET 152 Electronic Systems II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Describe today's public system telephone network, its services and signaling, and compare it to Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP).
    2.  Explain VoIP technology benefits, applications, and Quality of Service.
    3.  Describe and analyze in-depth VoIP architecture and implementation.
    4.  Describe the purpose and function of various VoIP protocols.
    5.  Describe the purpose and function of VoIP interconnection technologies.
    6.  Explain the use of network analysis software to view and troubleshoot VoIP networks.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe VoIP system organization and operation.
    2.  Describe the purpose and function of various VoIP protocols.
    3.  Describe the purpose and function of VoIP interconnection technologies.
    4.  Use IP networks for voice communications.
    5.  Use network analysis software to view, verify, and troubleshoot VoIP networks.
    6.  Work productively as a team, practicing project leadership, interpersonal skills, and conflict resolution in a networked environment.
    7.  Practice problem solving via the planning, organization, and delivery of projects in a networked environment.

  
  •  

    TLC 210 - Telecommunications III


    This course covers the organization, architecture, setup, hardware and software aspects of networked video delivery systems.  Topics include:  video transport; compression; packet transport; multicasting; content ownership and security; tranport security; IPTV-IP video to the home; video file transfer; VPN's and home-office video links.  A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  TLC 120 Telecommunications II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Describe video transport technologies, networks, protocols, and applications.
    2.  Describe video and audio data compression techniques and transport methods.
    3.  Explain video streaming, multicasting, and videoconferencing over IP.
    4.  Describe content ownership, encryption, and transport security.
    5.  Describe IP-TV video to the home, video file transfer technology and applications.
    6.  Explain network administration, and the configuration and implementation of a network to support video and VoIP.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe video delivery system organization and operation.
    2.  Describe the purpose and function of various video related protocols.
    3.  Describe the purpose and function of video delivery interconnection technologies.
    4.  Use LANs/WANs for converged (voice, video and data) communications.
    5.  Use network analysis software to view, verify, and troubleshoot network traffic conditions.
    6.  Work productively as a team, practicing project leadership, interpersonal skills, and conflict resolution in a networked environment.
    7.  Practice problem solving via the planning, organization, and delivery of projects in a networked environment.

  
  •  

    TLC 220 - Telecommunications IV


    A survey of current and emerging technologies in Telecommunications will be presented.  Lectures, interactive learning, demonstrations, and site visits will be employed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  TLC 210 Telecommunications III

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Explain advanced telecommunication techniques and principles.
    2.  Explain current and future integrated communication services and their applications.
    3.  Identify sources of information and reference material for current and emerging integrated technologies.
    4.  Articulate concepts of advanced networks and services.
    5.  Capstone the three previous telecommunications courses.
    6.  Further develop the following course competencies:  problem solving, teamwork, project leadership, quality, contextual learning, technology and service delivery, and customer focus.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe advanced telecommunication techniques and principles.
    2.  Explain current and future integrated communication services and their applications.
    3.  Identify sources of information and reference material for current and emerging integrated technologies.
    4.  Articulate concepts of advanced networks and services.
    5.  Demonstrate the following course competencies:  problem solving, teamwork, project leadership, quality, contextual learning, technology and service delivery, and customer focus.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to work in groups, research product, and develop design installation planning.

 

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