Sep 22, 2020  
2016-2017 Official General Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Official General Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    PSY 110 - General Psychology


    Survey of the field of psychology.  Major principles, theories, and methods, and their application to the study of human behavior.  Topics include the history and fields of psychology, the scientific method and statistical applications, the neural system, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory, intelligence and cognition, maturation, emotion, personality and social influences.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, emprical findings and historical trends in psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the basic research methods used in psychology and an ability to approach and solve problems from these perspectives.
    3.  Describe behavioral phenomena and the theories that attempt to explain them.
    4.  Evaluate research in psychology critically, both in the scientific and the popular press.
    5.  Communicate effectively about psychological issues.
    6.  Apply psychological concepts to a variety of real world settings.

  
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    PSY 210 - Human Development


    Human development from conception through adulthood to the end of life.  Considers physical, intellectual, emotional, and social maturation and typical problems in various stages of the life cycle.  Especially designed for Health Sciences, Education and Psychology majors.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate understanding and application of the facts, concepts, and theories of the stages of human development from conception through death.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method in the study of behavior and recognize the basic research methods used to gain knowledge about the stages of human development across the life span.
    3.  Understand and analyze psychological research about human development.
    4.  Identify social and ethical issues as well as current considerations in this field of human development.
    5.  Develop a broader understanding of human development across cultures.
    6.  Be familiar with local, state, and federal resources for parents, educators, and other professionals in the field of human development.

  
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    PSY 211 - Child Development


    An overview of the growth and development of the child from conception to adolescence including cognitive, physical, social and psychological changes.  Major theories and research related to child development.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological theories and models of child development.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the role of biological, psychological, cognitive and social processes in child development.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the research methods and ethical considerations appropriate for the study of child development.
    4.  Critically evaluate empirical evidence concerning child development.
    5.  Apply child development concepts to further the development and welfare of children in real-world settings.

  
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    PSY 212 - Adolescent Development


    Study of adolescent development and the complex nature of adolescent thought, behavior, and relationships.  Focus is on physical, cognitive, social, psychological, and moral development.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological theories and models of adolescents development.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the role of biological, cognitive, social, and psychological processes on adolescent development.
    3.  Critically evaluate empirical findings concerning adolescent development.
    4.  Consider ways to effectively apply theoretical concepts to interacting with adolescents in personal and/or professional settings.

  
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    PSY 214 - Abnormal Psychology


    Overview of the history of psychopathology, major psychological disorders, theoretical perspectives to understanding abnormality and approaches to treatment and therapy.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the concept of abnormality.
    2.  Describe the major diagnostic categories of mental disorders.
    3.  Understand and articulate the differences between the major theories currently used to explain causes and symptoms of mental disorders.
    4.  Distinguish between the variety of approaches used to treat mental disorders.

  
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    PSY 217 - Introduction to Counseling Theory and Practice


    Theoretical foundations and techniques associated with a variety of individual counseling approaches including psychoanalystic, humanistic, existential, cognitive - behavioral, feminist, and integrative.  Basic counseling skills are introduced and practiced.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the therapeutic process and the practical elements of the counseling interaction.
    2.  Understand and distinguish between the various theorectical models of counseling.
    3.  Learn and practice listening and attending skills essential to the counseling process.
    4.  Appreciate the variety of ethical and professional issues in counseling and develop a personal position on these issues.
    5.  Apply five contrasting theories to specific cases.
    6.  Integrate theorectical and experiential learning in order to begin to develop a personal model of counseling.
    7.  Engage in self-assessment of personal qualities that support and hinder attempts at being therapeutic for others.

  
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    PSY 223 - Human Exceptionality and Its Assessment


    PSY 223 is a survey of human exceptionality:  attention will be focused on the problems, etiologies (causes), and expectancies of exceptional people in their communities, at school, and at home.  Topics include persons with learning disabilities, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders, emotional disabilities, mental retardation, autism, and people who are gifted, talented, and creative.  Special consideration is given to intelligence testing and the placement of atypical learners in special education and inclusive school settings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding and application of the facts, concepts, and theories associated with atypical development.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method in the study of behavior and the research methods used to gain knowledge about atypical development.
    3.  Critically evaluate research about human exceptionalities.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the etiologies associated with different exceptionalities.
    5.  Appreciate the various needs of individuals with exceptionalities throughout their lifespan.
    6.  Become familiar with local, state, and federal resources for parents, educators, and other professionals interested in the field of human exceptionality.
    7.  Identify and appreciate social and ethical issues associated with working with exceptional individuals.
    8.  Apply course concepts in personal, educational and professional settings dealing with exceptional individuals.

  
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    PSY 227 - Learning and Behavior


    Exploration of the basic principles of conditioning and learning.  Emphasis on classical and operant conditioning and their place in the larger theoretical framework of behavioral psychology.  Application of these principles to understanding and changing individual and group behavior.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a knowledge of behavioral orientation in psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the explanations for behavior as postulated by behaviorists.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of classical and operant learning theory.
    4.  Define basic terms and understand principles and processes associated with classical and operant learning theory and conditioning.
    5.  Describe the various methods used in behavioral research.
    6.  Utilize basic techniques of behavior change.
    7.  Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between classical and operant learning research findings, many of which are based on animal studies, and direct application to human behavior and its modification.

  
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    PSY 230 - Psychology of Women


    Introduction to the scientific study of female behavior.  Exposure to and evaluation of psychological theories used to explain the female experience.  Major women theorists in the field of psychology, their perspectives and contributions.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Appreciate the historical underpinnings to the scientific study of women's experience.
    2.  Understand the historical placement and depiction of women in the discipline of psychology.
    3.  Understand the theory of social constructionism and its value in the process of understanding women's experience.
    4.  Understand theories of women's experience as studied by female psychologists, past and present.
    5.  Explain the biological and psychological basis of female sexuality and gender identity formation.
    6.  Understand psychological explanations of atypical behavior in women.
    7.  Develop a cultural perspective for evaluating psychological theories and information that attempts to explain female behavior.

  
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    PSY 234W - Psychology of Addiction


    Overview of the psychology of addictive behavior, psychophysiology of the brain and the addictive process.  Addiction to alcohol, illicit drugs, over-the-counter medications, psycho-pharmaceuticals, food, gambling and sex are introduced.  The impact of the addictive cycle on the individual, the family, and society as a whole is explored.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology or Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of addiction as a concept.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of various types of addictive behavior.
    3.  Integrate and apply information regarding how the central nervous system and other bodily systems process chemical substances.
    4.  Recognize the comprehensive impact of addiction on an individual's overall well being.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of addiction on the individual, family and society.
    6.  Apply information about various addiction treatment modalities.
    7.  Recognize the role that culture and the media have in relationship to addictive behavior.

  
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    PSY 240 - Psychology of Advertising


    Emphasizes the psychological dimensions of advertising as a basis for attracting and retaining consumer awareness of products, companies, and services.  Theories of communication, motivation, personality, attitude formation, perception and learning that pertain to the diffusion of media advertising messages are examined and analyzed using television, radio, print, and Internet media.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this coure the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the historical foundations of the psychology of advertising.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical issues surrounding advertising strategies currently in use.
    3.  Describe and analyze theories of motivation, perception and personality as each pertains to specific advertising campaigns.
    4.  Describe the rationale for market segmentation strategies through the analysis of consumer life-style and life-cycle theories and understand the rationale for utilizing both quantitative and qualitative analyses.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of theories of communication, such as encoding and decoding advertising messages.
    6.  Identify and explain examples of both classical and operant conditioning techniques utilized in advertising campaigns to affect consumer behavior.
    7.  Assess the importance of the diffusion of innovation in advertising and the psychological components of each market segment.
    8.  Demonstrate how advertising can be used to shape an individual's perceptions of advertising messages.

  
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    PSY 245 WE - Social Psychology


    Scientific study of social influences on human behavior.  Topics include social influence, attitudes, group behavior, social perception, social cognition, aggression, and interpersonal attraction.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, Undergraduate level ENG 110 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 111 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 107 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 108 Minimum Grade of D

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in social psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of, and ability to use, basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation.
    3.  Demonstrate the ability to think critically in applying social psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively about social psychology as a discipline and as a source of useful information and resources.

  
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    PSY 250 WE - Educational Psychology


    Application of psychological theory and research to education including behavioral, cognitive, and social approaches to teaching and learning in schools and other educational settings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, Undergraduate level ENG 110 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 111 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 107 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 108 Minimum Grade of D

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the basic issues and constructs in educational psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the historical and current theories and research which have shaped educational psychology.
    3.  Demonstrate the ability to approach educational problems from a psychological perspective.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively about educational psychology as a discipline and as a source of useful information and resources for educators.
    5.  Demonstrate the ability to apply psychological knowledge to students' own teaching.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to apply psychological knowledge to students' own learning.
    7.  Demonstrate the ability to think critically about traditional and contemporary educational issues.

  
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    PSY 255 - Forensic Psychology


    The primary goal of this course is to investigate the psychological disorders present in both perpetrators and victims of crime as these disorders apply to the various aspects of the United States criminal justice system.  Psychological underpinnings of crimes such as stalking, child abuse, murder, and sexual deviance are explored.  The course also provides an overview of the role psychologists play in criminal investigations, including profiling, risk assessment, crime scene analysis, and therapeutic interventions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  This course is designed to familiarize students with the symptoms of clinical syndromes and the application of diagnostics to forensic populaltions.
    2.  Students will be exposed to the aspects of forensic psychology as a career.
    3.  This course is intended to develop student research and writing skills in the expected professional writing format for social and behavioral sciences and criminal justice (APA).

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize, reflect on, and articulate (both orally and in writing) the scope of the field of forensic psychology including main terminology.
    2.  Summarize major topics, theories, research and concepts in the discipline and explain the interaction between the fields of Criminal Justice and Psychology.
    3.  Apply the principles learned in this course to practical experiences in the field specifically:

    • Differentiate between the various disorders most common in the criminal justice system including the etiology, symptomology, and treatment.
    • Effectively communicate with a variety of people involved in the criminal justice system including perpetrators, victims, and criminal justice personnel.
    • Interpret ambiguous situations involving the accused and the accuser using knowledge of reasoning and behavior.

    4.  Explain different aspects of crime, considering social, biological, cultural, and cognitive influences.
     

     

  
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    PSY 265 - Sport Psychology


    This course will provide an overview of the growing field of Sport Psychology, which examines human behavior in the context of athletic pursuits and the interaction between psychological variables and sports performance.  This multi-faceted field integrates theories and concepts from general, social, personality and developmental psychology as well as exercise psychology, sport sociology, and motor learning.  Topics will include group and team dynamics, leadership, motivation, psychological skills training, use of imagery and performance enhancement, promotion of health and well-being, the relationship between personality and performance, and psychopathology in sport.  This introductory course is ideal for students who wish to work with athletes in some capacity, pursue a career in physical education teaching and/or coaching or who plan on working with individuals in the health, fitness, or wellness industry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology
     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Through verbal or written communication, students will be able to list and describe definitions, distinctions, and proposed casual mechanisms of psychological theories that have been used to study human behavior in the context of sport.  For example, students will be able to compare similarities and differences between various personality theories, understand theories describing the development of personality, and how these personality theories apply to sports psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate how to apply theoretical knowledge to solve common problems that may be encountered in the field through written and verbal communication.
    3.  Show independent critical thinking and communicate these ideas both verbally and in writing by critically analyzing current research in the field.
    4.  Demonstrate knowledge of the interdisciplinary nature of the study of sport from perspectives through a written exam.  Perspectives such as gender differences, social context, developmental and biological changes and, professional ethical issues/concerns within the field will be covered.

     

  
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    PSY 299 - Independent Study in Psychology


    Guided or advanced study in psychology, typically beyond the scope or requirements of Psychology courses offered by the department.  Conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology plus at least 3 additional hours in a 200 level Psychology course

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    To be determined prior to approval.  Agreed to by student, faculty member and department chairperson.

  
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    PTA 100 SL - Introduction to Physical Therapy I


    An introduction to the profession of physical therapy presented with an emphasis on the definition of the role and education of the Physical Therapist Assistant.  Includes an outline of the history and development of medicine, basic knowledge of SOAP note writing, medical terminology, health care institutional organization, ethics, medical-legal aspects of patient care, and fiscal considerations.  Interpersonal skills and professional/patient interactions are discussed.  This course is designated as a service learning course.  The service learning component of the course requires the completion of 50 hours of approved volunteer/service learning experience in a hospital physical therapy department prior to the start of the course.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  50 service learning hours in a hospital physical therapy department

    Corequisite:  PTA 104 Basic Musculoskeletal Anatomy

    Prior or Concurrent:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, PHY 118 Physics for Physical Therapist Assistants

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the history and the roles of medicine, physical therapy, the State Board of Physical Therapy, Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy, and the American Physical Therapy Association.
    2.  Summarize the standards of practice, ethical conduct, federal laws and New York State practice act for physical therapy.
    3.  Describe and demonstrate cultural competence.
    4.  Discuss the team approach to health care and the Physical Therapist Assistant's role within the team, including supervisory responsibilities and the relationship of the Physical Therapist, Physical Therapist Assistant, and other health care personnel.
    5.  Define and use medical terminology at the introductory level.
    6.  Demonstrate the use of SOAP notation in patient record keeping.
    7.  Discuss and demonstrate compliance with HIPAA regulations.
    8.  Explain the purpose, standards and procedures established for the clinical training of Physical Therapist Assistant students at Broome Community College.
    9.  List and describe, in general terms, different patient conditions treated in physical therapy and the importance of evidence based practice.
    10.  Apply an ethical decision making process.
    11.  Demonstrate therapeutic communication.
    12.  Discuss the use of the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice and quality assurance in physical therapy.
    13.  Define and demonstrate evidence based practice.
    14.  Describe reimbursement issues related to providing quality physical therapy interventions.
    15.  Complete a learning style inventory, and recognize and implement individual learning style skills based on the outcome of the inventory.

  
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    PTA 101 - Introduction to Physical Therapy II


    General concepts of disease and disease processes are discussed.  Diseases of selected organs are studied as they relate to Physical Therapy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 100 Introduction to Physical Therapy II

    Corequisite:  BIO 132 Human Biology II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define terms related to the disease and disabilities studied in this course, including cell and tissue damage, inflammation and healing, immune response, disorders of growth, neoplasms, disorders of nutrition, disorders of metabolism, and infectious diseases.
    2.  Explain the causes, pathophysiological processes and classification of disease and disability of the body systems, including the circulatory, digestive, respiritory, integumentary, musculoskeletal and nervous systems.

  
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    PTA 102 - Introduction to Rehabilitation


    A theoretical and applied study of rehabilitation techniques used in the field of physical therapy.  The course includes the study of principles of normal body alignment, body mechanics, posture, balance and cultural competence.  Topics include bed positioning, moving and lifting the dependent patient, as well as the techniques of goniometrics, transfer and elevation activities, passive and self range of motion exercises.  Emphasis is on orthopedic and neurologic treatment techniques, including the therapeutic gymnasium, wheelchairs and assistive devices, orthotics, prosthetics, and the exploration of architectrual barriers.  In addition, interventions for the pediatric patient and patients with amputaions are explored.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 103 Physical Agents and Massage

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe and technically competent manner, including bed modality, transfers, ambulation training, goniometry, ROM, NDT, PNF, orthotics/prosthetics, and balance and coordination exercise.
    2.  Explain and discuss his/her role as a Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and the patient examination/evaluation process.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport, communicating adequate instruction/explanation orally and in writing; concerning all interventions with patient, peers, and other caregivers.
    4.  Identify architectural barriers.
    5.  Define and describe Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), and explain their impact on patient care.

  
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    PTA 103 - Physical Agents and Massage


    A review of the basic principles of massage and application of modalities.  Includes principles and procedures related to the use of the Hubbard tank, therapeutic pool, and intermittent compression.  Specific skills practiced in the laboratory include various massage techniques; use of hot and cold packs, paraffin application; fluid therapy, use of whirlpool and contrast baths; use of ultrasound; application of microwave diathermy; use of electrical stimulation; and ultraviolet and infrared radiation therapy techniques.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 102 Introduction to Rehabilitation

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe and technically competent manner, including massage, superficial heat modalities, deep heat modalities, hydrotherapy, therapeutic pool exercises, electrotherapy, traction, aseptic technique, wound care, handwashing, intermittent compression, and vital sign data collection.
    2.  Explain and discuss the role of the Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and in the patient examination/evaluation process.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport, and communicating adequate instruction/explanation orally and in writing concerning all interventions with patient, peers, and other caregivers.

  
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    PTA 104 - Basic Musculoskeletal Anatomy


    An experientially-based study of basic human bone and muscle anatomy.  Emphasis is on the study of anatomical human musculoskeletal structures as they relate to the field of physical therapy.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  PTA 100 Introduction to Physical Therapy I

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify bony and soft tissue landmarks on the human body.
    2.  Name the bones and muscles of the body according to region.
    3.  List the origin, insertion, nerve and action of each muscle studied.
    4.  Determine the location of each bone or muscle according to region.
    5.  Palpate the superficial bony landmarks and muscles studied.

  
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    PTA 105 - Patient Interaction


    This initial course in the PT Aide Certificate program sequence will introduce the student to the basic skills for working in a health science profession.  Topics covered include medical terminology, professional behavior, effective communication, cultural diversity, OSHA training, time management and basic computer skills.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate proficiency in medical terminology.
    2.  Effectively use therapeutic communication.
    3.  Display professional and ethical behavior.
    4.  Demonstrate cultural awareness and progress toward cultural competence.
    5.  Complete OSHA training.
    6.  Apply time management skills.

  
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    PTA 106 - Physical Therapy Procedures


    This course will introduce the student to common procedures in physical therapy.  Students will learn how to set up, take down and manage PT equipment.  They will also learn basic patient handling skills, safety and body mechanics in preparation to aid the physical therapist and physical therapist assistant in patient interventions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 105 Patient Interaction

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Exhibit proper personal and professional behavior consistently.
    2.  Maintain appropriate interpersonal relationships.
    3.  Exhibit adaptability to changing situations in the PT environment.
    4.  Demonstrate consistently the seven core values of physical therapy.
    5.  Demonstrate the use of universal precautions, clean and sterile aseptic technique.
    6.  Display good body mechanics.
    7.  Prepare for the patient intervention in a safe, thorough and comprehensive manner.
    8.  Perform patient transfers to all surfaces.
    9.  Demonstrate use of assistive devices including wheelchairs.
    10.  Consistently provide guarding when ambulating with a patient and/or transferring a patient.
    11.  Utilize appropriate bed mobility and positioning.
    12.  Clean and maintain department linens as needed.

  
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    PTA 110 - Clinical Affiliation I


    An introductory clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, ambulation, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  Additional emphasis on cultural competence and time management skills.  The student meets with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 102 Introduction to Rehabilitation, PTA 103 Physical Agents and Massage

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    10.7 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    2.  Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    3.  Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    4.  Deliver established patient care to reflect respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.

  
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    PTA 201 - Kinesiology


    A study of muscle structure and function as they relate to the science of human motion.  Emphasizes basic principles of movement and their application to physical therapy, including, manual muscle testing, pathological posture and gait patterns.  A laboratory experience that includes the application of kinesiology and exercise principles is integrated in the learning experience.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain and discuss the role of the Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and in the patient examination/evaluation process.
    2.  Perform all modalities/interventions presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner as they relate to specific diagnosis presented, including manual muscle testing and gait and posture assessment.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport and in communicating adequate instructions/explanations orally and in writing concerning all interventions with patient, peers and other caregivers.
    4.  Conduct themselves professionally, and ethically with respect for others' differences when engaged in learning and simulated patient care activities.
    5.  Define kinesiology, osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, kinetics and biomechanics.
    6.  Describe joint and muscle structure and function and the forces placed upon them.
    7.  Define, discuss and describe normal motor learning and motor skill acquisition.

  
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    PTA 202 - Therapeutic Exercise


    A presentation of the principles and techniques of therapeutic exercise.  Specific neurological, medical, surgical and orthopedic conditions are studied, as are normal gait and posture.  A terminal project related to cultural competence in healthcare is presented.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain and discuss his/her role as a Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and the patient examination/evaluation process.
    2.  Perform all modalities/interventions presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner as they relate to specific diagnosis presented, including:  manual and mechanical resistance exercise, stretching, proprioceptive exercise, aerobics, plyometric exercise and assessment, and interventions for orthopedic conditions.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport and in communicating adequate instructions/explanations orally and in writing concerning all interventions with patient, peers and other caregivers.
    4.  Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct, including respect for others' differences when engaged inlearning and simulated patient care activities.

  
  •  

    PTA 203 - Therapeutic Assessment & Review for the PTA


    An overview of the basic orthopedic, neurological, integumentary, pediatric and cardiopulmonary assessments in th physical therapy clinical setting.  Includes the application of specific state laws to the performance of these assessments by physical therapist assistants.  Also included in this course will be brief reviews of pertinent/related pathological condiditons.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 213 Senior I, PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
     Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify basic therapeutic assessments in the following areas: upper and lower extremity orthopedics, spinal orthopedics, sensory system, balance and coordination (sitting and standing), pediatrics, integumentary and cardiopulmonary areas of physical therapy.
    2.  Explain the implications of the following as they pertain to rehabilitation: orthopedic injuries, neurological injuries/diseases, wound management, postural deficits, cardiopulmonary pathology, pediatric diseases/disabilities, gait deviations, normal gait patterns and pharmaceuticals.

  
  •  

    PTA 210 - Clinical Affiliation II


    A clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility to assist students to improve skills and increase experience.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, ambulation, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  The student meets with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Includes the observation of surgical procedures.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 5 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 110 Clinical Affiliation I

    Corequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    13.3 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    2.  Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    3.  Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    4.  Deliver established patient care to reflect respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.
    5.  Describe the method and document the experience of an observed surgical procedure.
    6.  Manage at least one-half a typical patient caseload by the final week of the affiliation.
    7.  Demonstrate time management skills.

  
  •  

    PTA 213 - Senior Seminar I


    An exploration of the physical therapist assistant's professional role in the testing and treatment of more complex neurological, orthopedic, medical and surgical conditions.  Consideration of psychosocial issues are also discussed.  Review for the PTA licensing exam.  This course is presented in a seminar format of 12 to 15 hours per week for the first 7 weeks of the semester.  SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS:  This course may be presented by guest lecturers, and sessions may be held off campus in various health care facilities depending upon the particular topic.  Significant preparation time outside of regular class hours is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

     

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    5 Seminar Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner.
    2.  Demonstrate the safe and correct procedure for the clinical applicaiton of thermal modalities including Diathermy, Ultraviolet and Infra-red radiation.
    3.  Identify a variety of prosthetics, braces, and orthotics including components, material used in fabrication, advantages, disadvantages, indications and contraindications.
    4.  Interact professionally with other members of the health care team and discuss professional research presented including:  patients with visual or hearing loss, Sports Medicine and taping, cardiac rehabilitation, Chest PT, Complimentary medicine, vestibular therapy, falls assessment, sensory integration and NDT, selective functional movement assessment, hippotherapy, developmental disabilites, networking, interviewing and employment process, G codes and billing, Fish Philosophy, hydrotherapy, and lymphedema.
    5.  Recognize individual and cultural differences and respond appropriately in all aspects of physical therapy services.
    6.  Identify career development and lifelong learning opportunities

  
  •  

    PTA 220 - Clinical Affiliation III


    A clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility to assist students in mastering entry-level skills for employment as a physical therapist assistant.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with a wide variety of patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, gait training, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  Students meet several times with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Clinical hours:  40 hr/week for 6 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

    Corequisites:  PTA 213 Senior Seminar I, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

    Credits: 6
    Hours
    16 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    2.  Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    3.  Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    4.  Deliver established patient care to reflect respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.
    5.  Demonstrate time management skills.
    6.  Research a case study on a patient undergoing physical therapy.
    7.  Manage a typical patient caseload, appropriate for the entry level PTA by the final week of the affiliation.

  
  •  

    PTA 224 - Senior Seminar II


    A capstone course designed to allow students to integrate their theoretical knowledge and their clinical experience.  Students meet and present case studies in seminar format based on their clinical experience.  If time permits, special topics are presented and discussed.  In addition, a student/teacher conference is required for each student prior to graduation.  The course is held for 9 hrs/week for 2 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PTA 213 Senior Seminar I, PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Seminar Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to complete data collection from the patient chart, family, personnel and literature review and discuss the impact of data collected in progression of patient interventions within the plan of care established by the PT.
    2.  Discuss the impact of psychosocial factors and reimbursement policies on patient interventions and outcomes.
    3.  Describe the interrelationship of physical therapy practitioners and other health care providers to the patient's total treatment plan.
    4.  Discuss the integration of theory learned in PTA courses and learning gained through practical experience in the clinic.
    5.  Demonstrate that he/she has been socialized into the role of Physical Therapist Assistant and has internalized appropriate characteristics as shown through action and appearance.
    6.  Present a case study on a patient undergoing physical therapy.

  
  •  

    PTA 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project with advanced work in a specific area of physical Therapy.  Independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of courses currently offered by the department chairperson.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Approval of Department Chairperson

     

    Credits: 1-3
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2.  Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
  •  

    RAD 100 - Introduction to Clinical Education


    Overview of radiologic technology through the study of its historical development, its placement in the medical field today, the organization of a modern radiology department, professional ethics, medicolegal aspects of radiology, and medical terminology.  This course is designated as a service learning course.  The service learning component of the course requires the completion of 50 hours of approved volunteer/service learning experience in a hospital diagnostic imaging department prior to the start of the course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  50 volunteer/service learning hours in a hospital diagnostic imaging department

    Credits: 2.5
    Hours
    2.5 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Communicate with patients in a compassionate and caring manner.
    2.  Define basic medical terms, medical abbreviations and symbols.
    3.  Apply medical/professional ethics in the context of a broader societal ethic.
    4.  Explain concepts of personal honesty, integrity, accountability, competence and compassion as ethical imperatives in health care.
    5.  Identify legal and professional standards and relate each to practice in health professions.
    6.  Explain the legal implications of professional liability, malpractice, professional negligence and other legal doctrines applicable to professional practice.
    7.  Identify the benefits of contining education as related to improved patient care and professional enhancement.

  
  •  

    RAD 101 - Image Production and Evaluation I


    Introduction to the basic principles of radiographic imaging including recording media, processing methods, radiographic quality and radiographic accessories.  Lecture and laboratory are coordinated to enhance these fundamental concepts.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and describe a quality radiographic image, various imaging systems, and the components of an imaging system.
    2.  Describe the conventional processing area and darkroom, radiographic film, and digital processing.
    3.  Perform, identify and describe the steps to automatic processing and alternative processing methods.
    4.  Identify and differentiate between the types of intensifying screens, digital imaging plates, digital detectors, and imaging artifacts.
    5.  Perform, identify, and briefly describe how the geometric and photographic properties affect a quality radiographic image such as density, contrast, recorded detail and distortion.

  
  •  

    RAD 101 L - Image Production and Evaluation I Laboratory


    Introduction to the basic principles of radiographic imaging including recording media, processing methods, radiographic quality and radiographic accessories.  Lecture and laboratory are coordinated to enhance these fundamental concepts.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and describe a quality radiographic image, various imaging systems, and the components of an imaging system.
    2.  Describe the conventional processing area and darkroom, radiographic film, and digital processing.
    3.  Perform, identify and describe the steps to automatic processing and alternative processing methods.
    4.  Identify and differentiate between the types of intensifying screens, digital imaging plates, digital detectors, and imaging artifacts.
    5.  Perform, identify, and briefly describe how the geometric and photographic properties affect a quality radiographic image such as density, contrast, recorded detail and distortion.

  
  •  

    RAD 102 W - Image Production and Evaluation II


    Advanced study of the factors contributing to the radiographic image and evaluation.  This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 101 Image Production and Evaluation I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and describe the basic fundamentals of x-ray production.
    2.  Describe the possible fates of x-ray photons interacting with matter and how various beam limitations can control scatter.
    3.  Identify and describe the anatomical and patholocigal factors that affect the radiographic image.
    4.  Perform and describe how the image receptor responds to x-rays and the various tools and charts that are used to evaluate this response.
    5.  Perform, identify and briefly describe the terms of exposure manipulation, automatic exposure control, and the analysis of image quality.

  
  •  

    RAD 103 L - Positioning I


    Instruction and practice in radiographic positioning or the appendicular skeleton.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    5 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and discriminate between terms such as conventional radiographic image, digital image, projection, position, method, view, and several other basic positioning terms.
    2.  Identify and describe the patient positioning, CR direction, tube angulation, centering point, anatomical structures demonstrated and evaluation criteria for each of the following radiographic projections/positions involving the upper extremities, lower extremities, chest, abdomen, and shoulder girdle.
    3.  Identify the position demonstrated on radiographic images of the upper and lower extremities, chest, abdomen, and shoulder girdle regions.
    4.  Perform or simulate the above mentioned radiographic projections/methods on phantoms or live subject, respectively.
    5.  Perform 85% proficiency in hands-on evaluations with each of the following areas upper extremity, lower extremity, chest, abdomen, and shoulder girdle, prior to performing these types of exams on patients in the clinical setting.

  
  •  

    RAD 104 - Positioning II


    Instruction and practice in radiographic positioning of the axial skeleton.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 100 Introduction to Clinical Education

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and describe the patient positioning, CR direction, tube angulation, centering point, anatomical structures demonstrated, and evaluation criteria for the required radiographic positions/projections involving the bony thorax, pelvic girdle, spinal column, and skull.
    2.  Identify the position/projection demonstrated on radiographic images of the bony thorax, pelvic girdle, spinal column, and skull.
    3.  Perform or simulate the required radiographic positions/projections on phantoms or live subject, respectively.
    4.  Perform 85% on practical evaluations with each of the following areas; bony thorax, pelvic girdle, spinal column, and skull, prior to performing these exams on patients in the clinical setting.

  
  •  

    RAD 110 L - Methods of Patient Care


    Patient care procedures routinely performed in the radiology department.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and explain the following procedures that deal with the care of a patient in the radiology department; basic first aid, transporting the patient safely, vital signs, medical and surgical asepsis, intubation, and contrast media.
    2.  Perform practical evaluations for patient transport and blood pressure on live patients.
    3.  Fill a syringe with contrast media.
    4.  Give a brief explanation of the ancillary radiology departments.

  
  •  

    RAD 115 - Radiation Protection


    Basic radiation protection for the student radiographer.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the justification and responsibility of providing radiation protection during radiographic exams.
    2.  Define and identify the production of x-ray and the types of x-ray interactions with matter.
    3.  Identify and differentiate radiation quantities, the appropriate symbols for each, and the recommended measurement guidelines.
    4.  Identify and describe the biological effects from ionizing radiation and means of protecting the patient and occupational radiographers.
    5.  Identify and describe the various methods and/or devices that may be used to detect and monitor radiation exposure.

  
  •  

    RAD 131 - Clinical Education I


    Introduction and orientation to the Radiology Department in an affiliating site.  Clinical hours: 7.5 hours/day for 6 days; 45 hours total.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 100 Introduction to Clinical Education

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    45 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Properly identify patients and exam to be performed.
    2.  Communicate effectively with the patient, the staff, and classmates.
    3.  Read and utilize radiographic control panels.
    4.  Observe and assist the radiographer in a radiographic examination.
    5.  Perform a minimum on three (3) tasks analyses.
    6.  Identify all items on the clinical performance evaluation with 90% accuracy.
    7.  Maintain all records of clinical assignment hours and clinical examinations observed or performed with a radiographer.

  
  •  

    RAD 132 - Clinical Education II


    Observation and clinical experience for the development of competency involving elementary radiographic procedures in an affiliated site.  Clinical hours:  12 hr/week for 15 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  RAD 100 Introduction to Clinical Education, BIO 131 Human Biology I, RAD 131 Clinical Education I, and RAD 103 L Positioning I, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    12 Clinical Hours/Week
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform imaging procedures under direct supervision for first year level students.
    2.  Develop professional attitude by putting into practice knowledge of ethics, patient care, and communication skills.
    3.  Become more proficient in the use of radiographic equipment and adhere to radiation protection measures.
    4.  Integrate the radiographer's practice standards and HIPAA requirements into the clinical practice setting.
    5.  Perform with 80% accuracy a minimum of 10 competencies on specific categories, after proving proficient on-campus practical exams.

  
  •  

    RAD 133 - Summer Clinical Education III


    Clinical experience for development of competency involving general radiographic procedures in an affiliated site.  Clinical hours: 7.5 hr/day for 30 days; 225 hours total.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  RAD 132 Clinical Education II, BIO 132 Human Biology II, RAD 104 Positioning II, or permission of instructor

    Corequisites:  RAD 216 Imaging Modalities

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    7.5 hr/day for 30 days; 225 hours total
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform imaging procedures under direct/indirect supervision for progressing second year level students and observing other imaging modalities.
    2.  Maintain professional attitude by integrating appropriate personal and professional values into clinical practice.
    3.  Demonstrate proficiency in the use of radiographic equipment, radiation protection, patient communication, and contrast agents.
    4.  Maintain radiographer's practice standards and HIPAA compliance.
    5.  Perform with 80% accuracy a minimum of 10 competencies on specific categories, after providing proficient on-campus practical exams.

  
  •  

    RAD 201 - Equipment Operation and Maintenance


    Principles and operation of radiographic imaging equipment, tube design, X-ray circuitry, mobile equipment, image intensification, and digital radiography/fluoroscopy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  RAD 102W Image Production and Evaluation II

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe and compare imaging systems and the main components of each.
    2.  Define and explain electrostatics, electrodynamics, and magnetism.
    3.  Identify and briefly describe electromagnetism, laws of electromagnetic indution, electromechanical devices, and transformers.
    4.  Describe the construction and principles of operation of the x-ray circuitry, timers, rectifiers, generators, and mobile x-ray units.
    5.  Identify and describe the construction, principles of operation, advantages and disadvantages of x-ray tube design, rating charts, and digital imaging equipment.

  
  •  

    RAD 204 L - Advanced Positioning


    Instruction and practice in positioning techniques involving the skull, facial bones, and advanced radiographic procedures and sectional anatomy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 133 Clinical Education III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and describe the patient positioning, CR direction, tube angulation, centering point, anatomical structures demonstrated, and evaluation criteria for the required radiographic positions/projections involving the skull, sinuses, orbits, and facial bones.
    2.  Identify the position/projection demonstrated on radiographic images of the skull, sinuses, orbits, and facial bones.
    3.  Perform or simulate the required radiographic positions/projections on phantoms or live patients respectively.
    4.  Perform 90% on practical evaluations with each of the following areas of the head; sinuses, orbits, and facial bones.
    5.  Identify and explain the following Advanced Radiographic procedures; Pediatric Radiography, Bone Densitometry, Radiography of the Respriatory System, Radiography of the Genito-Urinary System, and Radiography of the Reproductive System.
    6.  Identify the basic sectional anatomy of the brain, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and extremities.
    7.  Correlate and identify sectional anatomy on CT & MRI images with cadaver images and diagrams.

     

  
  •  

    RAD 211 - Pharmacology for Radiographers


    Pharmacology and drug administration for imaging technologists.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 132 Human Biology II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish between the chemical, generic and trade names for select drugs.
    2.  Classify drugs according to specific categories.
    3.  Explain the effects of select drugs on medical imaging procedures and explain the actions, uses and side effects for select drugs.
    4.  Explain the pharmacology of barium and iodine compounds.
    5.  Describe methods and techniques for administering various types of contrast agents and identify and describe the routes of drug administration.
    6.  Demonstrate appropriate venipuncture technique on a simulated arm utilizing appropriate aseptic technique.
    7.  Identify, describe and document complications associated with intravenous drug therapy and appropriate actions to resolve these complications.
    8.  Explain the current legal and ethical status of the radiographer's role in drug administration.

  
  •  

    RAD 216 - Imaging Modalities


    Introduction to the principles of computerized axial tomography, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  RAD 102 Image Production and Evaluation II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the following imaging procedures:  MRI; CT; Nuclear Medicine; PETCT and Ultrasound.
    2.  Provide patient education concerning the following procedures:  MRI; CT; Nuclear Medicine; PETCT and Ultrasound.
    3.  Observe each of the various imaging modalities for diagnostic studies:  MRI; CT; Nuclear Medicine; PETCT and Ultrasound.
    4.  Perform basic CT competencies of the head, thorax and abdomen.

  
  •  

    RAD 220 - Radiologic Pathology


    A presentation of the various medical and surgical diseases and their relationship to radiographic procedures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 132 Human Biology II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define basic terms related to pathology.
    2.  Discuss the symptoms manifested and treatment of various congenital, chronic, acute, and acquired diseases.
    3.  Identify diseases causes by or contributed to by genetic factors.
    4.  Identify various disease processes radiographically.
    5.  Explain how a disease might affect the production of the radiographic image.

  
  •  

    RAD 225 W - Advanced Imaging Procedures


    An overview of advanced imaging procedures such as:  equipment, the use of computers in imaging, responsibilities of the radiographer, and the care of the patient.  The use of body systems-based approach to imaging procedures.  This course is desinated as a writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 230 Clinical Education IV, RAD 204 Advanced Positioning, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe specialized radiographic equipment utilized for vascular, cardiac, surgical, interventional, an trauma radiography.
    2.  Identify radiographic anatomy utilizing advanced imaging procedures.
    3.  Determine the ideal diagnostic procedure which will provide optimal diagnostic results.
    4.  Provide patient education for advanced imaging procedures.

  
  •  

    RAD 227 - CT Physics and Equipment


    This course is designed to cover system operations and components, image processing and display, image quality, and artifacts involved in Computed Tomography (CT).  Emphasis will be placed on data acquisition, tissue attenuation conversions, image reconstruction algorithms, processing display, and factors controlling image resolution.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  The student must be a Registered Radiologic Technologist (ARRT)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the history of Computed Tomography.
    2.  Describe the components of the CT imaging system.
    3.  Describe the types, location, and function of CT detectors.
    4.  Define linear attenuation coefficient.
    5.  Define and describe the functions of the data acquisition system (DAS).
    6.  List CT computer data processing steps.
    7.  Identify common filters, algorithms, and kernel settings.
    8.  Explain post-processing techniques.
    9.  Define terms such as:
         a)  Pixel
         b)  Matrix
         c)  Pitch
         d)  X, Y, Z coordinates
         e)  CT/Hounsfield
         f)  Window width (WW) and Window level (WL)
         g)  Spatial resolution
         h)  Contrast resolution
         i)  Noise
         j)  Region of interest (ROI)
         k)  Sampling
    10.  Name the factors affecting image quality in CT.
    11.  Trace the sequence of events in CT scanning from application of electrical current to the x-ray tube through image display.
    12.  Relate differences between conventional and spiral CT scanning.
    13.  Name the radiation protection devices and scan factors used to reduce patient dose in CT.
    14.  List and describe current data storage techniques.

  
  •  

    RAD 228 - CT Sectional Anatomy


    This course will cover the function and identification of cross-sectional anatomy as related to the Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging process.  Emphasis will be placed upon visualization of CT images of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and musculoskeletal system for imaging professionals.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  The student must be a Registered Radiologic Technlogist (ARRT) or Permission of the Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Name anatomical structures located within the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, upper and lower extremities.
    2.  Describe the relationship of each anatomical structure to surrounding structures.
    3.  Describe the function of each anatomical structure.
    4.  Locate the anatomical structures on CT images in the transverse axial, coronal, sagittal, and orthogonal (oblique) planes.

  
  •  

    RAD 229 - CT Pathology


    This course will provide an understanding of common diseases diagnosable using Computed Tolography (CT).  Importance will be placed upon the examination and demonstration of disease or trauma process from its description, etiology, associated symptoms and diagnosis with CT.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  The student must be a Registered Radiologic Technologist (ARRT)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define common terms used in the study of pathology.
    2.  Name common pathological conditions affecting any of the body systems studied in this course.
    3.  For each common pathological condition identified in the course:
         a)  Describe the disorder
         b)  List the etiology
         c)  Name the associated symptoms
         d)  Name the common means of diagnosis
         e)  List characteristic CT manifestations of the pathology
    4.  Identify each of the pathological conditions studied on CT images.
    5.  Identify pathology resulting from trauma on CT images.
    6.  Identify pathology common only in pediatric patients.

  
  •  

    RAD 230 - Clinical Education IV


    Practical application of advanced positioning techniques in an affiliating site.  Clinical hours:  18 hrs/week for 15 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 133 Summer Clinical Education III or permission of instructor

    Credits: 6
    Hours
    18 Clinical Hours/Week
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform advanced imaging procedures under more indirect supervision for second year level students focusing on procedures such as:  skull, sinuses, facial bones, surgical, pediatric, trauma.
    2.  Demonstrate continued professional attitude in the clinical practice.
    3.  Maintain proficiency in the use of radiographic equipment, radiation protection, patient communication, and contrast agents.
    4.  Maintain radiographer's practice standards and HIPAA compliance.
    5.  Perform with 80% accuracy a minimum of 10 competencies on specific categories, after proving proficiency on campus practical exams.

  
  •  

    RAD 232 - Clinical Education V


    Application of advanced radiographic procedures including evening assignments in an affiliated hospital.  Clinical hours:  12 hr/week for 15 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 230 Clinical Education IV

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    12 Clinical Hours/Week
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform advanced imaging procedures, simulations, and terminal competencies to include patient care and communication skills, radiation protection, image production, and evaluation images.
    2.  Demonstrate entry level radiographer skills and professional attitude.
    3.  Demonstrate competency in the use of radiographic equipment, radiation protection, patient communication, and contrast agents.
    4.  Maintain radiographer's practice standards and HIPAA compliance.
    5.  Complete American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Clinical Competency Requirements.

  
  •  

    RAD 245 - Radiobiology


    Radiobiology and advanced radiation protection procedures related to diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radiation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 201 Equipment Operation and Maintenance

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define and describe radiobiology, interactions of radiation and atoms, basic concepts of radiation, and the chemical composition of the human body.
    2.  Identify and describe the molecular composition of a cell and the effects of radiation on cells.
    3.  Describe the tissue radiosensitivity, systemic, genetic, and somatic effects of ionizing radiation.
    4.  Briefly describe the radiation-induced mutations of DNA and chromosomes.
    5.  Identify and describe means of radiation protection and measurement in order to follow the ALARA Concept.

  
  •  

    RAD 250 L - Quality Assurance


    The basic principles and techniques of quality assurance testing presented and illustrated through laboratory experiments.  Major emphasis on the tests and measurements used to analyze imaging systems with minimum information loss.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  RAD 201 Equipment Operation and Maintenance

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define and describe the historical development of quality assurance, quality management, quality care, quality control testing and the QM tool used to evaluate them.
    2.  Perform, identify and describe the purpose, frequency of testing, test equipment, potential problems, acceptance limits, and possible corrective actions for radiographic equipment, processing equipment, and viewing equipment.
    3.  Perform, identify and describe the quality control testing for beam geometry and quality.
    4.  Define and briefly describe quality assurance/control testing for CT, MRI, Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine, Interventional, Mammography, and Digital Imaging.
    5.  Explain the purpose of Total Quality Management within a radiology department.

  
  •  

    RAD 262 - Mammography


    Individual modules consisting of 1) patient education and assessment; 2) anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the breast; 3) positioning and image evaluation; 4) mammographic technique; and 5) instrumentation and quality assurance.  Preparation for the AART mammography registry examination.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisitie:  RAD 230 Clinical Education IV or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate basic mammographic positioning skills.
    2.  Explain advanced positioning techniques for supplementary views, difficult patients and implant patients.
    3.  Describe how various physical characterisitcs of the x-ray tube affect mammographic imaging; perform mammography quality control testing procedures per MQSA guidelines.
    4.  Describe the differences between imaging systems used to perform Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) examinations.
    5.  Describe and develop a comprehensive quality assurance program for digital mammography; understand the differences between film-screen and digital imaging.
    6.  Describe the parameters in digital imaging that control resolution and contrast.

  
  •  

    RAD 264 - CT Procedures


    This course is designed to provide detailed coverage of procedures for Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging.  Emphasis will be placed on patient care, patient assessment, basic pharmacology, medical ethics and law, and scanning procedures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  The student must be a Registered Radiologic Technologist (ARRT)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List the CT scanner and scan room preparation steps necessary for CT procedures.
    2.  Educate the patient on the general aspects of CT and the specifics of the CT procedure.
    3.  Name the patient preparation required for each protocol.
    4.  Determine if contrast media is indicated for a specific protocol and if indicated, name the type, specify the dosage, and the route of administration.
    5.  Determine from the patient medical laboratory results, patient history, and charted information if the use of contrast media is contraindicated and explain why.
    6.  Describe the conditions that require a patient to grant informed consent in writing for a CT procedure.
    7.  List the range, azimuth, anatomical landmarks, patient orientation, position, and technical factors used to produce CT images for a given protocol.
    8.  Provide correct information concerning the scan field of view, display field of view, mode, algorithm, gantry angle, technical factors, range, table incrementation, and slice thickness for each procedure protocol.
    9.  List the routine filming format for each protocol studied.
    10.  Perform any nonroutine procedure tasks associated with CT protocols.
    11.  Differentiate between scanning parameters for routine CT procedure vs. spiral protocols.
    12.  Explain current trends in CT image archiving.
    13.  List post-procedure patient instructions for each procedure protocol.

  
  •  

    RAD 266 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging


    Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Radiographer.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the physics of MRI.
    2.  Analyze the types of disease processes that are diagnosed through the use of MRI.

  
  •  

    RAD 295 - Seminar in Radiography


    Preparation of the technical report and its organization for both written and oral presentation.  Readings , review sessions, and practice exams in current literature and journals will prepare students for their ARRT Certification Examination.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Senior year status

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Prepare oral and written presentation.
    2.  Develop a resume.
    3.  Pass competency examinations with an 80% in:  Radiation Protection and Radiation Biology, Equipment Operation and Quality Control, Image Production and Evaluation, Patient Care, and Radiographic Procedures.

  
  •  

    RAD 298 - Independent Clinical Study


    A one-time individual student clinical experience to be conducted under the direction of a clinical instructor and approved by the department chairperson.

    Credits: (1-2)
    Hours
    Clinical: TBD
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform specified imaging procedures to an appropriate level of competency.

  
  •  

    RAD 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of radiography.  Independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of courses currently offered by the department.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Approval of Department Chairperson

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2.  Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
  •  

    RDG 090 - Reading Fundamentals


    A non-credit course involving individual diagnosis of student's reading strengths and weaknesses, and development and implementation of program to upgrade basic skills.  Content to vary with individual student.

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 4 credit - equivalents
  
  •  

    RDG 092 - College Preparatory Reading


    A course emphasizing vocabulary expansion, inferential and critical comprehension, and flexible rate.  Instruction and practice of reading skills to specific content areas.

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 4 credit - equivalents
  
  •  

    RDG 094 - College Vocabulary Skills


    Designed to provide students with several methods of mastering vocabulary encountered in college courses.  Students will review dictionary skills.  Learn to infer meanings from context, structural analysis, and methods of studying vocabulary for examinations.  In-class practice will be designed to fit students' individual needs.

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    2 Class Hours for 8 Weeks
  
  •  

    RDG 110 - Efficient Reading


    Development of skills characteristic of the mature reader.  Examination of structure of material, emphasis on identification of purpose, flexibility of rate.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Class Hours for 10 Weeks; Course starts at beginning of third week of semester
  
  •  

    RDG 120 - Critical Reading


    Emphasis is on critical reading and thinking skills.  Students will analyze and evaluate college level readings beyond the literal level.  Critical thinking skills will also be applied to the mastery of content area text material.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    SAC 101 - The Individual in a Changing Environment


    Individual interaction and reading designed to foster understanding and application of psychological and emotional growth within the many environments we are part of.  Basic class material is the individual and group analysis of student's experience within an immediate unstructured setting.  Focus on analysis and organization of experience into a personally rewarding conception of growth.  Individual self-development projects outside the class.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    SAC 110 - Orientation for International Students


    An orientation course for international students designed to aid in their adjustment as students at Broome Community College. Study skills, academic regulations, the American educational system, individual educational and vocational goals, American customs. Especially intended for students during their initial semester of enrollment in conjunction with English-as-a-Second-Language course offerings, such as ESL 103, 104, 106. (This course is not acceptable for credits toward a degree.)

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
  
  •  

    SAC 250 - Career Exploration


    How to plan, establish, change a career.  The process of deciding on a career and implementing career goals, assessment of values, interests and skills plus their relationship to occupations.  Analysis of the labor market needs, identification of employers and sources of occupation information, the means of securing employment through proposals, resumes, applications and job interviews.  Supportive small group atmosphere.  Class activities include discussion, speakers, testing, and individual counseling within career development theory.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    SAC 251 - Career Search


    For people who know their interests, skills, and values but are not sure which career field or lifestyles would be most satisfying to them.  Sources of occupational information, analysis of labor market needs, what colleges and college majors best prepare students for their career goals.  For students who are beginning a career, changing careers, or returning to the job market.  For students who scored 13-18 on My Vocational Situation.  Supporting small group atmosphere.  Discussion sessions, speakers, testing field work, and individual counseling.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Seminar Hours
  
  •  

    SAC 295 - Seminar in Human Potential


    Human Potential seminar centers on the person within a positive group setting while working on and with the potential of all involved. It assists persons in achieving the following:  becoming more self-directed, self-motivating, self-aware, selfcontrolled, self-disciplined and empathetic toward others.  The focus is on developing the person's own resources by utilizing specific and structured procedures.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
  •  

    SOC 110 - Introduction to Sociology


    Students will focus on developing their sociological imagination through the scientific study of society and the human behavior that occurs as a result of social conditions.  To accomplish this task, the three major sociological approaches, research methodology, culture, socialization, social interaction in groups and organizations, deviance, social stratification, the social institutions, and social change constitute the major topics of study.  This course satisfies the civic education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Analyze the meaning and relevance of developing a "sociological imagination."
    2.  Identify major contributions of the early classical social theorists.
    3.  Explain the three major theoretical approaches used by sociologists.
    4.  Discuss the four major research methods used by sociologists, the difference between qualitative and quantitative research methods and the importance of science to the discipline of sociology.
    5.  Identify the four levels of measurement, measures of central tendency, variance, standard deviation and the difference between descriptive and inferential statistics.
    6.  Describe at least two major functions of each major social institution.
    7.  Identify the sociological meaning of culture, socialization, social interaction, groups, organizations, deviance, social stratification, social institution, and social change.
     

  
  •  

    SOC 111 - Social Problems


    This course presents a sociological study of social issues with a particular focus on those social issues that have been defined within U.S. society as social problems.  Topics presented for discussion and critical analysis include:  sociological theory, research methodology, social inequality, deviance, sexuality, physical and mental health, urbanization, globalization, war/terrorism and the environment.  Additional topics may be included as social problems are continually defined within U.S. society.  This course satisfies the civic education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the difference between a social issue and a social problem as it is defined in the U.S.
    2.  Discuss the reasons for variations in the definition and recognition of social problems over time and within industrialized societies.
    3.  Identify the major research methodologies used by sociologists to collect data.
    4.  Analyze the major sociological causes underlying social problems.
    5.  Identify possible sociological solutions that may alleviate some aspects of social problems.
    6.  Analyze public policies that foster the continuance of some major social problems from the sociological perspective.
     

  
  •  

    SOC 220 - Race and Ethnicity


    The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the sociological study of race and ethnicity in the United States and the intergroup relationships that emerge.  The development of intergroup hostility, acculturation, assimilation, and pluralism are considered.  Specifically, the course emphasizes understanding the social, demographic, economic, political, and historical forces that have resulted in the unique experiences of different racial and ethnic groups.  (This course will satisfy the social science elective requirement).

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the concepts of race and ethnicity as socio-historical constructs.
    2.  Evaluate the socio-cultural concepts of race and ethnicity using the sociological perspective.
    3.  Describe the concepts of intergroup hostility, acculturation, assimilation, and pluralism based on the sociological perspective.
    4.  Apply sociological theories to explain the historical forces that have resulted in the unique experiences of racial/ethnic groups in the United States.
    5.  Explain the impact of socio-demographic forces among and between racial/ethnic groups in the United States.
    6.  Analyze the socio-economic forces that have and continue to shape the social lives of racial/ethnic groups in the United States.
    7.  Analyze the socio-political forces that have and continue to shape the social lives of racial/ethnic groups in the United States.
    8.  Evaluate the impact of one's race/ethnicity when intersected with social class, gender, and sexuality on one's personal identity.

  
  •  

    SOC 230 - Marriage & the Family


    Explanations of the changing institutional structures and interpersonal dynamics of both marriage and the family across cultures and throughout history are studied.  Topics covered include dating, preparation for marriage, role expectations, communication, family interaction, future of the nuclear family and alternative family structures.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Comprehend the interpersonal dynamics and changing institutional structures of marriage and the family within contemporary society.
    2.  Evaluate the major roles of the family as a social institution across cultures and throughout history.
    3.  Analyze the relationship between the institution of the family and the social institutions of the economy and politics.
    4.  Apply communication strategies that facilitate effective family relationships.
    5.  Understand the family as it is defined by the U.S. Census bureau as a social institution and as it is defined by individuals.

  
  •  

    SOC 250 - Introduction to Social Work


    Exploration of the field of social work.  Introduces philosophical frameworks for the profession and examines the social welfare system.  A systems approach to social issues and functions will be emphasized to provide balance between policy and practice.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the field of social work.
    2.  Critically examine the social welfare system.
    3.  Demonstrate knowledge of the fields of practice and population service in social work.
    4.  Develop strategies to observe, consider, and explore social welfare issues.

  
  •  

    SOC 289 - Research Methods


    This course provides students with a basic understanding of how to conduct and evaluate scientfic research in the social sciences.  Course topics follow the major steps in qualitative and quantitative social science research design and execution from the definition of the problem and formulation of hypotheses to the interpretation of results and preparation of the final report.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Students will explore the role and importance of research.
    2.  Students will be introduced to the scientific research process.
    3.  Students will identify acceptable ethical procedures for the protection of human subjects associated with social scientific research.
    4.  Students will be introduced to the concepts of scientific sampling, generalizability, levels of measurement, reliability, and validity.
    5.  Students will learn the difference between descriptive statistics and inferential statistics.
    6.  Students will understand the differences between quantitative and qualitative research methods.
    7.  Students will learn the difference between social scientific knowledge and other types of knowledge.
    8.  Students will learn how to write a research proposal.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the role and importance of social scientific research.
    2.  Evaluate social scientific studies published inpeer-reviewed journals.
    3.  Apply the research process to create a small-scale research proposal.
    4.  Identify the differences between qualitative and quantitative research methods.
    5.  Explain the role and importance of research ethics regarding human subjects.
    6.  Write clearly - identifying social scientific information correctly using proper citations.

  
  •  

    SOC 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project in sociology which is beyond the scope or requirements of the courses offered by the department, conducted under the direction of a faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester Hours in Sociology

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed by the instructor and approved by the department chair and Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
  •  

    SOS 101 - Contemporary World Issues


    An introduction to the ideas, methods, and materials (print, visual, and electronic) used in various social science fields, including history, political science, sociology, economics, anthropology, and geography.  Topics will cover selected modern global issues such as that will change each semester, but which will focus on underlying issues of globalism, pluralism, democratic aspirations, and equity.  Additional topics may cover issues in population, human rights, natural resources, development, conflict resolution, and cooperation.  Intended for beginning liberal arts students who will take social science courses in the future.  Daily newspaper reading is a core activity.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify some of the fundamental principles underlying current global issues.
    2.  Apply some of the basic concepts of the social sciences, including political science, geography, economics, and others, to an analysis of current global issues.
    3.  Describe select current global issues.
    4.  Identify various views on these issues.
    5.  Identify and analyze various solutions proposed for these issues.

  
  •  

    SOS 110 - Public Affairs


    Contemporary problems in America - racial strife, urban decay, educational dilemmas, poverty, pollution - examined from a "policy" perspective:  what can and should government do about them?  Attention to explanations rooted in values (liberty, equality), theory (political, economic, sociological), and practice (politics), and strategies for solving problems.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain racial/ethnic struggles based on the history of the U.S.
    2.  Analyze major urban problems and their consequences.
    3.  Identify possible solutions to the problem of urban decay.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the major issues found within the U.S. educational system.
    5.  Identify political, economic, and sociological forces at the root of public affairs issues in the U.S.
    6.  Evaluate the legal environment within which public institutions operate.
    7.  Discuss strategies to enhance liberty and equality within a pluralistic society.

  
  •  

    SOS 111 - Public Policy


    This course offers students an analytical survey of policy formulation and implementation in the United States, together with an examination of the impact of policy upon individuals and groups in American society.  Topics covered will include:  policy making processes, policy analysis, federal and state policies, rationality and irrationality in public policy, incrementatlism, special interests, public choice, and institutional influences.  This course satisfies the civic education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    POS 111
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define some of the major concepts in the study of public policy.
    2.  Describe the context within which policy decisions are made, including institutional, economic, cultural, and so on.
    3.  Apply their general knowledge of public policy to the analysis os specific policy issues such as economic, environmental, educational, and foreign policy issues.
    4.  Evaluate arguments for various policy options.
    5.  Assess public policy as an approach to dealing with public issues.

  
  •  

    SOS 116 - International Business Environments


    An overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic factors that influence the trade related interaction of nations and the operations of global business enterprises.  Trade theory, economic integration, global sourcing, export-import basics, cultural awareness, and other current topics relating to international business will be covered.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BUS 116
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will able to:

    1.  Analyze data on the global nature of economic and business activity.
    2.  Utilize the basic strategies for entering foreign markets to assess decision-making by internationsl business enterprises.
    3.  Critique political and economic systems encountered by international business.
    4.  Discuss cultural differences among nations and within nations along with the challenges these differences create for international business.
    5.  Apply international trade theory to cases involving international business.
    6.  Analyze and discuss current issues relating to globalization of markets and production and the consequences for businesses, workers, communities, and national policy.
    7.  Work with and interpret examples of protectionism as to their rationale and consequences for business, workers, communities, and national policy.
    8.  Research various international organizations and regional trade groups including the WTO (World Trade Organization) and European Union, using each organization's website.
    9.  Convert currencies and calculate the impact of foreign exchange movements on international business contracts.
    10.  Select appropriate strategy for managing all aspects of an international business including export/import financing.
    11.  Analyze the benefits and costs of differenct international strategies by using the Case Method.

  
  •  

    SOS 120 - Science, Technology, and Democratic Society


    A study of the interaction of the forces of science and technology with the major institutions (i.e., govt., industry, family, education, and organized religion) of contemporary democratic society.  Analysis of differing viewpoints on the role of a scientific technology with respect to key public policy issues (i.e., genetic engineering, fetal tissue research, pollution, space exploration, information management, weapons development, evolution/creationism debate, communications, etc.).  Satisfies the Civic Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify concepts in the social sciences relevant to the study of the social roles of science and technology.
    2.  Discuss the social and political context within which science and technology evolve.
    3.  Describe some of the major historical changes in the social roles of science and technology in Western societies.
    4.  Identify some of the current issues and problems in science and technology in terms of their social and political roles and influence.
    5.  Evaluate various solutions to problems raised by science and technology in contemporary society.

  
  •  

    SOS 127 - Introduction to Conflict Resolution and Mediation


    This course will explore the dynamics of conflict; and the theory of alternative dispute resolution methods; how communication skills enhance resolution or escalate conflict; an examination of various approaches to the resolution of conflict.  A major emphasis will be on the principles of mediation an skills required for effective mediation practice thus much of the course will require active class participation, including role play.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of teh Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify various methods of conflict resolution and how these methods have developed historically.
    2.  Identify conflict as an inevitable part of life that offers opportunities for growth and responsibility.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of alternative dispute resolution in our society.
    4.  Describe the role that conflict plays in their personal and professional lives.
    5.  Identify alternatives to the court system for conflict resolution.
    6.  Apply ways to enhance communication skills that help them and others present their point of view.
    7.  Experience the mediation process as mediator and disputant.

  
  •  

    SOS 155 - Media and Society


    An in-depth examination and analysis of the impacts and effects of the mass media upon society an the converse societal influences upon the media.  Includes such issues as media concentration, portrayal of violence, stereotyping, the public's right to know, among others.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  COM 100 Introduction to Mass Media

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 154
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define some of the major concepts in media studies.
    2.  Describe the historic and present day forms of media.
    3.  Discuss the economic, political, social, and cultural context within which the media operate.
    4.  Identify the major functions of the media in contemporary society.
    5.  Analyze selected issues and problems in the contemporary media landscape.

  
  •  

    SOS 171 - Contemporary Cultures


    The course is designed to provide CASS student with an understanding of the values and institution of contemporary societies.  The United States is com pared and contrasted with other countries.  Student are expected to develop familiarity with major tool and concepts in social science disciplines to analyze both their own countries and host country social institutions.

    Credits: 3
    Note
    This course is offered for CASS students only.

  
  •  

    SOS 172 - Community Organization and Development


    The objective of this course is to provide CASS scholars with the principles of community service, participation, and commitment. In this course student will learn communications, networking, and skills in influencing and mobilizing community members, as well as investigative, research, planning, and implementation tools, which are essential to serve their home communities.  Special attention will be given to planned change, innovation, development, and their impact in the local society, traditional values and environment.

    Credits: 3
    Note
    This course is offered for CASS students only.

  
  •  

    SOS 186 - Food in History and Society


    This course will explore the history of food as a means of introducing students to basic concepts in food studies.  Through historical examples, general themes will be developed, including the historical evolution of food systems, the development of regional and national cuisines, the relation of food to society and culture (including religion, ethnicity, and gender), and the globalization of foods and cuisines.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    HOS 186
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify some of the basic concepts in food studies.
    2.  Describe the fundamental features of the foraging, agricultural, and industrial food systems.
    3.  Analyze historical examples which illustrate the relation of food to society and culture.
    4.  Describe the historical development of some regional and national cuisines.
    5.  Identify some of the main issues in the globalization of foods and cuisines.

  
  •  

    SPA 101 - Beginning Spanish I


    This course introduces the student to the sound system and grammatical structure of the Spanish language.  The focus will be on developing and raising skill levels in the areas of aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.  Use of the target language is greatly stressed.  This course will also address various cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.

    Spanish 101 is for students with little or no previous Spanish study.  Students are not expected to know Spanish when they begin the course.  This is not a course to be taken for review.  Students with more than two years of high school Spanish should NOT enroll in this course.  You must talk to your Professor, immediately, if you do have more than two years of high school Spanish.  **Be aware that this class is not suitable for native and heritage speakers of Spanish.  Native and heritage speakers must not enroll in this course** NO EXCEPTIONS.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Note


    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have developed some knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the Spanish language and culture.
    2.  Have gained enough confidence to communicate in basic Spanish.
    3.  Understand the grammatical construction of language.
    4.  Speak basic Spanish in formal and informal situations.
    5.  Read with comprehension selected materials.
    6.  Write familiar material with ease.
    7.  Respond orally to questions in Spanish at the beginner level.
     

  
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    SPA 102 - Beginning Spanish II


    This course will build upon the grammatical structure of the Spanish language learned in first semester SPA 101.  Speaking the language is greatly stressed at this level.  Students of SPA 102 are expected to enhance the four language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.  This course will also discuss various cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.

    Spanish 102 is for students who have taken first semester college Spanish (SPA 101) or three years of high school Spanish.  Students who have four or more years of high school Spanish may not take this class.  **This course is not suitable for native or heritage speakers of Spanish.  Native speakers or heritage speakers of Spanish must not enroll in this course.**

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 101 Beginning Spanish I

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify, explain the use of, and use orally and in writing grammatical concepts appropriate to their level.
    2.  Deliver an oral presentation in the target language.
    3.  Write guided compositions in Spanish.
    4.  Respond orally to questions in Spanish at the basic level.

  
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    SPA 115 - Conversational Spanish for Law Enforcement


    This course is designed specifically for individuals who are in law enforcement.  The instruction will focus on specific, oral-aural, work-related Spanish and cross-cultural studies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    SPA 116 - Spanish for Business


    In doing business in Latin American, students learn basic Spanish phrases and questions necessary to carry out travel for business purposes.  Discussions also cover 50 important cross-cultural issues pertinent to relationships between non-Hispanics business persons and Hispanics business leaders in Latin America.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    SPA 201 - Intermediate Spanish I


    One purpose of this class is to review what the student has already learned and to expand on it.  This is a grammar class with an introduction to cultural and literary readings and basic research on topics related to the Spanish-speaking world.  All skills (reading. Writing, listening, and speaking), as well as the three basic fields (grammar, literature, and culture), will be emphasized in the course.  Speaking the language is greatly stressed at this level.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 102 Beginning Spanish II

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    SPA 201 is an appropriate entry point for most students with four or more years of high school Spanish.

  
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    SPA 202 - Intermediate Spanish II


    The study of grammar and syntax will be emphasized through writing, reading, and conversation about Spanish and Latin American literary works of recognized authors.  Speaking the language is greatly stressed at this level.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    SPA 203 - Spanish in Conversation


    This conversational class will intensively emphasize oral practice in the classroom through a wide variety of topics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II or chairperson approval

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    SPA 204 - Spanish Through Its Literature: A Contact Zone


    To talk about literature is also to talk about history, culture, and experience.  This course will attempt to explore the ways in which Latin American/Hispanic writers have made connections between literature and history, literature and culture, literature and experience.  One of the objectives of this course is to provide students an opportunity to examine the social, historical, and culture context(s) in which Latin American/Hispanic literature is produced.  That is, to open a space, a "contact zone," that will allow students to relate not only with the Spanish language but also with its literary production, its culture and its history.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II or chairperson approval

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    SPA 207 - Introduction to Latin American Literature: from the Conquest to Testimonial Narrative


    An introductory survey of Latin Americas literary production with special attention to historical and social contexts.  The course will include selected readings reflecting historical developments of Latin American literature from the Conquest to the "Boom" to Testimonial Narrative.  The selections to be read will include works by Colon, Guaman Poma de Ayala, Bartolome de las Casas, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Elena Poniatowska, Laura Esquivel, Isabel Allende, Vargas Llosa, Cortazar, and Carmen Cecilia Suarez.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II or chairperson approval

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
  
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    SPK 095 - Academic Speaking and Listening for Non-Native Speakers


    Spoken American English for non-native speakers at the high-intermediate to advanced level.  Further development of speaking, critical listening, and note-taking proficiency for full participation in academic, professional, and social situations.  Understanding of rhetorical patterns of formal, spoken English and lectures from diverse disciplines.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ESL 113 English as a Second Language Grammar 3, ESL 114 English as a Second Language Speaking & Listening 3, ESL 115 English as a Second Language Reading and Writing 3

    Corequisite:  ENG 095 Introduction to Academic Writing for Non-Native Speakers

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Grasp the rules for sentence focus, thought groups and intonation and apply them properly in English sentences, using proper stress, rhythm and intonation.
    2.  Use advanced language functions to communicate effectively in real world situations.
    3.  Describe events using different verb tenses.
    4.  Recognize and use non-verbal communication in a variety of social situations.
    5.  Compose and deliver a structured presentation with supporting materials.
    6.  Recognize common patterns of lecture organization and take notes in various formats based on those patterns.
    7.  Distinguish between fact and inference, and between main ideas and details in spoken texts and dialogs.

  
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    SPK 110 - Effective Speaking


    Principles and practices of public speaking.  Students will present extemporaneous and prepared speeches.  They will research, write, revise and deliver speeches, paying attention to audience, organization, technology, development, delivery, critical listening, and constructive evaluation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Feel more comfortable and confident in public speaking situations.
    2.  Build, practice, and deliver speeches with content and organization appropriate for the allotted time, intended audience, specific purpose, and given setting.
    3.  Deliver a variety of speeches, including informative, persuasive, inspirational, entertaining, and impromptu.
    4.  Develop the ability to use language clearly, accurately, concisely and appropriately, and to make effective use of body language, eye contact, vocal variety, diction, and visual aids (including PowerPoint) in public speaking.
    5.  Develop their research and writing skills to effectively enhance their public speaking skills.
    6.  Become better listeners and develop the ability to provide and receive constructive feedback.

 

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