Nov 17, 2018  
Website Catalog 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    PED 150 - Personal Nutrition


    Students will learn the basic principals of good nutrition; how energy nutrients work within their body and how they can use nutrition to improve their overall health.  They will also be able to utilize this information to decipher the current nutrition recommendations being addressed in the media.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    15 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the role of nutrients in the human body.
    2.  Apply knowledge of nutrition to a personal life style, nutrition plan, weight control and activity, and/ or athletic performance.
    3.  Explain the relationship between diet and: Health, disease and weight control.
    4.  Make a personal assessment of their dietary practices and proposals.
    5.  Identify claims regarding food and additives.
    6.  Apply the concepts of reliable research and consumer behaviors to one's advantage.

  
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    PED 160 - History and Philosophy of Physical Education and Sport


    This course is devoted to the study of physical education and sport based on major historial events and associated philosophies that have shaped physical education and sport from ancient times to present.  We will examine basic concepts and current issues within physical education, athletics, fitness, and wellness.  Future trends will be explored.
     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the notable leaders, educators and philosophies in the area of study.
    2.  Write or orally present an analysis of current issues and future trends in Physical Education and Sport.
    3.  Write or orally present an analysis of basic issues and concepts of Kinesiology.
    4.  Formulate and orally present an in depth research paper of career options in Health, Physical Education, Fitness, Exercise Science or Recreation and Dance the student is considering.
    5.  Demonstrate how current technology is applied to Kinsiology.

     

  
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    PED 161 - Sport and Society


    This course is an introduction to the field of sport sociology.  Consequently, the first objective is to provide students with the knowledge of important concepts, methods, and theoretical approaches that define this subdiscipline.  The second objective is to familiarize the students with sociological perspective to studying sport as a socio-cultural phenomenon, and to examine the often-controversial relationships between gender, race, class, and sexuality and the institution of sport.  The third objective is to develop critical thinking through analyzing the social, political, cultural and historical context of sport in te United States and other societies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of important concepts, methods and theoretical approaches that define this sub-discipline, in essays, exams or presentations. 
    2.  Apply a sociological perspective to sport as a socio-cultural phenomenon, and examine the often-controversial relationships between race, gender, class, and sexuality and the institution of sport.  They will do so in essays, exams, and presentations.
    3.  Analyze the social, political, cultural and historical context of sport in the United States and other societies.  They will do so in essay, exams and presentations.

     

  
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    PED 162 - Personal and Community Health


    An examination of health issues and problems related to individuals and communities.  Included is an exploration of wellness/health promotion; factors which impact health such as culture, heritage and socioeconomic level; chronic and communicable disease, including HIV/AIDS; nutrition, weight management and fitness, safety education, including such areas as fire and arson prevention, child abduction, abusive or dangerous environments and violence prevention/intervention; aging and death; relationships, sexuality, reproduction and birth control; stress management; health care delivery; and alcohol, tobacco and other drug prevention/intervention.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    HST 162
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and analyze selected health issues such as nutrition, fitness, mental and emotional health, and wellness and health promotion.
    2.  Identify and evaluate all levels of fitness.
    3.  Identify and evaluate favorable and unfavorable ecological variables that effect health and longevity, such as culture and heritage, socio-economic status, and environmental and personal factors.
    4.  Identify reliable sources of health information and evaluate health information, products, and services.

     

  
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    PED 168 - Exploring Healthy Lifestyles


    This course is a theoretical classroom approach to assessing and evaluating healthy pathways in life.  Students will explore and analyze the components of diet and exercise that can be chosen which may lead to a happier and healthier life.  Emphasis is placed on making educated decisions and using the self-motivation and discipline necessary to make changes leading to a more active healthy lifestyle.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    15 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss all of the factors in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.
    2.  Attend an exercise class on the SUNY Broome Campus.
    3.  Complete a 1 mile run.
    4.  Perform 10 pushups and 10 sit-ups.
    5.  Do stretching exercises and learn their importance in injury prevention.
    6.  Learn the wellness value of regular exercise.

  
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    PED 169 - Tennis (CV)


    Instruction and practice in the basic strokes - forehand, backhand, serve and volley.  Rules, terminology and equipment.  Strategy for singles and doubles.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 11 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Grip-(forehand, backhand, service and volley)
    2. Ready position, hitting position.
    3. Know the execution of forehand, backhand, volley and serve.
    4. Know the execution of volley.
    5. Serve the play in to play.
    6. Learn proper tennis scoring and appropriate terminology.
    7. Learn and execute proper pre-match warm-up.


  
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    PED 171 - Principles of Training and Conditioning


    Students will learn the principles of physical fitness and training, as well as the effects of training on various systems of the body.  With this knowledge, they will organize, assemble, and present their own personal life-long fitness programs.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    15 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  The course will provide to students a better understanding of the components of a healthy and fit lifestyle.
    2.  The course will provide to students a better understanding of the relationships among functioning systems and improved skill in the application of the principles of training and conditioning in an effort to improve those systems.
    3.  The course will assist students in assessing their own personal fitness levels and in developing their own personal life-long fitness programs.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Better recognize, understand, and relate to the material presented.
    2.  Have developed their own personal life-long fitness programs that reflect the material presented.

  
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    PED 172 - Volleyball (CV)


    A basic course in the fundamentals of power volleyball.  Team strategy, history and rules.  Drills and competitive play.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 12 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the studnet will be able to:

    1. Understand the rules and regulations of volleyball.
    2. Execute the basic skills of volleyball: forearm pass, set, and (underhand) serve in a game like setting.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of correct skill selection and decision making-making abilities.
    4. Facilitate game- play in controlled environment.
    5. Work cooperatively as a small group as well as with the larger class as a whole.
    6. Work to challenge each other to improve their skills in a competitive and cooperative environment.


  
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    PED 173 - Fitness Walking (CV)


    Fitness Walking is a safe form of aerobic exercise which can be incorporated into one's life style and individual fitness program.  Blended class requires proper shoes and foul weather gear as needed.

    Totally online class requires each student to have a FitBit.

    Credits: (1-1/2)
    Hours
    12 Class Hours, 33 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply the components of an effective physical fitness program, utilizing walking as a primary activity.
    2. Improve physical conditioning by participating in a regular walking program.
    3. Perform basic fitness walking techniques.
    4. Apply proper technique to set pacing for safe and effective walking for fitness.
    5. Understand the importance of a balanced lifestyle and the role wellness plays in it.


  
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    PED 175 - Weight Training


    Introduction to the Universal Gym and free weights as a means of physical conditioning. Components of fitness and principles of training discussed.  Several strength building prescriptions presented, including free weights.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 12 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Complete a 1 mile run.
    2.  Perform 20 pushups and 20 sit-ups.
    3.  Complete 2 circuits of training in the weight room each class.
    4.  Do workouts with dumbbells and free weights.
    5.  Learn the wellness value of regular exercise.

  
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    PED 181 - Adventure Activities (CV)


    Adventure Activities involves innovative warm-ups and conditioning exercises within a group setting as the group works together to problem-solve, develop trust through activities and work to solve challenges in adventure settings.  Through the stages of development, the student will gain an understanding of how to build more effective groups, demonstrate modeling and cooperation and learn healthy risk-taking behaviors.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Objective of the Course:

    1.  To promote decision making and problem solving within a group.
    2.  To participate in a wide variety of non-stereotypical Physical Education activities.
    3.  To demonstrate leadership and group skills necessary to communicate and complete assigned low-level activities as a group.
    4.  To be able to modify adventure activities effectively for presentation to diverse populations.
    5.  To develop and demonstrate professional behaviors and practices.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Show awareness of safety in a variety of settings.
    2.  Explain the importance of having the proper clothing and footwear for each activity or setting.
    3.  Develop a fitness plan that includes all areas of fitness.
    4.  Modify activities for diverse populations.
    5.  Write and implement lessons plans, using the available facilities and equipment.

  
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    PED 187 - Team Sports


    Classroom activities and experiences are designed to provide students with knowledge of the concepts associated with skill development in team sports.  Students will participate in and develop team plays, passing and scoring in net/wall sports.  Students will demonstrate game performance skills in four exemplar sports.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Demonstrate basic skills in volleyball, football, basketball, and softball, as measured through a skills test.
    2.  Possess a minimum competency in their understanding of all four team sports, including rules, procedures, safety, and instructions by applying them in practice and in theory.
    3.  Describe a variety of developmentally appropriate progressions and modified games for each sport.
    4.  Demonstrate sportsmanship and respect for others in class and throughout practice time.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and execute proper techniques and skills in four different team sports.
    2.  Improve muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance.
    3.  Demonstrate and model proper educational techniques for fitness-based team sports.
    4.  Recognize and identify correct and effective performance skills in all four team sports.

  
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    PED 188 - Rhythms and Dance (CV)


    This course is designed to introduce students to various forms of dance such as folk, square, social, popular, and creative.  The forms of dance will be presented in developmentally appropriate units.  Emphasis will be on learning the dance patterns and then performing them proficiently.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 26 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Recognize and perform the basic locomotor movements, combinations, and dances correctly.
    2.  Develop an appreciation for dance through the use of music, choreography, and language.
    3.  Explain and justify the importance of dance in a physical education curriculum.
    4.  Exhibit professional and responsible behavior that reflects a commitment to and respect for the profession.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Choreograph and perform a dance piece, expressing a message or emotion using a dance form which would best suit their body of work.
    2.  Demonstrate and perform developmentally appropriate movement combinations, rhythms, games, and dances.
    3.  Write an essay exploring the importance of the cultural history of dance.

  
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    PED 207 - Women's Varsity Lacrosse


    Credits: 1
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Each participant will be expected to show and demonstrate skill and improvement in the following topics:

    1. teamwork concepts
    2. passing
    3. catching
    4. cradling
    5. field rules
    6. team defense
    7. checking
    8. clears
    9. fast breaks
    10. team offense and scoring
    11. women's lacrosse etiquette
    12. safety of fellow players


  
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    PED 210 - Exercise Assistant Internship


    An introduction to work experiences in fitness setting.  With supervised assistance, students will work to obtain knowledge, develop skills, organize and work in a fitness center.  Placements will include a collegiate setting (22.5 hours), and also include one local fitness setting in the community (22.5 hours).  (1 contact hour = 30 hours in internship, 1.5 contact hours = 45 hours total in internship)

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Preprequisite:  PED 119 Solutions in Fitness
     

    Credits: 1.5
    Hours
    45 total for internship
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Effectively describe job training, job duties and responsibilities.
    2.  Investigate and report on procedures followed for employee training, evaluation and advancement.
    3.  Describe in depth exactly what was learned within the professional experience.
    4.  Describe and track in writing a personal log of experiences, professional development and personal challenges and successes.
    5.  Apply skills from professional learning to career experience.

     

  
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    PED 269 - Tennis II


    Students will learn intermediate tennis skills to enhance their level of play.  Competitive skills and strategies will be emphasized with a concentration on doubles play.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PED 169 Tennis I

    Credits: .5
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 11 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate consistency in their basic skills of forehand, backhand, volley, and serve.
    2.  Execute a slice, lob, and overhead, and utilize each in play.
    3.  Pass a quiz recalling the rules for a singles and a doubles game.
    4.  Employ learned singles strategies during a game.
    5.  Employ learned doubles strategies during a game.

  
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    PHI 102 - General Philosophy


    This course introduces philosophy by examining some of its major areas, including metaphysics (theories concerning the nature of reality), epistemology (theories concerning the nature of human knowledge), ethics (theories of morality), and logic.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the major areas of study in philosophy.
    2.  Describe some of the major theories of metaphysics in Western philosophy.
    3.  Describe some of the major theories of epistemology in Western philosophy.
    4.  Describe some of the major ethical theories in Western philosophy.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental conventions of philosophical argument.

  
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    PHI 103 - Philosophy of Mind


    What does it mean to have a mind?  What does it mean to be conscious?  Is the mind different from the brain?  This course examines the historic and contemporary theories of consciousness and personal identity.  Beginning with Descartes and his critics, the theories of physicalism, eliminative materialism, functionalism, and recent developments in cognitive science and neurophilosophy, and dialogues with Asian philosophy are explored.  Also, theories of personal identity.
     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Compare various positions regarding the nature of the mind and its relation to the physical world.
    2.  Analyze and evaluate arguments in defense of various positions regarding the nature of the mind.
    3.  Articulate and defend her/his own position concerning the nature of consciousness.
    4.  Recognize and describe various methods both historical and contemporary of relating science and philosophy.

     

  
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    PHI 104 - Philosophy of Religion


    An examination of the relationship between Relation of religion and philosophy and an investigation of the different concepts of God.  An Analysis of religion's types and experiences, and a review of the different attempts to justify religious beliefs.  An exploration of the logic of religious experience through a consideration of the leading ideas in the philosophy of religion both as a historical and contemporary phenomenon.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the general scope of the philosophy of religion.
    2.  Identify some of the major approaches to the philosophy of religion.
    3.  Describe some of the major theories regarding the existence of God.
    4.  Identify some of the major philosophical problems having to do with the relationship of religion to other areas of thought.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental conventions of argument in the philosophy of religion.

  
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    PHI 105 - World Religions


    A survey of the major world religious traditions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  The origins, major historical developments, socio-cultural influences, and core beliefs and practices of each tradition will be studied.  The instructor may choose to include other traditions as well.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of some of the concepts and methods of the comparative study of religion.
    2.  Apply those concepts and methods in order to think critically about religious history, doctrines, and practices.
    3.  Express a broad understanding of the major religions of the world.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of ideas that will help them to communicate more effectively with people of diverse cultural backgrounds and to understand global developments related to religion in the contemporary world.

  
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    PHI 201 - Ethics: Moral Philosophy


    An examanination of the main classical and modern ethical theories, including those of such theorists as Plato, Aristotle, Mill, Kant, and Moore.  A comparison and contrast of normative and meta-ethical theories, the good life and how one should act, the meaning of moral judgments and the criteria of validity and the justification of moral beliefs and the ground of moral responsibility.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the general scope of moral philosophy.
    2.  Identify some of the major classical theories in moral philosophy.
    3.  Identify some of the major contemporary perspectives on moral philosophy.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental conventions of argument in moral philosophy.

  
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    PHI 202 - Logic


    Analysis and practical application of the elements of logic as they apply on both a linguistic and formal level.  Forms of argument; informal and formal fallacies.  Determining validity and invalidity under Aristotelian, propositional, and predicate logic.  Use of Venn diagrams; translating ordinary language into syntax appropriate to those logical systems.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish between deductive and inductive arguments.
    2.  Identify a valid, sound argument and a strong, cogent argument.
    3.  Identify at least a dozen types of informal fallacies in written arguments.
    4.  Identify and write categorical propositions.
    5.  Determine the validity of immediate inferences involving categorical propositions.
    6.  Determine the mood and figure of a categorical syllogism.
    7.  Determine the validity of syllogisms using the Square of Opposition.
    8.  Determine the validity of syllogisms using Venn diagrams.
    9.  Determine the validity of enthymemes.
    10.  Translate ordinary language arguments into syllogisms in order to analyze them logically.
    11.  Translate ordinary language statements into propositional logic.
    12.  Analyze an argument by means of truth tables.
    13.  Analyze an argument using indirect truth tables.
    14.  Translate paragraphs into propositional logic symbolism.
    15.  Apply the 18 laws of natural deduction to determine the validity of arguments in propositional logic.
    16.  Use indirect truth to determine validity of arguments in propositional logic.
    17.  Use conditional proof to determine validity of arguments in propositional logic.
    18.  Use existential and universal quantifiers in correct syntax for predicate logic.
    19.  Translate ordinary language statements in predicate logic formulas.
    20.  Apply the 18 laws of natural deduction to determine validity of arguments in predicate logic.
    21.  Apply the change of quantifier rules to arguments in predicate logic.
    22.  Use the counter-example method to prove invalidity in predicate logic.
    23.  Use the finite universe method to prove invalidity in predicate logic.
    24.  Correctly translate relational predicates with quantifiers.

  
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    PHI 203 - Philosophical Issues in American Education


    Philosophy of selected American educators, with attention on the historical development of the American educational system.  Brief review of educational outlooks from antiquity to the present, including Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau.  Analysis of educational issues and of key terms in education from philosophical perspective.  The nature of the individual, the school and society and the underlying philosophical interrelations that may exist.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Trace the philosophy of education in American schooling.
    2.  Identify the historical importance of the philosophy of education in American education.
    3.  Explain the individual philosophies of the major educational philosophers and their impact on American schooling.
    4.  Develop their own philosophy of education.
    5.  Explore major educational trends in American schooling.
    6.  Identify the philosophies that influence educational reform in American schooling.
    7.  Evaluate the impact that philosophies of education have had on American schooling.
    8.  Analyze and evaluate the success of America's educational reform movements.
    9.  Identify current American educational policy.
    10.  Interpret current American educational policy.
    11.  Evaluate the success of American education policy in the nation's schools.

  
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    PHI 206 - Social and Political Philosophy


    A philosophical study of the social/political organization of society through an examination of such topics as justice, authority, leadership, individual rights, and of the relationship between the state and various social institutions, such as family, business, church, and education.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the scope of social and political philosophy.
    2.  Identify some fo the major classical theories of social and political philosophy.
    3.  Identify some of the modern theories of social and political philosophy.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental conventions of argument in social and political philosophy.

  
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    PHI 209 - Verbal Reasoning


    To improve student's ability in reasoning.  Concentration on qualification, symbols, ambiguity, analysis and semantics.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Construct reasoned arguments which are coherent and correct in form.
    2.  Determine the validity or non-validity of deductive arguments.
    3.  Identify the major forms of argumentation including but not limited to analogy, causal arguments, and deductive arguments.
    4.  Identify internal fallacies in media as well as formal reasoning.

  
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    PHI 299 - Independent Study: Philosophy


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of philosophy.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, the independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 semester hours of college level work in philosophy

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Course outcomes will be determined by the instructor with the consent of the department chair and Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
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    PHS 111 - Earth Investigations


    Investigate Earth's atmosphere, its geology, and its place in the universe.  Students will discover how weather and/or geology affect our every-day lives and how we use and modify our physical surroundings.  Students will learn how the Earth compares to the other planets and how our solar system compares to the universe.  Current scientific topics may be introduced by both students and instructors.  Binghamton's regional weather and geology will be emphasized.  Laboratory activities, including a field trip and a student project are included in this course.  This course does not meet science requirement for LAAA, LAAS or BAAS degree.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List and explain the steps in the scientific method.
    2.  Develop a hypothesis, test, modify, compare other hypotheses, and come to consensus on a theory as to what is hidden from view by using a cube with a hidden side.
    3.  Write an original scientific research project.  Students will form a hypothesis, design data collection and an analysis schemes to prove or disprove their hypothesis.  Students will learn how to write a scientific report by using a standardized scientific paper format.
    4.  List the elemental composition of the Earth's crust and apply how these elements combine to form minerals.  Students should also be able to use the definition of a mineral and their physical properties to identify minerals.
    5.  Describe the classification schemes of the three rock groups and use these systems to identify common rocks.
    6.  Assess the durability and weathering of different rocks and minerals used as building materials across campus.
    7.  Create a timeline of Earth's History, including Geologic, Biologic, and Atmospheric events.
    8.  Describe how Alfred Wegener's hypothesis of continental drift was eventually proved by modern evidence to construct the Theory of Plate Tectonics decades after his death.
    9.  Identify the height in the atmosphere at which various objects or phenomena occur.
    10.  Explain the greenhouse effect as it relates to global climate change and cite environmental consequences of unimpeded global warming.
    11.  Explain ozone depletion:  its causes and environmental consequences.
    12.  Create a graph of the seasonal daylight changes at various latitudes throughout one earth year.
    13.  Create a wind rose of Binghamton's resultant wind direction.
    14.  Articulate possible reasons for climatic differences when comparing two or more cities.
    15.  Describe Binghamton's climate.
    16.  Construct a brief history of the development of modern astronomy.
    17.  Describe the nebular theory of stellar and planetary development.
    18.  Classify the celestial objects in our Solar System and argue whether Pluto should have been reclassified as a dwarf planet.
    19.  Explain the basic properties and sizes of the 8 major planets and minor celestial objects in our solar system.
    20.  Describe the characteristics, changes in apparent size of the Moon, eclipses, and phases of the moon.

  
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    PHS 112 - Interactions with the Natural World


    Explore the relationships between living organisms and their physical environment in this activity-based course.  Study Earth's atmosphere and seasons and explore the resulting adaptations of living things, for example through photosynthesis and respiration.  Investigate rocks and minerals as the building blocks of the solid Earth and cells as the basic unit of life.  Biologic and earth science concepts are integrated to show the prehistoric and modern interactions among Earth's atmosphere, its rocks and minerals and its life.  Students are expected to become personally involved with in-class and at-home activities and projects.  Learning is accomplished by experimentation and discussion within cooperative groups; the laboratory becomes the classroom.  Appropriate for Elementary Education and Early Childhood majors.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish among the following:  theory, hypothesis, inference, observation.
    2.  Formulate hypotheses about phenomena under discussion; design and perform simple experiments to test the hypothesis; analyze and interpret data from the experiment to support or refute the hypothesis.
    3.  Describe the components and organization of our solar system and understand the scale of planetary distances and sizes in our solar system.
    4.  Describe some major conditions necessary to develop and sustain life on an astronomical body.
    5.  Plot a scale diagram of Earth's geologic history and recognize the interdependence of geologic, meteorologic and biologic events along this time line.
    6.  Describe and demonstrate the changes in daylight during a year and explain the reasons for these changes; describe adaptations of organisms to daylight and darkness and to seasons.
    7.  Describe the temperature and pressure characteristics of Earth's atmosphere and list its component gases and their major functions.
    8.  Distinguish between the processes of photosynthesis and respiration and describe simple experiments which can demonstrate each process.
    9.  Describe how heat is transferred within and to the atmosphere and to Earth's surface; describe major factors which affect the heating of Earth's surface.
    10.  Describe and perform the main physical tests and observations necessary to identify rocks and minerals.
    11.  Distinguish between plant and animal cells and describe the main components of both.
    12.  Discuss the evolution of Earth in terms of biologic change and in terms of plate tectonics.
    13.  Complete projects to investigate characteristics of plants and animals.

  
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    PHS 113 - Astronomy - Exploring the Universe


    Exploring the universe is an exciting challenge as you are led away from earth on a journey through the cosmos and back again.  Starting with a look at the historical origin of the constellations and a basic knowledge of the sky, you are taken into the realm of the stars, galaxies, and the universe at large.  Current theories of the birth, life, and death of stars will show you the possibilities of extraterrestrial life.  Theories of the origin of the universe will give you an informed opinion of the nature of existence itself.  The return trip to earth brings you a look at our solar system with the NASA provided knowledge of the planets.  Extensive hands-on experience is generated in the laboratory, which makes full use of the off-campus Link Planetarium and Kopernik Observatory.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the motion of the planets, Sun, and stars in the sky as seen from different locations on Earth.
    2.  Describe the motion of the Moon and how it creates tides and eclipses.
    3.  Describe the development of astronomical theories and models, from early Greek observations through the Copernican revolution to modern day.
    4.  Use and understand the underlying concepts of astronomical tools such as telescopes, spectrometers, and star charts.
    5.  List the members of the solar system, describe their characteristics, and explain theories concerning their information.
    6.  Explain the structure of the Sun, the production of solar energy, and the interaction of the Sun with the Earth.
    7.  Explain the methods used to measure stellar distances, masses, luminosities, diameters, densities, and populations.
    8.  Explain stellar evolution from cloud collapse through main sequence lifetime to compact object creation.
    9.  Describe the structure, formation, and evolution of the Milky Way and other galaxies, including active galaxies.
    10.  Describe the universe and its evolution in the Big Bang model.

  
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    PHS 114 - Meteorology: Investigating the Weather


    Does Binghamton have some of the worst weather in the nation?  Is severe weather getting worse?  How accurate are the weather forecasts?  If you have ever wondered about these questions and others, this course will help you find these answers.  This introductory course intends to educate you on the fundamentals of the Earth's atmosphere, weather and climate.  Topics including: the atmosphere and its energy transformations, the seasons, atmospheric optics, water vapor, precipitation, and the wind are woven together to enable you to understand how weather works and what constitutes severe weather.  Other topics of study might include El Nino, ozone depletion and global warming.  You will participate in the act of doing science by investigating a weather topic.  After taking this course, you should have a better understanding of the science of meteorology, how science progresses, and why Binghamton has such cloudy weather.  Laboratory activities including weather data collection and analysis are included in this course.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the layers of the atmosphere, both in chemical composition and temperature distribution.
    2.  Define temperature, pressure, and humidity.
    3.  Identify different types of meteorological instrumentation.
    4.  List the types of precipitation and their causes.
    5.  Describe the process of cloud formation.
    6.  Identify different cloud types.
    7.  Define lapse rates and their uses in meteorology.
    8.  Describe the earth's heat balance through convection, conduction, radiation, absorption, and scattering.
    9.  Describe seasonal variations at different locations and state their causes.
    10.  Describe the general circulation patterns of the earth, on both a large and small scale.
    11.  Define the jet stream and its effect on U.S. weather patterns.
    12.  List the air masses that effect the continental U.S.
    13.  Describe cyclogensis, pressure systems and their formation with respect to fronts and their effect on our weather.
    14.  Describe the conditions necessary for severe weather development.

  
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    PHS 115 - Physical Geology: The Dynamic Earth


    Why does Binghamton have such steep hills and flat valleys?  Why do we find such a great variety of rocks in our backyard?  Why doesn't Binghamton have more earthquakes or volcanoes?  If you have ever wondered about these questions and others like them, this course will help you to discover the answers to them.  This course will show you how geologists collect information, analyze and interpret observations.  Course content emphasizes the differences between rocks and minerals and what those differences mean to our region.  Local examples of streams, the effects of glaciers, volcanoes, earthquakes and why mountains and oceans form.  Other topics may be substituted in appropriate parts of the course depending on exciting developments on our dynamic planet.  You will gain working knowledge of the geologic wonders that surround you at home and when you travel.  Laboratory activities in learning communities allows students to gain a hands-on understanding of geologic concepts and processes.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the composition of the Earth, especially the crust.
    2.  Distinguish between a mineral and a rock and describe characteristics of each.
    3.  Describe the formation of the three major rock types; list the names and characteristics of some common examples of each type, especially those of local or state importance.
    4.  List the agents of erosion and various formations resulting from erosion and deposition, especially relating to mass wasting, streams, glaciers and groundwater.
    5.  Distinguish major types of volcanoes and volcanic eruptions and their effects on humans.
    6.  Describe the causes, detection, prediction and effects of earthquakes.
    7.  Construct a model of the Earth's interior based on evidence from seismic waves.
    8.  Describe and diagram the main types of faults and folds and list the forces causing them.
    9.  Describe the Plate Tectonic theory and give supporting evidence; describe major plate tectonic events in the Earth's history.
    10.  Explain the relationship between plate tectonics and volcanism, earthquakes and mountain building.

  
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    PHS 116 - Global Warming:Energy and the Environment


    Learn about the causes and effects of global warming and other environmental threats including ozone depletion and acid rain.  How does the way we use energy affect our changing global climate?  How much energy does it take to drive our cars or light, heat and cool our homes?  How can we save energy and will saving energy make a difference?  Discover positive things we can do as a society and as individuals to help reduce human impact on the climate.  Investigate the sources of the energy we use every day.  Energy sources include: fossil fuels, nuclear, and alternative sources such as solar, wind, biomass, hydropower and geothermal energy.  Current scientific topics may be introduced by both students and instructors.  Laboratory activities include hands-on experiences, field trips and energy use analysis.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use the concept of rates to describe various processes and problems.
    2.  Define velocity, acceleration and displacement.
    3.  List Newton's Laws of motion and predict motion of objects using Newton's Laws.
    4.  Define and use the concepts of work and energy to solve problems.
    5.  Use the concept of a model.
    6.  Describe and solve problems using the concepts of gravity, electric charge, and magnetic force.
    7.  Describe the origin and treatment for particulate and gaseous air pollution.
    8.  Define and use the basic principles of thermodynamics to describe the operation of various plants and the treatment of thermal pollution.
    9.  Describe the operation of a nuclear power plant and the possible consequences thereof.
    10.  Describe the energy technology of the future and the possible consequences thereof.
    11.  List and discuss the problems associated with the alternatives to conventional motor vehicles.
    12.  Describe a sound wave, the human ear, and noise pollution.
    13.  Discuss the prospects for mass transportation.
    14.  Describe remote sensing of materials.
    15.  Discuss the prospects for materials recycling.

  
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    PHS 117 - Exploring Everyday Phenomena


    This course uses activities that engage the students in hands-on learning of common physical concepts by experimentation.  The course will improve students' perspectives and comfort with science while promoting scientific literacy.  There will be no distinction between lab and lecture since the activities are an integral part of the teaching and learning process in the course.  The methods and ideas of the course will usually be based on the use of commonly available materials.  Group-based activities include observations and measurements, solids, liquids, gases, heat, simple machines, magnets, static electricity and electrical devices.  Appropriate for Elementary Education and Early Childhood majors.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Make length, area, and volume measurements using standard metric units.
    2.  Understand and be able to find the density of various types of materials.
    3.  Understand and give evidence for the idea that matter consists of tiny particles called atoms.
    4.  Understand the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases.
    5.  Understand that energy comes in many forms, is conserved, and may be converted from one form to another, but that the conversion will involve some losses in useful energy.
    6.  Describe methods of heat transfer:  conduction, convection and radiation.
    7.  Describe the operation of and the work, force, distance relationships involved in simple machines.
    8.  Understand the results of simple experiments in electrostatics and magnetism.
    9.  Understand the components of electrical circuits and be able to wire simple circuits.

  
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    PHS 123 - Natural Disasters


    Tsunamis!  Tornadoes!  Earthquakes!  Floods!  How likely are you to have to deal with a natural disaster?  What is the likelihood that Binghamton will have another flood like the one in June 2006?  This course examines the science behind natural disasters and how this results in loss of life and property.  Course will use case studies of natural disasters to analyze the forces of nature and their impact.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  State the statistics regarding different types of natural disasters and the highest cause for loss of life and property.
    2.  Identify the different types of earthquakes and what impacts different soils have on earthquake damage.
    3.  Identify the different types of volcanoes and which type has a higher probability for loss of life or property; also be able to identify where volcanoes occur.
    4.  State the causes for mass movements.
    5.  Identify regions prone to tsunamis, state the measures used to predict or warn the public about approaching tsunamis.
    6.  Describe the different types of severe weather and how each is formed.
    7.  Describe why Binghamton, NY is prone to flooding and what a 100-year flood means.
    8.  Identify the relationship between wind and pressure as it relates to the Saffir-Simpson scale of hurricane force winds.  Identify the major causes for loss of life during a hurricane.
    9.  State evidence that supports global climate change and state the causes of global climate change.

  
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    PHS 125 - Historical Geology: The History of Life and Planet Earth


    Did an asteroid really cause the extinction of the dinosaurs?  Where did life come from and how did it evolve?  Why do I find fossils of marine organisms in my back yard?  If you have ever wondered about these questions, you can discover the answers by taking this course.  This course intends to give you a perspective of the enormity of the geologic history of the Earth and the life that lives on it.  You will learn how scientists know how old a rock or fossil is and what the conditions in the past were like when it formed.  You will also investigate how scientific thinking about the geologic past have changed with respect to the age of the Earth and what the dinosaurs were like.  By looking at some bizarre groups of fossils, questions about evolution, speciation and chance will be examined.  Also, a detailed study of the local geologic past will reveal that Binghamton was on the shoreline of an ancient tropical sea about 365 million years ago.  Course includes laboratory activities.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    Geologic Time
    1.  Assess the difference between catastrophism and uniformitarianism.
    2.  Compare various historical attempts to age-date the Earth including the Judeo-Christian Bible, the accumlation of sediments, accumulation of salt in the oceans, and the rate of heat loss by conduction.  Compare age of the Earth estimates of each technique, appraise the assumptions and weaknesses of each of these attempts.
    3.  Describe Steno's principles and apply to specific geologic situations to unravel the geologic history of each.
    4.  Differentiate fossils from index fossils and explain how they are used to correlate sedimentary layers around the world.
    5.  Define radioactivity and half-lives and apply these principles to sequence the events in geologic block diagrams.
    6.  Prepare a geologic time scale:  Pre-Cambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic.
    Evolution
    1.  Discriminate how science differs from religion on evolutionary thought.
    2.  Assemble a history of the development of evolutionary thought from Aristotle to Darwin.
    3.  Differentiate between what Darwin did and didn't say about evolution.
    4.  Analyze what Darwinism is:  adaptation, random genetic variation, natural selection, sexual selection, non-constancy of species, gradualism.
    5.  Organize and describe the proofs for biologic evolution.
    6.  Define population, species, speciation and extinction.
    7.  Identify different types of evolution:  divergent, convergent, parallel.
    8.  Discriminate between evolutionary trends of gradualism and punctuated equilibrium.
    9.  Differenciate between Linnean and Cladistic classification.  Examine the advantages and limitations of each.
    The Pre-Cambrian
    1.  Describe the formation of the solar system, especially the Earth and its early history.
    2.  Differentiate between Archean and Proterozoic rocks, atmospheric conditions, life forms and orogenies.
    3.  Construct the steps necessary in the Evolution of life and photosynthesis.
    4.  Describe the significance of the Edicaran fauna.
    The Paleozoic
    1.  Organize the general characteristics of life, paleogeography, extinctions, regional examples, etc. of the Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Carboniferous and Permian worlds.
    2.  Describe the significance of the Burgess Shale.
    3.  Construct a Devonian history and paleogeography of South-Central New York State.
    The Mesozoic
    1.  Inventory the general characteristics of life and paleography of the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous worlds.
    2.  Describe the general characteristics of the evolution and types of dinosaurs (saurischian and ornisthischian).  Discriminate between the general groups of dinosaurs.  Differentiate between the evidence for some groups of dinosaurs being endothermic, ectothermic.
    3.  Sort the differing theories on the extinction of the dinosaurs.  List the pros and cons to both an extraterrestrial cause and volcanic cause of the extinction.
    The Cenozoic
    1.  Inventory the general characteristics and paleogeography of the Cenozoic worlds.
    2.  Describe the general characteristics of the evolution and types of mammals.
    3.  Explore competing theories on the evolution of humans from primate ancestors.
     

  
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    PHS 210 - Mountain Geology and Climate


    This course entails an in-depth study of processes affecting topography in mountainous regions, focusing on the geological and meterological aspects of mountain formations.  The geological portion of study includes rock formations and units of the region, orogenesis (mountain formation), glacial geology and mass wasting.  The meteorological portion of study includes the climatology of the region, orographic uplift and the influence of mountains on severe and hazardous weather.  The highlight of the course is intensive field study in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, including hiking of five or more miles per day with significant elevation gain.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify key geologic features in mountainous terrain.
    2.  Interpret past geologic settings and environments based on present day observations.
    3.  Identify key meteorological phenomenon that occur in mountainous regions.
    4.  Interpret past climate and meteorological conditions based on present day geological observations.
    5.  Use basic tools geologists and meteorologists use in observational field study.

  
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    PHS 226 - Oceanography


    Oceanography is the study of fundamental principles of ocean science.  A wide range of subjects will be presented including marine organisms, ocean currents, waves, geophysical fluid dynamics, plate tectonics, the geology of the ocean floor, tides, coastal processes, and the biology of diverse ecosystems such as deep sea vents, coral reefs, and estuaries.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PHS 111 Earth Investigations; or PHS 114 Meteorology; or PHS 115 The Dynamic Earth; or PHS 116 Global Warming: Energy and the Environment; or CHM 126 Marine Chemistry: An Introduction to Chemical Oceanography

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the geologic history of the oceans.
    2.  Describe the fundamental physical properties of seawater, and explain the temporal and spatial variation in these properties.
    3.  Describe the major water currents and circulation of ocean waters with these currents.
    4.  Explain the formation of waves and understand the differences between the major wave types.
    5.  Explain why coastal waters are biological, highly productive and diverse.
    6.  Explain why the future productivity of such coastal water regions is uncertain.
    7.  Explain how the ocean influences life on land and the role it plays in global climate.

  
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    PHS 291 - Special Topics in Physical Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Physical Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
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    PHS 292 - Special Topics in Physical Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Physical Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
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    PHS 293 - Special Topics in Physical Science


    Special courses covering particular topics in the Physical Sciences beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
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    PHS 298 - Physical Science Senior Seminar


    This course is a capstone course for students in the LAAS program who plan to go on to major in one of the physical sciences.  Students will learn how to search for, read, and interpret scientific papers, and then present that information to others in a formal setting.  This will prepare students for their science program at a 4-year school by becoming better consumers and producers of scientific information through journal articles and presentations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PHS 113 Astronomy - Exploring the Universe, PHS 114 Meteorology: Investigating the Weather, or PHS 115 The Dynamic Earth

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to search a scientific journal database for information specific to their interest.
    2.  Understand how to read and interpret scientific paper.
    3.  Demonstrate the ability to convey complicated topics in an understandable way to their peers.
    4.  Summarize the information learned from an oral presentation and ask relevant questions.
    5.  Conduct a formal presentation on a current topic in physical science.

  
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    PHY 090 - Preparatory Physics


    In this course, students will learn how to apply basic numerical, algebraic, and trigonometric procedures to the solution of physical problems.  Topics are selected from the fields of mechanics, heat, wave motion, electricity, optics, and electromagnetic radiation.  Numerous laboratory exercises and in-class activities are integrated into the course to reinforce understanding of the physical principles.  The course is designed for students who have not had high school physics, or need a basic introduction to physics before taking higher level physics or technology courses.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discriminate between fundamental and derived units of measurement.
    2.  State an appropriate SI unit for each physical quantity studied throughout the course.
    3.  Correctly assess the number of significant figures in a given or measured quantity.
    4.  Perform calculations with inputs of differing accuracy and state the result with the appropriate number of significant figures.
    5.  Perform calculations involving numbers in scientific notation.
    6.  Perform unit conversions within the SI system and between SI and the English system.
    7.  Measure physical quantities in the laboratory.
    8.  Analyze experimental data and graphs.
    9.  Solve algebraic motion problems.
    10.  Distinguish between vector and scalar quantities.
    11.  Find the components of a vector.
    12.  Determine a vector given its components.
    13.  Add vectors.
    14.  State Newton's laws of motion.
    15.  Solve simple problems using Newton's Second Law.
    16.  Discriminate between weight and mass.
    17.  Solve problems involving equilibrium of forces.
    18.  Define concepts of work and power.
    19.  Distinguish among gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy and elastic potential energy.
    20.  State the work energy theorem and conditions under which it leads to conversation of total mechanical energy.
    21.  Solve problems using the work energy theorem, or the law of conservation of energy, where appropriate.
    22.  Distinguish between temperature and heat.
    23.  Solve problems involving thermal equilibrium and heat transfer.
    24.  Explain the physical principles behind the operation of a thermometer.
    25.  Describe the present theory of the composition of matter in terms of the Standard Model of Elementary Particles.
    26.  Solve electrostatic force problems using Coulomb's Law.
    27.  Use Ohm's Law to solve simple problems.
    28.  Compute electric power, electric energy and cost of operation of ordinary household appliances.
    29.  Solve simple series and parallel circuit problems.
    30.  Define open and short, and state the consequence of having each in a series or in a parallel circuit.
    31.  Define electric  and magnetic fields.
    32.  Describe the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction.
    33.  Distinguish among the parts of the electromagnetic spectrum on the basis of wavelength, frequency, and energy.
    34.  Use the mathematical relationships among wavelength, period, frequency, and speed to solve problems.
    35.  Compute the energy of electromagnetic radiation given either its frequency or wavelength.
    36.  Describe the relationship between electromagentic energy and transitions between electron energy levels.

  
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    PHY 105 - Conceptual Physics


    How does your cell phone work?  How does the manipulation of light, sound, and motion help create more realistic animations or simulations?  What did Einstein mean when he said the distinction between past, present, and future is only a persistent illusion?  This course will give you the tools to answer these questions for yourself.

    "You know you can't enjoy a game unless you know its rules...Physics is about the rules of nature-so beautifully elegant that it can be neatly described mathematically.  However, in this course we will treat physics conceptually- in down-to-earth English rather than in mathematical language."  (from Conceptual Physics by Paul Hewitt)

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain laws of physics and apply these principles to determine probable outcomes and explain discrepant events demonstrated or observed in the natural world.
    2.  Discuss the historical origins and evolution of the laws of motion and energy including the work of Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Joule, Franklin, Faraday, and Einstein.
    3.  Demonstrate proportional reasoning by identifying and manipulating independent, dependent and controlled variables.
    4.  Demonstrate proportional reasoning to the laws of motion, gravity, energy, wave motion, electromagnetic fields, and light.
    5.  Recognize violations of the conservation of energy.
    6.  Apply major principles in the areas of Newton's Laws of Motion; Momentum; Energy; Rotational Motion; Gravitation; Properties of Matter, Heat and Thermodynamics, Vibrations and Waves, Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics, and Relativity.

  
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    PHY 118 - Physics for Physical Therapist Assistants


    Course is designed to cover topics in physics specifically related to PTA students.  The topics covered include: forces, torques, linear motion, energy, momentum, conservation laws; temperature and heat, temperature scales, heat transfer, changes of state; electric fields, potential difference; Ohm's law, DC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, motion of charges in magnetic fields; wave motion, electromagnetic spectrum, atomic structure.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discriminate between fundamental and derived units of measurement.
    2.  State an appropriate SI unit for each physical quantity studied throughout the course.
    3.  Measure physical quantities in laboratory.
    4.  Perform a mathematical analysis of experimental data and graphs.
    5.  Solve algebraic motion problems.
    6.  State Newton's laws of motion.
    7.  Solve simple problems using Newton's Second Law.
    8.  Define mass in terms of inertia and discriminate between weight and mass.
    9.  Solve problems involving equilibrium of forces and equilibrium of torques.
    10.  Relate equilibrium concepts to common physical therapy practices.
    11.  Solve equilibrium problems which include a buoyant force.
    12.  Define concepts of work and power.
    13.  Distinguish among gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, and elastic potential energy.
    14.  State the work energy theorem and conditions under which it leads to conservation of total mechanical energy.
    15.  Solve problems using the work energy theorem, or the law of conservation of energy, where appropriate.
    16.  Distinguish between temperature and heat.
    17.  Solve problems involving thermal equilibrium and heat transfer.
    18.  Describe the present theory of the composition of matter in terms of the Standard Model of Elementary Particles.
    19.  Define charge in terms of its consequences, using Coulomb's Law.
    20.  Name the electrostatic force and the gravitational force as two examples of an inverse-square law.
    21.  Define current, voltage, and resistance.
    22.  Graphically illustrate the difference between the time dependencies of DC and AC voltages.
    23.  Use Ohm's Law to solve simple problems.
    24.  State the relationship between voltage, current, and electrical power.
    25.  Compute electric power, electric energy, and cost of operation of ordinary household appliances.
    26.  Solve simple problems about circuits containing series and parallel resistor combinations.
    27.  Know how to connect an ammeter, a voltmeter, a fuse, and a circuit breaker into an electric circuit.
    28.  Define open and short, and state the consequence of having each in a series or in a parallel circuit.
    29.  State the function and purpose of a capacitor and name devices which use capacitors.
    30.  Identify the function of a transformer.
    31.  Define electric and magnetic fields.
    32.  Describe the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction.
    33.  Describe the principle of operation of an electric generator.
    34.  Use the mathematical relationships among wavelength, period, frequency, and speed to solve problems.
    35.  Distinguish among the parts of the electromagnetic spectum on the basis of wavelength, frequency, and energy.
    36.  Compute the energy of electromagnetic radiation given either its frequency or wavelength.
    37.  Describe the relationship between electromagnetic energy and transitions between electron energy levels.

  
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    PHY 161 - Physics I: Mechanics and Heat


    Physics includes the study of matter and motion, mass and energy.  It tells you how and why things move.  It is important for everyone from technicians to doctors to know why something happens.  Problem solving skills that you learn in physics will help you in other courses, as will the skills in laboratory observation and analysis.  In Mechanics you will learn about forces and the accelerations they produce, and conservation laws for energy and momentum.  In thermodynamics you will study how heat energy affects the properties of matter.  This includes topics that range from how atoms bounce around on a hot day to the operation of a gasoline engine.  Physics provides the underlying concepts used in technologies and in other sciences.  Basic principles are applied to solve realistic problems, using algebra and elementary trigonometry.  This course is designed for Liberal Arts, Computer Science, and Technology students and others who are interested in learning why things happen the way they do.  Laboratory experiences will provide you with problem solving techniques, measurement skills and applications of theory.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Minimum grade of 75 in Math B (H.S.) or a minimum grade of "C" in Math MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry or MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry.  Minimum grade of 75 in H.S. Physics or a "C" in PHY 090 Preparatory Physics.

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Carry out particular experimental tests of various theories considered, including calculating from measurements, stating results, and describing patterns of proportionality.
    2.  Make and record measurements of such physical quantities as length, time, mass, force, and temperature with appropriate instruments to the limit of accuracy of the instruments.
    3.  Express the results of measurements and calculations with correct units and with an appropriate number of significant digits.
    4.  Distinguish between a scalar quantity and a vector quantity.
    5.  Add two or more vectors by graphical and by component methods.
    6.  Display understanding of position, velocity, acceleration, and time as different quantities behaving differently in time, by (for example) explaining and graphing how position can be maximal when velocity is zero and acceleration is not zero.
    7.  Solve problems involving motion with constant acceleration, including linear free-fall and projectile motion problems, using all of the equations describing uniformly accelerated motion.
    8.  Solve problems involving varied physical systems undergoing uniform circular motion.
    9.  State and correctly draw conclusions from Newton's first, second, and third laws of motion.
    10.  Apply the second law, with equations describing motion with constant acceleration, to varied problems, including situations involving friction, linked objects, and later buoyant forces.
    11.  Use Newton's law of gravitation to draw correct conclusions and to solve numerical problems.
    12.  Define the quantities work, kinetic energy, gravitational energy, elastic energy, total mechanical energy, and internal energy.
    13.  Use the work energy theorem and the law of conservation of energy to solve problems.
    14.  Define the quantities impulse, momentum of an object, and system momentum.
    15.  Use the impulse momentum theorem and the law of conservation of momentum to solve problems.
    16.  Determine the torque of a force about a given axis.
    17.  State Newton's second law for rotation and apply it in solving problems involving an object's rotation about a fixed axis.
    18.  Apply the concepts of work, kinetic energy, and angular mementum to solving problems involving rotational motion.
    19.  Apply the first and second conditions of equilibrium in solving problems about the equilibrium of objects with concurrent and non-concurrent forces applied to them.
    20.  Use the ideas of elastic deformation, stress, strain, and Young's modules.
    21.  Define the ideas of density, pressure, and buoyancy and use them to account for everday phenomena and to solve problems.
    22.  Distinguish among the ideas of temperature, heat, and internal energy.
    23.  Solve problems involving thermal expansion.
    24.  Use the equation of state of an ideal gas to solve problems involving gases in various processes.
    25.  Solve problems involving transfer of heat between systems changing in temperature and changing phase.
    26.  Name and describe processes of heat transfer.
    27.  State and apply the first and second laws of thermodynamics.

  
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    PHY 162 - Physics II: Wave Motion, Electromagnetism, and Atomic Physics


    This is the second course of an algebra-based sequence in physics.  Your study of sound and light will reveal them as examples of waves, and will include study of optical instruments.  Electricity and magnetism introduces you to the basic properties of charges and currents, producing electric fields and magnetic fields.  You will progress to understand electric energy as one essential component of our standard of living.  Some selected topics in modern physics are also covered, including the study of atoms and their nuclei.  Laboratory experiences will provide you with problem solving techniques, measurement skills and applications of theory.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PHY 161 Physics I:  Mechanics and Heat

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Carry out particular experimental tests of various theories considered, including calculating from measurements, stating results, and describing patterns of proportionality.
    2.  Make and record measurements of various physical quantities with appropriate instruments to the limit of accuracy of the instruments.
    3.  Express the results of measurements and calculations with correct units and with an appropriate number of significant digits.
    4.  Solve problems involving the simple harmonic motion of an object.
    5.  Define the parameters frequency, speed, wavelength, amplitude, and period characteristic of a continuous wave, and reason quantitatively from the relationships among them.
    6.  Solve problems involving standing-wave resonance.
    7.  Solve problems involving the reflection, refraction, and dispersion of waves.
    8.  Use the principles of geometrical optics to solve problems involving mirrors, lenses, and various optical instruments.
    9.  Describe the phenomena of interference, diffraction, and polarization.
    10.  Solve problems involving wave intensity and the Doppler effect.
    11.  Apply concepts in electrostatics to display understanding of the electric nature of matter and the interactions between charged particles and charged objects mediated by electric fields and by electric potentials.
    12.  Solve problems involving the flow of electrical charge and the transfer of electric energy in single-loop and in multi-loop circuits.
    13.  Account for the creation of magnetic fields by currents with simple shapes, and the effects of magnetic fields on moving charges.
    14.  Account for the operation of electromagnetic devices such as meters, motors, generators, and transformers.
    15.  Use basic concepts of relativity to solve problems involving high-speed motion.
    16.  Use the idea of a photon to exhibit understanding of the photoelectric effect and the Compton effect.
    17.  Use the wave-particle duality to describe the motion of small-mass particles, and also of photons.
    18.  Describe the structure of an atom according to ideas of Rutherford and Bohr.  Account for the bright-line spectra of atoms.
    19.  Enumerate the particles making up the nuclei of atoms, and qualitatively describe the forces of interaction among them.
    20.  Describe the processes of radioactive decay, and solve problems with the idea of radioactive half-life.
    21.  Describe the processes of nuclear fission and fusion.
    22.  Reason about nuclear reactions written as equations; do calculations of energy released.

  
  •  

    PHY 181 - Physics for Engineers & Scientists I: Mechanics and Thermodynamics


    Engineering Physics, sometimes called "University Physics," uses calculus in the development of principles.  The topics include the description of motion and the causes of motion, with the ideas of force, energy, power, and momentum; equilibrium and rotation; and heat and its effects.  This course is designed for students studying engineering, computing, science, or mathematics.  Laboratory experiences will provide you with problem solving techniques, measurement skills and applications of theory.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Minimum grade of 80 in Math B (H.S.) or a minimum of B in Math 156 Algebra and Trigonometry for Calculus, or C in MAT 181 Calculus I (preferred).  Minimum grade of 80 in H.S. Physics or C in PHY 161 Physics I:  Mechanics and Heat.

    Corequisite:  MAT 182 Calculus II (preferred)

    Prior or Concurrent:  MAT 181 Calculus I

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Compute vector sums, scalar products, and vector cross products.
    2.  Solve problems involving displacement, velocity and acceleration for one dimensional translating systems at the level of elementary differential and integral calculus.
    3.  Solve the two dimensional kinematics problems of projectile and circular motions.
    4.  Apply Newton's three laws to static and dynamic physical situations.
    5.  Use the concept of kinetic and potential energy along with the work-energy principle to solve mechanics problems with constant and position dependent forces.
    6.  Calculate the center of mass and energy of motion for discrete and continuous mass distributions.
    7.  Solve one, two, and three dimensional collision processes.
    8.  Use the concepts of torque, angular momentum, and moment of inertia in rotating systems.
    9.  Solve equilibrium problems with concurrent and non-concurrent forces.
    10.  Solve problems involving simple harmonic motion with analyses based on ordinary second order differential equations.
    11.  Apply the Universal Law of Gravitation and resulting potential energy function to two body systems.
    12.  Solve problems using Pascal's, Archimedes and Bernoulli's principles and the elastic properties of solids.
    13.  Compute the thermal expansion of various materials and use specific heat capacities to solve problems.
    14.  Use the first and second laws of thermodynamics to solve problems including heat engines and heat pumps.

  
  •  

    PHY 182 - Physics for Engineers & Scientists II: Sound, Light, Electricity and Magnetism


    This continuation of PHY 181 covers the nature of sound and of light and their behavior; electric and magnetic forces and fields; electric circuits and electric energy transfer; and electromagnetic induction.  This is the second semester of University Physics taught at most major Engineering schools.  Laboratory experiences will provide you with problem solving techniques, measurement skills and applications of theory.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PHY 181 Physics for Engineers & Scientist I: Mechanics and Thermodynamics

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Analyze questions and problems involving Coulomb's Law.
    2.  Utilize the concept of electric field strength in solving problems involving point charges and charge distributions.
    3.  Find the electric field of symmetrical charge distributions by use of Gauss' Law.
    4.  Compute the capacitance of an object and the effects of dielectrics on that capacitance.
    5.  Calculate the energy stored in individual capacitors and in groups.
    6.  Calculate the magnetic field using the Biot-Savart Law and Ampere's Law for various cases.
    7.  Calculate the magnetic force and torque on a circuit or circuit element.
    8.  Apply Faraday's Law to the solution of problems involving time-varying magnetic flux.
    9.  Calculate the value of self-inductance of various objects and the effect of an inductor in a circuit.
    10.  Solve DC circuits and single loop AC circuits.
    11.  Calculate such characteristics as wavelength, frequency and wave speed for any wave and write a wave function appropriate for that wave which can be shown to obey the appropriate wave equation.
    12.  Calculate the wavelength, freuency and speed of standing waves in string and for resonant air columns in tubes open at one or both ends.
    13.  Solve problems involving simple harmonic motion with analyses based on ordinary second order differential equations.
    14.  Solve problems involving the intensity of sound waves and the Doppler effect as applied to sound waves.
    15.  Solve geometric optics problems involving mirrors and lenses.
    16.  Solve problems involving the reflection, refraction, diffraction and interference of waves.
    17.  Compute thin film thickness necessary for various interference effects.
    18.  Communicate effectively in laboratory reports, following accepted reporting formats to present laboratory results cogently and succinctly.

  
  •  

    PHY 281 - Physics for Engineers & Scientists III


    This elective is the third and last physics course for Engineering and Science majors.  It covers Einstein's theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, and nuclear physics.  Students majoring in Electrical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, and Physics should consider taking this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PHY 182 Physics for Engineers & Scientists II:  Sound, Light, Electricity and Magnetism and MAT 182 Calculus II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Note
    (This course is only offered as enrollment warrants)

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish between the photoelectrical effect, Compton effect, and pair production.
    2.  Solve problems involving x-rays and electron diffraction.
    3.  Interpret de Broglie waves in terms of probability distribution.
    4.  Use the Schrödinger equation to give a quantum description of a confined particle.
    5.  Give an account of Rutherford scattering and use Bohr's postulates to solve problems in atomic physics.
    6.   Describe quantization of angular moments.
    7.  Explain the normal and anomalous Zeeman effects and describe the Stern-Gerlach experiment.
    8.  Describe the principles of nuclear radiation measuring devices and high energy accelerators.
    9.  Explain the contributions to nuclear binding energy.
    10.  Derive radioactive growth and decay laws.
    11.  Explain simple decay schemes.
    12.  Describe methods of neutron production, velocity measurement, and moderation.
    13.  Solve problems of relativistic motion.

  
  •  

    PMD 211 - Foundations in Advanced Prehospital Care


    This initial course in an Emergency Medical Technician's progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic covers foundational preparatory concepts that enable them to enter the clinical setting, hone their EMT skills and be safe.  The course includes advanced provider roles and responsibilities, field safety, and the components of our EMS system.  The course also includes general cellular physiology & pathophysiology including acid-base balance, basic and advanced airway management, field history taking & patient assessment skills, introductory pharmacology & routs of administration and their associated skills, and concludes with an in-depth discussion of pulmonolgy pathophysiology and advanced treatment modalities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  Permission of the instructor is required.

    General Prerequisites:  a currently valid New York State EMT certificate, field experience, and successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 Human Biology I and BIO 132 Human Biology II.  Course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently.

    Co-requisite:  If successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 Human Biology I and BIO 132 Human Biology has not been accomplished then course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently which at BCC is the BIO 131 Human Biology I and 132 Human Biology II sequence.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 1.5 Laboratory Hours; 2 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  List the roles and responsibilities of personnel within an EMS system, and how these roles and responsibilities differ.
    2.  Write the importance os personal wellness and wellbeing of the EMS provider.
    3.  Justify how to serve as a healthy role model for peers.
    4.  Consistently demonstrate safe and effective behaviors in the initial response phase of an emergency.
    5.  Consistently demonstrate collecting and documenting a thorough and accurate field patient history and subjective assessment.
    6.  Consistently perform and document efficient field medical and trauma patient physical assessments.
    7.  Discuss general cellular physiology and pathophysiology including acid-base balance.
    8.  Consistently demonstrate safe and efficient establishment and maintenance of a patient's airway.
    9.  Consistently demonstrate safe and approporiate ventilation of a patient including ongoing assessment of oxygenation.
    10.  Safely and precisely obtain access to the venous circulation.
    11.  Safely and precisely administer medications.
    12.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently formulate and implement a treatment plan for the patient with respiratory problems.

  
  •  

    PMD 212 - Advanced Prehospital Care of Cardiovascular & Special Population Patients


    This second course in an Emergency Medical Technician's progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic covers an in-depth discussion of cardiovascular pathophysiology and advanced treatment modalities including basic ECG interpretation.  In-depth discussion of pathophysiology and advanced treatment modalities for special populations include; gynecological & obstetrics patients and neonatal & pedicatric patients.  An introduction to hazardous materials awareness concludes this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites for this course are:  successful completion of PMD 211 & PMD 211L Foundations in Advanced Prehospital Care, or permission of the instructor.

    General prerequisites include:  a currently valid New York State EMT certificate, field experience, and successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 Human Biology I and BIO 132 Human Biology II.  Course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently.

    Co-requisite:  If successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 Human Biology I and BIO 132 Human Biology II has not been accomplished then course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently which at BCC is the BIO 131 Human Biology I and 132 Human Biology II sequence.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Lab Hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
              a.  A cardiovascular emergency
              b.  A gynecological emergency
    2.  Describe the anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system.
    3.  Consistently demonstrate assessment and management of a patient experienceing normal or abnormal labor and delivery.
    4.  Synthesize pathopysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatement plan for the:
              a.  Neonatal patient
              b.  Pediatric patient
    5.  Recognize and evaluate hazardous material emergencies, call for appropriate resources, and safely manage patients in the cold zone.

  
  •  

    PMD 213 - Advanced Prehospital Trauma Care


    This third course in an Emergency Medical Technician's progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic covers more in-depth preparatory concepts including the history of EMS and Injury & Illness prevention strategies.  The course also includes the operational topics of Ambulance Operations and Crime Scene awareness.  The majority of this course is devoted to a foundational discussion of trauma pathophysiology and advanced trauma treatment modalities including hypoperfusion, head, face, neck, thoracic, abdominal and burn trauma.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:

    • Successful completion of PMD 212 or permission of the instructor
    • A currently valid New York State EMT certificate including field experience
    • Successful completio of BIO 131 and BIO 132.  BIO 131 or BIO 132 may be taken concurrently


    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Restate primary injury prevention strategies as an effective way to reduce death, disabilites and health care costs.
    2.  Analyze human hazards at a crime scene and from a potentially violent patient.
    3.  Describe safe and minimally intrusive operations at crime scenes.
    4.  Safely manage a patient who is he victim of a sexual assault recognizing the patient's physical and emotional needs along with the preservation of the crime scene evidence.
    5.  Consistently demonstrate safe ambulance operation.
    6.  Consistently demonstrate simple triage and rapid transport principles at a mass casualty incident.
    7.  Integrate principles of injury kinematics to enhance patient assessment and predict the likelihood of injuries.
    8.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for:
              a.  Shock (hypoperfusion)
              b.  Hermorrhage
              c.  Suspected or obvious head injury
              d.  Face injury
              e.  Suspected or obvious neck injury
              f.   Suspected or obvious spinal injury
              g.  Thoracic injury
              h.  Suspected or obvious abdominal injury
              i.   Burn injury

  
  •  

    PMD 214 - Advanced Prehospital Care of Medical Emergencies


    This fourth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's progression to Critical Care Technician or Paramedic is an introduction to various medical pathophysiology and advanced medical treatment modalities for neurologic, endocrinologic, toxicologic, environmental, allergy & anaphylaxis and behavioral medical patients.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:

    • Successful completion of PMD 213 or permission of the instructor
    • A currently valid New York State EMT certificate including required field experience
    • Successful completion of BIO 131 and BIO 132.  BIO 131 or BIO 132 may be taken concurrently


    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
              a.  A seizure
              b.  A cerebral vascular accident
              c.  A transient ischemic attack
              d.  A diabetic emergency
              e.  An acute coronary syndrome of various etiologies
              f.  A neurological problem
              g.  An endocrine problem
              h.  A toxic substance exposure
               i.  An environmentally induced or exacerbated medical condition
               j.  An allergic reaction
              k.  An anaphylactic reaction
    2.  Consistently demonstrate safe, empathetic competence in caring for patients with behavioral emergencies.

  
  •  

    PMD 221 - Paramedic Foundations and Comprehensive Physical Exam


    This sixth course in an Emergency Medical Techician's or this first course in a Critical Care' Technician's progression to Paramedic covers foundational paramedic level concepts.  Early in the course general cellular pathophysiology is expanded on with and in-depth discussion of hypoperfusion and various shock states.  Physical and emotional developmental milestones are reviewed along with effective communication strategies.  Additional advanced airway assessment tools and skills are developed.  An in-depth pharmacology knowledge is cultivated and the course concludes with the development of comprehensive history taking and physical examination skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites for this course is permission of the instructor. 

    For EMS providers at the EMT level general prerequisites include:  A currently valid New York State EMT certificate, field experience, and successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 and BIO 132.  Course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently.

    For EMS providers at the Critical Care level (bridge students) must have completed BIO 131 & 132 or its equivalent, present 100 "in charge" ALS calls within the past 5 years, and demonstrate skills and knowledge at the Critical Care level in a qualifying examination.

    Co-requisite:  If successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 and BIO 132 has not been accomplished then course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently which at BCC is the BIO 131 and 132 sequence.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize, classify, and determine proper management of the types of shock.
    2.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with pharmacology knowledge and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement an appropriate pharmacologic management plan.
    3.  Consistently apply therapeutic communication principles to effectively communicate with any patient while providing care.
    4.  Recall and integrate physiological, psychological, and sociological changes throughout human development with assessment and communication strategies for patients of all ages.
    5.  Recognize, classify, and properly manage a difficult patient airway including:
              a.  Surgical establishment of a patient airway
              b.  Use of capnography to assess and adjust the ventilation of a patient
    6.  Integrate appropriate alternative techniques to obtain a patient's medical history.
    7.  Explain the pathophysiological significance of normal and key abnormal physical exam findings.
    8.  Consistently integrate advanced principles of history taking and physical exam techniques to perform a comprehensive patient assessment.
    9.  Consistently and accurately collect, organize and state patient information in verbal form, either in person or over the radio following accepted formats.
    10.  Consistently and accurately collect, organize, and clearly write patient information on patient documentation forms.

  
  •  

    PMD 222 - Paramedic Care of Cardiovascular & Special Patient Populations


    This seventh course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this second course in a Critical Care Technician's progression to Paramedic covers the synthesis of information in order to make sound clinical decisions.  In-depth discussion of geriatric emergencies is followed by advanced cardiac pathophysiology and skills including 12 lead interpretations.  Neonatology and pediatrics emergencies and the skills necessary to care for them are reviewed.  The course concludes with a brief discussion of the recognition of abuse.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites for this course are permission of the instructor.

    For EMS providers at the EMT level general prerequisites include:  A currently valid New York State EMT certificate, field experience, and successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 and BIO 132.  Course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently.

    For EMS providers at the Critical Care level (bridge students) must have completed PMD 221 & 221L.

    Co-requisite:  If successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 and BIO 132 has not been accomplished then course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently which at BCC is the BIO 131 and 132 sequence.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Systematically apply accepted clinical decision making skills to formulate a field impression and treatment plan.
    2.  Consistently integrate advanced diagnostic techniques and skills for the patient with cardiovascular disease.
    3.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the unique emergencies of the:
              a.  Geriatric patient
              b.  Pediatric patient
              c.  Patient who has sustained abuse or assault

  
  •  

    PMD 223 - Paramedic Trauma Care


    This eighth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this third course in a Critical Care Technician's progression to Paramedic covers advanced preparatory concepts such as well being of the paramedic, roles and responsibilities, medical legal and ethical issues.  The majority of this course is devoted to pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of a trauma patient and concludes with complex trauma scenarios requiring efficient synthesis of knowledge and skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: 

    • Successful completion of PMD 222 or permission of the instructor
    • A currently valid New York State EMT certificate including required field experience
    • Successful completion of BIO 131 and BIO 132.  BIO 131 or BIO 132 may be taken concurrently
    • EMS providers at the Critical Care level (bridge students) must have completed both BIO 131 and 132, presented 100 "in charge" ALS calls within the past 5 years, and demonstrate skills and knowledge a the Critical Care level in a qualifying examination.

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the paramedic's professional and community responsibilities with respect to:
              a.  Continuing education
              b.  Continuous EMS improvement
              c.  Injury prevention
    2.  Recall and discuss common out-of-hospital issues with respect to:
              a.  Laws and regulations
              b.  Medical ethics
              c.  Personal ethics
              d.  On- and off-line medical control
              e.  Patient advocacy
    3.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
              a.  Multi-system trauma
              b.  Extensive soft tissue trauma
              c.  Suspected spinal injury
              d.  Complex musculoskeletal injury

  
  •  

    PMD 224 - Paramedic Care of Medical Emergencies


    This ninth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this fourth course in a Critical Care Technician's progression to Paramedic covers the body's defenses against disease and injury including discussion of the immune and inflammatory responses.  The majority of this course is devoted to pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of medical patients and concludes with complex medical scenarios requiring efficient synthesis of knowledge and skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites for this course are permission of the instructor. 

    For EMS providers at the EMT level general prerequisites include:  A currently valid New York State EMT certificate, field experience, and successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 and BIO 132.  Course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently.

    For EMS providers at the Critical Care level (bridge students) must have completed PMD 223 & 223L.

    Co-requisite:  If successful completion of instructor approved course work in human anatomy and physiology, e.g. BIO 131 and BIO 132 has not been accomplished then course work in human anatomy and physiology may be taken concurrently which at BCC is the BIO 131 and 131 sequence.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 3 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the components of the body's physical barriers, immune and inflammatory systems and their responses when activated.
    2.  Recall the bodies response to acute and chronic stress.
    3.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for the patient with:
              a.  A neurological problem
              b.  An endocrine problem
              c.  An allergic or anaphylactic reaction
              d.  A gastoenterologic problem
              e.  A renal or urologic problem
              f.  A toxic substance exposure
              g.  A hematopoietic system disease
              h.  An environmentally induced or exacerbated medical condition

  
  •  

    PMD 225 - Paramedic Operations, Pediatric Emergencies, Integrated Care


    This tenth course in an Emergency Medical Technician's or this fifth course in a Critical Care Technician's progression to Paramedic covers assessment based management and patients who present unique challenges for the paramedic.  Also, included are acute interventions for the chronic patient and an awareness of general rescue operations.  This course will re-emphasize and hone pathophysiology, patient assessment and advanced management of pediatric patients and concludes with a comprehensive review of all paramedic objectives including complex patient care scenarios.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites for this course are completion of PMD 224 and PMD 224 Lab or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours; 1.5 Laboratory hours; 2 Clinical hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, following classroom didactic, affective and psychomotor education along with the completion of clinical time each student will be able to:

    1.  Synthesize pathophysiological and psychosocial principles to adapt the assessment and treatment plan for diverse patients and those who face physical, mental, social and financial challenges.
    2.  Describe various special medical devices that might be encountered while caring for an acute chronic care patient and explain how to trouble shoot common devices.
    3.  Synthesize pathophysiological principles with basic and advanced assessment findings to articulate a field impression, and subsequently develop and implement a treatment plan for:
              a.  Acute deterioration of a chronic care patient
              b.  Common complaints
              c.  Acute pediatric patient
    4.  Restate standards and guidelines that help ensure safe and effective ground and air medical transport.
    5.  Describe and be able to implement the principles of rescue operations to safely rescue a patient from:
              a.  Water
              b.  Hazardous atmospheres
              c.  Trenches
              d.  Highways
              e.  Hazardous terrain

  
  •  

    POS 111 - Public Policy


    This course offers students an analytical survey of policy formulation and implementation in the United States, together with an examination of the impact of policy upon individuals and groups in American society.  Topics covered will include:  policy making processes, policy analysis, federal and state policies, rationality and irrationality in public policy, incrementalism, special interests, public choice, and institutional influences.  This course satisfies the civic education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    SOS 111
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to :

    1.  Define some of the major concepts in the study of public policy.
    2.  Describe the context within which policy decisions are made, including institutional, economic, cultural, and so on.
    3.  Apply their general knowledge of public policy to the analysis of specific policy issues such as economic, environmental, educational, and foreign policy issues.
    4.  Evaluate arguments for various policy options.
    5.  Assess public policy as an approach to dealing with public issues.

  
  •  

    POS 201 - Introduction to American Government


    American political institutions, processes and behavior.  The relationships among cultural, legal and social aspects of the political system.  Structure, organization and function of political parties, pressure groups and mass media.  Application to contemporary issues and events.  Satisfies the civic education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the main features of the US govenment as presented in the Constitution.
    2.  Identify the major political rights and liberties guaranteed in the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments, and describe the process by which political rights are created and affirmed.
    3.  Describe the political process in the United States today, including the roles of political parties, the media, and public opionion.
    4.  Discuss the nature of political campaigns and the electoral process.
    5.  Identify the nature and roles of the branches of the federal government.
    6.  Discuss some of the main features of policy-making at the federal level.

  
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    POS 203 - International Relations


    An examination of basic concepts and principles of world politics:  international conflict resolution, international organizations, and the struggle for power.  Factors affecting the relationships among the major powers.  The role of diplomacy, alliances, war and peace in the world arena.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe some of the major theories and models of international relations.
    2.  Identify the institutional framework of international relations today.
    3.  Discuss the main outlines of the history of US foreign policy.
    4.  Identify some of the major influences on US foreign policy.
    5.  Identify and discuss some of the major issues in international relations in the contemporary world.

  
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    POS 204 - American State and Local Government


    Theory and practice of state and local government, utilizing a problem-solving or "policy" approach.  Students are encouraged to explore in depth the workings of city and county governments locally.  Satisfies the civic education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe some of the main features of the structures of state and local government.
    2.  Discuss how the various levels of govenment interact with each other and with the citizens they represent.
    3.  Describe the major elements in the policy-making process in state and local governments.
    4.  Identify some of the forces influencing policy-making.
    5.  Identify and discuss some of the primary issues facing state and local govenments.

  
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    POS 205 - Women and Politics


    This course will focus on the role of women in politics.  We will start by reviewing the women's suffrage movement in the U.S. and abroad, then examine how far women have come today.  Interspersed with our historical examination, we will review the women themselves that have contributed to the progress of the women's movement as well as look at current women contributing to the movement today.  We will also consider questions such as:  Does gender matter in politics?  Is there a bias against women?  Do women politicians have different issue priorities than their male counterparts?  What is the gender gap?  We will use social science methodology to hypothesize, observe, measure, and assess the roles of women in politics and the impact of the political process on women.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Compare and contrast the major goals, failures and successes of the first, second and third waves of feminism.
    2.  Identify and analyze the current political, social and economic trends and issues facing the modern women's movement.
    3.  Identify and analyze the progress women have made as candidates for office since they achieved the right to vote.
    4.  Compare and contrast issues that are important to women and men while serving in political office.
    5.  Develop political research skills as well as written and oral skills.

  
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    POS 210 - Political Internship


    POS 210 is a service learning course, with an academic component, which allows students to receive credit for serving an internship in the political field.  There will be one class hour per week, focusing on issues related to these service activities.  Service activities include, but are not limited to, working with local political parties, serving in election campaigns, and working with local elected officials.  The instructor will determine which service activities are appropriate and how both the service and academic components are assessed.

    Credits: 1-3
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Service Activities
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe some of the major features of the local politcal system especially as these are related to the student's service activities.
    2.  Identify some important local issues and describe their relation to the local political system.
    3.  Identify opportunities for civic engagement in the local political system.

     

  
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    POS 289 - Research Methods


    This course provides students with a basic understanding of how to conduct and evaluate scientific research in the social sciences.  Course topics follow the major steps in qualitative and quantitative social science research design and execution from the definition of the problem and formulation of hypotheses to the interpretation of results and preparation of the final report.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ANT 289, SOC 289
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Students will explore the role and importance of research.
    2.  Students will be introduced to the scientific research process.
    3.  Students will identify acceptable ethical procedures for the protection of human subjects associated with social scientific research.
    4.  Students will be introduced to the concepts of scientific sampling, generalizability, levels of measurement, reliability, and validity.
    5.  Students will learn the difference between descriptive statistics and inferential statistics.
    6.  Students will understand the differences between quantitative and qualitative research methods.
    7.  Students will learn the difference between social scientific knowledge and other types of knowledge.
    8.  Students will learn how to write a research proposal.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the role and importance of social scientific research.
    2.  Evaluate social scientific studies published in peer-reviewed journals.
    3.  Apply the research process to create a small-scale research proposal.
    4.  Identify the differences between qualitative and quantitative research methods.
    5.  Explain the role and importance of research ethics regarding human subjects.
    6.  Write clearly - identifying social scientific information correctly using proper citations.

  
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    POS 299 - Independent Study


    An independent student project which is beyond the scope of courses currently offered by the department, directed by a faculty member with approval of the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester hours of political science

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Course outcomes will be determined by the instructor with the consent of the department chair and Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
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    PSY 110 - General Psychology


    Survey of the field of psychology.  Major principles, theories, and methods, and their application to the study of human behavior.  Topics include the history and fields of psychology, the scientific method and statistical applications, the neural system, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory, intelligence and cognition, maturation, emotion, personality and social influences.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, emprical findings and historical trends in psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the basic research methods used in psychology and an ability to approach and solve problems from these perspectives.
    3.  Describe behavioral phenomena and the theories that attempt to explain them.
    4.  Evaluate research in psychology critically, both in the scientific and the popular press.
    5.  Communicate effectively about psychological issues.
    6.  Apply psychological concepts to a variety of real world settings.

  
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    PSY 210 - Human Development


    Human development from conception through adulthood to the end of life.  Considers physical, intellectual, emotional, and social maturation and typical problems in various stages of the life cycle.  Especially designed for Health Sciences, Education and Psychology majors.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate understanding and application of the facts, concepts, and theories of the stages of human development from conception through death.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method in the study of behavior and recognize the basic research methods used to gain knowledge about the stages of human development across the life span.
    3.  Understand and analyze psychological research about human development.
    4.  Identify social and ethical issues as well as current considerations in this field of human development.
    5.  Develop a broader understanding of human development across cultures.
    6.  Be familiar with local, state, and federal resources for parents, educators, and other professionals in the field of human development.

  
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    PSY 211 - Child Development


    An overview of the growth and development of the child from conception to adolescence including cognitive, physical, social and psychological changes.  Major theories and research related to child development.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological theories and models of child development.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the role of biological, psychological, cognitive and social processes in child development.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the research methods and ethical considerations appropriate for the study of child development.
    4.  Critically evaluate empirical evidence concerning child development.
    5.  Apply child development concepts to further the development and welfare of children in real-world settings.

  
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    PSY 212 - Adolescent Development


    Study of adolescent development and the complex nature of adolescent thought, behavior, and relationships.  Focus is on physical, cognitive, social, psychological, and moral development.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the psychological theories and models of adolescents development.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the role of biological, cognitive, social, and psychological processes on adolescent development.
    3.  Critically evaluate empirical findings concerning adolescent development.
    4.  Consider ways to effectively apply theoretical concepts to interacting with adolescents in personal and/or professional settings.

  
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    PSY 214 - Abnormal Psychology


    Overview of the history of psychopathology, major psychological disorders, theoretical perspectives to understanding abnormality and approaches to treatment and therapy.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the concept of abnormality.
    2.  Describe the major diagnostic categories of mental disorders.
    3.  Understand and articulate the differences between the major theories currently used to explain causes and symptoms of mental disorders.
    4.  Distinguish between the variety of approaches used to treat mental disorders.

  
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    PSY 217 - Introduction to Counseling Theory and Practice


    Theoretical foundations and techniques associated with a variety of individual counseling approaches including psychoanalystic, humanistic, existential, cognitive - behavioral, feminist, and integrative.  Basic counseling skills are introduced and practiced.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the therapeutic process and the practical elements of the counseling interaction.
    2.  Understand and distinguish between the various theorectical models of counseling.
    3.  Learn and practice listening and attending skills essential to the counseling process.
    4.  Appreciate the variety of ethical and professional issues in counseling and develop a personal position on these issues.
    5.  Apply five contrasting theories to specific cases.
    6.  Integrate theorectical and experiential learning in order to begin to develop a personal model of counseling.
    7.  Engage in self-assessment of personal qualities that support and hinder attempts at being therapeutic for others.

  
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    PSY 223 - Human Exceptionality and Its Assessment


    PSY 223 is a survey of human exceptionality:  attention will be focused on the problems, etiologies (causes), and expectancies of exceptional people in their communities, at school, and at home.  Topics include persons with learning disabilities, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders, emotional disabilities, mental retardation, autism, and people who are gifted, talented, and creative.  Special consideration is given to intelligence testing and the placement of atypical learners in special education and inclusive school settings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding and application of the facts, concepts, and theories associated with atypical development.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method in the study of behavior and the research methods used to gain knowledge about atypical development.
    3.  Critically evaluate research about human exceptionalities.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the etiologies associated with different exceptionalities.
    5.  Appreciate the various needs of individuals with exceptionalities throughout their lifespan.
    6.  Become familiar with local, state, and federal resources for parents, educators, and other professionals interested in the field of human exceptionality.
    7.  Identify and appreciate social and ethical issues associated with working with exceptional individuals.
    8.  Apply course concepts in personal, educational and professional settings dealing with exceptional individuals.

  
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    PSY 227 - Learning and Behavior


    Exploration of the basic principles of conditioning and learning.  Emphasis on classical and operant conditioning and their place in the larger theoretical framework of behavioral psychology.  Application of these principles to understanding and changing individual and group behavior.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a knowledge of behavioral orientation in psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the explanations for behavior as postulated by behaviorists.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of classical and operant learning theory.
    4.  Define basic terms and understand principles and processes associated with classical and operant learning theory and conditioning.
    5.  Describe the various methods used in behavioral research.
    6.  Utilize basic techniques of behavior change.
    7.  Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between classical and operant learning research findings, many of which are based on animal studies, and direct application to human behavior and its modification.

  
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    PSY 230 - Psychology of Women


    Introduction to the scientific study of female behavior.  Exposure to and evaluation of psychological theories used to explain the female experience.  Major women theorists in the field of psychology, their perspectives and contributions.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Appreciate the historical underpinnings to the scientific study of women's experience.
    2.  Understand the historical placement and depiction of women in the discipline of psychology.
    3.  Understand the theory of social constructionism and its value in the process of understanding women's experience.
    4.  Understand theories of women's experience as studied by female psychologists, past and present.
    5.  Explain the biological and psychological basis of female sexuality and gender identity formation.
    6.  Understand psychological explanations of atypical behavior in women.
    7.  Develop a cultural perspective for evaluating psychological theories and information that attempts to explain female behavior.

  
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    PSY 234 - Psychology of Addiction


    Overview of the psychology of addictive behavior, psychophysiology of the brain and the addictive process.  Addiction to alcohol, illicit drugs, over-the-counter medications, psycho-pharmaceuticals, food, gambling and sex are introduced.  The impact of the addictive cycle on the individual, the family, and society as a whole is explored.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology or Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of addiction as a concept.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of various types of addictive behavior.
    3.  Integrate and apply information regarding how the central nervous system and other bodily systems process chemical substances.
    4.  Recognize the comprehensive impact of addiction on an individual's overall well being.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of addiction on the individual, family and society.
    6.  Apply information about various addiction treatment modalities.
    7.  Recognize the role that culture and the media have in relationship to addictive behavior.

  
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    PSY 240 - Psychology of Advertising


    Emphasizes the psychological dimensions of advertising as a basis for attracting and retaining consumer awareness of products, companies, and services.  Theories of communication, motivation, personality, attitude formation, perception and learning that pertain to the diffusion of media advertising messages are examined and analyzed using television, radio, print, and Internet media.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this coure the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the historical foundations of the psychology of advertising.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical issues surrounding advertising strategies currently in use.
    3.  Describe and analyze theories of motivation, perception and personality as each pertains to specific advertising campaigns.
    4.  Describe the rationale for market segmentation strategies through the analysis of consumer life-style and life-cycle theories and understand the rationale for utilizing both quantitative and qualitative analyses.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of theories of communication, such as encoding and decoding advertising messages.
    6.  Identify and explain examples of both classical and operant conditioning techniques utilized in advertising campaigns to affect consumer behavior.
    7.  Assess the importance of the diffusion of innovation in advertising and the psychological components of each market segment.
    8.  Demonstrate how advertising can be used to shape an individual's perceptions of advertising messages.

  
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    PSY 245 WE - Social Psychology


    Scientific study of social influences on human behavior.  Topics include social influence, attitudes, group behavior, social perception, social cognition, aggression, and interpersonal attraction.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, Undergraduate level ENG 110 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 111 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 107 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 108 Minimum Grade of D

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in social psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of, and ability to use, basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation.
    3.  Demonstrate the ability to think critically in applying social psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively about social psychology as a discipline and as a source of useful information and resources.

  
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    PSY 250 WE - Educational Psychology


    Application of psychological theory and research to education including behavioral, cognitive, and social approaches to teaching and learning in schools and other educational settings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology, Undergraduate level ENG 110 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 111 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 107 Minimum Grade of D or Undergraduate level ENG 108 Minimum Grade of D

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the basic issues and constructs in educational psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the historical and current theories and research which have shaped educational psychology.
    3.  Demonstrate the ability to approach educational problems from a psychological perspective.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively about educational psychology as a discipline and as a source of useful information and resources for educators.
    5.  Demonstrate the ability to apply psychological knowledge to students' own teaching.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to apply psychological knowledge to students' own learning.
    7.  Demonstrate the ability to think critically about traditional and contemporary educational issues.

  
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    PSY 255 - Forensic Psychology


    The primary goal of this course is to investigate the psychological disorders present in both perpetrators and victims of crime as these disorders apply to the various aspects of the United States criminal justice system.  Psychological underpinnings of crimes such as stalking, child abuse, murder, and sexual deviance are explored.  The course also provides an overview of the role psychologists play in criminal investigations, including profiling, risk assessment, crime scene analysis, and therapeutic interventions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  This course is designed to familiarize students with the symptoms of clinical syndromes and the application of diagnostics to forensic populaltions.
    2.  Students will be exposed to the aspects of forensic psychology as a career.
    3.  This course is intended to develop student research and writing skills in the expected professional writing format for social and behavioral sciences and criminal justice (APA).

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize, reflect on, and articulate (both orally and in writing) the scope of the field of forensic psychology including main terminology.
    2.  Summarize major topics, theories, research and concepts in the discipline and explain the interaction between the fields of Criminal Justice and Psychology.
    3.  Apply the principles learned in this course to practical experiences in the field specifically:

    • Differentiate between the various disorders most common in the criminal justice system including the etiology, symptomology, and treatment.
    • Effectively communicate with a variety of people involved in the criminal justice system including perpetrators, victims, and criminal justice personnel.
    • Interpret ambiguous situations involving the accused and the accuser using knowledge of reasoning and behavior.

    4.  Explain different aspects of crime, considering social, biological, cultural, and cognitive influences.
     

     

  
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    PSY 265 - Sport Psychology


    This course will provide an overview of the growing field of Sport Psychology, which examines human behavior in the context of athletic pursuits and the interaction between psychological variables and sports performance.  This multi-faceted field integrates theories and concepts from general, social, personality and developmental psychology as well as exercise psychology, sport sociology, and motor learning.  Topics will include group and team dynamics, leadership, motivation, psychological skills training, use of imagery and performance enhancement, promotion of health and well-being, the relationship between personality and performance, and psychopathology in sport.  This introductory course is ideal for students who wish to work with athletes in some capacity, pursue a career in physical education teaching and/or coaching or who plan on working with individuals in the health, fitness, or wellness industry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology
     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Through verbal or written communication, students will be able to list and describe definitions, distinctions, and proposed casual mechanisms of psychological theories that have been used to study human behavior in the context of sport.  For example, students will be able to compare similarities and differences between various personality theories, understand theories describing the development of personality, and how these personality theories apply to sports psychology.
    2.  Demonstrate how to apply theoretical knowledge to solve common problems that may be encountered in the field through written and verbal communication.
    3.  Show independent critical thinking and communicate these ideas both verbally and in writing by critically analyzing current research in the field.
    4.  Demonstrate knowledge of the interdisciplinary nature of the study of sport from perspectives through a written exam.  Perspectives such as gender differences, social context, developmental and biological changes and, professional ethical issues/concerns within the field will be covered.

     

  
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    PSY 295 - Psychology Research Capstone (WE)


    Students perform original research in psychology, to produce professional publications or presentations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology, ENG 110 College Writing I, and approval of the instructor.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Research Seminar Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to identify a researchable problem in psychology.
    2. Locate and critically evaluate appropriate existing psychological research.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding and mastery of a particular research method used in psychology, including research design, data analysis, data interpretation, and the development of conclusions from edvidence.


  
  •  

    PSY 299 - Independent Study in Psychology


    Guided or advanced study in psychology, typically beyond the scope or requirements of Psychology courses offered by the department.  Conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PSY 110 General Psychology plus at least 3 additional hours in a 200 level Psychology course

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    To be determined prior to approval.  Agreed to by student, faculty member and department chairperson.

  
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    PTA 100 SL - Introduction to Physical Therapy I


    An introduction to the profession of physical therapy presented with an emphasis on the definition of the role and education of the Physical Therapist Assistant.  Includes an outline of the history and development of medicine, basic knowledge of SOAP note writing, medical terminology, health care institutional organization, ethics, medical-legal aspects of patient care, and fiscal considerations.  Interpersonal skills and professional/patient interactions are discussed.  This course is designated as a service learning course.  The service learning component of the course requires the completion of 50 hours of approved volunteer/service learning experience in a hospital physical therapy department prior to the start of the course.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  50 service learning hours in a hospital physical therapy department

    Corequisite:  PTA 104 Basic Musculoskeletal Anatomy

    Prior or Concurrent:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, PHY 118 Physics for Physical Therapist Assistants

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the history and the roles of medicine, physical therapy, the State Board of Physical Therapy, Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy, and the American Physical Therapy Association.
    2.  Summarize the standards of practice, ethical conduct, federal laws and New York State practice act for physical therapy.
    3.  Describe and demonstrate cultural competence.
    4.  Discuss the team approach to health care and the Physical Therapist Assistant's role within the team, including supervisory responsibilities and the relationship of the Physical Therapist, Physical Therapist Assistant, and other health care personnel.
    5.  Define and use medical terminology at the introductory level.
    6.  Demonstrate the use of SOAP notation in patient record keeping.
    7.  Discuss and demonstrate compliance with HIPAA regulations.
    8.  Explain the purpose, standards and procedures established for the clinical training of Physical Therapist Assistant students at Broome Community College.
    9.  List and describe, in general terms, different patient conditions treated in physical therapy and the importance of evidence based practice.
    10.  Apply an ethical decision making process.
    11.  Demonstrate therapeutic communication.
    12.  Discuss the use of the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice and quality assurance in physical therapy.
    13.  Define and demonstrate evidence based practice.
    14.  Describe reimbursement issues related to providing quality physical therapy interventions.
    15.  Complete a learning style inventory, and recognize and implement individual learning style skills based on the outcome of the inventory.

  
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    PTA 101 - Introduction to Physical Therapy II


    General concepts of disease and disease processes are discussed.  Diseases of selected organs are studied as they relate to Physical Therapy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 100 Introduction to Physical Therapy II

    Corequisite:  BIO 132 Human Biology II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define terms related to the disease and disabilities studied in this course, including cell and tissue damage, inflammation and healing, immune response, disorders of growth, neoplasms, disorders of nutrition, disorders of metabolism, and infectious diseases.
    2.  Explain the causes, pathophysiological processes and classification of disease and disability of the body systems, including the circulatory, digestive, respiritory, integumentary, musculoskeletal and nervous systems.

  
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    PTA 102 - Introduction to Rehabilitation


    A theoretical and applied study of rehabilitation techniques used in the field of physical therapy.  The course includes the study of principles of normal body alignment, body mechanics, posture, balance and cultural competence.  Topics include bed positioning, moving and lifting the dependent patient, as well as the techniques of goniometrics, transfer and elevation activities, passive and self range of motion exercises.  Emphasis is on orthopedic and neurologic treatment techniques, including the therapeutic gymnasium, wheelchairs and assistive devices, orthotics, prosthetics, and the exploration of architectrual barriers.  In addition, interventions for the pediatric patient and patients with amputaions are explored.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 103 Physical Agents and Massage

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe and technically competent manner, including bed modality, transfers, ambulation training, goniometry, ROM, NDT, PNF, orthotics/prosthetics, and balance and coordination exercise.
    2.  Explain and discuss his/her role as a Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and the patient examination/evaluation process.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport, communicating adequate instruction/explanation orally and in writing; concerning all interventions with patient, peers, and other caregivers.
    4.  Identify architectural barriers.
    5.  Define and describe Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), and explain their impact on patient care.

  
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    PTA 103 - Physical Agents and Massage


    A review of the basic principles of massage and application of modalities.  Includes principles and procedures related to the use of the Hubbard tank, therapeutic pool, and intermittent compression.  Specific skills practiced in the laboratory include various massage techniques; use of hot and cold packs, paraffin application; fluid therapy, use of whirlpool and contrast baths; use of ultrasound; application of microwave diathermy; use of electrical stimulation; and ultraviolet and infrared radiation therapy techniques.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 102 Introduction to Rehabilitation

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe and technically competent manner, including massage, superficial heat modalities, deep heat modalities, hydrotherapy, therapeutic pool exercises, electrotherapy, traction, aseptic technique, wound care, handwashing, intermittent compression, and vital sign data collection.
    2.  Explain and discuss the role of the Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and in the patient examination/evaluation process.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport, and communicating adequate instruction/explanation orally and in writing concerning all interventions with patient, peers, and other caregivers.

  
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    PTA 104 - Basic Musculoskeletal Anatomy


    An experientially-based study of basic human bone and muscle anatomy.  Emphasis is on the study of anatomical human musculoskeletal structures as they relate to the field of physical therapy.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  PTA 100 Introduction to Physical Therapy I

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify bony and soft tissue landmarks on the human body.
    2.  Name the bones and muscles of the body according to region.
    3.  List the origin, insertion, nerve and action of each muscle studied.
    4.  Determine the location of each bone or muscle according to region.
    5.  Palpate the superficial bony landmarks and muscles studied.

  
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    PTA 105 - Patient Interaction


    This initial course in the PT Aide Certificate program sequence will introduce the student to the basic skills for working in a health science profession.  Topics covered include medical terminology, professional behavior, effective communication, cultural diversity, OSHA training, time management and basic computer skills.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate proficiency in medical terminology.
    2.  Effectively use therapeutic communication.
    3.  Display professional and ethical behavior.
    4.  Demonstrate cultural awareness and progress toward cultural competence.
    5.  Complete OSHA training.
    6.  Apply time management skills.

  
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    PTA 106 - Physical Therapy Procedures


    This course will introduce the student to common procedures in physical therapy.  Students will learn how to set up, take down and manage PT equipment.  They will also learn basic patient handling skills, safety and body mechanics in preparation to aid the physical therapist and physical therapist assistant in patient interventions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 105 Patient Interaction

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Exhibit proper personal and professional behavior consistently.
    2.  Maintain appropriate interpersonal relationships.
    3.  Exhibit adaptability to changing situations in the PT environment.
    4.  Demonstrate consistently the seven core values of physical therapy.
    5.  Demonstrate the use of universal precautions, clean and sterile aseptic technique.
    6.  Display good body mechanics.
    7.  Prepare for the patient intervention in a safe, thorough and comprehensive manner.
    8.  Perform patient transfers to all surfaces.
    9.  Demonstrate use of assistive devices including wheelchairs.
    10.  Consistently provide guarding when ambulating with a patient and/or transferring a patient.
    11.  Utilize appropriate bed mobility and positioning.
    12.  Clean and maintain department linens as needed.

  
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    PTA 110 - Clinical Affiliation I


    An introductory clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, ambulation, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  Additional emphasis on cultural competence and time management skills.  The student meets with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapy II, PTA 102 Introduction to Rehabilitation, PTA 103 Physical Agents and Massage

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    10.7 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    2.  Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    3.  Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    4.  Deliver established patient care to reflect respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.

  
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    PTA 201 - Kinesiology


    A study of muscle structure and function as they relate to the science of human motion.  Emphasizes basic principles of movement and their application to physical therapy, including, manual muscle testing, pathological posture and gait patterns.  A laboratory experience that includes the application of kinesiology and exercise principles is integrated in the learning experience.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain and discuss the role of the Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and in the patient examination/evaluation process.
    2.  Perform all modalities/interventions presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner as they relate to specific diagnosis presented, including manual muscle testing and gait and posture assessment.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport and in communicating adequate instructions/explanations orally and in writing concerning all interventions with patient, peers and other caregivers.
    4.  Conduct themselves professionally, and ethically with respect for others' differences when engaged in learning and simulated patient care activities.
    5.  Define kinesiology, osteokinematics, arthrokinematics, kinetics and biomechanics.
    6.  Describe joint and muscle structure and function and the forces placed upon them.
    7.  Define, discuss and describe normal motor learning and motor skill acquisition.

  
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    PTA 202 - Therapeutic Exercise


    A presentation of the principles and techniques of therapeutic exercise.  Specific neurological, medical, surgical and orthopedic conditions are studied, as are normal gait and posture.  A terminal project related to cultural competence in healthcare is presented.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain and discuss his/her role as a Physical Therapist Assistant in the application of interventions and the patient examination/evaluation process.
    2.  Perform all modalities/interventions presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner as they relate to specific diagnosis presented, including:  manual and mechanical resistance exercise, stretching, proprioceptive exercise, aerobics, plyometric exercise and assessment, and interventions for orthopedic conditions.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate communication skills in establishing patient/therapist rapport and in communicating adequate instructions/explanations orally and in writing concerning all interventions with patient, peers and other caregivers.
    4.  Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct, including respect for others' differences when engaged inlearning and simulated patient care activities.

  
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    PTA 203 - Therapeutic Assessment & Review for the PTA


    An overview of the basic orthopedic, neurological, integumentary, pediatric and cardiopulmonary assessments in th physical therapy clinical setting.  Includes the application of specific state laws to the performance of these assessments by physical therapist assistants.  Also included in this course will be brief reviews of pertinent/related pathological condiditons.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 213 Senior I, PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
     Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify basic therapeutic assessments in the following areas: upper and lower extremity orthopedics, spinal orthopedics, sensory system, balance and coordination (sitting and standing), pediatrics, integumentary and cardiopulmonary areas of physical therapy.
    2.  Explain the implications of the following as they pertain to rehabilitation: orthopedic injuries, neurological injuries/diseases, wound management, postural deficits, cardiopulmonary pathology, pediatric diseases/disabilities, gait deviations, normal gait patterns and pharmaceuticals.

  
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    PTA 210 - Clinical Affiliation II


    A clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility to assist students to improve skills and increase experience.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, ambulation, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  The student meets with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Includes the observation of surgical procedures.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 5 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PTA 110 Clinical Affiliation I

    Corequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    13.3 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    2.  Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    3.  Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    4.  Deliver established patient care to reflect respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.
    5.  Describe the method and document the experience of an observed surgical procedure.
    6.  Manage at least one-half a typical patient caseload by the final week of the affiliation.
    7.  Demonstrate time management skills.

  
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    PTA 213 - Senior Seminar I


    An exploration of the physical therapist assistant's professional role in the testing and treatment of more complex neurological, orthopedic, medical and surgical conditions.  Consideration of psychosocial issues are also discussed.  Review for the PTA licensing exam.  This course is presented in a seminar format of 12 to 15 hours per week for the first 7 weeks of the semester.  SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS:  This course may be presented by guest lecturers, and sessions may be held off campus in various health care facilities depending upon the particular topic.  Significant preparation time outside of regular class hours is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

     

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    5 Seminar Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all modalities/interventions/assessments presented in lab/lecture in a safe, technically competent manner.
    2.  Demonstrate the safe and correct procedure for the clinical applicaiton of thermal modalities including Diathermy, Ultraviolet and Infra-red radiation.
    3.  Identify a variety of prosthetics, braces, and orthotics including components, material used in fabrication, advantages, disadvantages, indications and contraindications.
    4.  Interact professionally with other members of the health care team and discuss professional research presented including:  patients with visual or hearing loss, Sports Medicine and taping, cardiac rehabilitation, Chest PT, Complimentary medicine, vestibular therapy, falls assessment, sensory integration and NDT, selective functional movement assessment, hippotherapy, developmental disabilites, networking, interviewing and employment process, G codes and billing, Fish Philosophy, hydrotherapy, and lymphedema.
    5.  Recognize individual and cultural differences and respond appropriately in all aspects of physical therapy services.
    6.  Identify career development and lifelong learning opportunities

  
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    PTA 220 - Clinical Affiliation III


    A clinical affiliation assignment in a health care facility to assist students in mastering entry-level skills for employment as a physical therapist assistant.  Students work under the supervision of a physical therapist with a wide variety of patients requiring treatments including modalities, exercise routines related to neurological conditions, patient care skills, gait training, activities of daily living and other interventions with which the student is familiar.  Students meet several times with the clinical coordinator to assess progress.  Clinical hours:  40 hr/week for 6 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PTA 201 Kinesiology, PTA 202 Therapeutic Exercise, PTA 210 Clinical Affiliation II

    Corequisites:  PTA 213 Senior Seminar I, PTA 224 Senior Seminar II

    Credits: 6
    Hours
    16 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform all interventions/assessments in a safe, ethical, efficient and technically competent manner that minimizes risk to patient, self and others.
    2.  Communicate with patient, peers, family members and other caregivers in writing and orally in ways congruent to situational needs and supports delivery of patient services.
    3.  Obtain accurate information by performing selected data collection consistent with the plan of care established by PT.
    4.  Deliver established patient care to reflect respect for and sensitivity to individual differences.
    5.  Demonstrate time management skills.
    6.  Research a case study on a patient undergoing physical therapy.
    7.  Manage a typical patient caseload, appropriate for the entry level PTA by the final week of the affiliation.

  
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    PTA 224 - Senior Seminar II


    A capstone course designed to allow students to integrate their theoretical knowledge and their clinical experience.  Students meet and present case studies in seminar format based on their clinical experience.  If time permits, special topics are presented and discussed.  In addition, a student/teacher conference is required for each student prior to graduation.  The course is held for 9 hrs/week for 2 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  PTA 213 Senior Seminar I, PTA 220 Clinical Affiliation III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Seminar Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to complete data collection from the patient chart, family, personnel and literature review and discuss the impact of data collected in progression of patient interventions within the plan of care established by the PT.
    2.  Discuss the impact of psychosocial factors and reimbursement policies on patient interventions and outcomes.
    3.  Describe the interrelationship of physical therapy practitioners and other health care providers to the patient's total treatment plan.
    4.  Discuss the integration of theory learned in PTA courses and learning gained through practical experience in the clinic.
    5.  Demonstrate that he/she has been socialized into the role of Physical Therapist Assistant and has internalized appropriate characteristics as shown through action and appearance.
    6.  Present a case study on a patient undergoing physical therapy.

  
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    PTA 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project with advanced work in a specific area of physical Therapy.  Independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of courses currently offered by the department chairperson.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Approval of Department Chairperson

     

    Credits: 1-3
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2.  Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
  •  

    RAD 100 - Introduction to Clinical Education


    Overview of radiologic technology through the study of its historical development, its placement in the medical field today, the organization of a modern radiology department, professional ethics, medicolegal aspects of radiology, and medical terminology.  This course is designated as a service learning course.  The service learning component of the course requires the completion of 50 hours of approved volunteer/service learning experience in a hospital diagnostic imaging department prior to the start of the course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  50 volunteer/service learning hours in a hospital diagnostic imaging department

    Credits: 2.5
    Hours
    2.5 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Communicate with patients in a compassionate and caring manner.
    2.  Define basic medical terms, medical abbreviations and symbols.
    3.  Apply medical/professional ethics in the context of a broader societal ethic.
    4.  Explain concepts of personal honesty, integrity, accountability, competence and compassion as ethical imperatives in health care.
    5.  Identify legal and professional standards and relate each to practice in health professions.
    6.  Explain the legal implications of professional liability, malpractice, professional negligence and other legal doctrines applicable to professional practice.
    7.  Identify the benefits of contining education as related to improved patient care and professional enhancement.

 

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