Nov 21, 2018  
Website Catalog 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    BUS 141 - Marketing


    Introductory study of Marketing as an art and a science.  Analysis of the basic principles and practices necessary to complete the marketing cycle effectively.  Marketing of goods and services, from conception of the original product idea to delivery to the ultimate consumer.  Marketing mix, marketing concept, environmental and societal constraints.  Lecture, discussion, cases.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the environment of marketing and its role in business and society.
    2.  Integrate global awareness and use of technology in customer relationships.
    3.  Make marketing mix strategic decisions regarding product, distribution (place), promotion, and price.
    4.  Compare and contrast final consumer behavior with organizational consumer decisions.
    5.  Demonstrate mastery of material, including product life cycle, new product plannning process, information collection and analysis, marketing concept, relationship marketing, strategic planning, etc.
    6.  Incorporate social services, accounting, and statistics in solving marketing problems and making strategic decisions.
    7.  Identify new developments that illustrate the dynamic nature of the field.

  
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    BUS 142 - Marketing for the Non-Profit Organizations


    Introductory study of marketing for organizations that operate in the pubic interest without a profit motive.  Analysis of the differences and similarities of profitoriented and non-profit marketing.  Emphasis of the exchange process, marketing concept, and environmental and societal constraints.  This course is designed to assist non-profit organizations or individuals in applying the appropriate marketing concepts and strategies to generate adequate financial and public support.  Lecture, cases, and discussions.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Differentiate the differences between profit and not-for-profit marketing concepts.
    2.  Utilize the strategic marketing planning process of the marketing concept.
    3.  Employ concepts of consumer behavior as it relates to non-profits.
    4.  Demonstrate understanding of consumer behavior through classroom discussions and assignments.
    5.  Define with the concept of organizational positioning in order to maximize the organizations exposure to potential users.
    6.  Utilize a marketing approach to fund raising and acquiring volunteers.
    7.  Create a marketing plan and budget.
    8.  Formulate marketing communication strategies.
    9.  Define and practice methods of managing public media and public advocacy.

  
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    BUS 145 - Introduction to Supply Chain Management


    An entry level course that explains what supply chain management is and why it is critically important to an organization's success.  Supply chain management includes all of the activities that corporations must coordinate to get the right products and services to their customers in the quantities that they require and when they need them to be delivered.  Topics that are covered are purchasing operations, purchasing policies and procedures, supply management integration, category management strategies, supplier evaluation and selection, supplier quality management, supplier development, worldwide sourcing, strategic cost management, supply chain analysis tools/techniques, strategic cost management, negotiations, contract management, purchasing laws and ethics.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the purchasing process (how it works) and of purchasing policies.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of how supply chain management helps corporations gain a competitive advantage.
    3. Select, explain and justify appropriate supplier selection decisions and the subsequent development, management and the ongoing evaluation of a company's suppliers.
    4. Demonstrate orally and in writing an understanding of tactical, operational and strategic supply chain responsibilities.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of cost management concepts.
    6. Articulate the importance of documentation such as request for quotes, specifications, contracts and negotiation techniques.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of purchasing law and some provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code, antitrust laws and legislation affecting global sourcing decisions.
    8. Articulate an understanding of the importance of acting in an ethical manner in purchasing and supply chain operations.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding that corporations are being held accountable today for their supply management actions as they impact sustainability and social responsibility initiatives across the globe.
    10. Better understand the business/career opportunities available in supply chain operations.


  
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    BUS 152 - Selling Fundamentals


    Principles of sales with practical application.  Steps leading to a successful sale - prospecting, planning and delivering, dramatizing, handling objections, closing, building good will.  Development and presentation of a complete procedure for a product or service.  Closed-circuit television used to critique sales presentations.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the Salesperson's responsibilities and qualifications.
    2.  Be capable of analyzing the elements of consumer motivation.
    3.  Demonstrate methods of prospecting and explain why prosperity is important.
    4.  Plan and deliver effective sales presentations.
    5.  Explain methods used to dramatize a sales presentation.
    6.  Demonstrate effective methods of handling customer objections and closing the sale.

  
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    BUS 156 - Real Estate for Salesperson


    Designed to meet current New York State requirements for licensure as a real estate salesperson.  Land use regulation, law of contracts, real estate instruments, real estate mathematics, brokerage and the law of agency, valuation and listing procedures, license law and ethics, human rights and fair housing, appraisal techniques, real property taxation and assessment.

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    5 class hours
    Course Profile
    Course Outcomes:

    After successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1.  Develop and administer an ability to transfer the ownership of a real estate interest.
    2.  Prepare a real estate deed.
    3.  Prepare a mortgage, and note.
    4.  Evidence an understanding of various restrictions on title by preparing language and inserting the language on an appropriate deed of title.
    5.  Prepare and analyze a real estate contract.
    6.  Prepare the real estate closing statement and administer the closing statement at the real estate closing.  These funcitons require an ability to be a critical thinker and effective communicator.
    7.  Have mathematical efficiency in calculating the closing mathematics as required by banking and federal/state requirements which govern the closing function.

  
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    BUS 164 - Real Estate for Brokers


    Designed to meet New York state requirements for licensure as a real estate broker.  Land use regulation, operation of a real estate broker's office, general business law construction, subdivision and development, leases and agreements, liens and easements, taxes and assessments, investment property, property management, condominiums and cooperatives, appraisal, advertising, rent regulations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 156 Real Estate for Salesperson

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for the Course:

    • The student will have a working knowledge of the laws, regulations, and practices of real estate brokerage as carried on in the State of New York. 
    • The student will have a competency in the princi­ples of a real estate brokerage office operations, general business law, subdivision and development, leases, liens and easements, investment property, property management and appraisal and advertising. 


  
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    BUS 170 - Insurance for Agents and Brokers


    Comprehensive survey of insurance.  Fire, marine, automobile, owner liability, burglary, boiler, machinery, accident and health, fidelity and surety insurance, insurance law and duties of the agent.  Designed to meet prelicensing requirements for the N.Y.S. Property and casualty insurance license.  Course offered based on student demand and may not be offered every semester.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    1 Class Hours; 6 Laboratory Hours
    Textbook Information
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following topics/categories by achieving a passing score of 70% on the NYS comprehensive exam:

    1.  Insurance Regulation:  Licensing, state regulation, federal regulation.
    2.  General Insurance:  Concepts, insurers, agents and general rules of agency, contracts.
    3.  Property and Casualty Insurance Basics:  Principles and concepts, policy structure, common policy provisions, Terrorism Risk Insurance Act of 2002 and the Extension Act of 2007.
    4.  Dwelling Policy:  Purpose and eligibility, coverage forms-perils insured against, property coverages, general excursions, conditions, selected endorsements, personal liability supplements.
    5.  Homeowner's Policy:  Purpose and eligibility, coverage forms, definitions, property coverages, liability coverages, perils insured against, exclusions, conditions, selected endorsements.
    6.  Auto Insurance:  Laws, personal automobile policy, commercial auto.
    7.  Commercial Package Policy:  Components of a commercial policy, commercial general liability, commercial property, commercial crime, commercial inland marine, equipment breakdown protection coverage form, farm coverage.
    8.  Business Owners Policy:  Purpose and eligibility, business owner's property coverage forms, business liability coverage form, business common policy conditions form, selected endorsements.
    9.  Workers Compensation Insurance:  Workers compensation laws, workers compensation and employer's liability insurance policy, volunteer firefighters/ambulance endorsement, other sources of coverage, New York State disability benefits law.
    10.  Other Coverages:  Umbrella excess liability policies, specialty liability insurance, excess lines, surety bonds, aviation insurance, ocean marine insurance, national flood insurance, other policies, New York property insurance underwriting association (fair plan).
    11.  Accident and Health Insurance:  Individual health insurance policy general provisions, disability income and related insurance, individual disability income insurance, medical plans, New York mandated benefits and offers, long term care insurance, group health and blanket insurance Medicare supplements.

  
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    BUS 172 - NYS Life/Health Insurance Licensing


    Prepares students to complete New York State licensing exams in life, accident, and health insurance.  Life Insurance Principles, Uses, Insurance Contracts, Group Insurance, Annuities, Social Security Programming, Laws on Insurance, Accident & Health Necessity, Accident & Health Insurance Terminology, Accident & Health Risk Selection, Types of Accident & Health Policies, Statutory Plans, Types of Accident & Health Carriers, Types of Accident & Health Coverage, Statutory Policy Provision, Agency Duties & Responsibilities.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for the Course:

    • Prepares students to successfully complete New York State licensing exams in life, accident, and health insurance.


  
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    BUS 181 - The Internet with Business Applications


    In depth examination of the internet and how It is used by modern business.  Use of tools such as browsers, e-mail, FTP, and website construction software.  Strategic issues in the design of an effective business website, including the construction of an actual site.  Discussion of contemporary issues and trends.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this Course:

    It is expected that after completing the course the student will be capable of:

    • Understanding the current direction that business is taking in regard to the internet
    • Be able to use a variety of internet resources effectively
    • Creating a website
    • Understanding how specific industries are being impacted by the internet
    • Utilizing the internet for a variety business opportunities


  
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    BUS 183 - Securities Training Series (Series 6 and 63)


    This course is designed for individuals who will be selling only investment company products (eg. Mutual funds, money market funds) and variable contracts for an NASD (National Association of Securities Dealer) broker-dealer or a bank affiliate.  The Series 6/Series 63 course will effectively prepare them for the qualifying exams (Series 6-Federal, Series 63-NYS).  Requires broker/dealer sponsorship to sit for federal/state exams.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Think critically and demonstrate an understanding of and discuss the interrelationships between the primary offerings of the following securities:  closed-end companies, mutual funds, unit investment trusts and variable products (annuities and insurance premiums).
    2.  Be aware of and be able to explain the relevant state law, rules and regulations for broker-dealer registered representatives that focus on the Uniform Securities Act and the Statement of Policy and Model Rules adopted by the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASSA).

    3.  Explain the differences among various employer/employee and individual retirement account options relevant to contribution and distribution options, tax consequences, costs/fees, and other characteristics that would be required of a Registered Representative/Securities Agent.
    4.  Demonstrate knowledge of ethical practices and fiduciary obligations pertinent to the securities industry.
    5.  Possess a means to successfully complete the Federal Securities Series 6 licensing exam administered by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), (formerly the National Association of Securities Dealers or NASD).
    6.  Possess a means to successfully complete the Federal Securities Series 63 licensing exam (also called the "Uniform Securities Agent State Law Examination".

     

  
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    BUS 184 - Financial and Risk Management Practicum


    Designed for students without previous exposure to the financial industry chosen.  Student will observe and study operations, policies and procedures performed by employees in various settings (private, public agencies, commercial corporations, etc.)  Emphasis placed on client, professional support and competition interaction (both front and back office).  Students may be placed with companies specializing in Financial Planning/Investing and/or Personal and Business Life and Accident and Health Insurance and/or Pension and Benefits Administration.  Final report integrating the practical and theoretical aspects of their experiences.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  15 credits, 9 of them in Business or permission of Instructor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    • The student will have the opportunity to apply theory learned in the classroom within the Banking/Real Estate/Mortgage setting. 
    • Each individual student will focus on areas based on their background, experience and education and coordinate these objectives with site location representatives and their supervisor.
    • The student will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of the internship objectives.


  
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    BUS 188 - Income Tax I


    An introduction to individual federal income tax concepts and applications including tax policy considerations and the historical development of tax law.  Develops the concepts of gross income, capital gains and losses, itemized deductions, employee expenses, deferred compensation, depreciation, property transactions, tax credits and tax planning.  Emphasis on tax theory and practical application of theory by preparing returns manually and with tax preparation software.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Prepare personal income tax forms for the average wage-earning taxpayer using correct interpretation of tax law and proper taxpayer information.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of various sources of information regarding income taxes and use this information in the proper preparation of tax returns.
    3.  Use current laws and regulations concerning income taxes and demonstrate this knowledge in the proper preparation of tax returns.
    4.  Prepare returns and schedules by hand and through the use of tax preparation software.

  
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    BUS 190 - Marketing and the World Wide Web


    An introduction to basic marketing principles and practices.  Emphasis on global aspects of marketing, consumer understanding, identification of target markets, and basic elements of advertising on the Internet.  An examination of how businesses design websites with specific emphasis on customer service and evaluation of customer responses.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Prior knowledge of e-mail, Internet, and HTML recommended

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the basic concepts of marketing of goods and services on the Internet.
    2.  Explain global aspects of marketing on the Internet.
    3.  Discuss the importance of consumer research in successful marketing efforts.  Use the Internet as a market research tool.
    4.  Demonstrate the overall role the Internet may play in a firms marketing strategy.
    5.  Become familiar with basic advertising using the Internet.
    6.  Analyze marketing aspects of a web page.
    7.  Discuss current, practical and upcoming uses of he Web as a marketing tool.
    8.  Discuss the importance of customer service and evaluation of customer responses.

  
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    BUS 200 - Intermediate Accounting I


    An intensive study of accounting theory and procedures.  Emphasis on the balance sheet accounts and their inter-relationship with income statement accounts, the accounting process, and correction of errors.  Advanced treatment of cash, receivables, and inventories.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 101 Accounting II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Analyze and interpret financial data of the conceptual framework of accounting.
    2.  Analyze and interpret financial data of the concepts and principles forming the theoretical structure of accounting.
    3.  Analyze and interpret financial data of the significance and limitations of the balance sheet.
    4.  Analyze and interpret financial data of the income statement and limitations of the income statement.
    5.  Analyze and interpret financial data of the valuation of marketable securities, receivables, and inventories.
    6.  Analyze various treatments of key elements of the Balance Sheet.
    7.  Project the financial consequences of alternative courses of action with regard to bad debt allocation, allowance for depreciation, warranties, depletion, and amortization.
    8.  Create an inventory system appropriate to a specific business.
    9.  Compare FASB standards to International Accounting Standards.
    10.  Discover and correct errors and create a clear and complete paper trail.
    11.  Utilize the time value of money to guide decision making.

  
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    BUS 201 - Intermediate Accounting II


    A more advanced treatment of accounting for property, plant, equipment, intangible assets, current and long-term liabilities.  Corporation accounting, funds flow reporting, financial statement analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 200 Intermediate Accounting I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the intricacies of accounting for long term assets.
    2.  Value, record, and analyze liabilities.
    3.  Explain the differences between invested equity and earned equity.
    4.  Demonstrate the differences between the direct and indirect method of presenting a statement of cash flows.
    5.  Discuss the appropriate revenue recognition principle.

  
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    BUS 202 - Securities Training Series 7


    This course will effectively prepare individuals to pass the General Securities nyse/nasd Registered Representative Examination.  The Series 7 license permits individuals to engage in sales and trading activities related to a variety of products including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, municipal securities, options, and direct participation programs.  Requires broker/dealer sponsorship to sit for federal/state exams.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    • To provide the student with a working knowledge of investment products and options, margin account regulation and management.
    • To prepare the student for successful completion of General Securities (Series 7) exam.


  
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    BUS 205 - Cost Accounting


    Nature and purpose of Cost Accounting and Cost Management.  Examine job-order, process, operation, and activity-based costing environments and accounting systems.  Accounting for the allocation of manufacturing overhead, common costs, and joint costs.  Comparison of absorption, variable, and throughput costing methods. Constructing budgets, emphasizing the flexible budgeting system, and the "analysis of variances" methods.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 210 Managerial Accounting or BUS 101 Accounting II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the major concepts of cost accounting and cost management.
    2.  Demonstrate each of the following concepts, do the basic calculations required to process the information associated with each topic, and utilize the results of that analysis to make effective business decisions:

         a.  Inventory planning and control.
         b.  Job costing systems.
         c.  Process costing systems.
         d.  Operations costing systems.
         e.  Activity-based costing.
         f.  Joint-product costs and allocation systems.
         g.  Standard costing systems.
         h.  Flexible budgets.
         i.  Allocating service department costs.

    3.  Demonstrate critical thinking skills in performing the calculations, analyzing the results, and making interpretations based upon those results.
    4. Demonstrate mathematical skills specific to business applications by using algebra, percents, ratios, special functions, and statistical procedures to analyze the information included in the topics listed above.
    5.  Demonstrate their ability to use calculators and computers to solve business applications.  Students will be able to use Excel or Lotus software to track inventory costs and to allocate costs.
    6.  Design their own spreadsheet using Excel or Lotus for at least two of the topics.  This will include formatting, labels, and formulas.  (This can be done for Process costing, Standard costing, Flexible budgeting, or any of the cost allocation procedures.)
    7.  Demonstrate cost accounting and cost management from a global perspective which will include topics of international implications.  (In today's world many corporations are multinational and it is absolutely imperative students can function in a global business environment).

  
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    BUS 209 - Operations Management


    This course aims to familiarize students with basic principles required to organize and manage service and manufacturing organizations in today's global economy.  The concepts for designing, planning and improving manufacturing and service organizations will be examined.  Recent trends in sustainability and the effect they have on operations management will be studied.  Topics include: productivity measures, process design, facility location and layout, project management, supply-chain management, Just-In-Time systems, inventory management, queuing models, lean manufacturing, total quality control, scheduling, and work force management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 115 Business Statistics or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the role that operations management plays in a changing global economy.
    2.  Calculate measures of productivity.
    3.  Construct Gantt charts and Critical Path Networks.
    4.  Use TQM tools for the generation of ideas, the organization of data, and the identification of problems.
    5.  Identify the four process strategies and describe how they relate to volume and variety of goods and services.
    6.  Develop and evaluate critical success factors affecting location selection.
    7.  Identify sustainability issues faced by operation managers.
    8.  Demonstrate critical thinking skills necessary for the recognition and solution of business problems using current operations management concepts and strategies.

  
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    BUS 210 - Managerial Accounting


    This course introduces current managerial accounting concepts, theories and practices applicable to manufacturing, retail and service industries.  Job order, process cost and activity-based cost systems are introduced.  Topics include budgeting, fixed and variable costs, breakeven analysis, profit analysis, relevant costs, capital investments, budgetary control, cost allocation.  Ethical issues are discussed throughout the course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 100 Accounting I or BUS 111 Financial Accounting

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the major concepts of Managerial Accounting and the organizational information needs.  Be able to state the differences between managerial and financial accounting.
    2.  Understand each of the following concepts, be able to do calculations required to process the information associated with each topic, and discuss how to utilize the results of that analysis to make effective business decisions:

         a.  Cost behavior patterns and their relationship to costs, volume, and profits in light of the cost benefit constraint.
         b.  Differential Accounting for short term non-programmed decisions.  E.G. Differentiate among direct and indirect, product and period, and various manufacturing costs.
         c.  Financial analysis and analysis of profitability.
         d.  Budgeting, including individual budgets and the master budget.
         e.  Capital expenditure decisions.
         f.  Pricing products and services.

    3.  Demonstrate critical thinking skills in performing the calculations, analyzing the results, and making interpretations based upon those results.
    4.  Demonstrate mathematical skills specific to business applications by using algebra, percent, ratios, special functions, and statistical procedures to analyze the information included in the topics listed above.
    5.  Demonstrate their ability to use calculators and/or computer spread sheets to solve managerial accounting problems.
    6.  Demonstrate an understanding of managerial accounting activities from a global perspective including special problems related to differences in currency, culture, legal, and government.

     

  
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    BUS 213 - Business Plan Development


    Students will learn how to research, develop and write a detailed business plan.  Emphasis is placed on understanding the major sections of a business plan:  Management and Organization Plan, Product/Service Plan, Marketing Plan, and Financial Plan.  In addition the identification and evaluation of resources available for small business funding will be explored.  Students will be required to develop and present a business plan.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 113 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

    • Understand what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur.
    • Understand the information, research, and analysis required to determine the feasibility of a business venture.
    • Understand the importance of a well-developed business plan.
    • Understand the major components of the business plan and the information that should be included in each component.
    • Have completed and presented a detailed business plan.


  
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    BUS 214 - Customer Service


    A comprehensive survey of all aspects of customer service.  Analysis of basic principles and practices leading to in-depth consideration of customer service specifics.  Topics covered will include measuring customer satisfaction, managing customer service, telephone skills, handling difficult customers, and multicultural customer service.  Other areas of customer service will be examined as current circumstances and areas of interest dictate.  This course is the capstone course for the customer service certificate program, but is of value to anyone interested in building customer satisfaction and loyalty.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the role of customer service within an organization.
    2.  Analyze the customer position as the center of all business activities.
    3.  Discuss the value of effective customer service to the long term success of an organization.
    4.  Develop skills and abilities necessary to effectively deal with an increasingly diverse customer base.
    5.  Develop a personal philosophy relative to the importance and methodology of customer service.
    6.  Develop a program to initiate an organization-wide commitment to servicing and maintaining the current customer base.

  
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    BUS 215 - Managing Diversity in Organizations


    An entry level course which explores the impact that a culturally diverse work force has on businesses, industry and the global/international environment.  The course illustrates the manager's role/responsibility in managing a culturally diverse work force and develops student awareness and an understanding of the role of culture, values, and social behavior in managing diverse groups in organizations.  This course explains why diversity is vitally important for organizations and how it helps in recruiting, retaining and effectively utilizing a diverse workforce.  Legislation, litigation and research topics will be covered providing a solid factual support basis for embracing diversity.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have a positive attitude toward valuing differences in the workplace.
    2.  Have a positive attitude towards embracing diversity and inclusion.
    3.  Be aware and understand the role of how culture, values, social behavior and politics impacts the management of diverse groups of employees.
    4.  Understand how assumptions, stereotypes and myths can create barriers and roadblocks to managing diversity effectively.
    5.  Value diversity and the benefits that follow from such a policy.

  
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    BUS 216 - Special Topics in International Business


    This course is designed to study current international, regional, country-specific, industry, and firm-based issues related to concepts in international business practice and environment.  Working individually and/ or in a group the student will engage in critical analysis of a broad range of selected readings and case studies.  Application of concepts in global economic and business theory presented by the student through writing and discussion.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUIB major, BUS 116 or SOS 116 International Business Environments or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    • Develop a comparative perspective of business practices in the three major trading regions of the globe.
    • Develop a comparative perspective of the varied environmental factors affecting business and trade relations in different countries of the globe.
    • Understand the mechanics of trade, both export and import, including transport issues, customs documentation, distribution methods, and etc.
    • Know the current issues related to the world trade organization and other international agencies.
    • Explore and provide analysis of current issues involving the European Union, North American Tree Trade Agreement, and other regional integration agreements.
    • Read articles and understand current issues related to business activity of U.S. businesses.
    • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the various sources of information and research tools relating to the practice of international business.
    • Be able to identify factors that create international business opportunities.
    • Be able to assess financing sources for global business operations.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how to manage international finance and business risk.
    • Understand and be able to differentiate the varied strategies for entering the global marketplace.
    • Complete and present an international business plan for a firm entering a new foreign market.
    • Use international business simulations to provide quasi-practical exposure to international operations of a firm.
    • Demonstrate a better understanding of the case study method as applied to international business management issues.


  
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    BUS 224 - Business Finance


    Financial principles and procedures of capital management.  Analysis of the relationship of finance to micro and macroeconomic factors such as inflation, business cycles, competition, and regulation.  Emphasis on corporate goals and objectives as a determining factor in the choice of financial management policy.  Financial ratios, cash budgeting, forecasting, leverage, working capital policy, capital markets, stocks and bonds, valuation, and other basic areas of finance.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 101 Accounting II or BUS 111 Financial Accounting

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the functions of finance in management's goals and objectives.
    2.  Demonstrate an expanded familiarity with the terminology/vocabulary of the business and financial community.
    3.  Identify the role of financial management to the current economic environment, theory, and policy.
    4.  Compute ratios and use ratio analysis to make financial decisions.
    5.  Prepare proforma statements.
    6.  Prepare a cash budget.
    7.  Calculate operating and financial leverage.
    8.  Apply the principles of working capital management to current assets and short-term financing.
    9.  Demonstrate an understanding of time value of money by the completion of problems involving annuities, present value, future value, sinking funds and amortization tables.
    10.  Calculate the cost of capital.
    11.  Incorporate risk analysis in capital budgeting decision.
    12.  Evaluate long-term financing options.

  
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    BUS 229 - Advertising


    Development, economics, functions of advertising. Cost application, media, testing and research methods.  Development of advertisements, copy and layout, methods and problems of reproduction.  Planning the advertising campaigns with step-by-step developments.  Lectures, discussions, demonstrations.  Students are required to use the computer to generate graphics.  BUS 141 Marketing is recommended as preparation for this course.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the purpose of advertising in an economy.
    2.  Explain the advantages and disadvantages of the major advertising media.
    3.  Explain how an advertiser should go about selecting media to enhance the overall marketing efforts of a business.
    4.  Prepare an advertising campaign that demonstrates basic ability to create ads for various media.

  
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    BUS 238 - Marketing Research


    Methods of collecting and interpreting marketing information which affects marketing management. Specific applications to problem identification in market development, gauging market potential and implementation of research designs in the marketplace.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the role of marketing research within a firm.
    2.  Apply the elements of research design.
    3.  Formulate data collection.
    4.  Apply sampling methods in marketing.
    5.  Analyze collected data.
    6.  Demonstrate an understanding of specific research applications.

  
  •  

    BUS 240 - Labor/Management Relations


    An examination of the complex and dynamic interaction between management and organized labor.  Coverage will include the origin and growth of unions and emphasize the legal, managerial, economic, and human factors relevant to past and current labor/ management relations.  The contract negotiation process and internal union structure will also be covered along with other current and timely topics.  Lecture, Discussion, Case Studies, and Case Law.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the history and development of unions.
    2.  Explain how unions are formed.
    3.  Explain the American Labor Relations Process.
    4.  Demonstrate how to interpret and apply Public Policy as it relates to the Labor Relations Process.
    5.  Analyze the necessities and actualities of the bargaining process.
    6.  Explain how union/management relations can be cooperative instead of adversarial.

  
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    BUS 241 - International Marketing


    In the context of economic, cultural, political, legal, and other environmental influences, this course will address how to identify and analyze worldwide marketing opportunities.  This diverse global context will also be examined in developing product, pricing, and distribution and promotion strategies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of different market environments found globally.
    2.  Show evidence of the ability to research data and information on potential market opportunities, industries, and countries.
    3.  Articulate different theoretical approaches to marketing internationally along with current theory and trends.
    4.  Select and justify appropriate marketing strategy and evaluate the financial, human resource, operational and logistical implications for various countries and country sub-regions.

     

  
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    BUS 242 - Marketing Seminar


    Senior capstone course which integrates various business subjects previously studied.  Individual and team approach are utilized to analyze comprehensive marketing and management cases.  A competitive computer based marketing simulation will give students a realistic view of the dynamic interaction of various marketing and management forces.  This course is student centered and focuses on interpretation of marketing information and the development of critical thinking skills.  Cases, computer simulation, discussion.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 141 Marketing

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Non-marketing majors must have instructor's permission.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the interrelationship of Business subjects previously studied.
    2.  Analyze marketing application to non-profit as well as profit organizations.
    3.  Apply problem-solving and decision-making capabilities to the marketing process.
    4.  Assess the team concept as it applies to marketing endeavors.
    5.  Be proficient in marketing, its strategies, outperforming competition, and solving marketing problems.
    6.  Analyze the consequences of marketing actions before implementing those actions.

  
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    BUS 244 - Employment Law


    An introductory study of employment law.  Emphasis on statutory interpretation, case law and the overall legal environment, and legislation intent.  Lecture and discussion.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the basic concepts of employment law.
    2.  Explain various existing statutory language and its effect on the citizen and institution.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of legal terminology not common to the layperson through classroom discussion and assignments.
    4.  Analyze how employment law effects the work place environment.
    5.  Define ever-increasing legislation affecting the world of work.
    6.  Demonstrate the importance of employment law principles as a segment of the national labor relations environment.

  
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    BUS 245 - Management: A Behavioral Approach


    An analysis of individual and group behavior, leadership, and culture of an organization. Emphasis is placed on the psychological, sociological and other variables useful in understanding organizational behavior.  Major topics include motivation, decision making, communication, group dynamics, organizational change, leadership and other related aspects of organizational behavior.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • Be able to identify different motivational models and theories.
    • Recognize the importance of communication and its impact on management.
    • Be able to identify different leadership patterns.
    • Be familiar with contemporary changes and models in the area of organizational behavior.
    • Recognize conflict situations in managerial situations and the methods for resolving conflict


  
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    BUS 246 - Principles of Management


    Principles of managerial practices.  Planning, organizing, directing and controlling.  Exposes students to proper methods and techniques to achieve employee and job satisfaction.  Topics covered include scientific management, behavioral theory and introduction to management science.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Analyze the basic management function.
    2.  Define management as a component of the overall organizational process.
    3.  Discuss historical and current management perspectives and understand the evolution of management as an art and science.
    4.  Explain organizational structure and design.
    5.  Assess management skills, such as stress and time management, communication, motivation, delegation, appraising performance, and handling conflict.
    6.  Critique the theorectical basis of current management thought and practices.

  
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    BUS 248 - Human Resource Management


    Acquisition, development, maintenance, and utilization of a workforce within an organization.  Job analysis, recruitment and selection, training and development, equal opportunity law, wage/benefit administration, and union-management relations are focus areas of this course.  Other timely topics such as sexual harrassment and the current regulatory environment are examined as circumstances dictate.  Lecture, cases, discussion.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the role of human resource activities within a business.
    2.  Explain how jobs are created and evolve.
    3.  Analyze and employ the proper policies concerning morale, employee relations as they relate to personnel.
    4.  Analyze and employ beneficial union-management relations.
    5.  Employ within a personnel program meaningful:
         a.  recruitment procedures
         b.  selection processes
         c.  training and development programs
         d.  compensation systems
         e.  benefit programs
    6.  Analyze group dynamics and organizational communication policies as they relate to HR activities.

  
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    BUS 251 - Advanced Topics in Human Resource Management


    An in-depth continuation of the study of concepts introduced in an introductory human resource management course.  Focus will be on increasing the depth and breadth of students knowledge in specific HRM topics with an emphasis on current issues.  This course will use a theoretical and practical approach to demonstrate the concepts and application of major topic areas such as; staffing, compensation management, public policy and the regulatory environment, human resource development, and collective bargaining.  Additional topics will be addressed as circumstances dictate.  Interactive learning is stressed through discussion, cases, and experiential exercises.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 248 Human Resource Management or permission of the Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate comprehensive analytical and decision-making skills relative to the HRM process.
    2.  Explain the nature of the American collective bargaining process.
    3.  Interpret the content of HRM law and its day-to-day applications.
    4.  Analyze the major staffing activities of HR planning, recruitment and selection.
    5.  Explain the importance and value of maintaining an internally equitable and externally competitive wage and salary program.
    6.  Demonstrate the methodologies and importance of continuous HR development.
    7.  Analyze the changing nature of HRM through the study of currently evolving HR topics. 

  
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    BUS 262 - Small Business Management


    An overview designed for those interested in small business as owner-managers.  Development of modern management techniques covering forms of organization, site acquisition and location, insurance, marketing, financing, pricing, break-even, permits, license and franchising.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    • The student will understand challenge of entrepreneurship and a small business in a global economy and learn the tools to enhance success. 
    • The student will have a comprehensive and logical understanding of the concepts involved with launching a small business including building a business plan, financing, marketing, legal aspects, pricing and risk management.    


  
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    BUS 267 - Retailing in a Service Economy


    The history and overview of Retailing and the growth of the Service Sector economy.  Covers the changes occurring in the distribution of goods and services including the growth of franchises, direct marketing and service businesses.  The changes in retail structures, i.e., the demise of urban centers and traditional department stores and the growth of shopping centers, malls, and specialty retailers, are central to this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Provide written knowledge of the background and concepts necessary to consider a career in retailing.
    2.  Demonstrate an increased understanding of the ethical issues surrounding all retail functions of merchandising, operations, finance, and sales promotion by examining case studies in the contemporary media and develop a positon paper.
    3.  Describe and analyze theories of merchandising as each pertains to specific types of retail operations in a required number of discussions.
    4.  Describe the rationale for market segmentation strategies through the analysis of consumer life-style and life-cycle theories and provide written evidence of understanding the rationale for utilizing both quantitative and qualitative analyses in retail functions.
    5.  Provide evidence of understanding theories of retail sales promotion and communication, such as encoding and decoding advertising messages in discussions and written assignments.
    6.  Describe examples of revenue, profit, and store volume, as each relates to gross margin and store operations in both course discussions and written assignments.
    7.  Assess the importance of various types of store operations relative to the retail economy, and how each impacts the service economy, after field experience and store visits and have this reflected in the final store report.
    8.  Demonstrate an understanding of retailing by preparing a formal PowerPoint class presentation and store report, identifying relevant retailing theories.

  
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    BUS 269 - Business Reports and Computer Communications


    Methods and skills for formal and informal business writing through the logical analysis of business case problems.  Emphasis on utilizing the computer in the preparation, transmittal, and retrieval of business information and reports.  Proper construction of business charts, graphs, tables, and graphics, using various computer software.  Students learn to properly construct business letters, memos, bids, quotes, and other business reports and documents.  Transmitting business reports using E-mail.  Accessing and transmitting business information using the computer.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Provide written evidence of the ability to communicate appropriately through electronic means by transferring business documents and information.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate business tone and style through writing samples prepared with process writing options and then presented in a course portfolio at the end of the semester.
    3.  Develop business documents including charts, graphs, and tables using various computer software and include in written reports.
    4.  Provide evidence and knowledge of the nine types of commonly used business reports; select a customized topic; and prepare a PowerPoint outline of the report for electronic transmission, as well as complete a formal report appropriate for business.  This is a culminating class activity in both face-to-face and online course.

  
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    BUS 275 - Accounting Information Systems


    Computer-based accounting systems with emphasis on development and implementation.  Topics will include: creation of a general ledger, establishment of accounts receivable and billing procedures, management of cash and current liabilities, and payroll accounting.  Also to be addressed is the development of a variety of custom management reports.  The course will be divided into two parts.  During part one students will learn the tools necessary to implement an accounting system.  Part two will consist of students working in teams to develop a system.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BUS 200 Intermediate Accounting I or permission of instructor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Set up an automated accounting system for an enterprise.
    2.  Record transactions using an automated system.
    3.  Prepare adjusting and correcting entries.
    4.  Create financial statements.
    5.  Discuss the internal control structure necessary for an automated accounting system.
    6.  Discuss the organizational change that the implementation of a new accounting system involves.

  
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    BUS 296 - Disney World Internship/Co-op


    Students accepted into the program will work for an extended period of time at the Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida.  These are paid positions, mostly full time.  Students must also complete the training program for their specific job in addition to any general Disney customer service training.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Instructor approval

    Credits: (3-6)
    Note
    See Co-op Coordinator for further information.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this coure the student will be able to:

    1.  Verify the completion of a minimum of 600 hours of work at Disney World.
    2.  Verify the completion of the basic Disney training program and the job specific training program.  Verify completion and demonstrate knowledge of training, in writing.
    3.  Verify, with managers written evaluation, successful completion of work assignments.
    4.  Articulate, in writing, skills and knowledge obtained from the job experience.

  
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    BUS 297 - Co-operative Work Experience


    On-the-job experience may be obtained in such areas as retailing, banking, fast foods, government services and hotel management, as well as CPA firms, public accounting offices, industrial, business and government offices where accounting is performed.  Cooperative work students will meet with the coordinator one hour each week.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  2.5 GPA and 3.0 in Business courses

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply classroom instruction to the job experience and articulate this in writing.
    2.  Investigate and report on procedures followed for employee training, evaluation, and advancement.
    3.  Describe, in-depth, exactly what was learned in the accomplishment of learning objectives.
    4.  Describe, in writing, job training and job duties.
    5.  Have developed work skills related to career goals and describe these in writing.

  
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    BUS 299 - Independent Study


    The student, under the guidance of a faculty member, undertakes an investigation, study and research in an advanced concept or problem concerning his/her major field of study.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Instructor and department chairperson approval

    Credits: (1-4)
    Note
    Only one independent study course is allowed per semester.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    • The learning outcomes for this course will vary, depending on the material being covered
    • In each case the student will be able to demonstrate successful completion of the learning activities specified in the Independent Study Contract.


  
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    CAS 101 - Introduction to the Gaming Industry


    Introduction to the operations found in casino and gaming establishments.  This course explores the function of casinos/racinos and their relationships to hotels, restaurants, resorts, and entertainment facilities within the hospitality industry.  Students will trace the history of the gaming industry and look ahead to future areas of expansion.  Special attention will be paid to the Racino concept.  Instruction on principles to practices found in a variety of gaming venues.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the evolution of gaming.
    2.  Understand the requirements of Pari-mutuel, Lottery and Racino Operations.
    3.  Understand and describe Slot and Video Operations.
    4.  Possess a general understanding of games of chance found in various gaming operations.
    5.  Understand and describe the general gaming regulations found throughout the industry.
    6.  Articulate the positive economic impact of gaming operations.
    7.  Have an introductory understanding of the sociological impact of the gaming industry.
    8.  Be versed in Native American gambling operations.
    9.  Possess an introductory understanding of river boat and cruise ship gaming.
    10.  Gain introductory requirements for gaming, marketing, and promotions specific to the gaming industry.
    11.  Possess an introductory understanding of gaming financial and accounting control found in a variety of venues.
    12.  Understand the basics of security and surveillance.
    13.  Understand Canadian gaming in the Provinces and International gaming abroad.
    14.  Articulate the future of the gaming industry regionally and on the Internet.

  
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    CAS 109 - The Mathematics of Gaming


    The Mathematics of Gaming is a Liberal Arts Mathematics course.  Using the backdrop of traditional casino games and horse racing, students will investigate relevant concepts that involve applications of arithmetic, algebra, probability and statistics.  The students will learn different ways to present and interpret numerical and statistical data.  The students will investigate mathematical models and simulations along with their applications.  The students will investigate gaming strategies involving mathematical reasoning and psychological components such as risk versus reward, wagering and bluffing.  Students will also be required to read and discuss the short novel "The Gambler" by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.
     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 093 (4-credit) Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, MAT 091 Mathematical Literacy I, or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    MAT 109
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.
    6.  Define basic terms related to probability and statistics.
    7.  Calculate theoretical probabilities and odds.
    8.  Set up and solve simple proportions.
    9.  Generate and employ a set of random numbers for simulating probabilities.
    10.  Discern between events that are independent and dependent.
    11.  Develop models for various casino games using expected value.
    12.  Discern between a fair and an unfair game.
    13.  Create a tree diagram to represent a multistage experiment.
    14.  Collect, organize and display data using tables and charts.
    15.  Create a probability distribution for an experiment.
    16.  Calculate the mean and variance for a distribution of sample means.
    17.  Apply concepts of the distribution of sample means using z-scores and the normal distribution.
    18.  Utilize the optimization strategies in games of chance.
    19.  Describe and explain strategy for money management and wagering in games of chance.
    20.  Calculate permutations and combinations for probability applications.
    21.  Describe and play games involving strategy (NIM, TIC_TAC_TOE, ROCK-PAPER-SCISSORS) and bluffing (LIARS DICE, BLUFF).
    22.  Investigate the mathematics of streaks using descrete and continuous methods.
    23.  Describe the differences between theoretical and empirical probabilities.
    24.  Calculate the odd and payoffs in a horse race based upon the betting pool.
    25.  Describe non-mathematical factors that may influence the results of chance events.
    26.  Perform simple regression and factor analysis.

     

     

     

  
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    CAS 127 - Gaming Surveillance and Security


    Gaming Surveillance and Security in reference to measures taken at casinos to protect an establishment's money, property, and patrons.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CRJ 127
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain what surveillance in gaming operation is.
    2.  Identify different surveillance techniques.
    3.  Understand the difference between proactive and reactive surveillance operations.
    4.  Successfully work a CC Camera.
    5.  Successfully identify different types of covert cameras.
    6.  Properly execute surveillance skills.
    7.  Be familiar with basic con strategies such as suspicious activity, advantage play, cheating techniques, card counting.
    8.  Explain the difference between internal theft and player theft.
    9.  Understand threat assessment and risk assessment.
    10.  Identify Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Threats inside a Casino.
    11.  Prepare and implement a basic Protection Plan.
    12.  Implement covert counter measures to risk or threat.
    13.  Explain the concept of Loss Prevention and Shrinkage.
    14.  Detect and deter employee thefts.
    15.  Identify and understand the basic concept of an audit.
    16.  Understand search and seizure rules of law in regard to casino gaming floor versus the guest hotel room.
    17.  Properly secure casino floor exits, and monitor parking garages.
    18.  Clearly write an incident report.
    19.  Execute proper relationship with law enforcement and court system.

  
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    CAS 200 - Casino/Racino Games


    Practical instruction on important casino/racino games including - blackjack, craps, slots, video poker, baccarat, roulette, keno, sports betting, Texas Hold'em, harness racing.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate, following practical instruction and examination, the ability to play, run, supervise and manage a veriety of casino/racino games to include:

    • blackjack
    • craps
    • slots
    • video poker
    • roulette
    • keno
    • sports betting
    • TexasHold'em
    • harness racing


  
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    CAS 201 - Casino Internship I


    Career-related employment in the gaming industry focusing on an area of interest in a casino, racino or other gaming related enterprise.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a gaming business setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  First year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate working competencies in any of hte following areas, or other areas as agreed between the student and instructor.

         Focus Areas - Casino Internship:

    • Dealer
    • Table Games
    • Casino Hotel Services
    • Butler
    • Cage Operations
    • Special Events
    • Sales Department
    • Casino Food & Beverage Service
    • Casino Accounting & Revenue Control
    • Casino Hotel Reservations
    • Casino Hotel Front Office
    • Casino Hotel Housekeeping
    • Racino Operations
    • Casino Direct Marketing
    • Casino Human Resources Department
    • Casino Maintenance Department
    • Casino Sales Department
    • Casino General Management

        All internship positions are to be paid

  
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    CAS 210 - Casino Operations Management


    Course topics include: Current high-roller marketing tactics and their effect on profitability, the effect of popular money management systems on casino profits, the initial development process of an Indian casino, studies designed to identify the patronage motives of gamblers, including those of riverboat customers; slot club design: player rating issues, point accumulation schemes, principles of casino floor design: managing table game and slot location; studies designed to measure the profit contribution of popular slot promotions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CAS 101 Introduction to the Gaming Industry; CAS 200 Casino/Racino Gaming

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the history of modern gaming.
    2.  Understand and articulate gaming control in a variety of regions.
    3.  Understand and calculate gaming taxes and internal control systems.
    4.  Understand and employ principles of casino management including casino organizational structure and casino hotel structure and staffing.
    5.  Understand and enact currency reporting requirements.
    6.  Design and manage casino cage, credit, and collections procedures.
    7.  Understand and implement slot management.
    8.  Implement and design table game operations including revenue per square foot and betting limits.
    9.  Understand and perform basic casino accounting including: Table Drop and Count, Slot Drop and Count, Key Control, Internal Audit, Casino Audit, Statistical Reports.
    10.  Understand the mathematics of casino games.
    11.  Understand and employ the elements of an effective player rating system.
    12.  Understand table game hold as a management tool.
    13.  Understand and utilize specific casino marketing techniques addressing such concerns as consumer choice factors, player action criteria, the premium player segment and discounting.
    14.  Understand sports book operations.
    15.  Special emphasis on race operations: student to be versed in betting at the track, types of races, types of bets, racing terms, regulatory requirements, race book operations.
    16.  Understand, calculate and utilize casino statistics.

  
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    CAS 297 - Casino Internship II


    Career-related employment in the gaming industry focusing on an area of interest in a casino, racino or other gaming related enterprise.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a gaming business setting.  225 work hours must be logged.  Second year course work must be completed or receive permission of Hospitality Programs Department Chair.  Prior work experience is not considered for this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate working competencies in any of the following areas, or other areas as agreed between the student and instructor.

        Focus Areas - Casino Internship:

    • Dealer
    • Table Games
    • Casino Hotel Services
    • Butler
    • Cage Operations
    • Special Events
    • Sales Department
    • Casino Food & Beverage Service
    • Casino Accounting & Revenue Control
    • Casino Hotel Reservations
    • Casino Hotel Front Office
    • Casino Hotel Housekeeping
    • Racino Operations
    • Casino Direct Marketing
    • Casino Human Resources Department
    • Casino Maintenance Department
    • Casino Sales Department
    • Casino General Management

        All internship positions are to be paid.

  
  •  

    CHM 090 - Preparatory Chemistry


    Introductory course in chemistry emphasizing problem solving techniques related to chemical concepts.  Atomic structure, stoichiometry, metric units, chemical bonding.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the general and physical properties of matter.
    2.  Understand the basic model of the atom.
    3.  Determine names and formulas of simple binary compounds and simple acids.
    4.  Perform basic algebraic manipulations to relative to simpe chemical calculations.
    5.  Perform mathematical manipulations such as unit analysis with proper attention to units and significant figures.
    6.  Use the concept of the mole in quantitative chemical calculations.
    7.  Balance chemical equations.
    8.  Calculate amounts of chemicals involved in reactions.
    9.  Calculate and utilize solution concentration units such as molarity.
    10.  Classify chemical reactions.
    11.  Use concepts of pH in acidicand basic solutions.
    12.  Predict shape and geometry of simple molecules.
    13.  Understand the ideal gas law and its application in quantitative problems.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, chapter exams, and the final exam.

  
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    CHM 120 - Fundamental Chemistry


    Composition of substances, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, chemical equations, state of matter, aqueous solutions, pH, and an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 090 Foundations for College Mathematics I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the general and physical properties of matter.
    2.  Understand the basic model of the atom.
    3.  Determine names and formulas of simple binary compounds and simple acids.
    4.  Perform basic algebraic manipulations to relative to simple chemical calculations.
    5.  Perform mathematical manipulations such as unit analysis with proper attention to units and significant figures.
    6.  Use the concept of the mole in quantitative chemical calculations.
    7.  Balance chemical equations.
    8.  Calculate amounts of chemicals involved in reactions.
    9.  Calculate and utilize solution concentration units such as molarity.
    10.  Classify chemical reactions.
    11.  Use concepts of pH in acidic and basic solutions.
    12.  Predict shape and geometry of simple molecules.
    13.  Understand the ideal gas law and its application in quantitative problems.
    14.  Discuss the naming and classification of organic compunds.
    15.  Discuss the basic reactions of organic compounds.
    16.  Discuss the naming and classification of biochemical compounds.
    17.  Discuss the basic compounds of food, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.
    18.  Discuss the basic chemical reactions of a living system.
    19.  Discuss the basic chemical reaction of drugs.
    20.  Discuss the basic chemical reactions of poisons.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, chapter exams, and the final exam.

  
  •  

    CHM 121 - Forensic Sciences


    The science behind the examination of firearms, cartridges, explosives, drugs and other types of physical evidence by the crime lab is presented.  Emphasis on proper handling of substances found in crime scene investigations.  Laboratory techniques include many modern instrumental methods, such as gas chromatography, infrared and mass spectroscopy as used in today's modern crime labs.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the history of Forensic Science.
    2.  Discuss those areas of chemistry, biology, physics, and geology relating to the analysis of physical evidence.
    3.  Carry out the laboratory analysis of physical evidence using gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, HPLC, head space GC, Atomic and Infrared Spectroscopy.
    4.  Recognize, collect, package, and document physical evidence from a crime scene.
    5.  Calculate a PMI from Algor mortis, livor mortis, and rigor mortis.
    6.  Calculate a PMI from insect larva.
    7.  Conduct a crime scene search.
    8.  Discuss the various type of physical evidence.
    9.  Analyze body fluids for drugs and poisons.
    10.  Discuss and analyze arson and explosive evidence.
    11.  Discuss and analyze fabrics evidence in a criminal trial.
    12.  Discuss and analyze illegal drugs.
    13.  Discuss and analyze firearm evidence.
    14.  Discuss and analyze glass fragment for RI and density.
    15.  Discuss and analyze glass fracture patterns.
    16.  Calculate vehicle speeds from skid marks and crush depths.
    17.  Discuss and analyze hair found at a crime scene.
    18.  Discuss and analyze fingerprint evidence found at a crime scene.
    19.  Discuss and analyze toolmark evidence found at a crime scene.
    20.  Discuss and analyze paint evidence found at a crime scene.
    21.  Discuss and analyze questioned document evidence found at a crime scene.
    22.  Discuss and analyze DNA evidence found at a crime scene.
    23.  Discuss and analyze computer evidence found at a crime scene.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, midterm exams, and the final exam.

  
  •  

    CHM 123 - Environmental Science


    Is your water safe to drink?  Worry about hotter climates, holes in the ozone layer, pesticide residues in food, and extinction of species?  This course is designed to give the student a better scientific background for understanding the environment from a chemical viewpoint and do hands-on laboratory investigations to better appreciate the ecosystem in which we live.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CHM 123L Environmental Science Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss EPA primary and secondary water quality standards.
    2.  Discuss EPA Environmental Regulations including the clean air act, clean water act, RCRA, CERLCA, NPDES, SPDES.
    3.  Discuss and determine the dissolved oxygen content, nitrate, nitrite, BOD, COD, phosphate, turbidity, pH, alkalinity, hardness, total coliform bacteria, E. Coli, total and redidual chlorine and their effect on an ecosystem.
    4.  Discuss primary production and trophic levels.
    5.  Discuss the Coriolis effect, orographic lifting, and the rain forrest.
    6.  Discuss sustainable agriculture, the green revolution and organic farming.
    7.  Discuss fossil fuels, nuclear power, and alternative energy.
    8.  Discuss the Chesapeake Bay and Liebig's Law of minimums.
    9.  Discuss air pollution, inversion layers, and the six criteria pollutants.
    10.  Discuss biotic potential, R and K strategists, demographics, and the total fertility rate.
    11.  Produce biodiesel from vegetable oil.
    12.  Discuss and demonstrate how the angle of the sun at noon varies during the year and how this is used in the design of passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    13.  Discuss and demonstrate the use of clerestories in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    14.  Discuss and demonstrate the use of trombe walls in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    15.  Discuss and demonstrate the use of window overhangs in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    16.  Discuss the environmental advantages and externalities of wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, solar passive, solar active, solar thermal (SEGS & Solar II), photovoltaic, hydrogen, fuel cell, and battery energy sources.
    17.  Discuss the role of greenhouse gases in global climate.
    18.  Discuss and demonstrate the use of a NEV as a zero emission vehicle and calculate the carbon footprint of an equivalent gasoline vehicle.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, midterm exams, and the final exam.

  
  •  

    CHM 124 - Environmental Science II


    A continuation of CHM 123 Environmental Science: this course will include biotec, geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric factors of the environment, human impacts and interdisciplinary issues.  Federal and State regulations and approved methodology for monitoring and remediation will also be discussed as illustrated by case studies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 123 Environmental Science

    Corequisite:  CHM 124L Environmental Science II Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Produce ASTM 6751 biodiesel from waste vegetable oil collected from local restaurants.
    2.  Calculate the BTU content of various biomass fuels.
    3.  Calculate the proper angle for the design of clerestories and the proper overhang length for windows in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings at various latitudes.
    4.  Calculate the size of trombe walls needed to achieve a 50% reduction in energy usage in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    5.  Calculate the square footage and materials for thermal storage walls needed to achieve a 50% reduction in energy usage in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    6.  Discuss and design thermal roof units needed to achieve a 50% reduction in energy usage in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    7.  Discuss and design thermal chimney units needed to achieve a 50% reduction in energy usage in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    8.  Discuss and demonstrate the differences between direct and indirect solar gain used in passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    9.  Calculate the insulation R factors and window requirements used to design passive solar heating and cooling of houses and commercial buildings.
    10.  Construct a fully functional wind turbine.
    11.  Measure the variation in wind turbine output based on height above ground, wind speed, distance from any obstruction, and rotor rpm.
    12.  Calculate the instantaneous and maximum current, voltage, and power for a wind turbine.
    13.  Calculate the minimum wind speed required to generate power and the average power that can be generated anywhere in the U.S. based on NOAA records.
    14.  Measure the variation in current, voltage, and power in a photovoltaic array based on load, angle, direction, and cloud coverage.
    15.  Calculate the instantaneous and maximum current, voltage, and power for a PV array.
    16.  Connect a wind turbine, PV array, lead storage battery, load monitor, and inverter to run various loads in the Science Building.
    17.  Calculate the minimum sunlight required to generate power and the average power that can be generated anywhere in the U.S. based on NOAA records.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, midterm exams, and the final exam.

  
  •  

    CHM 124 L - Environmental Science II Laboratory


    A continuation of CHM 123L Environmental Science Laboratory emphasizing the use of approved methodology, field trips, and a special project to study environmental problems of both local and global interest.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CHM 124 Environmental Science II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Produce ASTM 6751 biodiesel from waste vegetable oil collected from local restaurants.
    2. Measure the BTU content of various biomass fuels using bomb calorimetry.
    3. Construct a fully functional wind turbine.
    4. Measure the variation in wind turbine output based on height above ground, wind speed, distance from any obstruction, and rotor rpm.
    5. Calculate the instantaneous and maximum current, voltage, and power for a wind turbine.
    6. Calculate the minimum wind speed required to generate power and the average power that can be generated anywhere in the U.S. based on NOAA records.
    7. Measure the variation in current, voltage, and power in a photovoltaic array based on load, angle, direction, solar constant, and cloud coverage.
    8. Calculate the instantaneous and maximum current, voltage, and power for a PV array.
    9. Connect a wind turbine, PV array, lead storage battery, load monitor, and inverter to run various loads in the Natural Science Center.
    10. Construct and operate a fully functional electric car (NEV) with a photovoltaic charging system.
    11. Research a local environmental problem and present it to the class.


    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of laboratory reports, formal papers, and group presentations.

  
  •  

    CHM 125 - Fire Protection Chemistry


    Fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry.  Composition of substances, kinetic and molecular theories, atomic structure and bonding, solutions and colloids, ions in solution and introduction to organic chemistry.  For Fire Protection Technology students.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss and understand the use of SI units in Fire Science.
    2.  Discuss and understand the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis; and application of scientific data, concepts, and models in chemistry.
    3.  Discuss and understand the basic principles of chemical elements and compounds in Fire Science.
    4.  Discuss and understand physical and chemical changes.
    5.  Discuss and understand the flow of fluids.
    6.  Discuss and understand heat transfer.
    7.  Discuss and understand how chemistry and physics relate to fire protection.
    8.  Discuss and understand the combustion process.
    9.  Discuss and understand the fire characteristics of solid, liquid, and gaseous combustibles.
    10.  Discuss and understand combustion products.
    11.  Discuss and understand the movement of fire gases.
    12.  Discuss and understand the computer modeling of fire.
    13.  Discuss and understand Arson investigation sampling and testing.
    14.  Discuss and understand effect of fire impingement on construction types 1-5.
    15.  Discuss and understand federal incident command management system.
    16.  Discuss and understand fire fighting procedures.
    17.  Discuss and understand special fire situations.

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, chapter exams, and the final exam.

  
  •  

    CHM 126 - Marine Chemistry: An Introduction to Chemical Oceanography


    Would you like to learn more about the Earth's Oceans?  They cover 71% of Earth but are often neglected because we are land-based creatures.  The Earth's oceans are not simply water, but a mixture of various compounds.  The student will learn the basic principles of chemical oceanography.  The course topics presented will allow an understanding of the coupled atmospheric/ocean system and also demonstrate the current and future effects of human activities on the coastal and oceanic environments.  The chemical properties of the ocean are important to understand because the marine environment supports the greatest abundance of life on earth.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss and explain the chemical origin and history of the Oceans.
    2.  Discuss and explain the hydrological cycle.
    3.  Discuss and explain the chemistry of marine water.
    4.  Discuss and explain the influence of the atmosphere on ocean chemistry.
    5.  Discuss and explain the environmental issues involved in coasts, estuaries, and wetlands.
    6.  Discuss and explain the energy flow through marine trophic levels.
    7.  Discuss and explain the role of chemical nutrients and Liebig's law of minimums.
    8.  Discuss the chemistry of deep sea vents.
    9.  Discuss and explain the chemistry and envrionmental impact of oil spills at sea.
    10.  Discuss and explain the effect of temperature on chemistry of the ocean.
    11.  Discuss and explain the current research in marine chemistry.

  
  •  

    CHM 127 - Kitchen Chemistry


    You are what you eat.  Cooking and recipes may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and chemical research.  This course will cover the basic chemistry of the main components of food, carbohydrates, lipids, and protein, as well as water, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, food additives, flavors, and colors.  It will also cover the processing of food and the use of fermentation in the production of yogurt, cheese, wine, and beer.  The laboratory component will give the students a chance to perform the reactions presented in lecture.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BHM 127
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the chemical reactions that occur when food is cooked.
    2.  Discuss the four basic food molecules.
    3.  Describe how the four basic food molecules are used chemically in the human body.
    4.  Explain the other important molecules in food.
    5.  Discuss the various additives used in food production.
    6.  Describe the GRAS list.
    7.  Explain the chemical process of fermentation.
    8.  Discuss various categories of food.
    9.  Explain the chemistry of baking, leavening, denaturing, and browning.
    10.  Describe the effect of cooking temperatures on chemical reactions of the cooking.
    11.  Characterize the chemical poisons which can get into the food supply.

  
  •  

    CHM 128 - Brewing and Fermentation Science


    An introduction to the chemistry of brewing beer and other fermentation processes in the food science field.  The course will examine process by which malted barley, hops, yeast, and water are turned into beer in a commercial brew house.  The chemistry behind the process of making wine, cheese, and yogurt will also be explored.  In the laboratory portion of the course students will produce and analyze beer, wine, yogurt, and cheese in a pilot plant atmosphere.  This course is open to both science and non-science majors.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CUL 128
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the basic steps in the brewing of beer.
    2. Recognize the types of yeast used for fermentation.
    3. Explain the functions of the alpha acids in hops and the isomerization products when boiled.
    4. Describe the kinetics and temperature dependence of amylases.
    5. Explain the methods of denaturing casein proteins.
    6. Describe how to determine sugar content by various methods.
    7. Describe how to determine alcohol content by various methods.
    8. Describe how to determine IBU/pH/Acid content by various methods.
    9. Describe how to determine carbohydrate content by various methods.
    10. Describe how to determine protein content by various methods.


  
  •  

    CHM 129 - The Chemistry of Art


    This course is a study of art from a scientific perspective.  The molecular basis of art will be explored by using the atomic theory to explain how paints are made, the function of binders and varnishes, the absorption of light, the structure of ceramics, the process of photography, and the materials used for sculpture.  The atomic structure of the material will be used to explain its function for the artist.  The use of chemistry in art conservation, restoration, and the detection of forgery will also be investigated.  This course includes a hands on laboratory and is intended for non-science majors. 

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    ART 129
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2.  Demonstrate application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural (or physical) sciences.
    3.  Understand and use basic chemical principles and terminology.
    4.  Explain the basic properties of light based on atomic theory.
    5.  Understand how chemical changes lead to different colors of pigments.
    6.  Explain the chemistry of paints.
    7.  Describe the chemical processes in photography.
    8.  Identify art forgeries.
    9.  Explain the different processes of art conservation/restoration.
    10.  Possess an awareness of the influence of chemistry in the visual arts.
    11.  Identify the chemicals and/or materials used in various works of
    12.  Form opinions based on sound scientific reasoning.

     

  
  •  

    CHM 130 - Unit Operations & Food Processing


    This combined lecture-laboratory course focuses on the chemical principles and practices fundamental to modern distilleries, breweries, and dairy foods processing.  The first part deals with the unit operations, chemical transformations such as separation, crystallization, evaporation, filtration, polymerization, isomerization, and other reactions involved in breweries and the production of whisky, gin, and vodka.  The second part focuses on the chemistry of dairy processing and food processing in general (pasteurization, sterilization, centrifugal separation, homogenization, membrane separation, concentration, and drying).  Laboratories are conducted in the food science pilot plant facility, where students gain hands-on experience in operating distillery and food processing equipment.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the basic steps in the distillation of alcohol.
    2. Recognize the types of chemical products from distilleries.
    3. Explain the functions of the various components of a still.
    4. Describe the unit operations involved in distilleries and breweries.
    5. Explain the methods producing different types of foods from milk.
    6. Describe how to determine separation efficency.
    7. Describe how to determine alcohol content by various methods.
    8. Describe how different types of cheese are produced.
    9. Desctibe how to package different types of food.


  
  •  

    CHM 133 - Survey of Organic Chemistry


    Fundamental treatment of organic chemistry, nomenclature, properties of selected functional groups, mechanisms, stereochemistry and synthetic methods.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 145 General Chemistry I and CHM 145L General Chemistry I Laboratory

    Corequisites:  CHM 133L Survey of Organic Chemistry Laboratory and CHM 146 General Chemistry II and CHM 146L General Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the IUPAC rules of nomenclature to alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, phenols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, carbohydrates, amino acids, and proteins.
    2.  Draw the structures of the above mentioned compounds given their names.
    3.  Use the cis-trans system or the E,Z sequence rules to classify alkenes.
    4.  Predict the major and minor products of addition and elimination reactions using Markovnikov's rule and Zaitsev's rule.
    5.  Identify the major product(s) in electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions.
    6.  Propose synthetic routes to substituted benzenes via multi-step pathways.
    7.  Classify stereoisomers as either enantiomers or diastereomers.
    8.  Predict the predominant reaction pathway as SN1, SN2, E1, or E2.
    9.  Outline synthetic routes to primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols.
    10.  Explain how the Williamson synthesis is used to prepare ethers.
    11.  Describe the preparation of aldehydes/ketones from alcohols using oxidizing agents.
    12.  Use Grignard reagents in syntheses that convert aldehydes/ketones to alcohols.
    13.  Describe the use of the Fischer esterification reaction to make esters from carboxylic acids.
    14.  Show how an amino group can be attached to an aromatic ring via the reduction of a nitroarene.
    15.  Outline synthetic routes to substituted benzenes via the Sandmeyer reaction.
    16.  Draw and name the cyclic structures of monosaccharides.
    17.  Classify disaccahrides and polysaccharides as reducing or nonreducing.
    18.  Draw and name the structures of peptides.
    19.  Determine the structure of a peptide given sequencing data.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assess via 8 quizzes and 12 exams.

  
  •  

    CHM 141 - General, Organic, and Biochemistry I


    Introductory treatment of general chemistry for the non-science student emphasizing applications of chemistry in everyday life.  Measurements, atoms and bonding, the states of matter, nuclear processes, oxidation and reduction, solutions, acids and bases.  Applications include energy sources, effects of radiation, the environment, life processes, testing of advertising claims.  For Liberal Arts non-science students.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Math II

    Corequisite:  CHM 141L General, Organic, and Biochemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the chemical and physical properties of matter.
    2.  Understand basic metric and scientific measurements.
    3.  Perform mathematical manipulations such as unit analysis with proper attention to units and significant figures.
    4.  Understand the basic model of the atom.
    5.  Determine names and formulas of simple binary and ternary compounds.
    6.  Perform basic mathematic manipulations relative to simple chemical calculations.
    7.  Use the concept of the mole in quantitative chemical calculations.
    8.  Balance chemical equations.
    9.  Calculate amounts of chemicals involved in reactions.
    10.  Understand the factors involved in the physical states of matter.
    11.  Calculate and utilize solution concentration units such as molarity.
    12.  Identify oxidation and reduction reactions.
    13.  Use concepts of pH in acidic and basic solutions.
    14.  Predict shape and geometry of simple molecules.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of four exams.

  
  •  

    CHM 141 L - General, Organic, and Biochemistry I Laboratory


    Experiments to introduce chemical laboratory techniques while increasing awareness of the chemical world and to attain some insight into how a chemist attacks a problem.  Qualitative and quantitative measurements.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Math II

    Corequisites:  CHM 141 General, Organic, and Biochemistry I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the chemical and physical properties of matter.
    2.  Understand basic metric and scientific measurements.
    3.  Perform mathematical manipulations such as unit analysis with proper attention to units and significant figures on laboratory data.
    4.  Perform basic mathematic manipulations relative to simple chemical measurements.
    5.  Demonstrate the use of statistics in chemical analysis.
    6.  Demonstrate the effects of heat in exothermic and endothermic chemical reactions.
    7.  Use the concept of the mole in quantitative chemical calculations.
    8.  Balance chemical equations.
    9.  Calculate the amounts of chemicals involved in chemical reactions.
    10.  Understand the factors pertaining to the physical states of matter.
    11.  Calculate and utilize solution concentration units such as molarity by means of titrations.
    12.  Perform an oxidation and reduction reaction quantitatively.
    13.  Use concepts of pH in acidic and basic solutions utilizing titrations and buffer solutions.
    14.  Introduce the concept of chemical reactivity and chemical kinetics.
    15.  Test advertizing claims utilizing chemical analysis.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of laboratory reports and quizzes.

  
  •  

    CHM 142 - General, Organic, and Biochemistry II


    Continuation of CHM 141 General, Organic, and Biochemistry I.  A survey of organic chemistry including nomenclature, reactions of selected functional groups, stereochemistry and biochemistry.  Applications include consumer products, living systems, food and metabolism.  For Liberal Arts non-science students.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 141 General, Organic, and Biochemistry I

    Corequisite:  CHM 142L General, Organic, and Biochemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the basic chemical and physical properties of organic compounds.
    2.  Complete basic organic chemical equations.
    3.  Understand the effects of simple organic compounds on living things.
    4.  Determine the formulas and IUPAC names of simple organic compounds.
    5.  Predict the physical states and boiling point trends of simple organic compounds.
    6.  Understand the significance of steroeisomers and their role in biochemistry.
    7.  Understand the structures and basic chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes, hormones and vitamins.
    8.  Understand the basic principles of metabolism.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of four exams.

  
  •  

    CHM 142 L - General, Organic, and Biochemistry II Laboratory


    A continuation of CHM 141L General, Organic, and Biochemistry Laboratory I.  Laboratory emphasizing organic and biochemical reactions which substantiate classroom lectures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 141 General, Organic, and Biochemistry I and CHM 141L General, Organic, and Biochemistry I Laboratory

    Corequisite:  CHM 142 General, Organic, and Biochemistry II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the basic differences between organic and inorganic compounds.
    2.  Complete basic organic chemical equations of the main organic chemical functional groups based on laboratory observations.
    3.  Determine the formulas and IUPAC names of simple organic compounds based on models.
    4.  Prepare aspirin and chemically compare the students aspirin to commercial aspirin.
    5.  Prepare polymers and compare their strength and chemical properties to commercial polymers.
    6.  Understand the significance of steroeisomers and their role in biochemistry based on models.
    7.  Understand the structures and basic organic chemical reactions of carbohydrates, lipids, soaps, and proteins.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of laboratory reports and quizzes.

  
  •  

    CHM 145 - General Chemistry I


    Comprehensive treatment of general chemistry for the science-oriented student.  Builds on their prior chemistry, with emphasis on the basic laws and theories of chemistry and their derivation from experimental evidence.  Presents the qualitative and quantitative aspects of matter's composition and changes and their unifying principles.  Includes physical and chemical properties, periodicity of elements, stoichiometry, current atomic and bonding theories, laws and theories of physical states and changes of state, solution chemistry, and thermochemistry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Regents Chemistry (75 minimum final grade) or CHM 090 Preparatory Chemistry, MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or Math A (minimum grade of 85)

    Corequisite:  CHM 145L General Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the use of the Scientific Method and its importance in accessing experimental data.
    2.  Understand the method of factor labeling and its application of solving a variety of chemistry problems, especially mole relationships.
    3.  Understand the language of chemistry with regard to nomenclature, equation writing and stoichiometry.
    4.  Demonstrate the intricate nature of the elements by examining atomic structure, electronic configuration and formation of compounds through techniques such as spectroscopy.
    5.  Understand chemistry laws with their respective chemical equations to explore the gas laws, thermochemistry, atomic structure and bonding.
    6.  Develop a chemical aptitude to understand the importance of chemical structure of compounds with respect to bonding, intermolecular relationships and molecular geometry.  This chemical awareness will be utilized to comprehend complex chemistry scenarios such as oxidation reduction systems; global climate change; pharmaceutical research; nanotechnology; energy transformations; and many other areas where chemistry helps individuals to explain the laws of nature.

  
  •  

    CHM 145 L - General Chemistry I Laboratory


    Laboratory experiments to emphasize the empirical basis for the principles discussed in lecture and the proper gathering and interpretation of experimental data.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CHM 145 General Chemistry I

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Work efficiently in a laboratory setting because they will know how to make reagents; dilute solutions; physically separate phases; and calculate appropriate amounts of reagents to control chemical reactions.
    2.  Understand measuring masses, volumes and physical parameters such as pressure to determine quantities of a variety of variables either dependent or independent.
    3.  Use many diversified analytical techniques (tritration, precipitation, calorimetry, and others) to determine the identity or quantity of a chemical component.
    4.  Employ inductive as well as deductive reasoning to report the chemical structure or amount of an unknown using a multitude of chemical reactions such as acid-base chemistry.
    5.  Understand the nature of atoms, elements and compounds through spectroscopy; periodic table reactivity; chemical bonding; solution interactions; and molecular geometry.

  
  •  

    CHM 146 - General Chemistry II


    Continuation of CHM 145 General Chemistry I including thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, equilibrium in aqueous solution, acids and bases, coordination chemistry and electrochemistry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 145 General Chemistry I, CHM 145L General Chemistry I Laboratory and Math B (minimum grade of 65) or MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry

    Corequisite:  CHM 146L General Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Manipulate the colligative properties to determine molality, molarity, mole fraction, % composition, osmotic pressure as well as molar masses of compounds.
    2.  Understand graphing techniques to ascertain the rate constants of chemical reactions; energy of activation, Ea; equilibrium constants, Kc; and acid-base dissocation constants, (Ka and Kb).
    3.  Understand advanced thermochemistry functions such as Enthalpy, H; Entropy, S; and Gibbs-Free Energy, G to determine feasibility of chemical reactions.
    4.  Understand oxidation reduction systems to illustrate the value of redox reactions such as combustion processes and their thermochemistry relationships with respect to energy generation.
    5.  Understand the value of natural logarithmic (ln functions) and logarithmic (log functions) in the determination of rate constants; understanding half-life for radioactive isotopes; and solution concentrations of specific analytes (i.e., pH measurements to determine hydrogen ion concentrations).
    6.  Understand electrochemistry as it pertains to electromotive force, Eo; oxidation reduction reactions; galvanic and electrochemical cells; battery construction; and fuel cell technology.

  
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    CHM 146 L - General Chemistry II Laboratory


    Continuation of CHM 145 Laboratory with experiments designed to illustrate thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, qualitative analysis, and electro-chemistry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CHM 146 General Chemistry II

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Determine the molar mass of compounds from freezing point depression, boiling point elevation, vapor pressure lowering and/or osmotic pressure.
    2.  Utilize graphing techniques and linear regression analysis to calculate rate constants, equilibrium constants, Kc and acid-base dissociation constants.
    3.  Understand acid-base systems, pH and buffer solutions (calculating pH values for buffers using the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation.
    4.  Understand the Laws of Thermodynamics to calculate Enthalpy, H; Entropy, S; and Gibbs-Free Energy, G.  These interpretations will be used to determine exothermic/endothermic nature of chemical reactions as well as feasibility.
    5.  Understand how to use Electrochemistry to investigate oxidation reduction reactions for quantitative analysis and to understand battery construction.  Electromotive force values will be determined and used to illustrate electron flow in both galvanic and electrolytic cells.

  
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    CHM 245 - Organic Chemistry I


    A fundamental treatment of organic chemistry.  Organic nomenclature, chemical properties of selected functional groups, mechanisms, stereochemistry and synthetic methods.  For Liberal Arts science majors and Engineering Science students with departmental approval.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 146 General Chemistry II

    Corequisite:  CHM 245L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the IUPAC rules of nomenclature to the alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, and alkynes.
    2.  Draw the structures of the above mentioned compounds given their names.
    3.  Interpret Lewis, condensed, and line-angle structural formulas.
    4.  Predict the hybridization and geometry of the atoms in a molecule.
    5.  Identify constitutional isomers and stereoisomers.
    6.  Describe the structures and relative stabilities of carbocations and carbanions.
    7.  Given an IR spectrum, identify the characteristic peaks and functional groups.
    8.  Use IR data to propose structures for unknown organic compounds.
    9.  Classify molecules as chiral or achiral, and identify mirror planes of symmetry.
    10.  Identify asymmetric carbon atoms, and name them using (R) and (S) nomenclature.
    11.  Draw all stereoisomers of a given structure.
    12.  Classify stereoisomers as enantiomers, diastereomers, or meso compounds.
    13.  Predict the products of SN1, SN2, E1, and E2 reactions, including stereochemistry.
    14.  Identify the predominant reaction pathway as SN1, SN2, E1, or E2.
    15.  Predict the major and minor products of addition and elimination reactions using Markovnikov's rule and Zaitsev's rule.
    16.  Use the cis-trans tystem or the E,Z sequence rules to classify alkenes.
    17.  Predict the products of dehydrohalogenation, dehalogenation, and dehydration.
    18.  Propose synthetic routes to alkenes and alkynes via multi-step syntheses.
    19.  Predict products of additions, oxidations, and reductions of alkenes and alkynes.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed via 8 quizzes and 12 exams.

  
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    CHM 245 L - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory


    Basic techniques of separation and purification such as simple distillation, fractional distillation, steam distillation and extraction.  Characterization methods including melting point, gas chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and classification tests.  Introduction to modern organic synthesis with emphasis on miniscale techniques and methods of separation and purification.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Accurately record data and observations in a properly maintained lab notebook.
    2.  Construct a well-written lab report that concisely presents all the components of an experiment.
    3.  Separate and purify compounds by simple distillation, fractional distillation, steam distillation and extraction.
    4.  Charaterize compounds by melting point, gas chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and classification tests.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed via lab notebooks, lab reports and a written lab exam.

  
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    CHM 246 - Organic Chemistry II


    A continuation of CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I including spectroscopy and introduction to molecules of biological importance.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I

    Corequisite:  CHM 246L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply IUPAC rules of nomenclature to alcohols, arenes, ethers, phenols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, carbohydrates, amino acids, and proteins.
    2.  Draw the structures of the above mentioned compounds given their names.
    3.  Outline synthetic routes to primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols.
    4.  Show how oxidizing agents can be used to convert alcohols to aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids.
    5.  Describe the conversion of alcohols to alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, ethers, esters, and alkoxides.
    6.  Use NMR data to propose structures for unknown organic compounds.
    7.  Explain how the Williamson synthesis is used to prepare ethers.
    8.  Identify the major product(s) in electrophilic aromatic substitutions.
    9.  Propose synthetic routes to substituted benzenes via multi-step pathways.
    10.  Use Grignard reagents in synthetic schemes that convert aldehydes and ketones to alcohols.
    11.  Describe the use of the Fischer esterification reaction to make esters from carboxylic acids.
    12.  Show how an amino group can be attached to an aromatic ring via the reduction of a nitroarene.
    13.  Devise synthetic routes to substituted arenes via the Sandmeyer reaction.
    14.  Draw and name the cyclic structures of monosaccharides.
    15.  Classify disaccharides and polysaccharides as reducing or nonreducing.
    16.  Draw and name the structures of peptides.
    17.  Determine the structure of a peptide given sequencing data.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed via 8 quizzes and 12 exams.

  
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    CHM 246 L - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory


    A continuation of CHM 245L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory including an introduction to complex multi-step synthesis with emphasis on minicale techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I and CHM 245L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

    Corequisite:  CHM 246 Organic Chemistry II

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Accurately record data and observations in a properly maintained lab notebook.
    2.  Construct a well-written lab report that concisely presents all the components of an experiment.
    3.  Separate and purify compounds by simple distillation, recrystallization, fractional crystallization and extraction.
    4.  Characterize compounds by melting point, thin layer chromatography, infrared spectroscopy and classification tests.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed via lab notebooks, lab reports and a written lab exam.

  
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    CHM 247 - Biochemistry


    A study of the chemical and physical properties of biomolecules occurring in living organisms including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids.  Enzyme kinetics particularly emphasized.  Experiences in the laboratory involve the application of techniques used in biochemical investigations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 245 Organic Chemistry I
     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand how chemical models can be developed and tested on the basis of empirical evidence and the scientific method.
    2.  Recognize that modern chemical science is based upon the idea of atoms, their combination in compounds, and their recombination in the course of chemical reactions.
    3.  Understand that atomic, molecular and ionic particles are in constant motion.
    4.  Realize that physical and chemical properties of matter result from subatomic particles that behave according to physical rules not apparent in the behavior of macroscopic objects, and they must realize the importance of spectroscopy in establishing this behavior.
    5.  Understand how atoms combine in covalent molecules, coordination complexes and ionic solids, and understand the importance of the 3-D arrangements of atoms and ions in these molecules.
    6.  Understand the principal laws of thermodynamics and how these dictate the behavior of chemical substances.
    7.  Possess a mental library of common substances, their physical properties, and reactions that they undergo.  The major classes of organic chemicals and their reactions, the characteristic reactions of other elements of the periodic table, solubility, acid/base, and redox chemistry all must be familiar to students.
    8.  Understand how the study of the rates of chemical reactions and the structures of the products of these reactions can lead to knowledge of the detailed atomic-level behavior of chemical substances and elucidation of their chemical and physical properties.
    9.  Use their knowledge of chemical reactivity to plan and execute the preparation of compounds from common starting materials.
    10.  Have the necessary knowledge and strategies for the separation, identification and quantification of compounds and elelments from complex mixtures.  Students must also be able to identify uncertainties associated with these measurements.
    11.  Use traditional and modern laboratory equipment to measure chemical and physical properties of substances and to be able to correlate the resulting data with chemical models of structure and reactivity.
    12.  Understand the fundamental physical and chemical principles involved in instrumental chemical analyses.  Students must understand the chemistry relevant to sampling and sample preparation and must apply these to the successful operation of instruments regardless of model or manufacturer.
    13.  Work independently using their own hands and intellect to solve chemical problems with traditional and modern laboratory tools.
    14.  Know how to retrieve detailed information about chemical and physical properties of substances and accounts of other experimental or theoretical research.

     

  
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    CHM 265 - Analytical Chemistry


    Analytical Chemistry serves as an introduction to laboratory techiques with an emphasis on quantitate data gathering and analysis.  By course end, the student should be able to identify the appropriate laboratory technique to solve several types of chemistry problems, thoroughly explain the implementation of several techniques, statistically analyze data, and communicate results in standard scientific research paper format.  Techniques investigated include atomic spectroscopy, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and spectrophotometry, as well as several titration and electrochemical techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 146 and 146L General Chemistry II and General Chemistry II Laboratory, with a minimum grade of "D", MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry, with a minimum grade of "D"

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the basic scientific principles for following techniques:  atomic spectroscopy, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, spectrophotometry, as well as several titration and electrochemical techniques.
    2.  Perform standard laboratory calculations.
              a.  Carry uncertainty through calculations
    3.  Calibrate standard laboratory equipment, such as burets and pipets.
    4.  Collect data during laboratory exercises using select techniques discussed in lecture.
    5.  Keep a well-organized laboratory notebook which thoroughly documents laboratory experiments.
    6.  Analyze laboratory data for meaning.
              a.  Use electronic spreadsheet programs (example: Microsoft Excel)
              b.  Use appropriate statistical analysis to identify insignificant outlying data and determine relative and absolute uncertainty in results
    7.  Report results which agree with anticipated results, within specified tolerances.
    8.  Write complete laboratory reports which follow the reporting format used in scientific publications.


     

  
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    CHM 265 L - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory


    Analytical Chemistry Laboratory serves as an introduction to laboratory techniques with an emphasis on quantitate data gathering and analysis.  By course end, the student should be able to identify the appropriate laboratory technique to solve several types of chemistry problems, thoroughly explain the implementation of several techniques, statistically analyze data, and communicate results in standard scientific research paper format.  Techniques investigated include atomic spectroscopy, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and spectrophotometry, as well as several titration and electrochemical techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites: CHM 146 General Chemistry II and CHM 146L General Chemistry II Laboratory, with a minimum grade of "D", MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry, with a minimum grade of "D".

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the basic scientific principles for following techniques:  atomic spectroscopy, gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, spectrophotometry, as well as several titration and electrochemical techniques.
    2.  Perform standard laboratory calculations.
              a.  Carry uncertainty through calculations
    3.  Calibrate standard laboratory equipment, such as burets and pipets.
    4.  Collect data during laboratory exercises using select techniques discussed in lecture.
    5.  Keep a well-organized laboratory notebook which thoroughly documents laboratory experiments.
    6.  Analyze laboratory data for meaning.
              a.  Use electronic spreadsheet programs (example: Microsoft Excel)
              b.  Use appropriate statistical analysis to identify insignificant outlying data and determine relative and absolute uncertainty in results
    7.  Report results which agree with anticipated results, within specified tolerances.
    8.  Write complete laboratory reports which follow the reporting format used in scientific publications.


  
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    CHM 290 - Forensic Toxicology


    Application of the principles of forensic toxicology and the related forensic sciences within the scope of medical-legal investigation.  Drug and poison analysis, examination of physical evidence and death investigation.  Laboratory sessions will provide basic knowledge of forensic analysis utilizing microscopy, gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography and spectroscopy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CHM 120 Fundamental Chemistry or CHM 145 General Chemistry I or permission of department

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the role of poisons and drugs in the human body.
    2.  Understand the use of the gas chromatograph.
    3.  Determine the presence of drugs or poisons in body tissues, organs, or fluids.
    4.  Perform basic algebraic manipulations to relative to simple chemical calculations.
    5.  Perform mathematical manipulations such as unit analysis with proper attention to units and significant figures.
    6.  Use the concept of the mole in quantitative chemical calculations.
    7.  Balance chemical equations.
    8.  Calculate amounts of chemicals involved in poisonings and LD 50.
    9.  Calculate and utilize solution concentration units such as molarity.
    10.  Classify poisons and drugs.
    11.  Use concepts of pH in acidic and basic solutions.
    12.  Understand the use of the mass spectrometer.
    13.  Understand the ideal gas law and its application in poisonous gases.
    14.  Understand the use of liquid chromatography.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcome will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, chapter exams, and the final exam.

  
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    CHM 291 - Special Topics in Chemistry


    Special courses covering particular topics in the field of Chemistry beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning Outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
  •  

    CHM 292 - Special Topics in Chemistry


    Special courses covering particular topics in the field of Chemistry beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning Outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
  •  

    CHM 293 - Special Topics in Chemistry


    Special courses covering particular topics in the field of Chemistry beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning Outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
  •  

    CHM 294 - Special Topics in Chemistry


    Special courses covering particular topics in the field of Chemistry beyond the scope of normal course offerings.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning Outcomes will be developed depending on the area of study.

  
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    CHM 298 - Chemistry Senior Seminar


    This course is a capstone course for students in the LAAS program who plan to go on to major in chemistry or a related area.  Students will learn to search for, read, and interpret scientific papers.  Students will also be required to give oral presentations and poster board sessions based on their research.  Leaders in research from various areas of environmental, forensic, medicinal, and industrial chemistry will also be invited to present.  This will prepare students for success at a 4-year college.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  CHM 145 Chemistry and CHM 146 Chemistry

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to search a scientific journal database for articles related to their interest.
    2.  Understand how to read and evaluate scientific papers.
    3.  Demonstrate the ability to convey complicated scientific topics in a understandable manner to peers.
    4.  Summarize the information learned from an oral presentation and ask relevant questions.
    5.  Conduct a formal presentation on a current topic in chemistry.

  
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    CHM 299 - Independent Study


    The student undertakes an independent project in his/her specialty under the guidance of a faculty member.  Only one independent study course allowed per semester.  Consideration may be given a project involving a work assignment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  permission of department

    Credits: (1-4)
    Hours
    (1-4 Class Hours), (1-4 Laboratory Hours)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  State a scientific problem.
    2.  Develop a testable hypothesis.
    3.  Develop a null hypothesis.
    4.  Design experimental studies.
    5.  Collect and analyze data.
    6.  Make conclusions.

    Methods of Assessing Outcomes:

    The expected learning outcomes will be assessed through the use of homework assignments and/or quizzes, chapter exams, and the final exam.

  
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    CIV 105 - Introductory AutoCAD


    An introduction to computer aided drafting using AutoCAD.  Instruction includes file management, basic drawing commands, creating, editing and manipulation of drawing elements, and dimensioning.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create and/or delete basic geometric entities such as lines, arcs, circles, points, chamfers, fillets.
    2.  Edit (trim, extnd, break) basic geometric entities.
    3.  Manipulate and/or copy existing geometry by moving, rotating, or mirroring it.
    4.  Use screen controls to redraw-pan, or zoom within a view of a model.
    5.  Verify various data about existing entities in order to properly analyze existing geometry.
    6.  Dimension and label drawings.
    7.  Save and/or recall file properly.

  
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    CIV 113 - Engineering Drawing I w/CAD


    An introductory course in the fundamentals of engineering drawing and the basics of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD).  Manual drafting techniques are integrated with extensive use of AutoCAD.  Topics include use of the drawing instruments, geometric construction, freehand sketching, orthographic projection, sectional and auxiliary views and proper dimensioning techniques.  CAD topics include file management; command structure; creating, editing, and manipulating drawing elements; dimensioning.  Students will gain an understanding of engineering drawing concepts by applying them in both manual drafting and AutoCAD assignments.

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    MET 113
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be aware of the requirements of modern graphic language and be able to apply these requirements through both manual and CAD drafting techniques.
    2.  Understand and use professional language including abbreviations, specifications, and terminology associated with the development of working drawings.
    3.  Use both the Architect's and Engineer's Scale in the development of both manual and CAD drawings.
    4.  Use board-drafting tools in the completion of engineering drawings.
    5.  Sketch and construct orthographic projections, sectional views, and 3D drawings using manual drafting techniques.
    6.  Use proper dimensioning techniques in the development of both manual and CAD drawings.
    7.  Use AutoCAD including an understanding of menu options, status window, prompt line, history line, dialogue boxes, etc. in the completion of multiple types of CAD drawings.
    8.  Create, edit, and plot AutoCAD drawings.
    9.  Construct a working drawing complete with border, scale, details, titles, etc. using manual or CAD drafting techniques.

  
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    CIV 114 - Civil Drafting w/CAD


    An introduction to large scale mapping as used in highway and site design.  Laboratory exercises include preparation of site plans, boundary surveys, and road plans.  Laboratory exercises make extensive use of bearings and azimuths for line direction and location utilizing Cartesian Coordinates, elevation is represented by contours and profiles.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 113 Engineering Drawing I w/CAD, MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Represent direction by bearings and azimuths.
    2.  Use coordinates for mapping.
    3.  Be able to read and understand topographic maps.
    4.  Represent relief using contours and digital models.
    5.  Represent relief using contours.  Use maps to measure distance and area.
    6.  Map linear facilities using plan and profile drawings.
    7.  Using CAD to facilitate map preparation.
    8.  Have an appreciation of the basic structure of geographic information systems (GIS).

  
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    CIV 119 - Architectural Drawing w/CAD


    Fundamentals of architectural drafting including floor plans, elevations, sections, details, schedules, plot plans, plumbing layouts, electrical layouts.  Emphasis on residential drawings, instruction in the use of Architectural Desktop for the above types of drawings.  Drawing assignments done both manually and using AutoCAD.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 113 Engineering Drawing I w/CAD

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be aware of the considerations in the preliminary planning of a residence.
    2.  Understand the basic framing techniques and typical details for residential structures.
    3.  Have knowledge of materials and terminology used in residential construction.
    4.  Create the following architectrual working drawings using both board drafting tools and the college's Architectural CAD software:  Floor Plans, Basement/Foundation Plans, Section Views, Elevations, Site Plans, etc.
    5.  Be aware of architectural drafting conventions including common material symbols, appropriate lineweights, and level of detail required on various drawings.
    6.  Be proficient in the use of the college's architectural CAD software for creating the above residential plans.
    7.  Create basic three dimensional models of a residential structure using the college's Architectural CAD software.
    8.  Use proper dimension techniques for architectural working drawings.
    9.  Construct an architectural working drawing complete with border, scale, details, titles, etc. using manual or CAD drafting techniques.
    10.  Understand how to incorporate energy efficient design into residential structures.

  
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    CIV 124 - Mechanics (Statics)


    Instruction will be directed to the study of static force systems and equilibrium as applied to civil engineering structures.  Topics of study will include:  force distribution, moments, system equilibrium, free-body diagrams, centroids, moments of inertia.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    MET 134
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand, compute and resolve forces as vectors into concurrent force systems, parallel force systems, and non-concurrent force systems.
    2.  Understand moments and couples.
    3.  Understand and apply Varigon's Theorem.
    4.  Understand and solve problems in static equilibrium, including:
              a.  Computation of beam reactions
              b.  Calculate the magnitude of forces in truss members
              c.  Calculation of pin reactions in pin connected frames
    5.  Sketch free-body diagrams.
    6.  Understand and calculate center of gravity and the centroid of complex shapes.
    7.  Understand and calculate the moment of inertia of complex figures.

  
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    CIV 136 - Construction Methods & Management


    Principles of construction methods and management used in the construction industry including contracts, plans, specifications, methods, planning and scheduling, economics and safety.  Field trips to various local engineering and/or architectural firms/local construction sites.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have an understanding of the construction industry and the parties (owner, architect, engineer, contractor, subcontractors, construction manager, etc.) involved in the construction process.
    2.  Calculate % swell, % shrinkage, shrinkage factor, and load factor for use in earthwork computations.  Students will have an understanding of soil volume changes and resulting implications of those changes to construction costs.
    3.  Calculate and use the productivity rates for five types of heavy equipment including the backhoe, shovel, dragline, dozer, and loader.  In addition, students will have the ability to make an informed decision regarding the choice of equipment to be used for specific construction projects.
    4.  Understand various project planning and scheduling methods including the development of bar charts, arrow notation, and precedent notation.
    5.  Understand the critical path method (CPM) with implications for time and budget control within construction projects.
    6.  Calculate equipment costs including ownership and operating expenses with an understanding for use in the estimating of equipment expenses for construction projects.
    7.  Understand project safety and the importance of compliance to safety standards during the construction process.
    8.  Collaborate effectively with team members for purposes of research and class presentations of construction projects.
    9.  Appreciate the contractor's responsibilities involved in constructing LEED Certified buildings.

  
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    CIV 137 - Construction Inspection


    At some point in their career almost every civil engineer will be called upon to provide some level of construction inspection; others will dedicate their entire career to this specialty.  This course will prepare the student for employment as an inspector by reviewing the responsibilities and duties typically associated with the position; how to document quantities and to work with various materials as well as assuring a safe jobsite.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Prepare students for entry level inspection positions.
    2.  Instill the importance of maintaining safe jobsites.
    3.  Prepare the student for keeping clear concise documentation of all construction activities.
    4.  Prepare the student to perform basic construction inspection for the following activities:

    • Bituminous paving
    • Portland Cement paving
    • Highway earthwork
    • Installation of pipelines
    • Reinforced concrete


    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Clearly state the role of a construction inspector.
    2.  Outline the basic responsibilities of an inspector for maintaining a safe jobsite.
    3.  Express distances in stations.
    4.  Read highway plans.
    5.  Keep an inspector's diary.
    6.  Prepare inspection reports and documentation.
    7.  Perform basic inspection tasks for bituminous paving.
    8.  Perform basis inspection tasks for Portland Cement paving.
    9.  Perform basic inspection tasks for highway earthwork.
    10.  Perform basic inspection tasks for pipelines.
    11.  Perform basic inspection tasks for building foundations and reinforced concrete construction.

  
  •  

    CIV 159 - Architectural Drafting I w/CAD


    Development of working drawings for use in residential type construction.  Plot plans, floor plans, elevations, details, schedules, electrical layouts.  Lecture topics include construction materials, specifications, and methods.  Instruction in the use of Architectural Desktop for the above types of drawings.  Drawing assignments are done both manually and using AutoCAD.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 105 Introductory AutoCAD or CIV 113 Engineering Drawing I w/CAD

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the various uses of line types.
    2.  Make drawings accurately to scale.
    3.  Draw orthographic projections.
    4.  Draw sectional views.
    5.  Be aware of considerations in the preliminary planning of a residence.
    6.  Understand the basic framing techniques and typical details for residential structures.
    7.  Have knowledge of materials and terminology used in residential construction.
    8.  Create the following architectural working drawings using both board drafting tools and the college's Architectural CAD software:  Floor Plans, Basement/Foundation Plans, Section Views, Elevations, Site Plans, etc.
    9.  Be aware of architectural drafting conventions including common material symbols, appropriate lineweights, and level of detail required on various drawings.
    10.  Be proficient in the use of the college's architectual CAD software for creating the above residential plans.
    11.  Create basic three dimensional models of a residential structure using the college's Architectural CAD software.
    12.  Use proper dimension techniques for architectural working drawings.
    13.  Construct an architectural working drawing complete with border, scale, details, titles, etc. using manual or CAD drafting techniques.

  
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    CIV 170 - Introduction to GIS


    Digital spatial data has become a staple of modern society, from the GPS (global positioning systems) in your car to the targeted advertising in your mail all rely on GIS (geographic information systems) to analyze and map data spatially.  This course provides an introduction to mapping and analyzing spatial data using ArcGIS.  Particular attention will be given to understanding and using the two typical data types, raster and vector.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be proficient with ArcGIS software.
    2.  Understand and use GIS terminology.
    3.  Create maps of thematic subjects.
    4.  Use raster and vector data as appropriate in spatial analysis.
    5.  Use appropriate symbology for thematic maps.
    6.  Develop spatial queries for selecting features.
    7.  Prepare spatial queries for creating reports.

  
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    CIV 201 - Surveying I


    Introduction to the basic concepts of plane surveying as well as measurement by global position systems.  Class instruction covers the theory and application of measurement science.  Laboratory exercises develop skill in the use and care of surveying equipment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 114 Civil Drafting w/CAD or CIV 170 Introduction to GIS

    Prior or Concurrent:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand and apply the theory of measurement used in plane surveying.
    2.  Understand and use the basic mathematics required for plane surveying calculations.
    3.  Express direction by bearings and azimuths.
    4.  Keep field notes and operate surveying instruments for a survey crew.
    5.  Reduce level notes.
    6.  Compute closure, adjust, and calculate the area of a closed traverse.
    7.  Operate and care for the following types of surveying equipment:  surveyor's tape; compass; automatic level; transit; theodilite; and total station.
    8.  Prepare CAD maps based on the student measurements.
    9.  Work effectively as a member of a survey crew. 

  
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    CIV 202 - Surveying II


    This course covers the basics of horizontal and vertical curve geometry as used in highway design before undertaking the study of more advanced road design topics including:  use of mass diagrams to track earthwork on highways; control surveying mathematics; universal coordinate systems as used by NYSDOT; and boundary location, as needed for highway right-of-way.  Laboratory exercises will vary between CAD drawings and one or two outdoor exercises.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 201 Surveying I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this Course:

    After successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have a thorough understanding of the geometry of horizontal and vertical curves.
    2.  Use CAD to prepare plan and profile drawings.
    3.  Understand the calculations used for spiral curves.
    4.  Understand and apply mathematical methods for establishing location in non-Euclidian space.
    5.  Have a basic understanding of control surveying techniques and calculations.
    6.  Have a basic appreciation and understanding of global positioning systems (GPS).
    7.  Understand the fundamentals of geopgraphic information systems (GIS).

  
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    CIV 217 W - Materials Testing


    Civil Engineering projects require knowledge of many materials; this course introduces properties and testing of some of the most common including:  Portland cement concrete, aggregates, cement admixtures, bituminous materials, and ferrous metals.  Additional topics include:  design and proportioning of concrete mixes; placing and curing of concrete; and deformation measurement of materials under stress.  Students will learn  seven concrete sampling techniques required by American Concrete Institute and may elect to take the test for Concrete Field Testing Technician near the end of the semester.  This is a writing emphasis course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  CIV 219 Strength of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of the course students will be able to:

    1.  Understand the purpose and importance of inspection and testing on construction projects.
    2.  Have knowledge of the properties, qualities, and specifications for aggregates.
    3.  Be aware of the types of and properties of portland cement.
    4.  Understand the properties of portland cement concrete and requirements for quality concrete.
    5.  Know the proper procedures for mixing, placing, and curing concrete.
    6.  Understand the basics of concrete mix design.
    7.  Understand the importance of specifications for materials and procedures used in concrete construction.
    8.  Have a knowledge of bituminous materials including asphalt cement, liquid asphalt, emulsified asphalt.
    9.  Understand the types of bituminous pavements.
    10.  Perform seven field testing procedures used in concrete construction:  temperature, sampling, slump, entrained air by pressure meter, entrained air by the volumetric meter, preparation of samples for strength testing, unit weight.
    11.  Understand the requirements of the ASTM test specifications for the above seven field test procedures.
    12.  Work in teams to perform lab testing on concrete aggregates and portland cement concrete.
    13.  Prepare professional quality laboratory reports.
    14.  Analyze lab results and write about data trends, observations, and conclusions.

  
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    CIV 219 - Strength of Materials


    Behavior of materials due to axial force, shear force, and moments can be quantified by stress and strain.  Students will learn how to calculate stress and strain, apply Hooke's Law, draw shear and moment diagrams, calculate beam deflection, identify points of maximum and minimum stress and then use this information to select structural members.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics), MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry, MET 134 Statics

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1.  Have an understanding of the fundamental behavior of materials subject to axial force, shear, bending moment, and torsion.
    2.  Understand the relationships between stress and strain and be able to apply Hooke's Law.
    3.  Understand the concept of safety factors and allowable stresses.
    4.  Solve for reactions and draw shear and moment diagrams for statically determinate beams.
    5.  Calculate stresses due to axial force, shear force, bending moment and torsion.
    6.  Solve for beam deflections using the moment-area method.
    7.  Calculate combined stresses from combinations of axial plus bending, biaxial bending,and eccentric loadings.
    8.  Have an understanding of combined normal and shear stresses and be able to compute by applying Mohr's Circle.
    9.  Solve for reactions, shears and moments of statically indeterminate beams.

  
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    CIV 224 - Reinforced Concrete Design


    Fundamental theory and principles for design of reinforced concrete by the strength method.  Design, analysis and detailing of rectangular beams, T-beams, slabs and columns.  Integrated design and detailing projects.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 219 Strength of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Analyze and design rectangular beams, slabs, and T-beams for compression and T-beams for flexure using the strength method.
    2.  Design shear reinforcement for beams.
    3.  Calculate development lengths, splices, and bar cutoffs for tension bars.
    4.  Design a cantilever retaining wall.
    5.  Have an understanding of the use of current design specifications including the most up-to-date version of ACI-318.
    6.  Be familiar with the vaious types of concrete framing used in buildings and bridges.
    7.  Be familiar with the current industry standards for detailing reinforced concrete members.

  
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    CIV 226 - Structural Steel Design


    Fundamental theory and principles of design of simple steel structures using LRFD Method.  Design, investigation and detailing of beams, columns, tension and compression members and their connections.  Composite beams.  Includes an integrated design and detailing project.  Introduction to use of structural analysis/design computer program.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 219 Strength of Materials

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be familiar with the AISC Steel Construction Manual.
    2.  Understand the concepts of structural design by the Load and Resistance Factor Method and the Allowable Stress Design Method, and will understand the differences between the methods.
    3.  Analyze and design steel tension members.
    4.  Analyze and design steel compression members.
    5.  Analyze and design steel beams.
    6.  Design structural steel connections using bolting or welding.
    7.  Prepare detail drawings of structual steel connections.
    8.  Create fabrication drawings for steel members.
    9.  Design continuous steel beams using structural analysis software.

  
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    CIV 231 - Estimating & Construction Planning


    A systematic approach to estimating building project costs.  Semester long project will include building a cost estimate of a commercial building.  Microsoft EXCEL spreadsheet will be used as an estimating tool.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 119 Architectural Drafting w/CAD, CST 106 Computers in Technology

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have a sound foundation and knowledge of various aspects related to the construction estimating and bidding process including contracts, specifications, bonding requirements, types of estimates, estimate organization, overhead, contingencies, and profit.
    2.  Have the ability to use modern computer estimating tools including Microsoft Excel and Means Costworks software.
    3.  Have the ability to complete material takeoffs and associated material, labor, and equipment costs for building construction projects.
    4.  Have the ability to prepare a complete construction bidding package including the quantity takeoffs and cost estimate for a small commercial building.

  
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    CIV 237 - Hydraulics/Storm Water Management


    The principles of hydraulics and hydrology are covered, followed by application of these principles to the solution of stormwater runoff problems.  Runoff quantity is calculated by the Rational and Win-TR55 methods and then used to size culverts and stormsewer systems.  Manning's Equation is used for backwater analysis when establishing outlet control in culverts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand and be able to apply basic fluid mechanics.
    2.  Understand the hydrologic cycle and its relationship to storm runoff.
    3.  Compute storm runoff using the Rational and the SCS TR-55 Methods.
    4.  Calculate storm sewer flows.
    5.  Correctly size storm sewers.
    6.  Correctly size culverts.
    7.  Understand the desirability of using mitigation techniques such as on site detention basins to reduce storm flow.

 

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