Oct 19, 2018  
Website Catalog 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    CST 093 - Network Basics II


    This course focuses primarily on the software associated with computer networking.  The organization and operation of wide area networks is examined.  Detailed coverage of the software protocols that carry information between computers is examined.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 092 Network Basics I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the purpose of all layers of the TCP/IP network protocol suite.
    2.  Demonstrate how to use different network utilities.
    3.  Discuss the operation of client-server networking and network operating systems.
    4.  Explain the operation of common network applications FTP, Telnet, email, and web browsing.
    5.  Demonstrate useful network activities, such as capturing and analyzing network traffic and securing a network.

  
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    CST 094 - Programming Concepts


    An entry-level course teaches students how to think algorithmically and solve problems efficiently.  Students learn to update, repair, modify, and expand existing programs, and progress to perform analysis, design, and development of new programs.  The programmer converts a computer-solution design or design change into a logical series of instructions for the computer using a current programming language such as Python.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Analyze problems and create algorithms as solutions.
    2.  Evaluate software program design and structured programming techniques.
    3.  Practice the fundamentals of structured design, development, testing, implementation, and documentation in programming.
    4.  Explain classes and objects, assignments, decisions and iterations using an object-oriented language.
    5.  Develop programming logic and design using loops, conditionals, and operators.

  
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    CST 102 - Computer Skills and Literacy


    This course will help develop computer skills to enable a student to be successful in college (Super Useful Computer Concepts Every Student Seeks).  Topics include use of BCC Computer System, development of professional papers using Microsoft Word, creation of presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint, searching for and validating information found on the Internet, maintenance of computer files, maintenance of a Computer System, learning styles and time management.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the 150% Rule and "attempted credits".
    2.  Use professional Time Management techniques to balance school, work, and personal demands.
    3.  List and demonstrate the steps necessary to maintain a personal PC.
    4.  Use Outlook to send/receive e-mails with attachments.
    5.  Explain the use of Learning Management Systems for on-line course presentation.
    6.  Use Word to create/edit/save professional outlines and research papers.
    7.  Use PowerPoint to create/edit/save unique, creative, educational and entertaining presentations.
    8.  Use Excel to create an expense budget.
    9.  List and demonstrate the usefulness of career assessments (Strong's, Myers-Briggs, Colors).
    10.  List and demonstrate Learning Styles/Differentiated Learning and their specific "style".
    11.  Use Library resources to research and develop college-level research papers.
    12.  List and demonstrate academically reviewed/authorized search engines.
    13.  Properly cite sources using both MLA and APA citation formats.
    14.  Create both a hardcopy and e-format resume.
    15.  List and demonstrate the use of Publisher for creating a composite business presence.
    16.  List and demonstrate the use of Visio for creating industry-standards' layouts and designs.

  
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    CST 103 - General Security Concepts


    A first, introductory course in computer and network security concepts and techniques.  No knowledge of networking is required.  Topics include operating system security, authentication, attacks, auditing, cryptography, physical security, and disaster recovery.  Numerous case studies are presented and studied.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the legal and ethical issues associated with information security.
    2.  Describe the various operating security features (including authentication).
    3.  Explain the different types of malicious code and attacks on computers.
    4.  Understand how to perform auditing.
    5.  Be familiar with the basics of cryptography.
    6.  Understand the relationship between physical security and disaster recovery.

  
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    CST 104 - Remote Security Methods


    This second security course builds on the material introduced in CST 103 General Security Concepts.  Detailed examinations of many different remote access methods are undertaken.  These methods include RAS (via PPP over a modem), VPN (virtual private networking), secure email and file transfers, secure web access, wireless security, and instant messaging.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 103 General Security Concepts

    Corequisite:  CST 208 Introduction to Networking

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe unsecure and secure ways of doing web, email, and ftp.
    2.  Describe the operation and features of a typical router.
    3.  Explain the operation of a VPN tunnel, including the protocols used, and the essentials of encryption and hashing.
    4.  Understand how to setup an RAS server.
    5.  Understand the basics of file and directory access security.
    6.  Be familiar with wireless networking and instant messaging.

  
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    CST 105 - Computer Applications


    This is an introduction course to computer concepts and application software.  Topics include word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, the Internet and computer Operating Systems.  Microsoft Office will be used in the laboratory to develop academic, professional, and business applications.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    Credit will not be given for both CST 105 and CST 106.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use PowerPoint to create and present presentations.
    2.  Create a résumé, cover page, envelopes, labels, and tables.
    3.  Use the Internet to access course material.
    4.  Communicate using mail facilities.
    5.  Create and develop a solution to a problem using a spreadsheet for analysis.
    6.  Create a relational database.
    7.  Evaluate a computer configuration.
    8.  List and develop an understanding of computer ethics in today's society.
    9.  Create an integrated document with spreadsheets and/or databases.

  
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    CST 106 - Computers in Technology


    An introductory course on the use of computers for technology students.  Software packages will be used in problem solving and communications.  Topics will include basics of computer operations, hardware, word-processing, spreadsheets, e-mail, information transfer, presentation managers, the Internet, ethical issues and programming concepts.  For students of technology. 

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    Credits will not be given for both CST 105 and CST 106.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use PowerPoint for presentations.
    2.  Create résumés, reports, envelopes, labels, and tables.
    3.  Use Equation Editor to create equations with proper symbols.
    4.  Create forms and newsletters.
    5.  Use the Internet to research technical topics.
    6.  Communicate using different facilities.
    7.  Create a spreadsheet for technical analysis.
    8.  Evaluate a computer configuration.
    9.  Discuss computer ethics in today's society.
    10.  Collaborate and research with other team members.
    11.  List and demonstrate ten core presentation techniques in PowerPoint.
    12.  List and demonstrate ten core concepts for document preparation in Word.
    13.  State verbally and in written documentation, eight core requirements for creating formal documents.
    14.  Properly cite sources using both MLA and APA citation formats.
    15.  Create equations with proper symbols within a word processing document.
    16.  Use and contrast four different communication facilities.
    17.  List and demonstrate ten core concepts in Excel.
    18.  State verbally and in written documentation, seven core issues in computer ethics today.
    19.  State verbally and in written documentation, twelve key components to a computer system.
    20.  Present a final team project in an area related to your field of study (Civil, Mechanical, or Industrial Technology).

  
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    CST 109 - Computer and Malware History


    This course explores the history of the personal computer industry, and relates the evolution of computers with that of networking and the emergence of malicious code, Internet attacks, and identity theft.  The relationship between all three is explored in depth so that the student has a clear understanding of the environment in which they will be performing additional study and eventually, actual work activities.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Examine the history and development of various computing architectures.
    2.  Explore the advances in Intel microprocessor architecture and its impact on operating system power and vulnerability.
    3.  Study the progression of malicious code and its spread through computer networks, including the world wide web.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the evolution of the Intel microprocessor family and its relationship to the evolution of malicious code.
    2.  Understand how the power of the personal computer is related to the microprocessor used inside it.
    3.  Explain how the emergence of networking and the world-wide-web led to many of the computer security issues facing us today.
    4.  Explain how microprocessor technology, computer networking, and operating system vulnerabilities all combine to enable the evolution and spread of malicious code.
    5.  Describe how computers and the Internet combine to enable identity theft and other illegal activities.

  
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    CST 113 - Introduction to Programming


    Introduction to the fundamentals of programming using an Integrated Development Environment (IDE).  Topics may include data types and variables, decisions and conditional statements, repetition/loop structures, file processing and formatting of output.  Lab assignments emphasize program development using a modular design and self-documentation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  A computer course or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate using Visual Studio to compile, debug and run programs.
    2.  Demonstrate the use of good problem-solving skills for program development.
    3.  Create projects that use assignment statements, arithmetic computation, decisions and loops.
    4.  Demonstrate the use of good problem-solving skills for program development.
    5.  Demonstrate how to use standard requirements for programs to develop well written programs.
    6.  State, verbally and in writing, at least 3 core bugging techniques.
    7.  Demonstrate the use of at least 3 different repetition structures.
    8.  Demonstrate the use of the decision structure using if statements and the switch structure correctly.

  
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    CST 117 - Problem Solving & Communication Tools


    An introduction to tools for problem solving, decision making and communications.  This course presents several soft skill tools.  Topics include:  problem solving techniques, report creation, effective email and memo creation, formal and informal communication tools, and formal presentation preparation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Solve both technical and non-technical problems using top down problem-solving techniques.
    2.  Propose alternative solutions to both technical and non-technical problems.
    3.  Use decision tools to solve both technical and non-technical problems.
    4.  Evaluate and describe situational problems both verbally and in writing.
    5.  State verbally and in writing at least four group decision making techniques.
    6.  State verbally and in writing at least three decision and support tools.
    7.  Identify three key components to speaking with credibility.
    8.  Communicate with empathy and clarity.
    9.  Use email and memos to communicate effectively.
    10.  Create and deliver orally a professional presentation.

  
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    CST 119 - Computer Concepts


    A foundation course for students who have already had some exposure to computers.  The lecture and lab will cover basic concepts in computer science and information science.  The use of word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software will be covered through a series of self-directed projects.  Lecture and lab content includes an introduction to computer architecture, data representation, networks, database systems, systems analysis, CASE tools, operating systems including an introduction to DOS and UNIX, comparison of programming languages, Internet, Web page development, computer history and ethics.  Students should have completed a high school computer science course, which focused on the use of an office suite, or CST 105/CST 106.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  High School Computer course or CST 105 Computer Applications or CST 106 Computers in Technology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify historical inventions that lead to the development of modern computers and resulting computer ethics issues.
    2.  Convert to and from binary, decimal, octal, and hexadecimal number systems and perform arithmetic operations in other bases.
    3.  Develop logic using gates and circuits in computer architecture.
    4.  Develop algorithms and pseudo code used in software engineering.
    5.  Utilize command line code in several operating systems and manage productivity of software tools.
    6.  Design relational database systems and write queries using Structured Query Language (SQL).
    7.  Identify network protocols and models and design a web page utilizing Web development techniques.
    8.  Identify computer security threats and prevention techniques.

  
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    CST 120 - Java Programming


    An introductory programming course in the JAVA language with a focus an web applets.  Topics include data types, animation, program control, input/output, arrays and structures.  Students will be introduced to JavaScript as an introduction to Web-based programming.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create an applet.
    2.  Integrate applets in webpages.
    3.  Describe Java and AWT basics.
    4.  Dynamically use applet size information to position items on the applet.
    5.  Create Java applets with animation.
    6.  Describe a GUI interface.e
    7.  Have interaction with the user through Event Handling.
    8.  Use images in applet programs.

  
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    CST 121 - Introduction to Python Programming


    Python has become the leading programming introduction course among computer science and engineering departments.  Python is a high level language that both command line and compiled requires less resources to run and uses available open source integrated development environments (IDE).  With a basic syntax it provides straight forward and modern programming features.  Python is used as the core development language for many platforms.  The primary goal of this course is to give students a basic introduction to object-oriented and procedural programming.  Topics include introduction, conditional-loops, defining functions, strings and lists, recursion, classes and object orientation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Understand computer architecture and data representations (variables, representation of numbers and character strings).
    2. Learn basic algorithmic problem-solving techniques (decision structures, loops, functions).
    3. Use and understand objects used in programming.
    4. Design, document, implement and test solutions to programming problems.
    5. Identify and repair coding errors in a program.


  
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    CST 123 - Visual Basic for Technology


    Introduction to the fundamentals of programming in a technical environment using Microsoft's Visual Basic. NET.  The course will teach students how to design and create applications using structured, event-driven, and object-oriented programming techniques.  Programming concepts to be covered include data types and variables, control structures, arrays, functions, sequential files, printing, and effective GUI design.  Applications will include topics relevant to engineering technology courses.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CST 106 Computers in Technology or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use a computer programming language to solve technical problems.
    2.  Describe and compare the fundamentals of structured, event-driven, and object-oriented programming.
    3.  Create user-friendly graphical interfaces of Windows applications.
    4.  Describe and effectively use data types and variables/constants, programming control structures, arrays, functions, sequential files, and print output.
    5.  Describe the purpose and main features of an integrated development environment.
    6.  Use an IDE effectively to create a complete program.

  
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    CST 124 - Introduction to CGI Programming


    An introduction to CGI (Common Gateway Interface) Programming, used to develop server side application programs for the WWW.  The basic coverage of CGI programming includes developing the relationship between HTML coding displayed by the browser and the actual CGI program running on the server.  The main emphasis will be placed on developing and debugging CGI applications.  Several different methods of program input using forms will be covered, such as environment variables, hidden variables, selection menus, and passwords.  Program output using interactive forms, plain text and HTML will also be covered in detail.  Each student will be expected to write several CGI programs to explore some of the most common types of CGI applications.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 113 Introduction to Programming or CST 120 Java Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Determine the platform details including the operating system and http server software for various Internet websites.
    2.  Install and configure a local web server to allow CGI operation.
    3.  Develop web pages and CGI programs on a local web server.
    4.  Develop CGI scripts/programs using the GET and POST methods.
    5.  Create and/or copy web pages on a remote web server using FTP and Telnet.
    6.  Check the settings of a web server configuration file.
    7.  Use text files as the source of HTML displayed on a web page.
    8.  Discover the latest technologies used to develop web applications.

  
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    CST 127 - Introduction to C++ for Engineers


    Introduction to the fundamentals of structured programming using C++.  Topics may include input-output statements, data types, loop structures, decision structures and functions.  Lab assignments emphasize engineering concepts as well as program development using modular design and self-documentation.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    (This course cannot be used as a course substitute in any CST program)

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use a C++ editor and compiler.
    2.  Effectively use input/output statements, variable and constants.
    3.  Use assignment statements, if statements, loops and methods.
    4.  Create programs that use input and output file.
    5.  Create programs that declare, initialize and manipulate arrays.
    6.  Use C++ elements to solve engineering problems.

  
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    CST 131 - Internet Programming Languages


    This class will emphasize hands-on instruction and practical usage of HTML, JavaScript and XML for programmers. Topics in HTML will include tags, fonts, images, tables, layouts, image maps. Cascading Style Sheets will be covered. JavaScript will include the topics of declaring variables, declaring and using functions, event handling and accessing existing Java functions. This course is designed to give students an insight and hands on experience in how XML can be used on the Internet.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 113 Introduction to Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create a basic Web page with HTML commands.
    2. Demonstrate the use of HTML tags for ordered lists, pictures, fonts, frames, and links.
    3. Design effective Web pages and techniques to keep the user interested in the Web page.
    4. Demonstrate the use of JavaScript to allow the user to interact with a Web page.
    5. Create JavaScript to ask the user questions and act on answers.
    6. Create JavaScript to create motion on the screen.
    7. Create If statements, Loops and arrays and functions in JavaScript.
    8. Demonstrate the basics of a current webpage editor.
    9. Demonstrate how to alter the HTML created by a current webpage editor.
    10. Create and Validate an XML Document.
    11. Work with Basic XML Schemas. 

     

     

  
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    CST 133 - Structured Programming


    A structured approach to problem solving will be used.  Programming steps include program definition, coding, debugging, testing, validation, documentation, and program maintenance.  Topics include functions, objects, structures, arrays, and file processing.  Lab assignments will require modular structured programming and use in Integrated Development Environment (IDE).  Assumes introductory programming skills.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry and CST 113 Introduction to Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the use of Visual Studio.NET to compile, debug, and run programs.
    2.  Demonstrate the proper use of structured programming techniques.
    3.  Demonstrate the proper use of selection structures and repetition statements.
    4.  Demonstrate creation of functions.
    5.  Use arrays and strings for program development.
    6.  Use standard requirements for programs.

  
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    CST 138 - Structured Programming in C++ for Engineers


    Students will demonstrate a knowledge of C++ by writing programs to solve engineering problems such as:  statistics, Monte Carlo method, best fit straight line, heat flow, center of mass, complex numbers, matrices, and electrical circuits. 

    The course will illustrate the basics of C++ including:  structures, recursion, pointers, dynamic memory allocation, linked lists, OOP, classes, overloading, encapsulation and polymorphism, inheritance, and composition.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CST 127 Introduction to C++ for Engineers

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a working knowledge of the following C++ topics by successfully writing programs to solve engineering-based problems such as:

    • basics of C programming, data types, functions, files
    • scope, duration, recursion, scope resolution operator
    • passing functions, storage class modifiers
    • pointers, dynamic memory allocation, linked lists
    • enumeration, structures
    • OOP, classes
    • overloading functions and operators
    • encapsulation and polymorphism
    • inheritance, composition
    • friends, virtual functions
    • class templates

    2.  Expain the concepts, components and philosophy of Object Oriented Programming, OOP.
    3.  Explain the benefits of using OOP in classes.
    4.  Explain what a pointer is, and how it is used in a program.
    5.  Explain the advantages and disadvantages of a linked list.
    6.  Create a linked list using C++.
    7.  Solve various engineering problems using mathematical techniques such as:  statistics, Monte Carlo method, best fit straight line, heat flow, center of mass, complex numbers, matrices, determinates, electrical circuits.

  
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    CST 140 - Computer Maintenance


    This course teaches the principals of good computer maintenance including: identification of hardware components, storage organization, hardware and software troubleshooting, disaster recovery, safety procedures, and maintenance plans.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify hardware components of a computer system.
    2.  Organize secondary storage systems.
    3.  Trouleshoot hardware and software.
    4.  Maintain backups for disaster recovery.
    5.  Follow safety procedures.
    6.  Develop a maintenance plan.

  
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    CST 150 W - Object Oriented Programming


    This course assumes a complete understanding, and prior experience with High-Level Language programming concepts.  The course quickly presents the language syntax quickly moving on to more advanced topics using an Integrated Development Environment (IDE).  Topics covered will include:  variables, constants, program control, I/O, functions, preprocessors, arrays, structures, pointers, classes, and object-oriented programming, inheritance, overloading.  A writing emphasis course where documentation requirements will be covered in details.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 133 Structured Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  State, verbally and in written documentation, seven core debugging techniques.
    2.  List and demonstrate structured programming techniques.
    3.  List and demonstrate ten core concepts for objects.
    4.  Use memory management techniques in program development.
    5.  State, verbally and in written documentation, eight core construct/destructor methods.
    6.  List and demonstrate inheritance for objects.
    7.  List and demonstrate use of base and derived classes for programs.

  
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    CST 151 - iPhone/iPad Application Development


    Learn to develop iPhone/iPad Apps using Apple XCode.  Topics include:  Basis of killer applications, Objective-C and iPhone/iPad programming techniques as they relate to Object-Oriented Programming, the Foundation Framework, important objects, User Interface Controls, flip-side controls, photo views, XCode and the debugger, XCode's instruments, controllers and model classes, core data.  Then, take your application to the next step, after the course, and learn about Apple's provisioning and distribution process. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  A solid programming experience with Object-Oriented Programming (OOPs).  OOPs programming is the foundation language environment for iPhone and iPad development

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop and communicate an iPhone/iPad project concept that will be completed during the semester.
    2.  Develop and debug iPhone/iPad "Apps" using Objective-C and the Apple XCode environment including compilers, debuggers, and the other tools provided with XCode.
    3.  Design, in terms of a graphical layout, ideas for a working project.
    4.  Formulate, within the scope of the XCode model, the code necessary to bring the graphical layout to the screen.
    5.  Debug syntactical errors and eliminate logical errors at compile time.
    6.  Communicate to users how the application works, its features, limitations, uses and advantages.
    7.  Present to the class a final working project using either written or oral communication skills.
    8.  Take the project beyond the end of the class and prepare it for provisioning and distribution on the Apple store.

  
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    CST 153 - Robotics and C Programming


    This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of hardware control via a programming language.  While introductory in nature, this course will use an actual robot trainer and elements of the C programming language to control motion, read sensors, detect switch positions and more.  Students will learn key aspects of the C programming language such as the declaration of constants and variables.  Data types and sizes will be discussed along with control loops such as for, while and more.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    EET 153
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List and describe the key components of a typical robot.
    2.  List and differentiate between a variety of robotic sensors and switches.
    3.  Describe, in writing, how hardware is controlled with software.
    4.  Physically assemble robotics from supplied coponents, in order to accomplish lecture or laboratory objectives.
    5.  Use the hardware components assembled and make (trouble shoot) adjustments so that the hardware performs to the project's specifications.
    6.  Write C programming code to control the various aspects of the robot.  This includes motion control, switch detection, sensor input, output and more.
    7.  Write, compile and link the C code necessary for these operations.
    8.  List and describe (as well as use in a laboratory setting) all fundamental aspects of the C programming language; including variable declarations, loops, control statements, function calls and more.
    9.  Read a project's specifications and create a hardware and software solution for that project.  This includes the trouble shooting required to produce a working project.

  
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    CST 158 - Data Analysis with Spreadsheets


    A comprehensive course in data analysis using spreadsheet software. Students will use innovative techniques for composing spreadsheets, solving problems, analyzing data, and presenting results. Areas of research include statistical functions, financial functions, iterative solutions, information sharing, table data analysis, what-if analysis, pivot tables and charts, XML schemas, macros and user-written functions, and programming with VBA.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 119 Computer Concepts and Applications or permission of chair.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Be proficient at managing and analyzing data using complex formulas and tables.
    2. Effectively enhance data with charts.
    3. Be proficient at automating worksheet tasks with macros.
    4. Effectively analyze data using what-if analysis, pivot tables, and pivot charts.
    5. Use data exchange with other programs, share files, and incorporate Web information.
    6. Customize spreadsheets and perform advanced worksheet management.
    7. Use the Visual Basic Editor, analyze and write VBA code.


  
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    CST 160 - Malware Analysis


    The purpose of CST 160 is to gain an understanding of the different families of malware and how the malicious actions performed by the malware are coded and controlled.  Malware authors need to have a good understanding of operating systems, file systems, network communication, programming, and cryptography, as well as tricks to hide traces of malware on a system.  Numerous examples of actual malware are examined in a safe and secure way.  By examining malware we learn about its "indicators of compromise," which in turn help detect future attacks and plug security holes that allowed the malware to infect the system.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CST 113 Introduction to Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize the many different types of malware typically encountered on Windows systems.
    2. Demonstrate using different techniques for analyzing malware source code and executable code, including static analysis, string analysis, deobfuscation, decoding, decompression, decryption, and histogram analysis.
    3. Follow proper guidelines for setting-up and using a safe, secure, and contained virtual malware tesing and debugging environment.
    4. Examine network logs, protocols, and packet traffic for malware designed to exfiltrate data.
    5. Analyze malware written in different programming languages, including:  80x86 Assembly language, C/C++, VBS, Javascript, and Powershell.
    6. Demonstrate using disassemblers, debuggers, and other software tools to analyze malicious code.


  
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    CST 170 - Digital Logic


    Comprehensive coverage of basic gates, Boolean Algebra, Karnaugh Mapping and Quine-McCluskey technique for circuit simplification.  Adders, subtractors, multiplexers, code converters, asynchronous and synchronous counters presented in detail as basic computer building blocks.  Analog-digital and digital-analog interfacing.  Lab exercises use a combination of Multisim and/or TTL and CMOS gates.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and describe the function of the seven basic logic gates.
    2.  Use Boolean Algebra, Karnaugh Mapping or Quine-McClusky to reduce complex logic expressions to their simplest terms.
    3.  Identify and use medium scale integrated circuits like adders, subtractors, multiplexers, demultiplexers, encoders and decoders.
    4.  Design counter circuits using asynchronous design techniques.
    5.  Design counter circuits using synchronous design techniques.
    6.  Identify basic analog-to-digital conversion circuits (A/D converters).
    7.  Design A/D converters to perform specific conversions.
    8.  Identify basic digital-to-analog conversion circuits (D/A converters).
    9.  Design D/A converters to perform specific conversions.

  
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    CST 200 W - Systems Analysis


    A first course dealing with the principles of systems analysis and problem solving, concentrating on investigation and analysis of systems and their resulting design.  Emphasis on the importance of standards, procedures, documentation and design tools with a focus on object-oriented systems development.  A variety of group and individual lab assignments will include analysis and design tools, prototyping and CASE.  Both traditional and object-oriented techniques will be used.  Writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 113 Introduction to Programming or CST 120 Java Programming, and CST 119 Computer Concepts and Applications

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  State, verbally and in writing, the steps of the Systems Development Life Cycle.
    2.  List and demonstrate a variety of systems analysis tools and techniques.
    3.  List and demonstrate modeling including functional decomposition diagrams, dataflow diagrams, and entity relationship diagrams.
    4.  Demonstrate the use of memos, business letters and reports to demonstrate good communication and writing skills.
    5.  Demonstrate good teamwork and meeting skills in completing a systems team project.
    6.  Demonstrate the use of a Case Tool to develop diagrams for a systems team project.
    7.  Demonstrate prototyping skills for input and output design based on a systems team project.
    8.  Demonstrate mastery of course concepts in creating well written reports.
    9.  Demonstrate critical thinking skills in discussion responses and team assignments.

  
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    CST 202 W - Data Structures


    This course assumes a complete understanding and experience with programming including decisions, loops, file processing and object oriented programming.  The course gives the student the necessary design philosophies, fundamental syntax, and experience with advanced programming concepts.  Topics covered include: static and dynamic data structures, arrays, structures, files, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and recursion.  Structured modular programming and extensive documentation is required.  An Integrated Development Environment (IDE) will be used.  It is a writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 150 Object Oriented Programming with a minimum grade of "C" or better

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  State, verbally and in written documentation, five sort routines.
    2.  List and demonstrate five key concepts with Linked Lists.
    3.  List and demonstrate five key concepts with Stacks.
    4.  List and demonstrate five key concepts with Queues.
    5.  State, verbally and in written documentation, five core sort routines.
    6.  List and demonstrate five key concepts with Trees.
    7.  List and demonstrate structured programming techniques for C++.

  
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    CST 203 - Security Hardware and Software


    This third security course concentrates on security hardware and software.  Hardware devices include media, NICs, switches, routers, firewalls, intrusion sensors, and biometric security sensors.  Software applications include sniffers, network scanners, remote control software, OS network commands, forensic analyzers, and event analyzers.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 104 Remote Security Methods

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Configure a software or hardware firewall.
    2.  Configure a managed switch.
    3.  Capture and analyze network traffic using a sniffer.
    4.  Have knowledge of the essentials of biometric authentication involving fingerprints and facial recognition.
    5.  Work with JPG image files that have embedded EXIF information or stegonographic content.
    6.  Have knowledge of the operation of spanning tree algorithms and fault tolerant techniques and their application to networks.
    7.  Use disassemblers and debuggers to analyze malicious code.

  
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    CST 208 W - Introduction to Computer Networking


    This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of computer networking including network topology, design, implementation, troubleshooting support, and security.  Students will investigate hardware, software and applications that relate to configuring Local Area Network (LAN) and a Wide Area Network (WAN).  Popular network protocols and network operating systems will be covered in detail.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 119 Computer Concepts and Applications

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the various topologies used to construct computer networks.
    2.  Understand the differences between network devices such as hubs, switches and routers.
    3.  Explain the functions of each layer in the ISO/OSI and TCP/IP protocol stacks.
    4.  Install and/or configure a computer to participate on a network.
    5.  Troubleshoot networks using built in utility programs.
    6.  Use remote connectivity and file transfer programs.
    7.  Understand the role of client computers in the client server network paradigm.
    8.  Discover and implement various methods to mitigate risks and threats associated with networked computers.

  
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    CST 209 - Advanced Computer Networking


    This course provides an in depth exploration of current and next generation computer networking, data communication and telecommunication technologies including hardware, software, and applications.  Students will gain experience with server class operating systems, server applications installation and configuration, client server application development tools, secure data transmission, network security fundamentals, and network management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 208W Introduction to Networking, CST 113 Introduction to Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the various topologies used to construct computer networks.
    2.  Build networks using hubs, switches and routers.
    3.  Understand the function of each layer in the ISO/OSI and TCP/IP protocol stacks.
    4.  Install and/or configure a computer to participate in a secure network using VPNs.
    5.  Use advanced troubleshooting techniques to solve network problems.
    6.  Install and configure remote connectivity and file transfer programs.
    7.  Explain the role of server computers in the client server network paradigm, configure server applications, and develop/modify client server applications.
    8.  Implement various methods to mitigate risks and threats associated with networked computers.

  
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    CST 210 - Business Security


    This fourth security course concentrates on the security aspects related to business, including legal and ethical computing standards, security cost analysis, physical plant security, disaster recovery, business continuity, security policies and procedures, training, and careers in network security.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 103 General Security Concepts

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe how to perform a security cost analysis.
    2.  Describe the various steps involved in analyzing physical plant security, and providing disaster recovery and business continuity.
    3.  Explain the different ways of detecting network-based intruders.
    4.  Understand how to perform forensic analysis on spam and spoofed email.
    5.  Be familiar with ethics, computer crime, and information privacy issues.
    6.  Know what security policies and procedures are required for an organization.

  
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    CST 212 W - Computer Forensics I


    This first course in computer forensics introduces the student to the nature of real-world security incidents and forensic examples.  The student is introduced to the Incident Response process, a multi-step approach to the detection, analysis, and recovery from a security incident.  Critical skills including data collection and duplication, evidence  handling, and writing a forensic report are explored.  There are numerous real-world examples presented, as well as practical, hands-on activities designed to show the student how to properly, and legally, handle digital and physical evidence.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CST 208 Introduction to Networking, ENG 110 College Writing I, ENG 111 College Writing II, ENG 107 English as a Second Language Advanced I, ENG 108 English as a Second Language Advanced II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Examine the steps involved in incident response.
    2.  Utilize techniques for gathering digital forensic evidence, duplicating it, and following proper chain-of-custody procedures.
    3.  Explore the value of a forensic report.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe different types of security incidents and the appropriate response for each.
    2.  Describe the various steps involved in the incident response and recovery.
    3.  Explain the different ways of gathering digital evidence on Windows, Linux, and other operating systems.
    4.  Understand how to duplicate digital evidence and handle the evidence in a safe and legal manner.
    5.  Know what tools to use to gather digital evidence on a computer network.
    6.  Write a forensic report.

  
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    CST 213 - Database Systems


    A comprehensive course in database management with a focus on the effective use of database systems, database design, and application development with Access and Visual Basic for Applications.  Topics will include database concepts and architecture for both micro and mainframe computers, creating tables, queries, forms and reports, object linking and embedding, SQL, macro programming, integrity constraints, concurrency control, and transaction processing.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 119 Computer Concepts and Applications, and an introduction to programming course

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the advantages and disadvantages of database systems.
    2.  Describe and compare Relational, Network, and Hierarchical data models.
    3.  Design and create relational databases including tables, forms, queries, and reports.
    4.  Create and execute SQL queries.
    5.  Describe relational model views, indexes, catalogues, and integrity as they relate to databases.
    6.  Describe and implement normalization as it relates to databases.
    7.  Describe and implement database functions of concurrency, recovery, and security.
    8.  Generate custom database applications.
    9.  Program a database using macros.
    10.  Describe client/server systems and SQL servers.

  
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    CST 216 - Visual Basic.NET


    This course teaches the fundamentals of the Visual Basic language.  The first part of the course concentrates on a detailed discussion of various Visual Basic controls, programming options and the use of Visual Basic tools.  Once these concepts are mastered, the emphasis shifts toward integrating the various components into complete working applications.  Emphasis will be placed on visual interfaces as well as problem solving.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  2 programming courses

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be proficient in using the Visual Basic.NET environment to create, debug, and run programs.
    2.  Understand the fundamental syntax of Visual Basic.NET and the fundamental controls.
    3.  Appreciate the role and techniques of Rapid Application Development.
    4.  Demonstrate achievement of program clarity through proven techniques of structured programming, object-based programming, object-oriented programming and even-driven programming.
    5.  Understand and use the principles of good graphical user interface design and object-oriented design with UML.

  
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    CST 219 W - Socket Programming


    An introduction to network sockets programming, used to develop server and client server application programs for the Internet.  The basic coverage of socket programming will include an overview of TCP/IP, network addressing, well known services, blocking and non-blocking sockets and support programs.  The main emphasis will be placed on developing and debugging socket applications.  Each student will write both UDP and TCP client server application programs.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CST 113 Introduction to Programming and CST 208W Introduction to Computer Networking

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the resources associated with developing client server applications.
    2.  Write client server applications using UDP, connectionless communications.
    3.  Write client server applications using TCP, connection oriented communications.
    4.  Use Domain Name Services to initiate communications with host computer systems.
    5.  Implement client applications which communicate with a remote server.
    6.  Develop client and server applications which run on a local computer system.
    7.  Use blocking and non-blocking sockets as required by program specifications.

  
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    CST 220 - Microprocessors and Assembly Language Programming


    This course includes an introduction to the 32-bit Intel architecture with programming techniques utilizing the Intel microprocessor and coprocessor family.  Concepts include: programming modes, branching, flags, stacks, procedures, macros, interrupts, arithmetic and logic operations, multiple precision arithmetic and string operations.  Extensive laboratory work is done on small systems.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior:  CST 113 Introduction to Programming and a college-level algebra and trigonometry course

    Prior or Concurrent:  CST 170 Digital Logic

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the differences between 8, 16, 32 and 64-bit microprocessor architectures.
    2.  Write assembly language code demonstrating how 8, 16, 32 and 64-bit values can be used with software code.
    3.  Discuss and write code using the seven basic programming modes in assembly language.
    4.  Discuss and illustrate with programming code the use of branching, flags, stacks, procedures, macros, and interrupts.
    5.  Discuss and write programming code for the basic arithmetic and logic operations available in assembly language.
    6.  Discuss the need for and write code demonstrating multiple precision arithmetic.
    7.  Discuss the need for and the technique of using pointers in programming code.
    8.  Discuss string operations and write assembly language code demonstrating a variety of string operations including search and search & replace.
    9.  Discuss the need and operation of the mathematics coprocessor.
    10.  Discuss and write assembly language programming code using the coprocessor.
    11.  Write programming code using inline assembly language programming within a C++ program and with a stand alone assembler, such as MASM or TASM.

  
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    CST 222 - C# Essentials


    A fast paced introduction to the object-oriented C# programming.  Course provides coverage of C# terms and definitions in addition to historical links to the C and C++ languages.  This course is a continuation of CST 150 and provides additional programming detail in object-oriented programming techniques.  Extensive laboratory assignments and projects are used in this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 113 Introduction to Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List and demonstrate structured and object oriented programming techniques.
    2.  List and demonstrate advanced conceptual object knowledge for object oriented programs.
    3.  List and demonstrate details relating to inheritance in the object oriented environment.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to use construct/destructor methods in object oriented applications.
    5.  Develop and document Windows based GUI applications.
    6.  Develop and document multiple forms within a Windows GUI application.

  
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    CST 224 W - Introduction to Network Programming


    Introduction to Network Programming provides hands-on programming experience to develop TCP/IP socket, CGI and ASP network programming applications.  Students will develop programs for each type of network programming environment and explore the unique facets of each including input, output and coding requirements.  Students will be provided several development environments (local, remote, Citrix) to configure and deliver their software applications to the end user.  Students will also develop network and programming troubleshooting skills and use various debugging techniques that are necessary to ensure overall success.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CST 208 Introduction to Networking and CST 113 Introduction to Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Learn how to develop socket programs, Common Gateway Interface (CGI) programs and Active Server Pages (ASP).
    2.  Understand how TCP and UDP transport protocols are used in client/server and peer to peer communications.
    3.  Identify the key components of network communications in socket, CGI, and ASP programs.
    4.  Learn how to configure and use blocking and non-blocking sockets in socket applications.
    5.  Understand how the GET and POST methods are used with CGI and ASP programs.
    6.  Become familiar with debugging strategies and common network programming errors for each type of network program.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand how to develop network application programs using the Microsoft Visual Studio.
    2.  Install, configure, and use a web server to provide CGI and ASP networking services.
    3.  Use FTP and Telnet applications to interact with a remote web server used to host socket, CGI, and ASP network applications.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to create HTML documents which will provide CGI and ASP dynamic web content.
    5.  Use critical thinking and reasoning to solve problems which can be developed into network computer programs.
    6.  Develop socket, CGI, and ASP programs to demonstrate required knowledge on developing network applications.
    7.  Describe the essential elements required to implement socket, CGI, and ASP network applications.
    7.  Troubleshoot and resolve problems which prevent the correct operation of their network programs.

  
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    CST 225 W - Introduction to Small Systems


    Introduction to the concepts and implementation of embedded and small computer systems.  Topics include: the system architecture, software development environment, hardware interfacing techniques, processor capabilities, memory types, data busses, operating systems, telecommunications techniques, and networking.  Use of several small systems in an online laboratory environment will reinforce the conceptual framework.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CST 113 Introduction to Programming, CST 170 Digital Logic and CST 220 Microprocessors and Assembly Language Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the hardware architecture of computer systems.
    2.  Discuss the hardware architecture related to small systems.
    3.  Use simulation to design, create, and test practical hardware devices.
    4.  Identify the underlying features provided by a typical small system.
    5.  Write application programs which exploit the features of various small system hardware devices.
    6.  List security and management issues that affect small systems.
    7.  Use network troubleshooting tools to examine the communication between network devices.

  
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    CST 226 - Advanced Visual Basic.NET


    This course will help students develop advanced Visual Basic.NET programming skills including topics such as object-oriented design and programming, exception handling techniques, file-processing techniques, use of graphics and multimedia, connecting to database systems, retrieval and manipulation of database data through VB.NET, and an introduction to the use of Web forms, Web controls and dynamic Web content.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 216 Visual Basic.NET or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be well prepared to programs in Visual Basic.NET and to employ the capabilities of the .NET platform to create business-oriented and professional programs.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of and an ability to apply the following skills and concepts through programming assignments, in-class and homework excercises, and in-class exams:  object-oriented design and programming skills, exception handling techniques, file processing techniques essential for commercial applications including streams, use of graphics and multimedia, use of SQL, and ADO to connect to database systems, retrieve and manipulate data, and communicate it to other applications.

  
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    CST 228 W - GDI Programming with C and C++


    This course is a natural extension of CST 150, C/C++ Programming for Programmers.  The course teaches Graphics Device Interfacing (GDI) with Windows 98 and Windows NT Programming Concepts.  Topics include programming advantages of a GDI environment, concepts and techniques. Icons, cursors, bitmaps, fonts, menus, dialog boxes, etc. are integrated into the GDI environment.  Extensive programming and laboratory work matches the lecture topics.  Writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 150 Object Oriented Programming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Coure:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List and demonstrate structured and object oriented programming techniques.
    2.  List and demonstrate advanced GDI knowledge to develop Windows GUI programs.
    3.  List and demonstrate details relating to inheritance in the object oriented environment.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to use construct/destructor methods in object oriented applications.
    5.  Develop and document Windows based GUI applications.
    6.  Develop and document multiple forms within a Windows GUI application.

  
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    CST 231 - Advanced Internet Programming Languages


    Teaches students how to use Advanced Internet Programming languages, provides an overview of current Internet programming packages, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each, discusses issues specific to Web-site development including server requirements, system/user operating systems, end-user environments, screen resolutions, programming, maintenance, evolving standards and government mandated handicap access/features. Students will learn to use the industry’s current Internet programming languages.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 131 Internet Programming Languages

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate how to research good web page design.
    2. Design and create a complete web page site using good design and programming techniques with a local site.
    3. Write and debug code to create web pages with tables and page layout, links, images, forms, templates and style sheets.
    4. Write and debug code to create web pages with layers, image maps, and navigation bars.
    5. Write and debug code to create web pages with animation and behaviors, and media objects.
    6. Demonstrate proficiency with all the above tools in the current popular web development package.
    7. Demonstrate “teamwork” by working in a team to achieve good teamwork skills co-developing web pages.
    8. Demonstrate the use of the“backend”of the web page, by using a database to populate the webpage and update the database.
    9. Create web pages that will take into account different screen resolutions.
    10. Create web pages that adhere to government mandated handicap access/features.
    11. Demonstrate the ability to select and recommend servers, operating system and hardware needed to run webpages.


  
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    CST 232 - Multimedia Web Enhancement


    To cover the broad field of multimedia Web enhancement and gain "hands-on" experience developing and adding this content to today's Websites.  History of multimedia enhancements to Web development.  Discuss the future for multimedia Web content.  Discuss advantages and disadvantages of each multimedia type dealing with file size, storage requirements, transmission speeds, and resolutions.  Discuss hardware requirements for both server and client side multimedia content.  Discuss government mandated solutions to multimedia-enabled Websites.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 231 Web Development Packages

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create Flash files to enhance web pages.
    2.  Create web pages that are quick loading with multimedia items.
    3.  Edit photos and images with software such as Fireworks so that images are smaller in size, yet enhancing to web pages.
    4.  Create live web pages viewable over the internet.
    5.  Post to an internet site.
    6.  Protect a live internet site.
    7.  Address security issues with websites that are public.

  
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    CST 233 - Active Server Pages


    Active Server Pages (ASP) will provide students with the opportunity to learn about Microsoft ASP using Visual Studio.NET.  Students will be introduced to concepts and techniques necessary to create ASP. NET applications that provides dynamic content for a Web site.  The course will provide a background of legacy applications in addition to coverage of the NET development methodologies.  Students will also develop ASP applications on both local and remote servers.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CST 124 Introduction to CGI Programming, and CST 208W Introduction to Computer Networking

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Configure a local IIS web server to allow for ASP pages to be served.
    2.  Develop web pages and ASP programs on a local web server.
    3.  Develop ASP scripts/programs using different input methods.
    4.  Create and/or copy web pages to a remote web server using remote access tools.
    5.  Check the settings of a web server configuration file.
    6.  Manage state information to maintain continuity between ASP web pages.
    7.  Discover the latest technologies and techniques used to develop ASP web applications.

  
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    CST 242 - Computer Forensics II


    The second course in computer forensics takes the student deep into Windows and Linux.  The student is introduced to many tools used to gather and analyze digital evidence.  Critical skills are developed, including such data analysis methods as string searches, machine-code disassembly, log file analysis, data and file recovery, and both static and dynamic code analysis.  Evidence from computers, networks, and routers are all captured and analyzed.  Real-world examples, as well as hands-on activities, reinforce the material and concepts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CST 212 Computer Forensics I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Examine the details of several common storage media and technologies, including floppy disks and hard disks, and the FAT and NTFS file systems.
    2.  Engage in data analysis methods including log file analysis, string searches, protocol and code disassembly.
    3.  Explore investigative techniques for locating evidence in different operating systems and routers.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the hardware fundamentals of computer storage, as in the operation of IDE and SCSI drives.
    2.  Describe the software fundamentals of computer storage, as in the operation of the FAT and NTFS file systems.
    3.  Describe the various methods available for analyzing data, including log file analysis, shell histories, recovering files, and file lists.
    4.  Explain the different ways of gathering digital evidence on Windows, Linux, and oher operating systems.
    5.  Understand how to perform static and dynamic analysis on a hacker tool (virus, worm, etc.).
    6.  Know what tools to use to gather digital evidence from a suspicious program.
    7.  Know what tools to use to gather digital evidence on a computer network.
    8.  Know what information a string search, disassembly, and hexadecimal dump provide about a suspicious program.
    9.  Write a forensic report.

  
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    CST 262 - Cryptographic Systems


    This course provides a detailed exposure to the many different cryptographic techniques and systems employed in secure transmission and storage of data.  Symmetric versus asymmetric encryption and decryption, the importance of key length and algorithm complexity, and applications for encryption and hashing are presented.  The characteristics of secure web transactions, including VPN tunnels, secure email, secure FTP, and secure telnet, as well as the various security protocols, are also covered.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 130 Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Understand the mathematics involved in symmetric and asymmetric cryptographic algorithms.
    2.  Explain the features, operation, and differences between the different symmetric cryptographic algorithms DES, 3DES, and AES.
    3.  Explain the features, operation, and differences between the different asymmetric cryptographic algorithms RSA, ElGamal, and Elliptic curve.
    4.  Explain the purpose and methods of message integrity and authentication.
    5.  Describe the difference between cryptography and hashing and how MD5 and SHA operate.
    6.  Explain how secure email is exchanged via PGP and S/MIME and what role digital signatures take in the process.
    7.  Describe how security is handled at the transport layer via SSL and TLS and at the network layer via IPSec.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upons successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use the necessary mathematical operations required of symmetric and asymmetric algorithms.
    2.  Describe the operation of DES, 3DES, and AES cryptosystems.
    3.  Explain the operation of RSA, ElGamal, and Elliptic curve cryptosystems.
    4.  Understand how message integrity and authentication are performed.
    5.  Be familiar with MD5 and SHA hashing and where it is used.
    6.  Send and receive secure email using PGP and S/MIME.
    7.  Demonstrate the use of transport layer and network layer security.

  
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    CST 297 - Cooperative Work Experience


    Cooperative education in computing may be available.  On-the-job experience may be obtained by working with business, industries, and offices whose operations require the use of computers.  To be eligible a student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 with a 3.0 average in CST courses and have no "F" grades.

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate through writing the ability to apply classroom knowledge to a cooperative work experience.
    2.  Describe in detail the job duties and the job training involved in the cooperative work experience.
    3.  Describe in detail what activities were performed in the work environment and how this accomplished the learning objectives.
    4.  Summarize in writing what was learned from and the experience gained through participation in the cooperative work experience.

  
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    CST 299 - Independent Study


    The student undertakes an independent project, under the guidance of a faculty member, which is beyond the scope of courses currently offered by the department.

    Credits: (1-3)
    Note
    Only one independent study project allowed per semester.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate successful completion of the Learning Activities specified in the Independent Study Contract.

  
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    CTP 275 - Community Internship


    For qualified students who seek an internship experience in order to explore or validate a career choice, or to render volunteer service to the community.  Placements are available in non-profit, government or social service agencies as well as in public education and local hospitals.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  24 credit hours, application, interview, good academic standing.  Satisfies the Civic Education requirement

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 6-9 hours per week
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate awareness of the value of community service.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the goals and methods of the specific organization they have been assigned to work with.
    3.  Show awareness of the needs of the specific individuals and groups served by the organization they have been assigned to work with.

  
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    CUL 128 - Brewing and Fermentation Science


    An introduction to the chemistry of brewing beer and other fermentation processes in the food science field.  The course will examine process by which malted barley, hops, yeast, and water are turned into beer in a commercial brew house.  The chemistry behind the process of making wine, cheese, and yogurt will also be explored.  In the laboratory portion of the course students will produce and analyze beer, wine, yogurt,and cheese in a pilot plant atmosphere.  This course is open to both science and non-science majors.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CHM 128
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the basic steps in the brewing of beer.
    2. Recognize the types of yeast used for fermentation.
    3. Explain the functions of the alpha acids in hops and the isomerization products when boiled.
    4. Describe the kinetics and temperature dependence of amylases.
    5. Explain the methods of denaturing casein proteins.
    6. Describe how to determine sugar content by various methods.
    7. Describe how to determine alcohol content by various methods.
    8. Describe how to determine IBU/pH/Acid content by various methods.
    9. Describe how to determine carbohydrate content by various methods.
    10. Describe how to determine protein content by various methods.


  
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    CUL 200L - Baking Principles


    A comprehensive course covering baking basics while also offering enhanced coverage of higher-level techniques such as pastry, chocolate, and sugar work.  Balancing theory and practice, students will obtain both the understanding and performance abilities they need to progress and develop in a successful baking career.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BHM 110 Sanitation and Safety

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the baking profession.
    2.  Acquire and perform basic professional skills:  bakeshop math and sanitation.
    3.  Utilize baking and pastry equipment.
    4.  Acquire and demonstrate competency in:

    • basic baking principles
    • yeast doughs
    • artisan breads
    • lean yeast doughs
    • rich yeast doughs
    • quick bread
    • doughnuts, fritters, pancakes, and waffles
    • basic syrups, creams, and sauces
    • pies
    • tarts and special pastries
    • specialty cakes, gâteaux, and torten
    • cookies
    • custards, puddings, mousses, and soufflés
    • frozen desserts
    • fruit desserts
    • dessert presentation
    • chocolate
    • marzipan, nouogatine, and pastillage
    • sugar techniques


  
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    CUL 201 - Culinary Arts Internship I


    Career-related employment in the Culinary Arts focusing on an area of interest in a professional kitchen.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program professional kitchen setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  First year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  One year degree (30 credit hours) completion.  Needed in order to competently complete experiential learning.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    Demonstrate working competencies in any of the following areas, or other areas as agreed between the student and instructor.

    Focus Areas - Culinary Arts:

    • Short Order Cook
    • Pastry Chef
    • Sous Chef
    • Chef de Cuisine
    • Executive Chef
    • Personal Chef


  
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    CUL 205 - Menu Merchandising and Marketing


    Outlines both the "big picture" behind a well-run food service operation, and the practical details of costing, planning, analyzing, purchasing and production, beverage management, promotion, and service.  Students will be able to clearly develop a menu and effectively use it as a management tool.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIT 206 IT for Service Industries, BHM 110 Sanitation and Safety, HOS 127 Hospitality Purchasing, BHM 123 Bartending and Beverage Management, BHM 216 Quantity Food Production, CUL 200 Baking Principles, BHM 125W Hospitality Law, or permission of department Chair.  All necessary for competent course completion.

    Corequisite:  BHM 101 Basic Nutrition, or permission of department Chair

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand new trends in the food service industry.
    2.  Create a market survey.
    3.  Market through the menu.
    4.  Apply nutrition standards and menu planning techniques.
    5.  Effectively merchandise food service menus.
    6.  Perform a menu analysis.
    7.  Understand menu mechanics.
    8.  Cost recipes and price menu items.
    9.  Understand the characteristics of a menu.

  
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    CUL 218L - Garde Manger


    Instruction on a broad base of culinary skills, from basic cold food preparations to roasting, poaching, simmering, and sautéing meats, fish, poultry, vegetables, and legumes.  Includes detailed practical instruction on cold sauces and soups; salads; sandwiches; cured and smoked foods; sausages; terrines, pâtes, galantines, and roulades; cheese; appetizers and hors d'oeuvre; condiments, crackers, and pickles; and buffet development and presentation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BHM 110 Sanitation and Safety, BHM 216 Quantity Food Production, CUL 200 Baking Principles, or permission of department Chair.  All skills required to successfully complete Garde Manger.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the role of the professional garde manger.
    2.  Perform the preparation or presentatin of:

    • cold sauces and cold soups
    • salads
    • sandwiches
    • cured and smoked foods
    • sausage
    • terrines, patés, galantines, and roulades
    • cheese appetizers and hor d'oeuvre
    • condiments, crackers, and pickles
    • buffer presentation


  
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    CUL 222L - Specialty Cuisines: International/American


    Cooking techniques and finished dishes for American Regional Cuisines and International Cuisines providing comprehensive instruction of cuisines found throughout American regions and the world not only thorugh recipes and techniques, but also through coverage of the history, culture, geography, religion, and locally grown ingredients that influence these various cuisines.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BHM 110 Sanitation and Safety, BHM 216 Quantity Food Production, CUL 200 Baking Principles, or permission of department Chair.  Required skills to complete specialty cuisines.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    Prepare cuisines from the follwoing regions:

    America:  New England; Mid-Atlantic States; The South; Floribbean Cuisine; Cajun and Creole Cuisine; Cuisine of the Central Plains; Texas and Tex-Mex Cuisine; Cuisines of the Southwest and the Rocky Mountain Region; California; Pacific Northwest and Hawaii

    Internationally:  Mexico; South America; The Caribbean; Japan; China; Korea; Southeast Asia; Spain; The Middle East; Turkey, Greece, and Crete; Africa; India; The British Isles; France; Italy; Germany, Austria, Switzerland; Scandinavia and Russia

  
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    CUL 290 - Professional Foodservice Operations


    A service oriented course covering the ins and outs of running a successful front-of-the-house operation:  taking reservations and greeting guests, basic service, table-side service, beverage service, and money handling combined with professional cooking to provide experiential learning for restaurant operations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BHM 123 Bartending and Beverage Management, CUL 205 Menu Merchandising and Marketing, CUL 218 Garde Manger, CUL 222 Specialty Cuisines: International/American, or permission of department Chair.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Utilize all professional cooking and baking skills learned in articulated prerequisites.
    2.  Understand and employ the basics of hospitality and service.
    3.  Manage the relationship between the front and the back of the house.
    4.  Manage the front door.
    5.  Prepare for professional dining room service.
    6.  Professionally serve guests utilizing French, English, American, Russian and Buffet.
    7.  Perform tableside cooking.
    8.  Perform beverage service including coffee, tea, cocktails, wine and beer.
    9.  Successfully negotiate staffing challenges.
    10.  Successfully handle emergencies.

  
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    CUL 297 - Culinary Arts Internship II


    Career-related employment in the Culinary Arts focusing on an area of interest in a professional kitchen.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program professional kitchen setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  Second year course work (56 hours) must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  56 hours toward completion.  Needed in order to competently complete experiential learning.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    Demonstrate working competencies in any of the following areas, or other areas as agreed between the student and instructor.

    Focus Areas - Culinary Arts:

    • Short Order Cook
    • Pastry Chef
    • Sous Chef
    • Chef de Cuisine
    • Executive Chef
    • Personal Chef


  
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    DEN 101 - Dental Hygiene I


    An introduction to the skills utilized in the contemporary practice of dental hygiene.  Included will be topics on patient assessment, therapeutic care (fluoride, instrumentation theory, selective polishing, instrument sharpening), as well as ergonimics for the hygiene practitioner.  Theory is applied in preclinic laboratory setting. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  DEN 108 Infection Control in Dentistry

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, Clinical Hours: 8 hrs/week for 15 weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply ergonomic principles to the clinical practice of dental hygiene.
    2.  Develop large and small motor skills necessary to apply proper instrumentation principles in the laboratory setting.
    3.  Identify any hygiene instrument and describe where and how it is used on the dentition.
    4.  Apply proper infection control protocol to the entire appointment sequence.
    5.  Demonstrate professionalism and treat faculty, peers, and staff with respect.
    6.  Obtain and review a comprehensive health history and assess the potential health conditions that may require treatment alterations or intervention to maintain safe, quality care.
    7.  Recognize the need for a comprehensive history to plan comprehensive care.
    8.  Identify dental hygiene instruments and describe how and when they are used.
    9.  Describe the concept of selective polishing and apply the rationale for its use to the clinical setting.
    10.  Describe the rationale and method for instrument sharpening.
    11.  Meet pre-clinic objectives set forth in the Dental Hygiene Clinic Manual.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    It is intended that each student who completes DEN 101 will have a basic understanding of the importance of patient assessment from obtaining a medical history to examining the hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity and will be competent in performing those skills.  Each student will also be competent in basic instrumentation skills.

  
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    DEN 102 - Dental Hygiene II


    Theory and clinical experience in dental hygiene process of care, including patient assessment, treatment planning, instrumentation, and evaluation of patient care.  Includes patients with special needs, tobacco cessation intervention, oral physiotherapy, medical/dental emergencies, identification and reporting of child abuse, and oral health instruction. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  DEN 101 Dental Hygiene I, DEN 103 Oral Anatomy and Physiology, DEN 108 Infection Control in Dentistry, DEN 109 Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence, BIO 131 Human Biology I, ENG 110 College Writing I

    Corequisites:  DEN 106 Clinical Dental Radiography, DEN 107 Introduction to Periodontology, DEN 110W Dental Materials

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, Clinical Hours: 8 hrs/week for 15 weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe and apply the concepts of patient assessment, individualized treatment planning, implementation and evaluation and begin to apply this information in the clinical setting.
    2.  Prepare appropriate and specific treatment plans based on patient need.
    3.  Explain and explain basic terminology related to oral physiotherapy.
    4.  Explain the importance of self-care instruction and patient rapport as an integral part of providing patients with optimum dental hygiene care.
    5.  Apply concepts of oral physiotherapy and oral health instruction to personal needs, while appreciating the importance of being a role model for patients in terms of one's own oral health status and lifestyle choices.
    6.  Formulate their own style of effectively interacting with patients, while displaying sensitivity to their patients' needs and problems.
    7.  Discuss the value of visual and printed materials in providing patient education and for increasing oral health awareness.
    8.  Discuss and apply ultrasonic scaling in the clinical setting.
    9.  Discuss and apply dental hygiene treatment adaptations for patients with special needs, including the gerodontic patient.
    10.  Provide oral health education in a community-based setting (service learning) via offsite bulletin board construction.
    11.  Treat patients while meeting objectives set forth in the Dental Hygiene Clinic Manual.

    Intended Learning Outcomes:

    DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II will prepare the freshman student to carry out the dental hygiene process of care, including patient assessment, radiographs, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, implementation of prevention and therapeutic procedures and evaluation of treatment.  The student will practice and learn the appointment sequence, as well as interact with patients, peers, and faculty in a professional manner while providing preventive oral hygiene services in the clinical setting.

  
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    DEN 103 - Oral Anatomy and Physiology


    Normal structures of the oral cavity and their function (microscopic and gross); embryonic development of face and oral cavity.  Laboratory sessions include study of dental terminology, normal landmarks, occlusion, tooth morphology, and head and neck anatomy.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe oral histology/embryology and macroscopic dental anatomy necessary as it relates to the prudent practice of clinical dental hygiene.
    2.  Define appropriate dental terminology.
    3.  Identify the normal landmarks of the oral cavity.
    4.  Explain and apply the components of occlusal evaluation.
    5.  Describe the anatomical features of the permanent and primary dentition.
    6.  Identify the anatomical structures of the head and neck including:  bones and their landmarks, origin/insertion, function of muscles, dental cranial nerves, arterial/venous blood supply and lymphatics.

    Intended Learning Outcomes:

    The intended objective of this course is to enable students to apply the oral histology and embryology and the macroscopic oral and dental anatomy necessary for the prudent practice of clinical dental hygiene.  Knowledge and understanding of the material in this course will also assist students in their efforts to provide patients with thorough and correct information.  Inherent in the intended objective is the necessity for this course to provide students with the opportunity to learn the material needed for success in the courses for which this course is prerequisite.

  
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    DEN 106 - Clinical Dental Radiography


    Radiation physics and biology; understanding of radiation health, safety and protection; concepts of radiological imaging, production of x-ray, x-ray machine attenuation, recording of radiographic images and diagnostic quality or radiographs, intraoral dental radiographic techniques, film processing and mounting, interpretation of radiographic errors and recognition of anatomical landmarks.  Theory is applied in the laboratory setting on radiographic phantoms and adult patients.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II, DEN 107 Introduction to Periodontology, DEN 110W Dental Materials

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the production of x-radiation.
    2.  Describe the principles of dental radiographic imaging and the production of a quality radiographs.
    3.  Explain the biological effects of radiation.
    4.  Describe the safety factors necessary to make radiation as safe as possible for the patient and the dental hygienist.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Expose and process quality intraoral films while adhering to all radiation safety requirements.

  
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    DEN 107 - Introduction to Periodontology


    Clinical and histological evaluations of gingivitis and periodontitis; study of the periodontium, the inflammatory and immune responses, and microbiology of plaque.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II, DEN 106 Clinical Dental Radiography, DEN 110W Dental Materials

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe clinically normal and abnormal gingiva using the descriptors in the Gingival Evaluation in the assessment tool.
    2.  Describe the structures of the periodontium and report their connection to the assessment and treatment of periodontal disease.
    3.  Describe the inflammatory and immune responses and how they relate to the histopathogenesis of Gingivitis and Chronic Periodontitis.
    4.  Describe the characteristics and pathogenicity of the microbes associated with gingivitis and chronic periodontitis.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    This course introduces students to the basic parameters of periodontal disease.  This involves understanding the tissues of the periodontium, their response to plaque, and clinical manifestations.

  
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    DEN 108 - Infection Control in Dentistry


    An overview of the infectious agents that the dental team is exposed to while working in the dental office setting.  Course focuses on the study of the rationale for practicing infection control as well as how to perform proper infection control procedures and apply those guidelines in their clinical laboratory setting.  Topics also include the regulatory agencies responsible for the protocol and the guidelines that they set.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  DEN 101 Dental Hygiene I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the rationale for practicing disease prevention that is specific to dentistry.
    2.  Describe and describe the role of the various recommending and regulatory agencies that affect the dental profession and its infection control practice.
    3.  Describe the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard.
    4.  Demonstrate competency in the use of infection control techniques that are required in the dental setting for both personal and patient safety.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    Upon successful course completion, each student should have a comprehensive understanding of the rationale for practicing Infection Control in Dentistry.  Each student will also gain the training for implementing safe infection control practices in accordance with guidelines from OSHA, the CDC, and other agencies.  The student will learn to read an MSDS insert, understand the importance of a hazard communication program, and learn the infection control protocol for the BCC Dental Hygiene Clinic.

  
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    DEN 109 - Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence


    This is an Internet course section and requires one or more proctored exams and projects submitted on campus.

    Ethics and ethical issues; jurisprudence and legal considerations in dentistry and dental hygiene.  This course includes the study of vocabulary and theoretical models important in determining ethical behavior and identifying legal concepts in dentistry and dental hygiene today.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Review and apply basic concepts pertaining to ethics and professionalism in the dental practice.
    2.  Comprehend key ethical theories and principles.
    3.  Emphasize the importance of portraying a professional code of conduct on and off the job.
    4.  Promote an awareness of ethical issues in dentistry and dental hygiene.
    5.  Discuss and differentiate between constitutional law and dental law.
    6.  Critically analyze the legal system as it relates to the dental profession.
    7.  Interpret the legal parameters found in the New York State dental profession.
    8.  Promote group discussions regarding legal and ethical issues affecting the practice of dentistry and dental hygiene.

    Intended Learning Outcomes:

    The course provides necessary background information essential for the entering dental hygiene student to understand how the career of dental hygiene is bound by legal issues and intertwined with expected ethical behaviors.  Each student will gain this understanding of the dental hygiene career and its legal parameters through the study of its basic ethical and professional concepts along with the NYS Dental Hygiene Practice Act.

  
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    DEN 110 W - Dental Materials


    Composition, chemical and physical properties and use of materials in dental laboratory and operatory will be covered.  Laboratory sessions will provide experience in performing common dental laboratory procedures including their clinical application of expanded functions.  In addition, the laboratory allows for the manipulation of dental materials. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II, DEN 106 Clinical Dental Radiography, DEN 107 Introduction to Periodontology

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be familiar with and able to competently use several common dental materials.
    2.  Identify which of those comprehensive services that may be performed by a registered dental hygienist in the State of New York.
    3.  Demonstrate the proper procedures for taking alginate impressions, pouring alginate impressions, fabricating a sports mouthguard, amalgam polishing, placing periodontal packing, placing and removing a rubber dam, suture removal, selecting and pre-fitting orthodontic bands and removing arch wires.
    4.  Apply proper infection control protocol to all aspects of dental laboratory and clinical procedures.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    At the completion of this course, the student should be familiar with and be able to use several common dental materials to lab competency.  This course will provide the student with a comprehensive knowledge base of the various properties and types of dental materials, particularly those used in the practice of dental hygiene.  In addition, this course will prepare the student to be able to write effectively and professionally and to become an effective team player with excellent communication skills.  The student will learn to recognize and manipulate several dental materials as well as to perform those functions that are deemed duties of the dental hygienist in New York State so the he/she may practice within the full scope of licensure in private practice.

  
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    DEN 201 - Dental Hygiene III


    Continuation of patient care from DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II.  Integration of theory with clinical experience in various oral hygiene preventive and therapeutic procedures.  Emphasis on planning and execution of the total patient treatment (including tobacco cessation).  Students are required to provide direct patient care at off-campus community based clinics. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II, DEN 106 Clinical Dental Radiography, DEN 107 Introduction to Periodontology, DEN 110W Dental Materials, BIO 132 Human Biology II, CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology, CLT 209L Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory

    Corequisite:  DEN 203 Pain Management in Dentistry

    Credits: 5.5
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, Clinical Hours: 12 hrs/week for 15 weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform a comprehensive head and neck exam, including an oral cancer screening, on all of his/her patients and be able to document properly significant clinical findings.
    2.  Explain the incidence, predisposing factors, and treatment of the oral cancer patient.
    3.  Exhibit developing proficiency in traditional and digital radiographic techniques on patients and be able to interpret basic landmarks and oral structures found on radiographs. 
    4.  Recognize caries, restorative materials, incipient and advanced periodontal disease, endodontic therapy, root formation, retained roots, appliances and supernumerary teeth.
    5.  Chart the patient's mouth for periodontal and dental manifestations using conventional paper charting and computer software technology.
    6.  Assess the patient's need for a fluoride treatment and properly perform this treatment utilizing fluoride tray treatments or fluoride varnish treatments.
    7.  Discuss the purpose, procedures, and treatment planning involved in the placement of dental sealants.
    8.  Describe and provide proper patient management of the cancer patient.
    9.  Treat patients while meeting objectives set forth in the Dental Hygiene Clinic Manual.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    This course integrates theory with clinical dental hygiene in various preventive and therapeutic procedures such as: assessments and treatment plans for total patient treatment and their performance on clinic patients, ultrasonic instrumentation, oral cancer screenings, dental/periodontal charting, radiographic interpretation, fluoride treatments, dental sealant placement, oral care for the cancer patient, impression taking/study model/mouthguard fabrication, and amalgam polishing.

  
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    DEN 202 - Dental Hygiene IV


    Comprehensive clinical experience in all phases of dental hygiene practice.  Students are prepared for entry level Dental Hygiene Practice. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  DEN 201 Dental Hygiene III, DEN 203 Pain Management in Dentistry, DEN 204 General and Oral Pathology, DEN 205 Periodontology, DEN 206 Dental Pharmacology and DEN 209 Dental Nutrition

    Corequisites:  DEN 214 Current Topics in Dental Hygiene, DEN 213W Community Dental Health

    Credits: 5.5
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, Clinical Hours: 12 hrs/week for 15 weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define and demonstrate the process of periodontal screening and recording.
    2.  Demonstrate and be proficient in the use of an intraoral camera.
    3.  Define/discuss the rationale for advanced ultrasonic instrumentation.
    4.  Complete a DH IV project; which consists of comprehensive non-surgical periodontal treatment and necessary nutrition counseling to a patient.
    5.  Explain the principles of panoramic projections.
    6.  Explain the rationale for air polishing.
    7.  Demonstrate proficiency in the clinical care of a pediatric patient.
    8.  Explain the concepts of cephalometric tracings.
    9.  Explain/identify the warning signs of elder abuse and discuss how to report suspected abuse.
    10.  Gain the appropriate akills to prepare a cover letter and resume.
    11.  To treat patients while meeting objectives set forth in the Dental Hygiene Clinic Manual.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    Through lecture, guest speakers and practical application in a clinical setting, students will become proficient in providing patients with all aspects of care based on the Dental Hygiene Process of Care including, but not limited to, advanced instrumentation, local anesthesia, oral irrigation, non-surgical periodontal therapy, nutrition counseling, phase microscopy and case presentation.  Students will continue developing proficiency in all radiographic techniques, as well as further implementation of computer technology during patient treatment.  This prepares students for clinical and written licensing exams as well as entry level dental hygiene employment.

  
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    DEN 203 - Pain Management in Dentistry


    Management of pain control through the use of local anesthetic agents and the administration of nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation.  The physiologic and pharmacologic agents, indications and contraindications for use, and the treatment of complications and emergencies are stressed.  Other modalities of pain control will be discussed.  This course meets the New York State Education Department's requirements for certification in the Administration and Monitoring of Local Infiltration Anesthesia and Nitrous Oxide Analgesia in the Practice of Dental Hygiene.  Enrollment in this course requires documentation of current certification in CPR (BLS for Health Professionals).

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  DEN 102 and current certification in CPR (BLS for Health Professionals)

    Corequisite:  DEN 201 Dental Hygiene III

    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 204 General and Oral Pathology, DEN 205 Periodontology, DEN 206 Dental Pharmacology, DEN 290 Dental Nutrition

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe relevant New York State Education Law and Commissioner's Regulations.
    2.  Demonstrate proper medical history review and evaluation procedures.
    3.  Differentiate the pediatric and adult respiratory and circulatory physiology and related anatomy.
    4.  Describe states of drug-induced central nervous system depression through levels of anxiolysis, conscious sedation, deep sedation and general anesthesia.
    5.  Identify definitions and descriptions of physiological and psychological aspects of anxiety and pain.
    6.  Define pharmacology of agents used in inhalation sedation, local anesthesia and vasoconstrictors, including drug interactions and incompatibilities.
    7.  Identify indications and contraindications for use of inhalation sedation and local anesthesia.
    8.  Identify recommended dosages of local anesthesia and nitrous oxide analgesia.
    9.  Describe patient monitoring using observation, with particular attention to vital signs and reflexes related to consciousness.
    10.  Differentiate selection and preparation of the armamentaria and record keeping for administering various local anesthesia agents and nitrous oxide analgesia.
    11.  Identify recognition and management of complications and management of reactions to local anesthetic agents and nitrous oxide analgesia.
    12.  Describe proper infection control techniques with regard to local anesthetic and nitrous oxide analgesia and proper disposal of sharps.
    13.  Identify the description and use of inhalation sedation equipment.
    14.  Define the introduction to potential health hazards of trace anesthetics and proposed techniques for limiting occupational exposure such as appropriate scavenging systems.
    15.  Describe abuse potential and hallucinatory effects of nitrous oxide analgesia.
    16.  Identify post-operative care of the patient and instruction to the patient.
    17.  Complete a course in basic life support (BLS) prior to the start of the course.
    18.  Selection and preparation of the armamentaria for administering various local anesthetic agents and nitrous oxide analgesia, including demonstrations regarding scavenging systems.
    19.  Demonstration of proper infection control techniques with regard to local anesthetic agents and nitrous oxide analgesia and proper disposal of sharps.
    20.  Demonstration of proper evaluation of the patient's health status, taking the patient's vital signs and monitoring the patient's physical status while under the effects of local anesthesia and/or nitrous oxide analgesia.
    21.  Administration of local anesthetic in conjunction with inhalation sedation techniques.
    22.  A clinical experience, under the personal supervision of a licensed dentist, demonstrating the successful use of local infiltration in no fewer than 15 instances involving the treatment of a patient, provided that no individual patient may be treated more than three times; and a clinical experience demonstrating the successful use of nitrous oxide analgesia in no fewer than 15 instances involving the treatment of a patient, provided that in no such instance may an individual patient be treated more than two times.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to consistently give infiltration injections of local anesthetic that are safe and effective with minimal discomfort.  The participant will also be able to provide nitrous oxide analgesia using safe and effective techniques with the understanding of the indications, contraindications and environmental safety considerations.  DEN 203 - Pain Management will prepare the senior dental hygiene student to carry out the dental hygiene process of care involving proper pain management utilizing patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, implementation and evaluation of treatment.  The student will be able to provide appropriate life support measures for medical emergencies that may be encountered in dental hygiene practice while providing pain management.  The student will implement problem solving strategies (critical thinking and decision - making skills) when providing pain management during comprehensive patient care and management of patients.

  
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    DEN 204 - General and Oral Pathology


    A broad picture of the disease process through the study of common general diseases, their etiology, results and treatment.  Emphasis on the principles of inflammation, healing and repair, oral disease, including etiology, pathogenesis, prognosis, recognition and treatment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 201 Dental Hygiene III, DEN 203 Pain Management in Dentistry, DEN 205 Periodontology, DEN 206 Dental Pharmacology, DEN 209 Dental Nutrition

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish between normal and abnormal oral and head and neck findings.
    2.  Discuss (using appropriate terminolgy) common abnormalities viewed orally and in the head and neck region.
    3.  Describe, identify and report various lesions manifested in and about the oral cavity.
    4.  Recognize and describe signs, symptoms, and clinical features of systemic disease.
    5.  Identify and describe various medical conditions which may affect dental or dental hygiene treatment.
    6.  Describe and interpret pathology viewed on dental radiographs, slides, and photographs.

    Therefore, upon completion of DEN 204 General and Oral Pathology, the student will be able to recognize, distinguish between, discuss and understand the possible pathogenicity of normal and abnormal oral and head and neck findings, including oral manifestations of systemic disease.  This knowledge and skill will enable to the student to identify and report oral pathology discovered during extra/intraoral examination, one of the most valuable services that the dental hygienist provides for patients.                  

  
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    DEN 205 - Periodontology


    A study of Periodontology as it relates to the practice of dental hygiene.  Emphasis on classification of periodontal disease, assessment, Phase I Therapy, maintenance and fundamentals of periodontal surgery.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  DEN 201 Dental Hygiene III

    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 201 Dental Hygiene III, DEN 203 Pain Management in Dentistry, DEN 204 General and Oral Pathology, DEN 206 Dental Pharmacology, DEN 209 Dental Nutrition

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.
    2.  Explain the models for periodontal disease and the associated local and systemic risk factors.
    3.  Prepare a matrix on the Classification of Periodontal Disease using the etiology associated microbes, oral manifestations and extraordinary treatment.
    4.  Explain the assessment mechanisms for periodontal disease including: medical history, BOP, CAL, PD, MGI, severity, extent, and radiograph findings.
    5.  Prepare treatment plans for gingivitis, slight, moderate, and severe chronic periodontitis using evidence-based approach.
    6.  Explain the mechanical methods utilized in non-surgical periodontal therapy.
    7.  Explain the parameters of chemical agents utilized in periodontal pharmacology.
    8.  Prepare a matrix which reports the type of interdental aid used to maintain different types of embrasures.
    9.  Explain the different types of periodontal surgery and their purpose for repair and regeneration.
    10.  Explain the parameters of dental implants.
    11.  Explain and apply the guidelines for periodontal maintenance for both gingivitis and chronic periodontitis.
    12.  Explain the controlling factors in the epidemiology of gingivitis and chronic periodontitis.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    The outcome of this course is to enable students to identify periodontal disease using both scientific and clinical determinants.  This will result in selecting the best treatment modalities and preventive measures.

  
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    DEN 206 - Dental Pharmacology


    Pharmacology as it affects the clinical practice of dental hygiene and dentistry.  Emphasis is on drugs commonly used in dentistry and correct methods for their use.  Also covers the major drug classes and their uses.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 201 Dental Hygiene III, DEN 203 Pain Management in Dentistry, DEN 204 General and Oral Pathology, DEN 205 Periodontology, DEN 209 Dental Nutrition

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define and use the vocabulary and terminology associated with dental pharmacology.
    2.  Use reference books to learn about unfamiliar drugs.
    3.  List the major classes of drugs and their actions and uses.
    4.  Describe and demonstrate the basic components of writing prescriptions.
    5.  List and describe drugs commonly used in dentistry, particularly local anesthetics.

    Intended Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of DEN 206 Dental Pharmacology, the student will be able to define the basic principles of pharmacology, list the different classifications of drugs and describe how they relate to dentistry.

  
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    DEN 209 - Dental Nutrition


    Basic nutrition principles, including metabolism, functions, sources, and conditions resulting from excessive or inadequate intake of each nutrient.  Study of diet planning, dietary guidelines, weight control, and current nutrition topics and controversies.  Special emphasis on the relation of nutrition to the oral cavity, interviewing, nutritional counseling, computer aided dietary analysis, and its practice in the dental office.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  DEN 201 Dental Hygiene III, DEN 203 Pain Management in Dentistry, DEN 204 General and Oral Pathology, DEN 205 Periodontology, DEN 206 Dental Pharmacology

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define/discuss basic terms/concepts related to nutrition.
    2.  Explain the functions, sources and conditions resulting from excessive or inadequate intake of various nutrients.
    3.  Discuss current nutrition controversies.
    4.  Apply nutrition concepts to personal nutrition.
    5.  Discuss the relationship between nutrition and the oral environment.
    6.  Apply nutrition concepts to clinical dental hygiene practice (nutrition counseling).
    7.  Make portfolio of current topics in Nutrition Upon.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    The student will be proficient in the basics of Nutrition and its relatlionship to oral health.  In addition, the student will provide Nutrition Counseling to a periodontally involved patient as part of the dental hygiene process of care.

  
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    DEN 213 W - Community Dental Health


    A study of the principles of community health and fundamentals of assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating of public health care with emphasis on community dental health.  Laboratory experience emphasizes reading scientific literature, statistics, community health education, and partnerships with community health agencies.  Emphasis is placed on service learning. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 202 Dental Hygiene IV, DEN 214 Current Topics in Dental Hygiene

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain basic principles of public health and community dental health.
    2.  Explain the fundamentals of public health including: assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating public health care.
    3.  Read and reflect upon evidence-based, scientific literature and statistics.
    4.  Provide successful community health education.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    Lecture - Understand the principles of public health and community dental health, the methods of oral epidemiology, the prevalence and control methods, and the order of importance and effectiveness.  Understand the process and principles of assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating community dental health programs and to understand dental care in the United States, including the delivery and financing of one and the role of the dental professional.

    Laboratory - Understand the role of research in community dental health and the importance of scientific literature, have a basic understanding of statistics as it relates to public health and community dental health and become familiar with the role of dental health promotion and education as it relates to the community.  To participate in community health projects which allow the student "in-the-field" experience with community agencies.

  
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    DEN 214 - Current Topics in Dental Hygiene


    Review of current topics relevant to the contemporary practice of dental hygiene, including dental specialties, risk management and the hygienist's role in the care of special patients.  Emphasis is on case-based learning and patient case presentation derived from the student's clinical experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  DEN 202 Dental Hygiene IV, DEN 213W Community Dental Health

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the role of the dental hygienist as a caregiver for patients with special needs.
    2.  Describe those physical conditions that may necessitate treatment alterations and understand the evidence-based rational for those treatment modalities.
    3.  Describe the Americans With Disabilities Act and the role it plays in advocating accessibility for patients with special needs.
    4.  Apply the concepts of evidence-based care to patient assessment, treatment planning, implementation, and evaluation of all patients.
    5.  Apply these concepts of evidence-based care to the investigation and evaluation of case studies in preparation for the National Board Examination as well as the student's individual Case-Based Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy Project.
    6.  Describe and apply the concepts of risk management as it relates to the practice of dental hygiene.
    7.  Describe the various types of oral piercings and explain the risks associated with each type of piercing procedure.
    8.  Enrichment of Cultural Diversity through interaction with the BCC International Student Organization.
    9.  Share clinical patient experiences through classroom discussion by investigating numerous case studies in dental hygiene.

    Intended Learning Outcome:

    This capstone course covers a variety of current issues relating to dental hygiene practice.  The course encompasses dental hygiene care for patients with special needs; case-based presentations utilizing computerized dental technology as well as additional topics relating to the practice of dental hygiene.  The patients with special needs topics include areas not covered thus far in the curriculum.  This course has been designed to provide the student with the additional knowledge necessary to provide comprehensive dental hygiene care to their diverse pool of patients.

    In addition, the case-based learning component continues to prepare the student for evidence-based contemporary dental hygiene practice.  Participation in a mock-board simulation is also included.

  
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    DEN 298 - Independent Study-Fall/Spring


    Advanced studies in Dental Hygiene conducted under the guidance of a Dental Hygiene instructor.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  DEN 101 Dental Hygiene I, DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II, and permission of Department Chairperson

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2.  Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
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    DEN 299 - Independent Study-Fall/Spring


    Advanced studies in Dental Hygiene conducted under the guidance of a Dental Hygiene instructor.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  DEN 101 Dental Hygiene I, DEN 102 Dental Hygiene II and permission of Department Chairperson

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2.  Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
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    ECE 110 - Introduction to Early Education


    This course is an introduction to early childhood and elementary school education.  ECE 110 will provide an overview of professionalism, child development, learning theories with a historical perspective, family involvement, contemporary issues in education, and career options within the field of education.  Students will also explore the definition and concept of developmentally appropriate practice for young children (infants through eight years old).  Eight hours of field observation and four hours of community service experiences are required.  ECE 110 is required for A.A.S. Early Childhood Education majors.  ECE 110 is an advised career pathway course for Teacher Education Early Childhood and Childhood bachelor programs.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the history, philosophy and ethics of early childhood and elementary education via class discussions and written assignments.
    2.  Define and identify developmentally appropriate practice in accordance with various ages and stages of development via class discussions, written assignments and field observation experiences.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of child development in the context of family via class discussions and written assignments.
    4.  Apply critical thinking, problem solving, and self-reflection skills to class discussions, written assignments, field observation experience and related community service.
    5.  Articulate in writing career goals and pathways to reach them.

  
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    ECE 120 - Curriculum Development


    This course concentrates on developing curriculum for young children (infants through eight years old).  Methods and materials for planning developmentally appropriate activities will be explored.  Literacy, mathematics, science, social studies, the arts, technology, health and safety topics will be addressed.  Students will create and practice lessons in local early childhood settings.  Other course topics include:  creating anti-bias environments; the mechanics of lesson planning; positive child guidance; differentiated instruction; assessment and; the value of self-reflection for professional growth.  Sixty hours of field, and additional service learning experiences are required.  ECE 120 is required for A.A.S. Early Childhood Education majors and is part of a sequence that may benefit students transferring into Early Childhood or Ealry Childhood / Childhood bachelor programs.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Education

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe child development and learning theories relevant to young children and how they relate to childrens' development and learning via class discussions, field experiences and written assignments.
    2.  Recognize the ecological relationships that exist between family, community and curriculum as they relate to childrens' development and learning via class discussions, field experiences and written assignments.
    3.  Utilize observation and evaluation as a basis for developmentally appropriate curriculum via class activities, field experiences and written assignments.
    4.  Select developmentally appropriate approaches to teaching young children via class discussions, field experiences and lesson plan assignments.
    5.  Facilitate knowledge acquisition and dispositions for learning in all content areas (literacy, mathematics, social studies, science, the arts, health and technology) via class activities, field experiences and written assignments.

  
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    ECE 145 - Children and the Arts


    This course prepares students to effectively teach the arts to young children.  Students learn the role of creative movement, dramatics, music, and visual art in young children's education through the exploration of their own creative identity and become comfortable in using integrated teaching methods, which nurture creativity in young children.  Through discussion and analysis of current research and theory in the teaching of the arts, they also learn how to choose and use multicultural fine artworks, music, and children's literature, how to use the arts in inclusionary practice, and how to assess children's artistic progress to enhance children's creative development in the arts.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 145
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Plan and carry out developmentally appropriate, integrated activities in the arts that nurture creativity and foster children's development and meet the arts standards.
    2.  Understand the role their personal experiences in the arts play in how they approach arts education with young children.
    3.  Use authentic assessment tools to evaluate children's development in the arts.
    4.  Adjust and adapt arts activities to meet the needs of children of different ages, backgrounds, and abilities.

  
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    ECE 155 - Language and Literacy in Early Childhood


    This course examines the development of language and literacy in young children (infants through eight years old).  Students will explore theoretical foundations of early literacy development and the implementation of various models to effectively support young children as listeners, speakers, readers and writers.  Other topics include:  working with families to support language and literacy development; selecting quality children's literature for effective instruction; evaluating early literacy development using formal and informal assessment methods; integrating language and literacy throughout the curriculm and; adaptations for individual children in diverse and inclusive settings.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe and critically evaluate the historical, philosophical, theoretical and practical foundations of early literacy development and instruction via class discussions, written assignments and examinations.
    2.  Identify the developmental stages of language and literacy acquisition via class discussions, activities, written assignments and examinations.
    3.  Outline the criteria for quality children's literature via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    4.  Define the role and recognize the importance of family in language and literacy development in young children as well as develop strategies for successful partnerships with family members via class discussion, written assignments and presentations.
    5.  Demonstrate practical knowledge and skill in planning and implementating developmentally appropriate language and literacy experiences for young children via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    6.  Differentiate between assessment strategies and tools as well as identify particular strengths and weaknesses of each via class discussions and written assignments.

  
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    ECE 175 - Techniques of Observation and Evaluation


    This course presents various methods used to document and evaluate the development of young children (infants through eight years old) in structured and unstructured situations.  ECE 175 will highlight the value of keen observation in order to record and assess the social, physical, language, intellectual, creative and emotional development in young children.  Ethics, confidentiality, accountability, communicating with families, portfolio organization, developmental milestones, individual strengths and challenges, developmental delays and special needs are some of the topics that will be addressed.  Field observation and community service experiences are mandatory. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Education

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a proficiency in various formal and informal assessment methods used to document children's development via class activities, field experiences, written assignments and examinations.
    2.  Interpret observations and evaluate children's social, physical, literacy, intellectual, creative and emotional development via class discussions, field experiences, written assignments and examinations.
    3.  Identify common developmental delays and four types of child abuse via class discussions and written assignments.
    4.  Produce a child study that demonstrates knowledge of child development with appropriate curriculum recommendations that are documented with actual observation recordings.
    5.  Communicate a positive attitude toward each child in evaluations as well as respect confidentiality through class discussions, field experiences and written assignments.

  
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    ECE 190 - Infants, Toddlers and the Families


    This course is on the developmental milestones of children under three years old.  Students will learn how to plan individualized activities and preparing quality environments.  Appropriate practices in child care centers and family day care homes will be examined with an emphasis on producing positive partnerships between families and early childhood educators to ensure that infants and toddlers receive high-caliber, consistent care-giving and education.  Twenty-five hours of child observation required.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Evaluate the development of infants and toddlers via observations, class discussions and written assignments.
    2.  Compare differences between infant, toddler, and preschool programs and developmentally appropriate practices via observations, class discussions and written assignments.
    3.  Utilize infant and toddler development knowledge to formulate a homemade learning toy.
    4.  Appraise an infant or toddler environment and program using a standardized rating scale instrument.

  
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    ECE 200 W - Field Experience I


    This course is a seminar focused on guiding students in their role as practicing teachers in early childhood settings (infant through four years old).  Topics will include the students' weekly teaching experiences and current issues in early childhood education.  Students will teach in an assigned classroom under the supervision of a qualified educator for 8-10 hours per week over the course of the semester for a minimum of 96 hours total.  Students will also be observed by the seminar instructor.  Field and service learning experiences are required.  A.A.S. Degree students taking their second semester of Field Experience will be required to assume all lead teacher responsibilities successfully for one day.  The seminar instructor and sponsor teacher will evaluate each student's effectiveness.  ECE 200W is required for A.A.S. Early Childhood Education majors. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Education, ECE 120 Curriculum Development

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate competence in planning and implementing developmentally appropriate curriculum in a supervised field experience via seminar discussion, field experience and written assignments.
    2.  Act ethically and practice professionalism in the supervised field experience.
    3.  Communicate in writing the rationale for developmentally appropriate practice.
    4.  Identify and explore current issues in early childhood education and their impact on children, families and society via seminar discussions, field experiences and written assignments.

  
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    ECE 201 - Field Experience II


    This course is a seminar focused on guiding students in their role as practicing teacers in early childhood settings (infants through four years old).  Topics will include the students' weekly teaching experiences and current issues in early childhood education.  Students will teach in an assigned classroom under the supervision of a qualified educator for 8-10 hours per week over the course of the semester for a minimum of 96 hours total.  Students will also be observed by the seminar instructor.  Field and service learning experiences are required.  A.A.S. Degree students taking their second semester of Field Experience will be required to assume all lead teacher responsibilities successfully for one day.  The seminar instructor and sponsor teacher will evaluate each student's effectiveness.  ECE 201 is required for A.A.S. Early Childhood Education majors.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Education, ECE 120 Curriculum Development

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate competence in planning and implementing developmentally appropriate curriculum in a supervised field experience via seminar discussions, field experience and written assignments.
    2.  Act ethically and practice professionalism in the supervised field experience.
    3.  Communicate in writing the rationale for developmentally appropriate practice.
    4.  Identify and explore current issues in early childhood education and their impact on children, families, and society via seminar discussions, field experiences and written assignments.

  
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    ECE 210 - Children With Special Needs


    This course provides an overview in recognizing, understanding and supporting children with special needs in early childhood settings.  Students will learn about common developmental delays and the various physical, cognitive and emotional diagnoses that are used to classify a child as having special needs.  Students will also become familiar with special education terminology, federal laws, referral agencies, the referral process, evaluation instruments and methods, the role of various specialists in special education, individual family service plans (IFSPs), individual education programs (IEPs), teacher accountability as well as how to work with families of children with special needs.  Ten to fifteen hours of child observation required.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop appropriate concepts and attitudes towards people with disabilities via class discussions and written assignments.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge in the identification of children with special needs via class discussions, written assignments and examinations.
    3.  Illustrate an understanding of the concept of as well as the rationale and procedure for curricular adaptations when working with children with special needs via class discussions and written assignments.
    4.  Identify the placement options along the continuum of services for children with special needs via class discussions and examinations.
    5.  Enhance their understanding of the importance of family involvement in the educational process via class discussions and written assigments.
    6.  Distinguish between types of learning disabilities including sensory impairments, physical, learning and behavioral disabilities via class discussions, written assignments and examinations.

  
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    ECE 223 - Positive Child Guidance


    This course explores positive child guidance strategies for young children (infants through eight years).  Students will explore theoretical foundations related to child development and the implementation of various models to facilitate self-control and pro-social skills in young children.  Other topics include:  organizing the classroom environment and curriculum to promote positive social interactions; identifying typical and atypical behaviors based on age and stage of child development; defining and distinguishing problem behavior; investigating effective methods for addressing persistent and challenging behaviors; working with children with special needs and; defining and promoting culturally sensitive guidance.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe and critically evaluate the historical, philosophical, theoretical, and practical implications of child development and guidance via class discussions, written assignments and examinations.
    2.  Define positive child guidance according to various ages and stages via class discussions, activities and written assignments.
    3.  Identify problematic and challenging behavior in young children as well as create an action plan to resolve the issue effectively and appropriately via class discussions, activities and written assignments.
    4.  Create pro-social classroom environments and curriculum for young children via written assignments and presentations.
    5.  Expand knowledge base of children with special needs and recognize effective strategies for guiding development and behavior within inclusive settings via class discussions and written assignments.
    6.  Recognize the impact and influence of family and culture on child guidance and respond appropriately via class discussions and written assignments.

  
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    ECE 224 - Preschool Mathematics


    This course explores the methods and materials used to present developmentally appropriate mathematics concepts and skills to preschool children.  Other topics include:  the teacher's role in the learning process; the role of the environment in the learning process; math literature; differentiated instruction; making math meaningful as well as; establishing and enhancing the connections between home and school.

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish between the concepts of classification, comparison and contrasting via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2.  Identify the difference between rote counting, number identification and concept of quantity via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    3.  Define concepts of shape, size and time via class discussions, written assignments and projects.
    4.  Create developmentally appropriate math activities via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    5.  Recognize quality children's math literature for preschoolers via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    6.  Generate interdisciplinary math activities via class projects, wirtten assignments and presentations.
    7.  Demonstrate the value of positive home-school connections in early education via the creation of a math bag that would be sent home to families to use.
     

  
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    ECE 226 - Preschool Science


    This course examines the methods and materials used to present developmentally appropriate science concepts and skills to preschool children.  Other topics include:  the teacher's role in the learning process; the role of the environment in the learning process; science in children's literature; differentiated instruction; using our senses for observation and discovery as well as; establishing and enhancing connections between home and school.

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish between and define life science, physical science, earth science and health science via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2.  Create developmentally appropriate science activities via class activities, written assignments and presentations.
    3.  Recognize quality children's literature that focus on scientific concepts via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    4.  Generate interdisciplinary science activities via class projects, written assignments and presentations.
    5.  Demonstrate the value of positive home-school connections in early education via the creation of a science send-home sack for families to borrow and utilize.

  
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    ECE 227 - Early Childhood and Technology


    This course investigates the content and methods for teaching with computers and related technologies in early childhood classrooms.  Other topics include:  evaluating children's software; using technology for communication, record keeping and instruction as well as; the benefits, barriers and controversy surrounding technology use in early childhood classrooms.

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify technologies appropriate for young children via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2.  Evaluate computer software, internet sites and other technologies for developmental appropriateness for young children via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    3.  Demonstrate competence in computer usage and instruction to meet children's developmental levels and needs via written assignments and presentations.
    4.  Illustrate comprehension of digital camera usage via the creation of a photo project that would be appropriate for early childhood settings.
    5.  Exhibit the value of positive home-school connections in early education via the creation of a newsletter and information packet for families.

  
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    ECE 230 - Working With Families in Early Childhood Programs


    This course examines the importance of family involvement in the education of young children.  Topics include:  diversity; definition of family; parenthood as an emotional experience; definition of family involvement; barriers to partnerships; issues of trust; communication methods; conferencing; home visits; families in the classroom; parent education and; exploring model programs.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize family diversity, modern challenges and how family life impacts learning and teaching via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2.  Identify the various roles that family members have and the emotions of parents as well as how to address them as an educator vis class discussions and written assignments.
    3.  Define and identify factors that motivate family involvement via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    4.  Determine potential barriers to teacher-family partnerships via class discussions and written assignments.
    5.  Develop strategies for working partnerships with families and the community via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.

  
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    ECE 245 - Social Development of Young Children


    This course explores the developmental, environmental and temperamental aspects of the socialization process for young children.  Topics include:  separation; transitions; aggression; learning self-regulation; cooperation; sharing; resolving conflicts; moral development; peer interaction; gender-role development; communicating with families and; valuing diversity.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize the importance of social-emotional learning via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2.  Discriminate between and define positive self-identity, empathy, a sense of competence as well as recognizing and labeling emotions via class discussions and written assignments.
    3.  Differentiate between and define cooperative play, conflict resolution, moral development, self-regulation and democratic participation via class discussions and written assignments.
    4.  Identify how family culture and diversity impacts social development while, in turn, creating strategies to individualize social needs via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    5.  Describe the value of positive role modeling in the classroom environment to teach pro-social skills via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.

  
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    ECE 255 - Special Topics in ECE


    This course is based on the particular needs of early childhood students and/or community.  A forum will be provided for early childhood professionals to share their unique knowledge and skills with students.  Recent topics have included:  Infant and Toddler Language and Literacy Development and; Autism.  Other topics are:  Sensory Integration Dysfunction; Gifted Children; Gender Issues in Early Childhood Education; Health and Safety in Early Childhood Settings as well as; Anti-Bias and Multicultural Education.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ECE 110 Introduction to Early Education or permission of the department chair

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upoon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define core concepts in the identified content area via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    2.  Discuss the relevance of the special topic to the field of early childhood education via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    3.  Demonstrate knowledge in the specified content area via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    4.  Differentiate the significance of the special topic in teaching young children via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.
    5.  Create a project that applies the special topic to an early childhood setting.
    6.  Critique contrasting perspectives on the special topic via class discussions, written assignments and presentations.

  
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    ECE 256 - STEAM for Young Children


    This course explores how to create and implement integrated science, technolgoy, engineering, arts, and mathematics or STEAM activities for young children from infancy to age eight.  Developmentally appropriate mathematics instruction for young children is emphasized.  Activity planning, child observation and assessment, teacher reflective practices and documenting learning using digital technology will be explored through hands-on projects with young children.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Plan and carry out developmentally appropriate, integrated, inquiry-based science, technology, engineering, arts, and math, [STEAM] activities for children from infancy to age eight that address number and operations, patterns, functions and algebra, geometry and spatial concepts, measurement, and graphing.
    2.  Explain how STEAM activities meet STEM standards.
    3.  Incorporate thinking routines and deep questioning in their STEAM activity plans to develop critical thinking skills in young children.
    4.  Use authentic assessment tools to observe and assess children's learning in the STEM areas.
    5.  Use digital technology in developmentally appropriate ways with young children to further learning.
    6.  Document children's STEAM learning as a way to foster the home-school connection.
    7.  Reflect on their teaching practices and evaluate their effectiveness as a STEAM teacher.

  
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    ECE 299 - Independent Study in Early Childhood


    This course is designed as an individual student project that goes beyond the scope of requirements offered by the Teacher Education and Early Childhood Department.  The project is facilitated under the direction of a faculty member and upon approval by the department chairperson and Dean of Liberal Arts.  No more than three credits may be acquired toward the Early Childhood Education A.A.S. Degree or Liberal Arts General Studies A.S. Degree in independent study projects.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  6 Semester hours in Early Childhood Education courses

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define core concepts in the identified subject area via instructor meetings, written assignments and project work.
    2.  Discuss the relevance of the selected topic to the field of early childhood education via instructor meetings, written assignments and project work.
    3.  Demonstrate knowledge in the identified subject area via instructor meetings, written assignments and project work.
    4.  Differentiate the significance of the topic selected in teaching young children via instructor meetings and project work.
    5.  Create a project that applies the concept to early childhood settings.
    6.  Critique contrasting perspectives on the selected topic via instructor meetings and project work.

  
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    ECO 101 - Consumer Economics


    A practical course in developing educated consumers.  The role of quality information is a central theme.  Topics covered in this course will include:  the consumer movement, consumer affairs/legal issues, identity theft, food/health/wellness issues, home ownership/safety/repairs issues, basic household budgeting, tenants' rights, and the influence of social, political and economic forces that shape consumption.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Synthesize quality consumer information.
    2.  Understand the consumer movement and its influence on consumer affairs.
    3.  Identify laws developed to enhance consumer protection.
    4.  Analyze warranties, guarantees, and product safety guidelines.
    5.  Understand procedures and practices that help prevent identity theft.
    6.  Apply good food, health, and wellness choices.
    7.  Evaluate differences related to home ownership and/or home rental.
    8.  Understand the role of a consumer in a capitalist society.

  
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    ECO 105 - Introduction to Economic Thought


    This course will introduce students to the basic ideas of economics through a study of the ideas of the great economists.  The course will introduce students to the problem of "scarcity", and to the interpretation of economic theory.  The origins of economic thought, the ideas of the major economists, and the current state of economic theory in relation to contemporary economic issues will be studied.  ECO 105 will fill the Social/Behavioral Sciences requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the basic problem of "scarcity" in economic thought.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of interpreting economic theories.
    3.  Explain the main ideas of some of the major economic thinkers.
    4.  Describe some of the main ideas in economic thought today, and apply these to understanding contemporary economic issues.

  
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    ECO 110 - Micro-Economics


    An introduction to key economic concepts which relate to the market mechanism, supply and demand, the allocation of scarce resources, consumer behavior and the behavior of firms.  We all live in a world where choices are made and those choices always involve economic costs and consequences.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Satisfies the Civic Education requirements

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of and apply an economic perspective.
    2.  Describe the operation of the market system.
    3.  Identify how market prices are determined.
    4.  Identify various market structures.

  
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    ECO 111 - Macroeconomics


    Causes of unemployment and inflation and the government's efforts to control them.  Problems of economic growth as they relate to our economy and the other countries, developed and underdeveloped.  International trade and finance problems.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Satisfies the Civic Education requirements

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of and apply an economic perspective.
    2.  Identify causes of fluctuations in economic activities.
    3.  Identify phases of the business cycle in the macroeconomy.
    4.  Interpret macroeconomic aggregate variables.
    5.  Describe the application of governmental stabilization policies.

  
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    ECO 299 - Independent Study-Economics


    An individual student project in economics which is beyond the scope or requirements of the courses offered by the department, conducted under the direction of a faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester Hours in Economics

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be determined by the instructor with the consent of the department chair and Dean.

 

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