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Website Catalog
SUNY Broome Community College
   
 
  Feb 21, 2018
 
 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 
  
  •  

    FRS 201 - Fire Service Hydraulics


    Application of the laws of mathematics and physics to properties of fluid states, force pressure and flow velocities.  Emphasis on applying principles of hydraulics to fire fighting problems.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define hydraulics and explain its origin as a science and its history within the fire service.
    2.  Understand the six principles of pressure.
    3.  Understand and apply Bernoulli’s theorem as it applies to hydraulics.
    4.  Recognize the origins of formulas used to calculate gallons per minute, velocity and flow of water streams.

  
  •  

    FRS 202 - Juvenile Firesetter


    A study of the nationally recommended approach of the education, intervention, and development of a juvenile firesetter program.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize the difference between fire play and intentional firesetting.
    2.  Understand the extent of juvenile firesetting and the effect on the individual, the family, and the community.
    3.  Understand the benefit of a juvenile firesetter program.
    4.  Identify an intervention strategy for juvenile firesetters.
    5.  Recognize the scope of the problem and insight into the motives of why juveniles play with fire.
    6.  Understand the stigma attached to juvenile firesetting.
     

  
  •  

    FRS 204 - Protection and Suppression Systems


    Comprehensive overview of the design and operation of the various types of fire protection systems, including fire alarm and detection systems, automatic fire sprinkler systems, special hazard fire protection systems, smoke control and management systems, and security and emergency response systems.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand basics of fire behavior.
    2.  Describe fire protection systems and the model code process.
    3.  List the functions fire alarm systems provide.
    4.  Articulate various types of fire alarm and detection systems.
    5.  Recognize specialized fire protection systems.

  
  •  

    FRS 205 - Fire Department Administration


    Organization of the fire departments with emphasis on personnel management, distribution of equipment, maintenance of records, communications, data collection and community relations.  ISO Grading Schedule.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain how the history of the fire service in the United States has evolved into what it is today.
    2.  Designate the qualities of a leader (to include administrators, managers, and supervisors).
    3.  Describe the different functions of line and staff personnel in both paid and volunteer fire service organizations.
    4.  Explain the potential legal liabilities associated with hiring, training, retaining, discriplining, and terminating employees.
    5.  Understand the planning and decision-making process and complete a group decision-making project that reflects the value of group decisions over individual decisions.

  
  •  

    FRS 250 - Special Topics


    Exploration of special topics in Fire Protection Technology.  May be repeated since topics will vary from semester to semester.  Special topics have included The Psychology of the Firesetter and Code Enforcement.

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  The learning outcomes for this course will vary, depending on the material being covered.

  
  •  

    FRS 299 - Independent Study: Fire Service


    An individual student project in an area of fire protection or service beyond the scope of regular course-work.  Conducted under supervision of coordinator and approved by department chairperson and Dean.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  6 Credits in FRS coursework and 6 Credits in General Education courses

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  The learning outcomes of this course will vary, depending on the material being covered.

  
  •  

    GEO 120 - World Cultural Geography


    Description and analysis of human or cultural use of physical space, economics, religious, linguistic, and political phenomena in major world areas.  A regional approach is used to highlight the phenomena.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify major concepts in cultural geography including place, region, mobility, and cultural landscape.
    2.  Identify and discuss some of the elements of cultural geography, including the geographies of population, language, race and ethnicity, religion, and political geography.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the relation of geography to such phenomena as urbanization and globalization.
    4.  Apply geographical knowledge to the analysis of contemporary local, regional, national, and international issues.

  
  •  

    GER 101 - Beginning German I


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Written homework assignments supplemented by work in audio-lingual laboratory.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop some knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the German language and culture.
    2.  Acquire enough confidence to communicate in basic German.
    3.  Develop an understanding of elementary German grammar that cover forms, meanings and functions, and use them appropriately in oral and written communication.
    4.  Develop basic oral skills in pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking, and oral presentations.
    5.  Read with comprehension selected materials.
    6.  Develop some basic writing skills through various writing assignments such as paragraphs, journals, and comprehension questions.

  
  •  

    GER 102 - Beginning German II


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom. Written homework assignments supplemented by work in audio-lingual laboratory.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  GER 101 Beginning German I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop an understanding of high-beginning German grammar that cover forms, meanings and functions, and use them appropriately in oral and written communication.
    2.  Develop high-beginning oral skills in pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking, and oral presentations.
    3.  Develop their active vocabulary of high-frequency words, collocations, and idiomatic expressions that are commonly used in the German-speaking world.
    4.  Develop reading comprehension skills at the high-beginning through a variety of authentic genres, including academic discourse, newspaper and magazine articles, fiction, poetry, and essays.
    5.  Develop high-beginning writing skills through various writing assignments such as comprehension questions, paragraphs, essays, journals, and letters.
    6.  Develop an understanding of German-speaking cultures and societies as well as that of their own.

  
  •  

    HCM 193 - Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems


    A survey of the American Health Care System that examines the elements related to the organization, delivery, financing and planning of health services.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the major component of US Health Care Systems and understand their relationships.

  
  •  

    HCM 194 - Healthcare Financing


    This course will present the United States’ health care system from a cost perspective.  Students examine the history of health care costs in the U.S., the nature of competition, the characteristics of the market for medical services that influence competition, and the implications of these factors on the health care sector of our economy.  Special emphasis will be placed on the most current legislation and administrative proposals/enactments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequiste:  HCM 193 Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be familiar with health care financing policy development and the implementation of these processes.
    2.  Understand the size and scope of the health care financing system in the United States and its comparison to other countries.
    3.  Understand the differences and similarities in the public and private financing components of the health care system and the different reimbursements of various provider categories.

     

  
  •  

    HCM 195 - Managed Health Delivery Systems


    Managed Health Delivery Systems is designed to engage students in a learning process about the intricacies of managed care.  It will provide a core of basic information about managed care in the United States - history, promises and shortcomings.  In addition, this course will focus on managerial parameters of managed care.  Strategies for marketing services, physician recruitment and price quality competition will be presented in the context of the new market place realities.  Finally, consumer health behavior and utilization dynamics will be discussed and evaluated from the standpoint of their practical rather than theoretical significance.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HCM 193 Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Comprehend the public policy imperatives for health service reform.
    2.  Understand the role of managed care in health service restructuring.
    3.  Distinguish between traditional indemnity fee-for-service practice and managed care.
    4.  Develop familiarity with the principles and techniques for marketing managed delivery systems in a highly competitive environment.
    5.  Acquire greater awareness of the practical problems encountered in today’s health care market place.
    6.  Identify ethical issues surrounding managed care implementation.

  
  •  

    HCM 196 - Healthcare Ethics


    Health care ethics is designed for health care professionals and students planning to enter the health care field.  It offers participants the chance to understand health care ethics.  Some topics covered in the course will include:  autonomy in long-term care settings and withdrawing fluids and nutrition, euthanasia, and physician assisted suicide (medicide); HIV, reproductive rights, allocating health care resources, institutional missions, and obligations, competition and entrepreneurship in health care, and rationing.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the role of medical ethics regarding research and health care delivery in an historical context.
    2.  Be familiar with ethical principles and their application to current situations in the health field.
    3.  Analyze health care issues from varying ethical perspectives to determine how to make the best decisions.
    4.  Examine various codes of ethics of organizations including the American Hospital Association, the American College of Health Care Executives, and the American Medical Association.
    5.  Discuss current areas of ethical concerns from the perspective of consumers, providers, and payers of health care services.

     

  
  •  

    HCM 198 - Long-Term Care


    Long-term care will be studied in its current and dynamic environment.  Students will learn how longterm care has evolved in the United States.  Specific emphasis will be placed on levels of care, payment systems, social and economic concerns, current legislative initiatives, and the future needs of our expanding long-term care population.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop a deeper awareness of the demographic and economic changes influencing public policy for the elderly.
    2.  Discuss socio-cultural and socio-economic factors influencing long-term care in the U.S.
    3.  Discern the political and economic controversies associated with high rates of public spending for the elderly.
    4.  Understand the role of family and community social support structures for the elderly.
    5.  Recognize the power of financial incentives for altering provider behavior.
    6.  Identify the challenges and opportunities for evolving health and human services delivery systems.
     

  
  •  

    HIS 103 - Western Civilization I


    A survey of Western Civilization from its beginnings to the 18th century.  This course fulfills the SUNY Western Civilization requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish primary and secondary sources in history.
    2.  Read primary sources in history and formulate pertinent inferences and interpretations.
    3.  Identify some of the methods used by historians and social scientists to study the past.
    4.  Identify the major civilizations of the ancient Near East and describe their influence on Western Civilization.
    5.  Identify the main periods and themes in the history of Ancient Greece.
    6.  Identify the main periods and themes in the history of Ancient Rome.
    7.  Describe the major transformation in late antiquity.
    8.  Identify the major influences of Byzantine Civilization on Western Civilization.
    9.  Identify the major influences of Islamic Civilization on Western Civilization.
    10.  Describe the major social, political, and cultural developments of the High Middle Ages.
    11.  Describe the crisis of the late Middle Ages and the origins and early history of the Renaissance.
    12.  Identify and describe the main political, economic, social, cultural, and religious conditions of early modern Europe.

  
  •  

    HIS 104 - Western Civilization II


    A survey of Western Civilization from the 18th century to the present.  This course is equivalent to HIS 100 The Rise of the West, which is no longer offered.  This course fulfills the SUNY Western Civilization requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish primary and secondary sources in history.
    2.  Read primary sources in history and formulate pertinent inferences and interpretations.
    3.  Identify some of the methods used by historians and social scientists to study the past.
    4.  Identify and describe the main political, economic, social, cultural, and religiou conditions fo lat medieval and early modern Europe (1450-1789).
    5.  Identify and explain the increasing conflicts between a traditional aristocratic society and emerging “modern” movements in the economic, political, social, cultural, and religious arenas.
    6.  Describe the industrial transformation and evaluate its consequences.
    7.  Identify and describe the movements of the 19th century age of “isms,” including imperialism, and evaluate their impact on European and non-European societies.
    8.  Explain why World War I was the product of mounting tensions within an increasingly “modern” European nation-state system.
    9.  Explain and assess how WW II grew out of a failed European peace and a series of interwar crises.
    10.  Explain and evaluate the impact of communism and fascism on 20th century European civilization.
    11.  Identify and analyze the competing historical interpretations of the Cold War and the subsequent collapse of the Soviet Union.
    12.  Describe the factors giving rise to decolonization of the European empires and evaluate its consequences, focusing especially on the rise of globalization.

     

  
  •  

    HIS 116 - World History I


    A survey of the histories of human societies from the beginnings to the 16th century.  This course was formerly titled The West and the World to 1500.  It fulfills only the SUNY World History requirement; students who took HIS 116 before the fall 2015 semester should consult with their advisor.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish primary and secondary sources in history.
    2.  Read primary sources in history and formulate pertinent inferences and interpretations.
    3.  Identify some of the methods used by historians and social scientists to study the past.
    4.  Identify some of the main features of human prehistory.
    5.  Distinguish the general characteristics of civilizations.
    6.  Identify the primary civilizations of the Old and New Worlds.
    7.  Identify some of the main features of some of the major religious and cultural traditions of Asia, Africa, and Europe to circa 1500 CE.
    8.  Explain the rise of the state and the development of distinct social groups and gender roles.
    9.  Locate the major trade routes of the Old World before 1500 CE.
    10.  Describe the general conditions that existed in the Old and New Worlds on the eve of modernity, circa 1500 CE.

  
  •  

    HIS 117 - World History II


    A survey of the histories of human societies around the world from the 16th century to the present.  This course was formerly titled The West and the World since 1500.  It fulfills only the SUNY World History requirement; students who took HIS 117 before the fall 2015 semester should consult with their advisor.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish primary and secondary sources in history.
    2.  Read primary sources in history and formulate pertinent inferences and interpretations.
    3.  Identify some of the methods used by historians and social scientists to study the past.
    4.  Describe the general conditions that existed in the Old and New Worlds on the eve of modernity, circa 1500 CE.
    5.  Identify the major changes in Europe and its relations with the rest of the world in the period 1500-1800.
    6.  Describe some of the major developments in Asia, Africa, and the Americas in the period 1500-1800.
    7.  Explain the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution.
    8.  Identify the major political developments of the period 1800-1914.
    9.  Describe the general crisis of the first half of the twentieth century and identify its global consequences.
    10.  Identify some of the main themes in global history since 1950.
     

  
  •  

    HIS 130 - United States History I


    The United States from 1607 to 1877.  The colonies, Revolution, Constitution, early national period, Jacksonian era, expansion, Civil War and Reconstruction, and Westward Movement.  Survey of political, economic, social and cultural developments through most of the 19th century.  Satisfies the civic education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Write clearly, speak cogently, and think critically about historical events and issues.
    2.  Identify some of the methods used by historians to study the past.
    3.  Name and discuss some contributions made to historical knowledge by archaeologists, anthropologists, and geographers.
    4.  Read primary historical sources and formulate pertinent inferences and interpretations.
    5.  Identify the cultural areas of native peoples in North America.
    6.  Evaluate the impact of European exploration on Europe, Africa, and North America, for example, the Columbian Exchange.
    7.  Explain the motivations of European powers and colonists and varying subsequent colonial developments consequent upon their actions.
    8.  Describe the various measures used by the European powers to control and profit fromthe New World colonies, as well as patterns of colonial compliance and resistance.
    9.  Identify some of the causes–long term and immediate, foreign and domestic–of the Revolutionary War(s) and independence from Great Britain.
    10.  Describe the composition and distribution of the North American immigrant population in the 18th and 19th centuries.
    11.  Discuss the Constitution and Bill of Rights as well as the process of development and approval.
    12.  Distinguish the key issues between the federalists and anti-federalists and relate those issues to the development of political parties.
    13.  Discuss the nature of Jacksonian democracy, including ethnic, class, and regional affiliations, and the status of white men, women, native peoples, and African American.
    14.  Examine the causes and consequences of the market and transportation revolutions of the 19th century.
    15.  Evaluate how sectional differences, including slavery and diverse economic, political, and social interests, propelled the nation towards Civil War.
    16.  Recognize the short and long term consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

  
  •  

    HIS 131 - United States History II


    The United States from 1877 to the present.  The closing of The Frontier, the American Empire, Progressive reforms, World War I, the Twenties, the Depression, The New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam involvement, and the present.  Emphasis on political, cultural, social, and economic & developments.  Satisfies the Civic Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Write clearly, speak cogently, and think critically about historical events and issues.
    2.  Identify some of the methods used by historians to study the past.
    3.  Name and discuss some contributions to historical knowledge made by archaeologists, anthropologists, and geographers.
    4.  Read primary historical sources and formulate pertinent inferences and interpretations.
    5.  Discuss the outcomes of the Civil War and Reconstruction.
    6.  Identify and explain causes and patterns of immigration to America, internal migration, and cultural changes as a result of those movements.
    7.  Explain the development of the American West–motives for westward expansion, impact on indigenous peoples, and national economic change.
    8.  Evaluate trends in the industrialization, commercialization, and urbanization of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
    9.  Identify and appraise the Progressive responses to the social, economic, and political problems of the Gilded Age.
    10.  Distinguish motives and consequences of American expansionism and imperialism of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
    11.  Describe American economic, diplomatic and military roles abroad and at home during World War I.
    12.  Review the economic, social, and political changes of the 1920s.
    13.  Name and discuss the causes and outcomes of the Great Depression, including the New Deal response.
    14.  Describe American economic, diplomatic and military roles abroad and at home during World War II.
    15.  Examine the various concerns of the Atomic Age, the Cold War in American life and politics, and the post-war era of the 1950s.
    16.  Discuss the various civil rights movements of American marginal populations, American Indians, women, sub-culture lifestyles, and African Americans in particular.
    17.  Examine the technological, political and social changes caused by the Space Race, the conflict in Vietnam, and the Great Society.
    18.  Evaluate the political and foreign policies of the 1980s and 1990s and understand the impact on America of the end of the Cold War.
    19.  Debate recent events of the 1990s and early 21st century and discuss implications for the future of America and Americans.

  
  •  

    HIS 135 - Jazz in US History and Culture


    This is a course on the evolution of jazz in the context of American history.  The course explores how events and trends in American history have created and influenced the development of jazz and its evolution within american culture.  The development of jazz from its African roots, through the creation of African American musical forms in the nineteenth century, to the present day will be examined.  Various styles and personalities in jazz history will be studied.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    HUM 135
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify some of the fundamental principles in the study of jazz history.
    2.  Describe some of the relationships between events and trends in American history and the evolution of jazz.
    3.  Identify and describe the roots of jazz in African and nineteenth-century African American musical traditions in relation to colonial and nineteenth-century history.
    4.  Distinguish between different jazz styles and identify important individual personalities in jazz history.
    5.  Evaluate the relationship of jazz to twentieth-century American history.
    6.  Creatively discuss the place of jazz in contemporary American culture.

  
  •  

    HIS 141 - History of Modern Latin America and the Caribbean


    History of Latin America and the Caribbean from independence to the present, emphasizing distinctive cultures, power relations between indigenous peoples and elites, the causes of political instability and economic backwardness.  Close analyses of reform, reactionary, and revolutionary movements in the hemisphere and inter-American affairs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the general nature of colonial Latin American societies.
    2.  Analyze the causes of the Latin American independence movements of the nineteenth century.
    3.  Identify major themes in the political, economic, and social development of Latin American societies in the nineteenth century, including reform, reaction, and revolution.
    4.  Discuss the causes of political instability and economic backwardness in Latin America in the twentieth century.
    5.  Identify some of the significant political leaders and movements in Latin America in the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

  
  •  

    HIS 155 - War and the Western World


    A survey course from 1500 to the present examining the interaction of Western Civilization and warfare.  Major emphasis will be on how warfare/military developments helped to shape Western Civilization as well as a distinctive Western style of warfare.  Specific concern will be given to the role of gunpowder, industrialization, nationalism, as well as economic, social, and cultural factors.  Exploration of how the West used its distinctive style of warfare to dominate the rest of the world and to spread Western influence and institutions will also be considered.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the general nature of warfare in the early modern West, including theories of the “military revolution” of the period.
    2.  Identify some of the relationships between warfare and culture, politics, and society in the early modern West.
    3.  Discuss the causes and consequences of the Age of Revolution in the West, including the rise of mass armies.
    4.  Describe the nature of indurstrialization in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including the development of new technologies and strategies of war.
    5.  Identify the major belief systems of the nineteenth century West, including Liberalism, Conservatism, Socialism, and Nationalism.
    6.  Discuss the nature of imperialism and imperial wars in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
    7.  Analyze the political, social, cultural, and military causes and consequences of the two world wars.
    8.  Discuss the period since 1945 in the West, including the Cold War, decolonization, and globalization, with a special emphasis on the nature of war in the contemporary world.

  
  •  

    HIS 156 - Nature and Western Civilization


    A historical overview of human interaction with the natural system in the Western world; an exploration of the Western ideologies justifying the exploitation of nature; an examination of the present state of the global energy system; a critical investigation of various solutions for ecological problems.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify some of the major ideologies regarding nature in the history of Western thought.
    2.  Examine some of the major developments in the human relationship to nature in the West since 1500.
    3.  Identify some of the historical trends in energy use since 1500.
    4.  Identify some of the historical trends in pollution and other environmental issues since 1500.
    5.  Examine the present-day state of global environmental issues.
    6.  Discuss and analyze some of the various solutions proposed for energy and environmental problems today.

  
  •  

    HIS 163 - Introduction to Chinese Civilization


    Survey of Chinese history and introduction to Chinese culture.  Origins of Chinese civilization.  Development of Chinese culture and religion in early Chinese history.  Unification of China under the Qin and Han dynasties.  Imperial China:  institutions, social life, and culture.  Relations between imperial China and other societies.  Crisis of late Qing China.  Chinese revolution, 1911-1949.  China under Mao.  Recent developments.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the main chronological divisions in Chinese history.
    2.  Identify some of the major elements in traditional Chinese culture.
    3.  Discuss some of the major social, cultural and political developments in ancient China.
    4.  Describe some of the main features of social and political life in imperial China.
    5.  Explain the origins of the Chinese Revolution.
    6.  Describe the course of the Chinese Revoluton.
    7.  Identify the major events and developments during the rule of Mao Zedong.
    8.  Identify some of the major developments in China since 1976.

  
  •  

    HIS 164 - Introduction to Japanese Civilization


    Survey of Japanese history and introduction to Japanese culture.  Origins of Japanese civilization.  Chinese and Korean influences in early Japan.  Classical Japan (Nara and Heian periods):  institutions, social life, culture.  Medieval Japan:  rise of the Bushi, new forms of Buddhism, social and cultural developments.  Early modern Japan:  wars of unification, Tokugawa period.  Meiji Restoration and its consequences.  The modernization of Japan:  industrialization, imperialism, cultural changes, the Pacific War.  Japan since 1945.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the main chronological divisions in Japanese history.
    2.  Identify some of the major elements in traditional Japanese culture.
    3.  Describe some of the major features of the political, social, and cultural life in Heian and medieval Japan.
    4.  Describe some of the major features of the polical, social, and cultural life in Tokugawa Japan.
    5.  Account for the Meiji restoration and describe its consequences.
    6.  Identify some of the main features of Japan’s modernization (1868-1953).
    7.  Identify some of the main developments in Japan since 1953.

  
  •  

    HIS 171 - American Economic History


    This course offers a topical approach to the economic growth and development of the United States.  The course will discuss the roles of population, resources, and technologies, the colonial heritage, the evolution of the market system, and the development of agriculture, transportation, manufacturing, and the capital market.  Business institutions, labor, and the role of government will also be considered.  The relation of the growth of the US economy to international developments will also be discussed.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the major periods in the economic history of the United States.
    2.  Describe the roles of population, resources, and technologies in the historical development of the American economy.
    3.  Identify some of the major themes in the histories of American business and labor, and the relation of government to each.
    4.  Explain the relations between the development of the American economy and major international developments.

  
  •  

    HIS 175 - Local History


    This introductory study encompasses the history of Broome County and, where relevant, the larger upstate New York area.  Areas of exploration include:  early presence of the First Peoples (Native Americans) from the early woodlands period to the Iroquois Confederacy, late 18th and 19th century Anglo settlement with cultural, religious, and land use perspectives, canal, railroad, industrial and factory growth fueled by rural migrants and European immigrant groups, as well as recent changes in County growth and demographics.  Historical methods of research will be used, along with actual exploration of historical aspects of the County, for instance, the homes of Riverside Drive or the Chenango Canal.  We will utilize the archival and historical records on the premises of cooperative local institutions.  Meets SUNY General Education requirement for US History for students scoring 85 and above on US history regents.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the main chronological divisions in the history of Broome County and its adjacent areas.
    2.  Describe the main features of Native American life in the region before colonization.
    3.  Discuss some of the major themes of the colonial and revolutionary periods in the local area.
    4.  Describe the development of the local area during the nineteenth century, against the backdrop of broader regional and national history.
    5.  Discuss the growth of important local businesses in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including Endicott-Johnson, IBM, and others.
    6.  Identify the major themes of local history in the twentieth century, against the backdrop of regional and national developments.

  
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    HIS 180 - Utopia: American Visions of the Good Society


    Examines the functions of the Utopian Impulse throughout American History by examining a series of thought experiments/or actual experimental communities.  To include comparative analysis of various American utopian writers such as Edward Bellamy, C.P. Gilman and W. W. Wagar etc.  Consideration will also be given to such experimental communities as the Shakers, the Oneida Perfectionists, the communes of the 1960s, etc.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the general nature of utopian ideas and practices.
    2.  Discuss the utopian impulse in American history.
    3.  Examine experimental communities such as the Shakers, the Owenites, the Oneida Perfectionists, and the communes of the 1960s.
    4.  Compare and analyze key works of utopian literature by such authors as Edward Bellamy, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W. Warren Wager, and others, including their place in American history and culture.

  
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    HIS 183 - Women in American History


    An introduction to women’s history in America.  The course will discuss women’s roles from the pre-colonial period to the present, including social, economic, political, and cultural aspects of women’s lives.  This course will meet the SUNY General Education US history requirement for students who scored 85 or above on the US History and Government Regents Examination.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the various women’s cultures in America and describe how they have changed over time.
    2.  Show an understanding of the influence in Western traditions, practices, and laws dealing with women upon developments in American women’s history.
    3.  Demonstrate, through research, class discussion, and class presentations, a familiarity with research methods regarding historical records.
    4.  Complete at least one project demonstrating in-depth knowledge of one aspect of American women’s history.

  
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    HIS 186 - Modern American Social History


    This course focuses on social change in the United States since 1877.  Among the themes that will be discussed are those including but not limited to changing ideas and realities of social class, race, ethnicity, and gender, the development of social institutions (including education, health care, and social services), and the evolving role of government in American social life.  Social movements such as the temperance, women’s suffrage, and civil rights movements will also be considered.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the major periods in the economic history of the United States.
    2.  Describe the roles of population, resources, and technologies in the historical development of the American economy.
    3.  Identify some of the major themes in the histories of American business and labor, and the relation of government to each.
    4.  Explain the relations between the development of the American economy and major international developments.

  
  •  

    HIS 187 - The United States Civil War: Causes and Effects


    A study of American institutions within the time-frame of 1815-1877; examination and analysis of Antebellum politics, society, and culture; origin and nature of the American Civil War and the social, economic and political changes brought about by the War and Reconstruction.  Approval for SUNY General Education requirement for US History pending.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe conditions in the United States in 1815.
    2.  Describe the development of sectional rivalries.
    3.  Identify major political conflicts in the Antebellum Period, such as the Missouri Compromise and the Nullification Crisis.
    4.  Describe some of the major features of slavery and Southern society and culture.
    5.  Discuss the major ideas of Abolitionism.
    6.  Identify the consequences of the Westward Expansion, such as the Wilmot Proviso.
    7.  Describe the development of the Republican Party.
    8.  Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of the election of 1860.
    9.  Discuss the life and ideas of Abraham Lincoln.
    10.  Identify the balance of forces in 1861.
    11.  Discuss some of the major military aspects of the Civil War.
    12.  Discuss some of the political, economic and social aspects of the war in the North and South.
    13.  Describe African-American experiences during the war, including Emancipation.
    14.  Discuss the Reconstruction and some of the long-term consequences of the Civil War.

  
  •  

    HIS 188 - Vietnam and America


    A course on the Vietnam War and American society.  Background:  modern Vietnam, war and American culture, the Cold War.  The War:  military and political aspects, the soldier’s experience.  The homefront: social developments, the media, the anti-war movement.  The legacy of the war.  Meets SUNY General Education United States History requirement for students scoring 85 and above on the United States History Regents Exam.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Distinguish primary and secondary sources in history.
    2.  Read primary sources in history and formulate pertinent inferences and interpretations.
    3.  Distinguish and evaluate principal interpretations of the lessons of the Vietnam War.
    4.  Discuss the impact of Cold War events and American culture on the American response to conflict in Vietnam.
    5.  Identify the major features of Vietnamese geography, culture, and history.
    6.  Identify the principal historical “turning points” in the Vietnamese wars.
    7.  Distinguish and evaluate both actual and alternative military strategies of both Americans and Vietnamese.
    8.  Describe the war and post-war experiences of soldiers on all sides.
    9.  Explain how the United States military draft was organized and functioned and the impact of factors of race, class, and gender on the creation of the American forces.
    10.  Debate issues of the legality of this war and war generally, the nature of war crimes, and the war powers of the branches of the Federal govenment.
    11.  Examine a variety of Vietnamese perspectives on the war.
    12.  Describe the roles of women on all sides of this war.
    13.  Explain the social, cultural and political developments in the United States in this period and their impacts on the outcome of the war.
    14.  Debate the impact of the United States mass media in the support for the war and its outcome.
    15.  Discuss the ways in which the war has been represented in popular culture.
    16.  Examine social, political and economic effects on Vietnam and America after the war.

  
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    HIS 189 - First Peoples: Native American History


    An introduction to the history of Native North Americans from their earliest history to the present day.  From New England to the Southwest, various Indian cultures will be examined by region and time period.  Early creation beliefs, religious, social, and political practices, peace and conflict, family life, environmental adaptations, frontiers and borderlands, and archaeological and artistic survivals will be covered.  Emphasis will be on the period since Europeans arrived in the present-day United States.  Particular interest will be given our local Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), and their contacts with French and English colonists.  Modern day legal and geographical conflicts will be reviewed.  Approval for SUNY General Education requirement for US History pending.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify various Native cultures and their regions.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the outline of pre-historic development, historic interactions with European settlers and govenments, and modern indian life.
    3.  Demonstrate, through written research and class discussion, a familiarity with research methods regarding historical records.
    4.  Complete at least one project demonstrating an in-depth knowledge of one aspect of the history of the First Peoples.

  
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    HIS 194 - African American History


    An introduction of African American history from the colonial period to the present.  Topics to be discussed include West Africa and the slave trade; slaves and free blacks in the colonial and revolutionary periods; slavery, abolitionist movements, and African Amercian life  in the antebellum years; the Civil War and emancipation; Reconstruction and the Jim Crow erea; the development of African American thought and culture; the Civil Rights era; and recent developments.  This course will meet the SUNY General Education US History requirement for all students, and it also meets the Civic Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe and apply some of the methods used by historians and social scientists to understand the past.
    2.  Identify important general concepts in the study of African-American history.
    3.  Describe the nature of the African slave trade.
    4.  Describe conditions in colonial America with special reference to African-Americans.
    5.  Discuss African-American roles in and responses to the era of the American Revolution.
    6.  Identify conditions of slave and free African-American life in the antebellum period.
    7.  Discuss the Civil War era with special reference to African-American experiences.
    8.  Identify the general conditions of African-American life from Reconstruction to the First World War.
    9.  Describe the Harlem Renaissance and related developments of the 1920s and 1930s.
    10.  Discuss the ideas of key African-American thinkers such as Booker T. Washington, W. E. DuBois, and Marcus Garvey, including their relation to conditions in Africa.
    11.  Identify important features of African-American experiences from the Second World War to the present.
    12.  Compare and contrast the ideas of important African American thinkers in the Civil Rights and post-Civil Rights eras, including Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcom X.

  
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    HIS 210-280 - Special Topics in History


    Additional history courses are available besides those listed here in the College Catalog. For further information consult the college master schedule or department chair.

    Credits: (1-3)
  
  •  

    HIS 225 - The Second World War


    A course on the history of the Second World War (1939-1945).  The course will discuss the background of the war; the causes of the outbreak of war in Europe and the Pacific; the military, political, social, and cultural dimensions of the conflict; and the consequences and legacy of the Second World War.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIS 100 The Rise of The West: 1500-Present, HIS 117 The West and the World Since 1500, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the conditions–political and military–leading to the outbreak of the First World War.
    2.  Discuss the consequences–political and military–of the First World War.
    3.  Identify the main causes of the outbreak of the Second World War in Europe and Asia.
    4.  Describe the balance of forces in the two theaters of operation at the start of the war.
    5.  Discuss the initial military strategies employed by all sides and describe how those strategies changed during the course of the war.
    6.  Discuss the entrance of the United States into the Second World War.
    7.  Describe the conditions of battle in the various theaters of operation.
    8.  Discuss the end of the Second World War and the military, technological, and political consequences of that War.

  
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    HIS 299 - Independent Study


    An independent study project which is beyond the scope of courses currently offered by the department, directed by a faculty member with approval of the department chairperson.  Independent study does not satisfy the Liberal Arts requirement in history, and it may not be taken in lieu of a 100-series course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 hours of College History

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed by the instructor and approved by the department chair and the Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
  •  

    HIT 101 - Introduction to Health Information Systems


    Introduction to the organization of healthcare delivery and overview of the profession.  Definition of, standards for, and development of both paper and electronic health records as to content, format, evaluation and completion.  Numbering and filing systems, registries, indexes, forms and screen design are addressed.  A study of methods for compiling statistics for administration, medical staff, and licensing and accrediting agencies.  Vital statistics, public health statistics and hospital statistics are covered.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Trace the development of the health information profession and understand the responsibilities of the health information profession.
    2.  Identify the purpose and structure of AHIMA.
    3.  Recognize and describe the uses, users, and functions of the health record.
    4.  Understand the content, documentation requirements and formats of the health record in various healthcare settings.
    5.  Understand the advantages of electronic health records over paper-based and hybrid records.
    6.  Identify and define terms, initiatives, and technologies used in the planning and implantation of the electronic health record.
    7.  Describe the purpose, development, and importance of healthcare data sets and standards.
    8.  Recognize the purpose, development, and maintenance of registries and indexes used in healthcare.
    9.  Understand the role that ethics plays in the health information profession.
    10.  Identify the types of vital statistics that are collected in the healthcare industry.
    11.  Identify and explain statistical terminology used in the healthcare industry.
    12.  Compute the following statistics:  Census Data, Percentage of Occupancy, Discharge Data, Length of Stay, Mortality, Obstetrical, Autopsy, Infection, and other rates.

  
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    HIT 106 - Medical Terminology


    A study of the language of medicine, including suffixes, prefixes and root words.  Emphasis on terminology associated with the anatomic systems.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop an appreciation for the historical development of the medical language.
    2.  Identify and define the five basic word parts.
    3.  Understand the concept of analyzing and defining medical terms.
    4.  Recognize the rules on word building and be able to apply these rules when building medical terms from given definitions.
    5.  Define, pronounce, and correctly spell the word parts (combining forms, suffixes, and prefixes) presented within each chapter.
    6.  Define, pronounce, and correctly spell medical terms related to body structure, color, and oncology.
    7.  Define, pronounce, and correctly spell terms which are used to describe directional terms, anatomic planes, regions, and quadrants.
    8.  Define, pronounce, and correctly spell disease and disorder, surgical, diagnostic, and complementary terms that are associated with the following body systems: Integumentary, Respiratory, Urinary, Male and Female Reproductive, Obstetrics and Neonatology, Cardiovascular, Immune, Blood, and Lymphatic, Digestive, Eye, Ear, Musculoskeletal, Nervous, and Endocrine.
    9.  Identify, interpret, and correctly spell medical abbreviations associated with the above mentioned anatomic systems.
    10.  Interpret, read, and comprehend the medical language in simulated medical statements and documents.

  
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    HIT 107 - Medical Transcription and Correspondence


    Introductory course emphasizing the fundamentals of medical transcription.  Orientation to equipment and software including authentic physician dictation organized by medical specialty.  Transcription of various medical reports including chart notes, letters, history and physicals, consultation reports, and discharge summaries, while building typing speed and accuracy.  Review of medical terminology related to the medical specialities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  HIT 106 Medical Terminology, MDA 104 Keyboarding and Medical Word Processing, BIT 100 Keyboarding

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Produce an error-free transcribed letter, consultation, chart note, history and physical report, and discharge summary dictated by a variety of physicians.
    2.  Edit the transcript to correct obvious grammatical and punctuation errors, while identifying medical transcription inconsistencies.
    3.  Develop keyboarding skills and an increased knowledge of medical terminolgy, confidentiality, and professionalism.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to utilize references and resources efficiently.

  
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    HIT 117 - Reimbursement Methodologies


    A study of the reimbursement and prospective payment systems used in the health care industry.  Comprehensive review of the Official Guidelines for Coding and reporting, as well as Revenue Cycle Management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisitie:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding, HIT 205 Coding Practicum

    Corequisite:  HIT 214 CPT and HCPCS Coding

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    At the conclusion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use basic language associated with the health care reimbursement methodologies.
    2.  Describe the structure of the approved code sets used in the United States.
    3.  Identify the Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting and to examine coding compliance issues that influence reimbursement.
    4.  Distinguish between various insurance plans and government sponsored health care.
    5.  Differentiate between inpatient, post-acute care and ambulatory reimbursement systems.
    6.  Understand the components of revenue cycle management.
    7.  Discuss inpatient and outpatient reimbursement methodologies.
    8.  Define the provisions and functions of health care insurance plans.
    9.  Differentiate between the various government sponsored health care programs.

  
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    HIT 203 - Computers in Health Care


    Identification of computer applications in the health care industry; types of hardware and software systems; components of a health care facility database; electronic patient records; principles of database coding design and data dictionaries; overflow of systems approach in the selection and development of an information system; data quality; methods to control security and confidentiality; and strategies for report management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify computer applications in the healthcare industry.
    2.  Differentiate between the types of hardware and software used in healthcare.
    3.  Discuss the components of a healthcare facility database.
    4.  Identify electronic patient record system.
    5.  Explain the principles of database coding design and data dictionaries.
    6.  Discuss a systems approach used in the selection and development of an information system.
    7.  Summarize the concepts that relate to data quality.
    8.  List the types of methods used to control security and confidentiality.
    9.  Discuss strategies for report management.

  
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    HIT 204 - ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding


    Principles and application of the ICD-10-CM & PCS coding systems.  Introduction to the Official Coding Guidelines for Coding and Reimbursement.  Theory and practice of coding medical records using manual methods and encoder software systems.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 132 Anatomy and Physiology II, HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Corequisite:  HIT 205 Coding Practicum, HIT 240 Pathophysiology & Pharmacology

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the structure and format of the ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding System.
    2.  Describe the types of diagnoses and procedures that are coded using ICD-10-CM & PCS.
    3.  Select and accurately code diagnoses and procedures using ICD-10-CM & PCS.

  
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    HIT 205 - Coding Practicum


    Supervised practice structured so that students gain practical coding experience in a simulated hospital setting.  Laboratory hours: 2 hr/week for 15 weeks

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Assign diagnosis and procedure codes using ICD-10-CM (both manually with the code books and with the encoders).
    2.  Validate coding accuracy using clinical information in the health record.
    3.  Compute DRG, POA indicators, and HACs using coding software.

  
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    HIT 208 - Advanced Medical Transcription


    Transcription of authentic physician-dictated reports organized by body systems or medical specialties.  Emphasis on advanced skills, developing accuracy, speed and additional detailed study of medical terminology.  Emphasis on the basic medical reports as well as specialized reports relating to the various body systems.  Emphasis also on using references and other resources efficiently, editing and proof-reading techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 107 Medical Transcription

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Select the correct format for a dictated medical report.
    2.  Demonstrate the proper use of reference materials.
    3.  Transcribe consultations, chart notes, history and physical reports, discharge summaries and operative reports dictated by a variety of physicians.
    4.  Edit the transript to correct obvious grammatical and puctuation errors.
    5.  Identify obvious medical inconsistencies.
    6.  Produce a final, neat, error-free transcript.
    7.  Increase transcription speed and productivity throughout the course.
    8.  Understand the process of speech recognition technology.
    9.  Successfully utilize the ExpressScribe Transcription Program.

  
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    HIT 210 - Management Principles for Health Information


    Principles of management, planning, organizing, controlling, and directing as they relate to and are integrated with specific applications to health information management functions.  Principles of personnel supervision are also included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HIT 236 Quality Improvement

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Participate in the planning, design, selection, implementation, integration, testing, evaluation, and support for organization-wide information systems.
    2.  Use the principles of ergonomics and human factors in work process design.
    3.  Apply the fundmentals of team leadership and conduct continuing education programs.
    4.  Monitor staffing levels and productivity standards for health information functions, and provide feedback to management and staff regarding performance.
    5.  Communicate benchmark staff performance data and priortize job functions/activities.
    6.  Use quality improvement tools and techniques to monitor, report, and improve processes.
    7.  Make recommendations for items to include in budgets and contracts, as well as monitoring coding and revenue cycle processes.
    8.  Recommend cost-saving and efficient means of achieving work processes and goals.
    9.  Contribute work plans, policies, procedures, and resource requisitions in relation to job functions.

  
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    HIT 214 - CPT and HCPCS Coding


    A study of CPT and HCPCs as it relates to ambulatory and physician coding.  An overview of ambulatory and physician coding and data collection.  Theories and practical applications of ambulatory and physician payment methodologies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding System, HIT 205 Coding Practicum

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the sections of the CPT and HCPCs book.
    2.  Discuss the format and organization of CPT and HCPCs.
    3.  Discuss the coding guidelines that relate to CPT and HCPCs.
    4.  Accurately code medical services and procedures using CPT and HCPCs.
     

  
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    HIT 220 - Survey of Healthcare Delivery


    The study of the regulatory issues, content, use and structure of healthcare data and data sets as they relate to long term care facilities, home health agencies, hospice, mental health facilities, ambulatory care, physicians offices and others.  The financing of health care services will be discussed as it relates to the various payment and reimbursement systems.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the various types of healthcare facilities.
    2.  Discuss the medical record systems used in healthcare facilities.
    3.  Explain the regulations that impact various types of healthcare facilities.
    4.  Discuss the role of HIM professionals in healthcare facilities.
    5.  Describe the reimbursement methodologies used throughout healthcare.
    6.  Identify the types of data sets used in healthcare facilities.
    7.  Explain risk management, legal and quality management concerns that relate to the various types of healthcare facilities.

  
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    HIT 222 W - Medical Legal Aspects


    Introduction to legal aspects of medical records.  Legal basis for medical practice, confidentiality.  Patient’s “Bill of Rights,” HIPAA, voluntary and involuntary release of medical information.  Authorizations and consents, professional liabilities, medical-moral issues such as abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, artificial insemination and organ transplantations. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Complete written lab assignments on various topics.
    2.  Apply current laws, accreditations and certification standards related to health information initiatives.
    3.  Apply policies and procedures for access and disclosure to personal health information.
    4.  Understand procedures regarding the release of patient information to authorized users.
    5.  Apply and promote ethical standards of practice.

  
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    HIT 236 - Quality Improvement


    A study of the components of a hospital-wide quality assurance program, including quality assessment, utilization management, credentialing and risk management.  Collection, organization and presentation of data will be included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 222 Medical Legal Aspects

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the development of quality review in the healthcare industry.
    2.  Identify the pioneers of QI and discuss their theories.
    3.  Explain QI processes that include ongoing monitoring and evaluation.
    4.  Describe The Joint Commission standards that impact the quality of care in healthcare organizations.
    5.  Perform quality assessment audits, analyze the findings and display findings using visual tools.
    6.  Discuss the development of utilization management in healthcare.
    7.  Identify the various components of utilization management that include preadmission, admission, and continued stay reviews.
    8.  Discuss the development of risk management programs.
    9.  Identify court decisions, federal regulations, and The Joint Commission standards that relate to risk management.
    10.  Explain risk identification and risk control activities used in the healthcare industry.
    11.  Develop quality improvement tools and policies that can be used in health information departments.
    12.  Present data using tables, charts, and graphs.
    13.  Explain the importance of clinical documentation improvement programs.

  
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    HIT 240 - Pathophysiology & Pharmacology


    The study of major disease processes, by body system, including their etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.  Students will learn which diagnostic tests are used, as well as the appropriate surgical techniques.  Basic pharmacology and the most commonly used drugs will be discussed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 106 Medical Terminology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define disease, etiology, signs, symptoms, and prognosis.
    2.  Differentiate between an organic and functional disease.
    3.  Identify the predisposing factors of disease.
    4.  Track the essential steps in diagnosis of disease.
    5.  Describe the five classifications of diseases.
    6.  Describe the various components of the principles of diagnosis.
    7.  List and describe some of the common diagnostic tests and procedures.
    8.  Define pharmacology and other terms related to specialty fields within the field of pharmacology.
    9.  List and describe three general areas of medical uses for drugs.
    10.  Describe the function of the Food and Drug Administration with respect to approving or removing drugs from the market.
    11.  List five things that the names of drugs might tell you about those drugs.
    12.  Describe the therapeutic effect of given drugs on a specific body system.

  
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    HIT 245 - Clinical Practicum


    Professional practice experience in facilities, organizations and agencies related to healthcare.  Students will gain practical experience in technical procedures and in developing professional attitudes in interacting with other professionals and consumers in the healthcare field.  Clinical hours: 30 hr/week for 5 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  All HIT courses must be successfully completed prior to participation in Clinical Practicum

    Corequisites:  HIT 295 Health Information Seminar

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    150 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the HIM department in the overall function of the healthcare institution.
    2.  Observe the working relationships of the HIM practitioners and department staff, facility staff, visitors, and medical staff.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of patient confidentiality throughout the clinical practicum experience.
    4.  Recognize and apply the characteristics of a professional in his/her attitude throughout the clinical practicum experience.
    5.  Follow and demonstrate an understanding of facility/departmental policy and procedures.
    6.  Gain practical experience in a variety of HIM functions under the supervision of experienced practitioners.

  
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    HIT 295 - Health Information Seminar


    A capstone course that will review and integrate theory and practice in Health Information.  Guest speakers will present on various topics and issues relevant to the profession.  Career opportunities, resume preparation, interviewing techniques, the job application process, and RHIT exam preparation will be discussed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  HIT 245 Clinical Practicum

     

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Prepare a resume and cover letter identifying its purpose/value in the employment process.
    2.  Apply networking in identifying employment opportunities.
    3.  Conduct oneself appropriately during a job interview.
    4.  Identify the importance of earning the RHIT credential and become familiar with the RHIT exam preparation/application process.
    5.  Obtain valuable information on the various career opportunities for the HIM professional and strategies for success.
    6.  Gain further insight and knowledge in various HIM topics through review of pertinent literature.
    7.  Complete RHIT exam practice questions in HIM content areas, evaluating areas of strenghts and weaknesses.

  
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    HLS 111 - Introduction to Homeland Security


    An overview of homeland security.  Evaluation of the progression of homeland security issues throughout New York and the United States.  An examination of the roles undertaken and methods used by governmental agencies and individuals to respond to those issues.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required for degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the history behind the establishment of homeland security.
    2. Explain the roles and methods that encompass homeland security.
    3. Identify the goals and philosophy within the field of homeland security.
    4. Summarize programs and methods used to meet the homeland security needs of New York and the United States.
    5. Identify the specific roles that individuals and governmental agencies play in homeland security.


  
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    HLS 150 - Emergency Management (WE)


    A study of establishing a process and structure for systematic, coordinated, and effective delivery of emergency assistance to address consequences of major disaster or other emergency occurring in the United States.  This course covers public and private responses, mitigation, and recovery measures carried out by state, federal and local governments.  Topics include types of aid available to individuals and communities, intergovernmental emergency preparedness, planning, training, exercises, and coordination of efforts.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certiticate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the types of emergencies that require multi-agency response and the functions of those agencies in responding to disasters.
    2.  Describe the process used in impact assessment and the planning that goes into preparing for emergencies.
    3.  Identify steps in recovery effort and agencies that provide services to asist in post-disaster relief.
    4.  Develop a model emergency response plan for an individual, a family, a community, and a non-governmental organization.
    5.  Understand the components of an emergency drill.

  
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    HLS 200 - Theory and Practice of Terrorism


    A study of terrorism and why the United States is a terrorist target.  Includes methods of terrorism, domestic and international terrorism, Islam and Radical Islam, terrorist operations, cyber terrorism, narco-terrorism, the mind of the terrorist, and organized crime’s impact on terrorism.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the evolving definition of terrorism.
    2.  Identify terrorist organizations and their respective goals.
    3.  Explain various models for combating terrorism and the roles of various government and private organizations in this effort.
    4.  Discuss the economic and environmental impacts as a result of terrorist attacks.
    5.  Discuss research results on terrorism from the 1980s to present.

  
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    HLS 205 - Bioterrorism & Public Health Emergencies


    An examination of the roles and responsibilities of hospitals, public health agencies, and the emergency medical services system in preparing for, and responding to, natural and human-made disasters, including bioterrorism.  This course explores the objectives and implementation of federal, state, and local health emergency management programs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the difference between public health and medicine.
    2.  Identify legal and ethical issues in emergency medical services and disaster medicine.
    3.  Explain current Federal, State, and local organizations and programs supporting health emergency management.
    4.  Explain the threat posed by Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) weapons.
    5.  Identify response actions for selected Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) weapons.
     

  
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    HLS 207 - Emergency Medical Services Disaster Response


    A study of the roles and responsibilities of emergency medical services systems, with a focus on disaster response.  This course explores the history and development of federal, state, and local emergency medical services programs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the major components of an emergency medical services system.
    2.  Describe the roles and functions of emergency medical services systems.
    3.  Explain current federal, state, and local roles in the oversight and development of emergency medical services systems.
    4.  Identify how emergency medical services systems contribute to disaster response.

  
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    HLS 210 - Special Security Issues


    This course will cover a wide range of topics in Homeland Security related to transportation, border, and maritime security; executive protection; emergency communications; and infrastructure protection.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and recognize critical infrastructures that are potential targets of terrorist attacks.
    2.  Understand the difficulty in assessing and evaluating potential terrorist attacks.
    3.  Describe various homeland security related activities the nation’s organizations (federal, county, state, local, tribal, territorial, and non-government) participate in and the types of assistance they provide.
    4.  Understand the definition of cybersecurity and the roles government agencies have in maintaining cybersecurity and protecting critical infrastructures.
    5.  Discuss transportation safety and security.

  
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    HMS 146 - Introduction to Gerontology


    Interdisciplinary study of the processes of aging.  Focus on changes in the aging lifestyle and how they are transforming the United States and the international community.  Policies, services, and resources that have been impacted by the changing age demographics.

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    SOC 146
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the biological, social, and psychological characteristics of older individuals.
    2.  Examine major national/international policies and understand their relationship to the process of growing older.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the services and resources available to an aging population that is changing in terms of needs.
    4.  Critically reflect on personal issues with regard to aging.

  
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    HMS 147 - Eldercare Seminar and Internship


    Exploration of the physical, psychological, social and recreational needs of older individuals and how well these needs are met in a variety of eldercare settings.  Weekly class seminars coupled with experiential activity.  Four hours per week of service in local eldercare facilites is required.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the process of aging from a variety of developmental perspectives.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the physical, psychological, social and environmental needs of older individuals.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose(s) of the various services provided in eldercare settings.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which the provision of services in eldercare can conflict with the quality of life of older individuals.
    5.  Conceptualize methods for improving both practice and policy in eldercare.

  
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    HMS 240 - Perspectives on Death and Dying


    Individual and cultural perspectives on death and dying.  Includes historical, psychological, socio-cultural, legal and ethical dimensions of the dying process, grief and bereavement, and communities of care.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an appreciation of the historical and sociocultural dimensions of death and dying.
    2.  Describe psychological, emotional, and physical elements of the dying process for individuals and caregivers.
    3.  Analyze concepts and theories related to end-of-life care including mourning and grief.
    4.  Apply legal and ethical principles to the analysis of complex issues in end-of-life care.
    5.  Explore multidiscriplinary communities of care for dying persons and their families.
    6.  Evaluate appropriate resources for consumer decision-making regarding end-of-life care.

  
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    HMS 250 - Human Service Organizations


    Overview of agencies whose mission is to assist people with needs that develop in their lives.  Emphasis is on human service organizations and the way these organizations function, their role in society, and the services they provide.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the variety of services provided by human services organizations.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the challenges, demands, expectations, and opportunities that human service organizations face.
    3.  Appreciate the role of human service organizations and their importance to the social, economic, political, and cultural fabric of our society.
    4.  Appreciate human service administration and practice and the factors associated with organizations becoming effective and efficient.
    5.  Become better prepared to enter the human services as practitioner and professional.

  
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    HMS 260 - Special Topics on Aging


    In-depth study of current and/or topical issues related to the field of gerontology and working with the elderly.  Possible topics include person-centered care, multigenerational living arrangements, aging policy, the ethic of care and the decline of aging seniors and the baby-boomer generation.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    To be determined upon selection of course topics (which vary from semester to semester).

  
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    HMS 290 - Human Service Field Experience


    A field placement in a health, human service or education setting, under the supervision of faculty and agency personnel.  Weekly seminar to develop helping and relationship-building skills.  Minimum of 10-hours of field work per week is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ENG 110 College Writing I, HMS 250 Human Service Organizations, PSY 110 General Psychology, SOC Introduction to Sociology

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 10 Field Experience Hours
    Note
    For Human Services students only.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

     

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Correlate knowledge of Human Services theories.
    2.  Demonstrate the ability to apply Human Service theories to actual practice environments.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of how the Human Service network of organizations functions to assess and meet client needs.
    4.  Apply skills to maintain personal well-being while in a setting that may lead to professional fatigue.
    5.  Critically reflect on Human Service values and professional ethics.

  
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    HOS 101 - Introductions for the Hospitality Freshman


    * This is a blended course.

    An introduction to college life and the hospitality industry for the beginning student in the Hospitality Department.  Familiarity with characteristics of the hospitality and tourism industry as well as hospitality industry sustainability and corporate responsibility are stressed.  Study of current trends and issues using a daily or weekly hospitality publication and Introduction to the Hospitality Industry text.  College and departmental policies and procedures, academic advisement and registration, study skills, transfer and employment, career navigaton and mapping; work ethic; college and departmental resources.  Required course for all first semester hospitality students.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be familiar with college and Departmental services and opportunities.
    2.  Be aware of relevant college policies and procedures.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of departmental policies, procedures, and programs.
    4.  Be provided with a means to bond to the institution and increase their success and retention.
    5.  Discuss the interrelationship between the different areas of hospitality study, and tie together what is learned in other freshman business classes.
    6.  Explain academic, transfer and career planning.
    7.  Prepare for the process of pre-registration.
    8.  Be enabled to perform effective career navigation and mapping for future employment in the hospitality industry.
    9.  Have developed proficiency in the attainment of a positive and productive work ethic.

  
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    HOS 115 - Hospitality Marketing & Promotions


    Development of marketing and promotion systems for lodging properties, restaurants, bars, casinos, events, wedding planners, caterers, conventions, trade-shows, expositions, meeting planners, microbreweries and cruise ships.  Hospitality case-study and marketing project analysis will be a key aspect of the course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Familiarize with the principles of hospitality marketing management.
    2.  Explain the process of formulating and enacting a marketing and promotions strategy for a variety of hospitality operations.
    3.  Evaluate customer relationship management (CRM) systems for hospitality operations.
    4.  Understand the interrelationship of marketing and promotions with guest service quality, guest satisfaction and guest loyalty.
    5.  Conduct hospitality marketing environmental scans.
    6.  Manage capabilities of marketing and promotions of ‘green’ and sustainable hospitality operation programs.
    7.  Familiarize International hospitality marketing in a global environment.
    8.  Engage in hospitality destination marketing.

  
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    HOS 127 - Hospitality Purchasing


    In depth instruction on general hospitality purchasing techniques.  This course covers product information as well as management of the purchasing function, and how this relates to a successful operation.  The selection and procurement functions within the hospitality industry are also covered.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand and apply the concepts of selection and procurement.
    2.  Utilize and employ technology applications in purchasing.
    3.  Understand distribution systems.
    4.  Comprehend forces affecting the distribution system.
    5.  Explain an overview of the purchasing function.
    6.  Work within the organization and administration of purchasing.
    7.  Understand the buyer’s relations with other company personnel.
    8.  Using the purchase specification, be able to determine:

    • the optimal amount
    • the optimal price
    • the optimal payment policy
    • the optimal supplier

    9.  Understand and employ typical ordering, receiving and storage management procedures.
    10.  Understand and manage security in the purchasing function.
    11.  Recognize, grade and purchase:

    • fresh produce
    • processed produce and other grocery items
    • dairy products
    • eggs
    • poultry
    • fish
    • meat
    • beverages
    • nonfood expense items
    • services
    • furniture, fixtures, and equipment


  
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    HOS 186 - Food in History and Society


    This course will explore the history of food as a means of introducing students to basic concepts in food studies.  Through historical examples, general themes will be developed, including the historical evolution of food systems, the development of regional and national cuisines, the relation of food to society and culture (including religion, ethnicity, and gender), and the globalization of foods and cuisines.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    SOS 186
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify some of the basic concepts in food studies.
    2.  Describe the fundamental features of the foraging, agricultural, and industrial food systems.
    3.  Analyze historical examples which illustrate the relation of food to society and culture.
    4.  Describe the historical development of some regional and national cuisines.
    5.  Identify some of the main issues in the globalization of foods and cuisines.

  
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    HOS 242 - Hospitality Human Resources


    This course provides a contextual background of human resources in the hospitality industry.  Effective resourcing of the hospitality industry, development of hospitality human resources, rewards and renumeration, hospitality employment relationships, and discussions of contemporary issues in human resource management in the hospitality industry are presented.  Human resource management in multi-site hospitality operations are introduced.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Discuss and understand the background into the hospitality industry’s workforce.
    2. Develop effective job designs, recruitment, selection, appointments and induction for the various hospitality industry resourcing demands.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of performance and management development specific to the hospitality industry.
    4. Critique and describe the special human resource demands for: Responsible Alcohol.
    5. Discuss and reflect upon labor turnover and workforce stability in various hospitality enterprises.
    6. Explore hospitality human resource planning and information systems.
    7. Calculate productivity and labor costs for the hospitality industry.
    8. Explore and articulate selected hospitality human resource management issues in the international context.


  
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    HST 100 - Seminar in Health Sciences


    This course will present an overview of the health science professions including, but not limited to, those offered at Broome Community College.  The focus will be on both in-depth exploration of individual health careers and on how these professions collaborate and interrelate.  An introduction to professional behavior and cultural diversity will be included.  The class will also help students to develop learning strategies to enhance academic success and acquire a working knowledge of campus services.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify one’s own learning style and employ strategies that can facilitate academic success.
    2.  Identify the various student resources found on campus that are available to help each student achieve educational goals.
    3.  Identify one’s own plan for academic success at BCC and be familiar with the various academic policies in place that affect each student.
    4.  Be familiar with the guidelines of HIPAA, and understand who it affects, as well as how to abide by the legislative guidelines of this policy.
    5.  Be familiar with the principles of ethical and professional behavior that is required of a healthcare professional.
    6.  Explain the importance of cultural awareness as it relates to healthcare.
    7.  Explain the importance of becoming an effective communicator in the role of a healthcare professional.

  
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    HST 104 - Health for Haiti


    Students will explore the dynamics between poverty and healthcare, address specific health-related needs of Haitian people, and learn historical, cultural, economic, political and spiritual aspects of Haiti.  Students will engage in service projects at orphanages, hospitals, health clinics and food distribution centers in Haiti.  Specific service projects will be designed based on the pre-existing skills of the students and the most pressing community needs as identified by our partners in Haiti.  The course will foster fellowship and cultural humility, provide humanitarian assistance to the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, and prepare students to participate in a dynamic, global world.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BIO 104
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate increased understanding of personal social values.
    2.  Demonstrate enhanced civic responsibility that can be applied on a local and global level.
    3.  Demonstrate enhanced reflective writing skills.
    4.  Have acquired practical experience in applying health or general science skills including:

    • Interaction with Haitian children in hospitalized and orphanage settings
    • Packaging and distribution of food
    • Assist at health clinics
    • Provide personal hygiene instructions
    • Provide water purification instructions
    • Assist in sustainability efforts in farming and animal husbandry
    • Provide social interactions with orphans during recreational outings

     

  
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    HST 109 - Personal Success Strategies


    This course is designed to enhance the college learning experience and prepare students to be more successful, academically, personally, and professionally.  The course introduces principles and strategies to help students to remove personal barriers to success and to implement behavioral changes to be more successful in academic settings, including internships and clinicals.  The course also focuses on developing the soft skills needed to reach personal potential.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe how conscious control of thought processes impacts habits, attitudes, beliefs, and expectations.
    2.  Explain how habits, attitudes, beliefs, and expectations impact personal performance.
    3.  Establish achievable personal goals based on individual roles and responsibilities.
    4.  Identify and list personal barriers to success.
    5.  List possible strategies for overcoming barriers to personal success.
    6.  Apply the affirmation process toward achieving established goals.
    7.  Evaluate the effectiveness of the process in achieving established goals.

  
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    HST 110 - Personal Care Aide


    Our Personal Care Aide training course prepares students to provide personal care services to individuals within the comfort of their home while fostering their independence.  This curriculum follows the Home Care Curriculum requirements set forth by the NYS Department of Health.  Upon successful completion of this program, students will be a New York State Certified Personal Care Aide and qualify for employment providing personal care within the homecare setting.  Student will be eligible to enroll in the Home Health Aide training course upon successful completion of this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to qualify as a New York State Certified Personal Care Aide.
    2. State what home care is, the type of clients who receive home care, roles of the home healthcare team, and expectations of the home health worker.
    3. Apply an understanding of basic human needs according to Maslow’s theory to meet the changing needs of clients across the life span.
    4. Communicate effectively with clients, families, and members of the home healthcare team, while demonstrating ability to respect individual and cultural differences and maintain confidentiality.
    5. Explain tasks related to personal care and nutrition, housekeeping, budgeting, and medication administration assistance.
    6. Perform tasks correctly related to personal care and nutrition provision, housekeeping, budgeting, and medication administration assistance, while staying within scope of practice as a Personal Care Aide.
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to maintain safety, prevent personal and other injury, and provide basic first aid.
    8. State the process of infection and demonstrate ability to follow infection control precautions, as set forth by the CDC.


  
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    HST 111 - Home Health Aide


    Our Home Health Aide training course prepares students to assist clients with health-related tasks, such as performing simple measurements and tasks, or assisting with the preparation of special diets, prescribed exercise programs, or with the use of prescribed medical equipment.  This curriculum follows the requirements set forth by the NYS Department of Health for Home Health Aide Training Programs.  Upon succesful completion of this program, students will be a New York State Certified Home Health Aide and qualify for employment in the home health field.  In addition, this course will also include American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Providers CPR training.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HST 110 Personal Care Aide or Proof of Certification as a Personal Care Aide in the state of NY

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    1.72 Class Hours, 0.64 Laboratory Hours, 0.64 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill requirements to obtain Home Health Aide certification in the State of New York.
    2. Demonstrate ability to integrate respect for an individual’s dignity, self-worth, and sensitivity to cultural differences, while performing patient care.
    3. Follow prescribed care plans for patients as ordered and within the scope of practice for a Home Health Aide.
    4. Explain tasks related to performing simple measurements, collecting specimens, assisting with preparation of ordered diets, use of assistive devices/medical equipment/supplies, and skin/ostomy/urinary collection device care.
    5. Perform tasks correctly related to performing simple measurements, collecting specimens, assisting with preparation of ordered diets, use of assistive devices/medical equipment/supplies, and skin/ostomy/urinary collection device care.
    6. Demonstrate proper technique for 1 and 2 rescuer CPR for infants, children, and adults, including use of an AED.


  
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    HST 115 - Sanitation and Safety


    A course in the fundamentals of restaurant and hotel organization and sanitation.  In this certification course the student will learn the control points in food service, the importance of sanitation, and safety procedures.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BHM 110
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify factors that affect growth of foodborne bacteria.   
    2. Analyze evidence to determine the presence of foodborne illness outbreaks.
    3. Identify personal behaviors that can contaminate food.
    4. Identify methods for preventing cross-contamination.
    5. Describe the flow of food through an organization.  
    6. Describe and understand the steps to a HAACP plan. 
    7. Recognize the importance of proper cleaning and sanitizing in lodging and foodservice establishments.
    8. Demonstrate their level of understanding of Basic First Aid/CPR/AED by successfully earning American Heart Association certification.
    9. Demonstrate their level of understanding of all course materials by successful completion of the ServSafe ® examination.


  
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    HST 161 - Women’s Health


    The Women’s Health course is three-credit course which will introduce students to the developmental, physical, psychological, and cultural issues related to female gender health care issues.  Selected course activities promote critical thinking so students learn to analyze and evaluate information and in orer to create positive health environments.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and evaluate female physical health needs.
    2.  Identify and evaluate female psychological health needs.
    3.  Identify and evaluate health care resources for women.
    4.  Identify and evaluate cultural aspects of women’s health.

    Students will be able to evaluate the information and social factors that influence personal health.  They will be able to discriminate the socioeconomic, cultural and political influences on women’s health.

  
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    HST 162 - Personal and Community Health


    An examination of health issues and problems related to individuals and communities.  Included is an exploration of wellness/health promotion; factors which impact health such as culture, heritage and socioeconomic level; chronic and communicable disease, including HIV/AIDS; nutrition, weight management and fitness, safety education, including such areas as fire and arson prevention, child abduction, abusive or dangerous environments and violence prevention/intervention; aging and death; relationships, sexuality, reproduction and birth control; stress management; health care delivery; and alcohol, tobacco and other drug prevention/intervention.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    PED 162
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and analyze selected health issues such as nutrition, fitness, mental and emotional health, and wellness and health promotion.
    2.  Identify and evaluate all levels of fitness.
    3.  Identify and evaluate favorable and unfavorable ecological variables that effect health and longevity, such as culture and heritage, socio-economic status, and environmental and personal factors.
    4.  Identify reliable sources of health information and evaluate health information, products, and services.


  
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    HST 205 - Rural Health Externship


    HST 205 is an externship experience that will provide students with the opportunity to explore the unique rewards and challenges of providing rural healthcare through an immersion experience in a rural community setting.  Students will shadow a variety of professionals in a rural health care setting and immerse themselves in the local culture by taking part in arranged community events and experiences.  The course is designed so the students will gain a better understanding of the public health issues, recreational issues, educational resources, social influences, and other elements that impact rural healthcare.
     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Teacher Recommendation

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    4 hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and evaluate challenges that rural communities face in access to high quality healthcare.
    2.  Identify and describe the top five health issues in the target community.
    3.  Compare and contrast the healthcare needs in the target rural community with urban or suburban settings.
    4.  Describe the role of regulatory agencies and regulations that impact healthcare access in the rural community.
    5.  List the health professionals, services, agencies, and facilities that comprise the continuum of health and related care and services available in the target community.
    6.  List reliable sources of healthcare in the target community and sources for referred healthcare.
    7.  List the barriers patients in rural communities may experience to obtaining healthcare, and services or options to overcome those barriers.
    8.  Describe the active relationship between rural healthcare facilities and surrounding community.
    9.  Develop and deliver a presentation on the concepts and information obtained from the course.

     

  
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    HST 210 - Pharmacology


    An introduction to the clinical concepts of pharmacology and the review of the classes of pharmaceutical medications, including terminology, drug category, use, side effects, contraindications, and interactions.  Emphasis on the actions and use of various groups of pharmacologic agents according to major drug classifications and body systems.  Includes a review of prescriptions and prescription-writing, basic principles of pharmaceutical mathematics, the generic pharmaceutical relationship, common dosage ranges, and routes of administration.  A practical course relevant to a variety of health science curricula.
     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 131 Human Biology I or consent of instructor
     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completionof this course the student will be able to:

    Module 1

    1.  Identify common drug terminology
    2.  Identify drug classifications, schedules, and categories.
    3.  Describe the FDA and DEA standards & regulations.
    4.  Identify differences between a generic and trade name.
    5.  Identify how to use resources to find drug information.

    Module 2

    1.  Define/identify basic units of measurement in metric, apothecary and household systems.
    2.  Identify the information included on a written prescription.
    3.  Describe the routes used for drug administration.
    4.  Identify the Six Rights of safe drug administration.
    5.  Demonstrate/apply knowledge of mathematical computations to solve equations related to medication dosages.
    6.  Identify abbreviations and symbols used in calculating medication dosages.

    Module 3

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the autonomic nervous system.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat disorders related to mood, seizure, pain, and degenerative disorders.
    3.  Identify drugs used for anesthesia.

    Module 4

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the cardiovascular system.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat disorders related to the cardiovascular system.

    Module 5

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the urinary system.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat disorders of the urinary system.

    Module 6

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the immune system.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat disorders related to infections.

    Module 7

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the respiratory system.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat disorders related to respiration.

    Module 8

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the gastrointestinal system.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat disorders related to digestion.

    Module 9

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the reproductive sysem.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat reproductive disorders.

    Module 10

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the respiratory system.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat disorders related to respiration.

    Module 11

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the bones and joints.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat bone and joint disorders.

    Module 12

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the skin.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat skin disorders.

    Module 13

    1.  Describe how drugs affect the eyes and ears.
    2.  Identify drugs used to treat eye and ear disorders.

     

  
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    HUM 101 - Western Humanities I


    Critical analysis of western culture through a thematic investigation of literature, philosophy, music, and the arts as found in the ancient Near East, classical Greece and Rome, and Medieval Europe.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe and apply some of the fundamental principles in understanding the arts and humanities.
    2.  Identify some of the major periods in the history of Western humanities, from the Ancient world to the Renaissance.
    3.  Identify some of the major stylistic conventions in the arts and humanities of each historical period.
    4.  Identify some of the influences of the arts and humanities from those periods on the contemporary world.

  
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    HUM 102 - Western Humanities II


    Critical analysis of Western culture through a thematic investigation of literature, philosophy, music, and the arts as found in the Renaissance, Early Modern Europe, and 19th to 20th Century Europe.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe and apply some of the fundamental principles in understanding the arts and humanities.
    2.  Identify some of the major perods in the history of Western humanities, from the Renaissance to the present day.
    3.  Identify some of the major stylistic conventions in the arts and humanities of each historical period.
    4.  Identify some of the influences of the arts and humanities from those periods on the contemporary world.

  
  •  

    HUM 103 - The Shock of the New: 20th Century Culture


    A course on the humanities in the twentieth century.  The nineteenth-century background.  Developments in modern thought.  Modernism in music, the visual arts, and literature, 1880-1940.  Major cultural movements (expressionism, surrealism, etc.).  High modernism, 1940-1975.  New directions in culture (international style, theater of the absurd, etc.).  Late twentieth century developments, 1975-2000.  Recent trends in art, music, and literature (magic realism, the new classicism, etc.).

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify some of the major interpretations of the nature of modernism and postmodernism in the arts and humanities of the twentieth century.
    2.  Describe some of the major movements in the arts humanities from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth century.
    3.  Describe some of the major politcal, social, economic, and institutional influences on the arts and humanities in the twentieth century.
    4.  Identify some of the influences of twentieth century arts and humanities on the contemporary.

  
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    HUM 104 - Introduction to Classical Mythology


    This course is designed to introduce the basic substance of the stories which constitute classical Greek mythololgy.  The course is also meant to provide experience in reading and understanding those stories in their original context - so far as that can be determined - in order to discern how they have continued to influence Western art and culture to express the values of that art and culture.  Key traditional interpretative methods will be examined and applied to the Greek myths.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe some of the major interpretations of mythology in human culture.
    2.  Discuss some of the chief characteristics of Greek mythology.
    3.  Identify the major categories of Greek mythology.
    4.  Summarize some of the major myths and legends of ancient Greece.
    5.  Discuss the influence of Greek mythology in ancient Rome and on later works of art, music, literature, and film.

  
  •  

    HUM 135 - Jazz in US History and Culture


    This is a course on the evolution of jazz in the context of American history.  The course explores how events and trends in American history have created and influenced the development of jazz and its evolution within American culture.  The development of jazz from its African roots, through the creation of African American musical forms in the nineteenth century, to the present day will be examined.  Various styles and personalities in jazz history will be studied.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    HIS 135
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify some of the fundamental principles in the study of jazz history.
    2.  Describe some of the relationships between events and trends in American history and the evolution of jazz.
    3.  Identify and describe the roots of jazz in African and nineteenth-century African American musical traditions in relation to colonial and nineteenth-century history.
    4.  Distinguish between different jazz styles and identify important individual personalities in jazz history.
    5.  Evaluate the relationship of jazz to twentieth-century American history.
    6.  Creatively discuss the place of jazz in contemporary American culture.

  
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    INT 110 - Interior Design Studio I


    This studio course requires the student to become well acquainted with the designed physical environment.  Practical, aesthetic, and psychological aspects of the built environment are addressed.  Conceptualizing space through use of orthographic rendering to scale is stressed.  Visual presentation techniques are introduced.  The design vocabulary is applied to interior spaces.  The design projects emphasize affordable residential solutions and sustainable design.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART 105 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design, CIV 159 Architectural Drafting w/CAD, or CIV 119 Architectural Drawing w/CAD

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 4 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the fundamental language of design to the process of building interior space within a specific environmental context.
    2.  Identify and utilize the basic steps of creating successful design including initial research, design development, and presentation to client.
    3.  Analyze and balance practical versus aesthetic elements enabling students to obtain clarity, creating an optimal interior for specialized use.
    4.  Demonstrate an intuitive sense towards design solutions, meaning learning to see the end result of their efforts in their minds, before actual execution.
    5.  Discuss and explain design ideas in a clear and coherent manner to peers and professionals.

  
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    INT 120 - Surface Materials for the Interior


    Appropriate use of fabrics, wood, laminates, tiles, vinyls, metals and glass is introduced.  Durability, cleanability, and flammability of materials will be studied emphasizing substainable and green design.  Aesthetic considerations will be explored.  Field trips are an integral part of this course.  Excellent for students interested in the building or hospitality industry.  This course is recommended for students pursuing a career in Interior Design.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Continue research for new design products that are appropriate for residential and commercial applications.
    2.  Understand functional and aesthetic qualities of interior design products useful for a variety of applications.
    3.  Develop an intuitive and analytical approach to choosing interior products that will function and visually work together.  Always consider the relationships between focal point, line, shape/form, color, texture and pattern, and quality of natural and aritficial light.

  
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    INT 210 - Interior Design Studio II


    Two complex interior projects are assigned.  At least one of the projects makes use of an existing space.  Students develop and present the projects through the process of conceptualizing space, drawing schematics and perspectives, rendering in scale, and creating material boards.  AutoCAD in combination with hand drawing will be used.  A full client presentation is made for each project using graphics, oral, and writing skills.  The assigned projects are excellent for inclusion in portfolio for transfer or job application.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART 105 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design; CIV 105 Introductory to AutoCAD; CIV 159 Architectural Drafting I w/CAD or CIV 119 Architectural Drawing w/CAD; ART 111 History of Decorative Arts: 1600-present or ART 113 History of Modern Design; INT 120 Surface Materials for the Interior or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 4 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop a sense of responsibility towards the satisfaction of their client and the integrity of their own design work.
    2.  Understand the importance of time management and meeting deadlines under less than optimal conditions.
    3.  Strengthen their communication skills and learn to work with clients and other professionals enabling them to recognize the importance of team effort.
    4.  Solve design problems transforming design theory into practical application.
    5.  Develop a sensitive and critical eye strengthening their ability to suggest appropriate and inappropriate design solutions to clients therefore improving the human environment.
    6.  Understand how to achieve a high level of self-sufficiency in the profession of Interior Design through self-motivation, self-discipline, organizational and research skills, negotiating skills, and decision-making skills.
    7.  Produce tangible products in the form of presentation documents.

  
  •  

    INT 215 - Special Event Interior Design


    This course addresses major trends and successful business practices in Special Event Management and Interior Design to provide the knowledge and tools to improve your effectiveness and profitability as a special event designer/manager/owner/operator.  Students will learn special event design materials and tool usage, special event centerpiece design and construction with a special focus on weddings, trade show booth displays and construction, table settings and material selection and related special even Décor props design and construction.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    EVE 215
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Students are to be taught the special event business and more specifically the interior designs that go along with that business that make it special.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create and manage a successful special events enterprise.
    2.  Build special event clientele.
    3.  Effectively select special event venues.
    4.  Financially manage a profitable special event.
    5.  Identify and prioritize special event goals and objectives.
    6.  Identify potential challenges to creating a successful special event cabinet.
    7.  Choose materials for, design and construct table centerpieces; special focus on weddings.
    8.  Employ effective color coordination.
    9.  Design and create islands of Décor.
    10.  Create professional floral arrangements for special events.
    11.  Employ and devise creative special event concepts.
    12.  Research special event interior design ideas and experiences.

  
  •  

    INT 220 - Principles of Floral Design


    This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the hands-on skills and theory required for career success in event function and commercial/residential floral design.  Students will understand the elements, principles, forms, styles and techniques of floral design.  Students will learn to identify flowers and interior foliage plants, create specialty floral items and develop knowledge of sound business management practices and careers in the floral industry.  Students will learn floral marketing, pricing and sales.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    EVE 220
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Gain familiarity with basic floral supplies and equipment.
    2.  Practice the proper care and handling of fresh flowers.
    3.  Understand and utilize the basic elements and principles of design.
    4.  Create professional centerpiece arrangements with permanent flowers.
    5.  Be exposed to and create asymmetrical arrangements.
    6.  Have a working knowledge of the major foliage available to floral designers.
    7.  Obtain the skill-set to work with and without floral foam.
    8.  Develop expertise in the creation of a comosite flower - Glamellia.
    9.  Obtain proficiency at creating a round bridal bouquet; a cascade bridal bouquet; corsages and boutonnieres.
    10.  Develop a familiarity with comtemporary design techniques.
    11.  Obtain the ability to select and recommend appropritate flowers for an arrangement.
    12.  Experience and perform floral creations that maximize visual value.
    13.  Develop pricing, marketing and selling plans for the sale of floral arrangements.

  
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    INT 299 - Independent Study: Interior Design


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of art.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Credits: (1-4)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning Outcomes are specified on an individual basis.

  
  •  

    ITA 101 - Beginning Italian I


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate basic proficiency in the understanding and use of Italian in formal and informal situations, through speaking, listening and writing.
    2.  Understand basic grammatical construction principles of the Italian language.
    3.  Respond orally to questions in the target language at the beginner level.
    4.  Acquire appropriate reading strategies (such as phonics, structural analysis, context clues) to read and comprehend selected materials.
    5.  Write familiar material in Italian including sentences, phrases and basic paragraphs with ease.
    6.  Demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the culture(s) associated with the Italian language.

  
  •  

    ITA 102 - Beginning Italian II


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ITA 101 Beginning Italian I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop an understanding of high-beginning Italian grammar that cover forms, meanings and functions, and use them appropriately in oral and written communication.
    2.  Develop high-beginning oral skills in pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking, and oral presentations.
    3.  Develop their active vocabulary of high-frequency words, collocations, and idiomatic expressions that are commonly used in the Italian-speaking world.
    4.  Develop reading comprehension skills at the high-beginning through a variety of authentic genres, including academic discourse, newspaper and magazine articles, fiction, poetry, and essays.
    5.  Develop high-beginning writing skills through various writing assignments such as comprehension questions, paragraphs, essays, journals, and letters.
    6.  Develop an understanding of Italian-speaking cultures and societies as well as that of their own.

  
  •  

    LAW 110 - Survey of Paralegalism


    Role of the paralegal and attorney.  Introduction to jurisprudence and functions of administrative agencies. Local, state, federal courts.  Introduction to contracts, torts, negligence, criminal procedure, real property law, law office management.  Legal terminology.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize the jurisdictional structure of the New York State court system.
    2.  Recognize the jurisdictional structure of the local court system.
    3.  Recognize the original and appellate distinctions of the judicial system.
    4.  Prepare legal documents pursuant to NYS statutory law.
    5.  Apply the rules learned to the preparation of legal documents.

  
  •  

    LAW 200 - Real Property Law


    Comprehensive survey of law of real property, emphasizing, practical application to a paralegal function.  Analysis of form of deeds, bonds, notes,mortgages, assignments, discharges, purchase of contracts, leases and options.  Training in searching title, basic understanding of abstracts of title, real property litigation, estates, condemnation and foreclosure.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the legal terminology regarding the ownership, acquisition and conveyance of Real Estate.
    2.  Articulate an understanding regarding the distinction between Personal and Real Property.
    3.  Understand the Law of Fixtures by identifying various legal texts used in fixture law.
    4.  Understand the process of transferring title to Real Estate; including the use of deeds, mortgages, promissory notes, real estate contracts, and closing statements and prepare such statements.
    5.  Close the Real Estate transaction.
    6.  Articulate the difference between a buyer representation and a seller representation.
    7.  Understand the role of the County Clerk Records in the Real Estate Transaction by recording various documents.

  
  •  

    LAW 207 W - Legal Writing and Research


    Development of legal research and drafting skills through use of digests, reporter systems, and other features of law libraries.  Analysis of various types of legal documents for clarity, composition, conciseness.  Practice in research and drafting of legal documents.  Writing Emphasis Course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism and ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of legal research by preparing an assignment using the Westlaw database and preparing a legal brief.
    2.  Demonstrate an ability to identify and argue legal issues by responding to a classroom legal fact pattern in written and oral format.
    3.  Illustrate an understanding in drafting legal documents by preparing legal briefs, courtroom briefs and legal position papers.

  
  •  

    LAW 215 - Estates, Probates and Trusts


    Disposition of descendent’s property, law of interstate succession, execution and probate of wills, nature and creation of trusts and the administration of estates and trusts, estate and gift tax preparation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Articulate the mechanics of the disposition of testate property by analyzing a will and having a client meeting which discusses the disposition.
    2.  Illustrate the substantive rules of will preparation by preparing a will.
    3.  Illustrate an understanding of intestate distribution by distributing the proceeds and preparing a written document which outlines the correct distribution.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the probate process by filing a probate petition.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of the creation and administration of a trust by creating a trust.
    6.  Illustrate an understanding of the tax laws, both Federal and New York, which affect the estate by preparing an estate for file.

  
  •  

    LAW 220 - Contracts


    The law of contracts, their historical significance, formation, validity interpretation, transfer or contractual rights.  Assignment, third party beneficiaries, discharge, breach and remedies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of contract information.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of contractual rights.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of contract Breach and legal remedies available.

     

  
  •  

    LAW 222 - Medical Law


    General coverage of how legal and medical issues are inter-related, including right to treatment, organ transplant, right to die, abortion issues, medical malpractice, informed consent, insanity defense, surrogate mothers.  Lecture and discussion. How these topics affect the role of the attorney and paralegal in servicing client needs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of Medical Law statutory periods.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of Discovery statues.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the issues surrounding the insanity defense.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the commencement and discovery procedure regarding a Medical Law litigation suite. 


 

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