Apr 19, 2018  
Website Catalog 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    ACM 208 L - Capstone Project


    This course will provide students with the opportunity to participate in a capstone project that will be sponsored by an aircraft repair company.  The students will work on specific inspection, troubleshooting, servicing, and repair of aircraft under the direct supervision of an FAA cerfified Aviation Maintenance Technician.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ACM 100, ACM 101, ACM 102, EET 090, ACM 150, ACM 151, ACM 152, ACM 153, ACM 200, ACM 201, ACM 202 and ACM 203

    Corequisites:  ACM 204, ACM 205, ACM 206 and ACM 208 (taught in the same semester)

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    9 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have completed an aircraft maintenance capstone project that will incorporate their technical knowledge gained in the previous 19 aircraft maintenance courses.

  
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    ADN 105 - Meeting Human Needs I


    The focus of this course is to introduce the student to the concepts and philosophy of the nursing program.  Gordon's Eleven Functional Health Patterns, Maslow's Hierarchy of Human Needs and the care of persons across the life cycle are presented.  Emphasis is placed on health assessment, health promotion and health maintenance related to self and others.

    The nursing process is introduced to guide the development of critical thinking skills in the delivery of care.  Pharmacological concepts are introduced as they relate to healthy individuals across the life cycle.  Under close supervision the student will use knowledge acquired in the classroom and lab skills to provide safe and effetive care.  The roles of the professional nurse are introduced.  These include:  professional behavior, communication, assessment, clinical decision making, caring, teaching-learning, collaboration and management of care.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, ENG 110 College Writing I, and PSY 110 General Psychology

    Credits: 7
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 2 Lab Hours, 6 Clinical Hours/Wk for 15 Weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of this course the student will practice as a caregiver who demonstrates basic competency in a real or simulated simulation in the eight roles of the nurse which include:  communication, professional behaviors, assessment, clinical decision-making, caring interventions, teaching/learning, collaboration, and manager of care.

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the professional attitudes and roles of the nurse.
    2.  Identify communication techniques used in patient interactions and documentation.
    3.  Assess patient using Gordon's Eleven Functional Patterns.
    4.  Demonstrate safe and culturally appropriate interventions.
    5.  Demonstrate critical thinking by using Nursing Process and Maslow in decision making.
    6.  Apply concepts of teaching/learning to educate patient.
    7.  Identify resources available for planning patient care.
    8.  Demonstrate safety and asepsis during basic nursing skills and medication administration.

  
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    ADN 106 - Meeting Human Needs II


    The focus of this course is the care of persons who have actual/potential health problems related to immunity, fluid and electrolytes, the integumentary system, surgery and health management.  Classroom, theory, and clinical practice integrate all eleven of Gordon's Functional Health Patterns, our beliefs about human caring, the nature of human beings, health and nursing.  The concepts of hierarchy of human needs and life cycle are applied to the nursing care of persons with common health problems.

    The nursing process is utilized as the modality through which critical thinking skills are applied in the delivery of care.  Emphasis is placed on health assessment, health promotion, health restoration, and health maintenance.  The student provides care using knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis, under supervision in a variety of settings and further develops the eight roles of the associate degree nurse.  The eight roles include:  professional behavior, communication, assessment, caring intervention, clinical decision making, teaching-learning, collaboration, and managing care.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ADN 105 Meeting Human Needs I, BIO 131 Human Biology I, ENG 110 College Writing I, PSY 110 General Psychology

    Prior or Concurrent:  BIO 132 Human Biology II, HST 210 Pharmacology, PSY 210 Human Development

    Credits: 7
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours, 6 Clinical Hours/Wk for 15 Weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of ADN 106, the student will practice as a caregiver who demonstrates intermediate competency in the eight roles of the nurse which include:  communication, professional behaviors, assessment, clinical decision-making, caring interventions, teaching/learning, collaboration, and manager of care.  When caring for persons experiencing disruptions in Health Perception/Health Management and Nutrition/Metabolic Function, the student will:

    1.  Analyze personal professional behavior within boundaries of nurse-patient relationship and organizational policies.
    2.  Use current technology available for documentation, data retrieval, and medication administration.
    3.  Analyze assessments according to Gordon's Functional Health Patterns.
    4.  Implement a plan of care incorporating individual cultural and/or spiritual differences.
    5.  Apply nursing process to clients experiencing pathologic changes across the life cycle using Maslow.
    6.  Construct a teaching/learning poster presentation choosing a topic related to course content.
    7.  Use resources available for planning patient care.
    8.  Apply the principles of safety, medical, and surgical asepsis during clinical practice.

  
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    ADN 112 - Holistic Health


    This course is open to all majors and requires no prerequisite.  An introductory foundation regarding complementary medicine, with an emphasis on holistic health for the individual and the healthcare provider, with a focus on body, mind, spirit, and emotions.  Diversity of healthcare is investigated as the student becomes familiar with multiple alternative therapies, stress management, meditation, exercise, and nutrition.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize the holistic concepts of whole person health and how it affects wellness and disease prevention.
    2.  Describe personal wellness model of body, mind, and spirit.
    3.  Understand and explore how stress affects all the levels of our being.
    4.  Compare and contrast traditional western medicine from complementary therapies.
    5.  Identify how complementary medicines work.
    6.  Identify traditional Chinese, Ayurveda, Native American healing elements.
    7.  Recognize various botanical healing medicines.
    8.  List manual healing practices.
    9.  Describe mind-body techniques.
    10.  Identify Spritual Therapies.

  
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    ADN 116 - Humor and Healthy Living


    Research has proven that humor has important benefits for one's health which include providing stress relief and enhanced coping skills, strengthening the immune system, and facilitating communication.  This class will provide an overview of the benefits of humor, enlighten the participant about current research, and enable him or her to develop ways to incorporate humor in everyday life. 

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Experience increased awareness of the benefits of humor and laughter.
    2.  Explore humor from a historical perspective.
    3.  Assess impact of humor in his or her personal life.
    4.  Explore humor as a form of complementary therapy.
    5.  Develop strategies to incorporate humor into his or her personal life.
    6.  Gather a resource bibliography for humor.

  
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    ADN 211 - Meeting Human Needs III


    The focus of this course is on the nursing care of people who have actual/potential health problems related to Gordon's health patterns of:  Nutrition/Metabolic, Elimination, and Sexuality/Reproductive.  Classroom theory and clinical practice integrate all eleven of Gordon's Functional Health Patterns.  Also integrated into this course are our beliefs about human caring, the nature of human beings, health and nursing.  The concepts of hierarchy of human needs and life-cycle are applied to the nursing care of persons with common health problems. 

    The nursing process is utilized as the modality through which critical thinking skills are applied in the delivery of care.  Emphasis is placed on health assessment, health promotion, health restoration and health maintenance.  The student provides nursing care to persons in specialty and general medical/surgical units, as well as in community settings.  Students assume the nursing practice roles of the Associate Degree nurse with direction.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ADN 105 Meeting Human Needs I, ADN 106 Meeting Human Needs II, BIO 131 Human Biology I, BIO 132 Human Biology II, ENG 110 College Writing I, HST 210 Pharmacology, PSY 110 General Psychology, PSY 210 Developmental Psychology

    PRIOR ad Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology and CLT 209 Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory or BIO 150 General Microbiology

    Credits: 6.5
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hours, 6 Clinical Hours/Wk for 15 Weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon Completion of ADN 211, the student will practice as a caregiver who demonstrates more advanced competency in the eight roles of the nurse which include:  communication, professional behaviors, assessment, clinical decision-making, caring interventions, teaching/learning, collaboration, and manager of care.  When caring for persons experiencing disruptions in Sexuality/Reproductive, Nutritional/Metabolic, and Elimination, the student will:

    1.  Demonstrate accountability within the ethical, legal and regulatory framework of nursing.
    2.  Communicate professionally with colleagues and therapeutically with clients.
    3.  Accurately interpret assessments of maternal/child clients and clients with disruptions in endocrine, renal and GI systems, according to Gordon's Functional Health Patterns.
    4.  Apply nursing process in the care of clients experiencing disruptions in human functioning.
    5.  Support clients and significant others experiencing disruptions in human functioning by incorporating the dimensions of human caring.
    6.  Design teaching plans specific to maternal/child care, endocrine, renal and GI disorders.
    7.  Collaborate with health team members in the provision of care.
    8.  Develop an individualized and prioritized plan of care for clients based on variations in assessments across the life-cycle.
    9.  Maintain safety and asepsis at appropriate skill level.

  
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    ADN 212 - Meeting Human Needs IV


    The focus of this course is on the nursing care of persons who have actual/potential health problems related to Gordon's health patterns of Activity/Exercise and Sleep/Rest.  Classroom theory and clinical practice integrate all eleven of Gordon's Functional Health Patterns.  Also integrated into this course are our beliefs about human caring, the nature of human beings, health and nursing.  The concepts of hierarchy of human needs and life-cycle are applied to the nursing care of persons with common health problems.  The nursing process is utilized as the modality through which critical thinking skills are applied in the delivery of care.  Emphasis is placed on health assessment, health promotion, health restoration and health maintenance.  The student provides nursing care to persons in specialty and general medical/surgical units, as well as in community settings.  Students assume the nursing practice roles of the Associate Degree nurse with direction.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ADN 105 Meeting Human Needs I, ADN 106 Meeting Human Needs II, BIO 131 Human Biology I, BIO 132 Human Biology II, ENG 110 College Writing I, HST 210 Pharmacology, PSY 110 General Psychology, PSY 210 Developmental Psychology

    PRIOR and Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology and CLT 209 Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory or BIO 150 General Microbiology

    Credits: 6.5
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hours, 6 Clinical Hours/Wk for 15 Weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of ADN 212, the student will practice as a caregiver who demonstrates more advanced competency in roles of the nurse.  When caring for persons experiencing disruptions in Activity/Exercise and Sleep/Rest, the student will:

    1.  Demonstrate accountability within the ethical, legal and regulatory framework of nursing.
    2.  Communicate professionally with colleagues and therapeutically with clients.
    3.  Accurately interpret assessments of clients with disruptions in hematologic, vascular, cardiovascular, respiratory, orthopedic function according to Gordon's Functional Health Patterns.
    4.  Support clients and significant others experiencing disruptions in human functioning by incorporating the dimensions of human caring.
    5.  Adapt interventions to provide coordinated, safe and culturally competent care.
    6.  Design evidence based teaching plans specific to hematologic, vascular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and orthopedic disorders.
    7.  Collaborate with health team members in provision of care.
    8.  Develop an individualized and prioritized plan of care for clients based on variations in assessments across the lifespan.
    9.  Maintain safety and asepsis at appropriate skill level.

  
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    ADN 213 - Meeting Human Needs V


    The focus of this course is on the nursing care of persons who have actual/potential health problems related to Gordon's health patterns of Values/Beliefs, Role/Relationship, and Self Perception/Self-Concept.  Classroom theory and clinical practice integrate all eleven of Gordon's Functional Health Patterns.  Applications specific to Leadership/Management and Mental Health Disorders are presented.  The concepts of hierarchy of human needs across the life-cycle are applied to the nursing care of people with common health problems.  The nursing process is utilized as the modality through which critical thinking skills are applied with an emphasis on health assessment, health promotion, health restoration and health maintenance.  The student provides care to people in specialty and general medical/surgical units, long term care, as well as commmunity settings.  Students assume the nursing practice roles of the Associate Degree nurse with increasing autonomy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ADN 105 Meeting Human Needs I, ADN 106 Meeting Human Needs II, BIO 131 Human Biology I, BIO 132 Human Biology II, ENG 110 College Writing I, HST 210 Pharmacology, PSY 110 General Psychology, PSY 210 Developmental Psychology

    PRIOR and Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology and CLT 209 Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory or BIO 150 General Microbiology

    Credits: 6.5
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hours, 6 Clinical Hours/Wk for 15 Weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of ADN 213, the student will practice as a caregiver who demonstrates more advanced competency in the roles of the nurse.  When caring for persons experiencing disruptions in Values/Beliefs, Role/Relationships, and Self Perception/Self-Concept, the student will:

    1.  Demonstrate accountability within the legal ethical and regulatory framework of nursing.
    2.  Appraise therapeutic communication techniques regarding nursing ethics/values to meet patient, family and colleague needs.
    3.  Evaluate patients across the life-cycle with a focus on patients with mental health disorders.
    4.  Adapt interventions to provide coordinated, safe and culturally competent care.
    5.  Utilize the nursing process to evaluate clinical decisions involving management of patient care which includes patients, family support systems and resources.
    6.  Implement evidence-based teaching plans specific to clients experiencing disruptions in mental health.
    7.  Collaborate with patient, family and health care team to creatively solve problems.
    8.  Delegate activities of assistive personnel.
    9.  Maintain safety and asepsis while managing care in varied health care settings.

  
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    ADN 214 - Meeting Human Needs VI


    The focus of this course is on the nursing care of persons who have actual/potential problems related to the health patterns of Cognitive/Perceptual and Coping/Stress.  Classroom theory and clinical practice integrate all eleven of Gordon's Functional Health Patterns.  Also integrated into this course are our beliefs about human caring, the nature of human beings, health and nursing.  The concepts of hierarchy of human needs and life-cycle are applied to the nursing care of persons with common health problems.  The nursing process is utilized as the modality through which critical thinking skills are applied in the delivery of care.  Emphasis is placed on health assessment, health promotion, health restoration, and health maintenance.  The student provides care to persons in specialty and general medical/surgical units, as well as community settings.  Students assume the roles of the Associate Degree nurse with increasing autonomy.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ADN 105 Meeting Human Needs I, ADN 106 Meeting Human Needs II, BIO 131 Human Biology I, BIO 132 Human Biology II, ENG 110 College Writing I, HST 210 Pharmacology, PSY 110 General Psychology, PSY 210 Developmental Psychology

    PRIOR and Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology and CLT 209 Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory or BIO 150 General Microbiology

    Credits: 6.5
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 1 Laboratory Hours, 6 Clinical Hours per week for 15 weeks
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of ADN 214, the student will practice as a caregiver who demonstrates more advanced competency in the roles of the nurse.  When caring for persons experiencing disruptions in Cognitive/Perceptual, and Coping/Stress, the student will:

    1.  Demonstrate accountability within the legal ethical and regulatory framework of nursing.
    2.  Appraise therapeutic communication techniques to meet patient and family needs.
    3.  Evaluate patients across the life cycle with focus on patients experiencing disruptions in neurosensory function and patients with neoplastic disorders.
    4.  Adapt interventions to provide coordinated, safe and culturally appropriate care.
    5.  Utilize the nursing process to evaluate clinical decisions involving patients, family, support systems and community groups.
    6.  Implement evidence-based teaching plans specific to clients experiencing disruptions in neurosensory function and with neoplastic disorders.
    7.  Collaborate with patient, family and health care team to creatively solve problems.
    8.  Supervise activities of assistive personnel.
    9.  Maintain safety and asepsis in providing care to patient and family.

  
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    ADN 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project in the nursing field which is beyond the scope of requirements of the courses offered by the department conducted under the direction of a nursing faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.  Independent study is available to students who have completed one semester of Professional Nursing Courses.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ADN 105 Meeting Human Needs I

    Credits: 1-7
    Hours
    1-4 Class Hours, 0-6 Laboratory Hours, 0-6 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2.  Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
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    ANT 110 - Physical Anthropology and Archeology


    Introduction to human evolutionary history and present day variation examining genetics, ecology, fossils and the primate order.  Relationships of physical evolution to early cultural developments as revealed by the archeological record.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the history of human evolution as recorded in the fossil record.
    2.  Understand human adaptation and variation and how it evolves.
    3.  Identify basic archeological methods.
    4.  Explain the development of early human societies and cultures.
    5.  Evaluate archeological explanations for cultural change.

  
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    ANT 111 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    Introduction to the study of culture as the behavioral adaptation unique to human societies.  Cultural characteristics shared by all humans and major variations found among specific groups.  Explanations for rules of social interaction in common activities, the social functions of institutions, language in a culturally defined system of communication, modernization in our own and third world societies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of basic issues, methods and theories in cultural anthropology.
    2.  Recognize and apply scientific methodology in theory and practice.
    3.  Develop comparative knowledge of a variety of case studies and ethnographies.
    4.  Understand beliefs and behaviors different from their own.
    5.  Categorize, analyze and manipulate quantitative and qualitative cultural anthropological data.
    6.  Develop tolerance and respect for the cultures of others.
    7.  Identify and articulate ethical dilemmas in the field of cultural anthropology.

  
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    ANT 112 - Introduction to Archaeology


    An introduction to current archaeological issues, methods, and theories.  The nature of archaeological data and the means by which they are gathered, analyzed, dated, and interpreted, will be considered by reviewing current research on both prehistoric and historic sites.  Scientific methods of research formulation, survey, excavation and analysis will be emphasized in both the laboratory and lecture. 

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of basic archaeological issues, methods and theories.
    2.  Recognize and apply scientific methodology in theory and practice.
    3.  Identify principal archaeological sites, cultures, periods and processes.
    4.  Apply their knowledge of scientific archaeology by critiquing an example of popular psuedoscience in archaeology.
    5.  Categorize, analyze and manipulate quantitative and qualitative archaeological data.
    6.  Develop tolerance and respect for the cultures of others.
    7.  Identify and articulate ethical dilemmas in the field of archaeology.

  
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    ANT 113 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology


    An introduction to the biological and evolutionary history of humans.  The course will consider basic concepts of evolutionary theory and human genetics, the fossil record for human evolution, the behavior and ecology of living non-human primates, and human population biological adaptation and diversity.  Laboratory will include study of primate evolution, human anatomy, and DNA analysis.  The laboratory also requires a full weekend field trip.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate knowledge of basic issues, methods and theories in biological anthropology.
    2.  Recognize and apply scientific methodology in theory and practice.
    3.  Evaluate the scientific evidence for human evolution.
    4.  Apply their knowledge of scientific biological anthropology by critiquing an example of popular psuedoscience in biological anthropology.
    5.  Categorize, analyze and manipulate quantitative and qualitative biological anthropological data.
    6.  Develop tolerance and respect for the cultures of others.
    7.  Identify and articulate ethical dilemmas in the field of biological anthropology.

  
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    ANT 114 - Language, Culture, and Communication


    An introduction to the multifaceted meanings and uses of language in society.  Basic discussion of issues in the evolution of language, language learning, language and cultural meaning and sociolinguistics.  Relationships between language and class, race and gender.  ANT 114 will fill the Social/Behavioral Sciences requirement.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Better understand the relationship between language, power and society as expressed through multilingualism, diglossia, language and social identity, and language ideology, among other concepts discussed in this course.
    2.  Define and provide relevant examples of all the important terms, concepts and expressions discussed in this course.
    3.  Add to, and critique, classmates' understanding of important course concepts.
    4.  Summarize and critique at least two scholarly essays written by professional sociolinguists.
    5.  Research, write and document a paper addressing problems/issues confronting a linguistic minority.
    6.  Conduct field research regarding an assigned linguistic variable, analyze the results, and present findings to the class and the instructor.

  
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    ANT 204 - Human Evolution


    An introduction to the fundamentals of evolutionary theory and the application of this framework for our understanding of human evolutionary history.  Introduction to the theory of evolution, its historical background and its articulation by Charles Darwin and modern modifications to Darwinian evolution.  The anatomical and phylogenetic context of human evolution is explored by discussing the origin and evolution of primates and the origins of the first hominids and their place in the human family tree.  Origins of the genus Homo, the criteria used to differentiate these specimens and the emergence of the modern human suite of anatomical and behavioral characteristics.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Provide students with a rigorous introduction to epistemology and scientific methodology.
    2.  Introduce the fundamentals of evolutionary theory and the application of this framework for our understanding of human evolutionary history.
    3.  Introduce the theory of evolution, its historical background and its articulation by Charles Darwin and modern modifications to Darwinian evolution.
    4.  Explore the anatomical and phylogenetic context of human evolution by discussing the origin and evolution of primates and the origins of the first hominids and their place in the human family tree.
    5.  Explain the origins of the genus Homo, the criteria used to differentiate these specimens and the emergence of the modern human suite of anatomical and behavioral characteristics.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Acquire a firm understanding of what constitutes a scientific theory.
    2.  Have an understanding of the components of the Theory of Evolution, including natural selection, gene flow, genetic drift and mutation, as well as related evolutionary concepts such as inclusive fitness, sexual selection and species concepts.
    3.  Differentiate the distinct scientific disciplines which contribute to our understanding of human evolution, including paleoanthropology, archaeology, molecular biology, and evolutionary ecology.
    4,.  Demonstrate a current understanding of the lineage of human evolution and of the scientific evidence for that interpretation.

  
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    ANT 289 - Research Methods


    This course provides students with a basic understanding of how to conduct and evaluate scientific research in the social sciences.  Course topics follow the major steps in qualitative and quantitative social science research design and execution from the definition of the problem and formulation of hypotheses to the interpretation of results and preparation of the final report.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    POS 289, SOC 289
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Students will explore the role and importance of research.
    2.  Students will be introduced to the scientific research process.
    3.  Students will identify acceptable ethical procedures for the protection of human subjects associated with social scientific research.
    4.  Students will be introduced to the concepts of scientific sampling, generalizability, levels of measurement, reliability, and validity.
    5.  Students will learn the difference between descriptive statistics and inferential statistics.
    6.  Students will understand the differences between quantitative and qualitative research methods.
    7.  Students will learn the difference between social scientific knowledge and other types of knowledge.
    8.  Students will learn how to write a research proposal.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the role and importance of social scientific research.
    2.  Evaluate social scientific studies published inpeer-reviewed journals.
    3.  Apply the research process to create a small-scale research proposal.
    4.  Identify the differences between qualitative and quantitative research methods.
    5.  Explain the role and importance of research ethics regarding human subjects.
    6.  Write clearly - identifying social scientific information correctly using proper citations.

  
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    ANT 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project in anthropology which is beyond the scope of requirements of the course offered by the department, conducted under the direction of a faculty member and approved by the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester Hours in Anthropology

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Course outcomes will be determined by the instructor with the approval of the department chair and Dean.

  
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    ARA 101 - Beginning Arabic I


    This is a comprehension-based foundation course with an emphasis on developing communicative strategies in Arabic.  The course introduces grammar and the skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing and provides exposure to Arabic culture and peoples.  Students will study a wide range of subjects in class, using audio-visual as well as audio and written materials, to consolidate the use of the four communicative skills (reading, writing, speaking, and hearing).  Attention will be given to the mastering of the Arabic alphabet, Arabic pronunciation, basic grammatical structures in Arabic, and initial Arabic vocabulary.  Topics/skills covered at this level include communication in everyday situations (through role-play) and the comprehension of short, simple texts.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Note
    Appropriate course for beginners. Heritage speakers and native speakers of Arabic should not enroll in ARA 101. Students with 3 or more years of high school Arabic should contact the Department Chair to discuss proper placement.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Write their names and make greetings in Arabic at the beginners level.
    2.  Use the present tense of simple verbs as well as articles, possessive and demonstrative adjectives, interrogative expressions, numbers, and expressions for time and weather.
    3.  Describe simple actions in the present.
    4.  Write simple sentences based on addressing chapter topics and vocabulary.
    5.  Formulate simple questions and answers in Arabic.
    6.  Recognize gender and plural inflection in Arabic.
    7.  Speak about themselves in short sentences in Arabic.
    8.  Tell time and count to a hundred in Arabic.
    9.  Read newspaper headlines in Arabic.
    10.  Discuss the ethnic, linguistic and religious diversity of Arabic culture.

  
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    ARA 102 - Beginning Arabic II


    This is the second part of the first-year language sequence and continues to build on the skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing acquired in ARA 101.  There will be an emphasis on the ability to use the target language to accomplish basic communicative tasks.  Students should expect to be immersed in the language.  English will be used at a minimum.  The course promotes understanding and appreciation of the Arabic culture.

    Appropriate course for beginners.  Heritage speakers (students who are exposed to a language other than English at home) and native speakers of Arabic should not enroll in ARA 102.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ARA 101 Beginning Arabic I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe family, activities and events in Arabic.
    2.  Use the past tense of simple verbs as well as use articles, possessive and demonstrative adjectives, interrogative expressions, and time-related concepts including days, months and holidays.
    3.  Describe simple actions in the past.
    4.  Express basic needs in the spoken and written language.
    5.  Formulate questions and statements in the spoken and written language.
    6.  Recognize gender and plural inflections in Arabic.
    7.  Speak about themselves and others in compound sentences.
    8.  Demonstrate comprehension of sentence-length statements or questions in a limited number of content areas.
    9.  Interpret the written target language in texts that are linguistically non-complex.
    10.  Have an understanding of the social life and cultures of the Arab world.

  
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    ART 102 - History of Western Art I


    An overview of Western Art and Architecture from the 25,000 B.C.E. to about 1350 C.E.  Study of objects, sculptures, paintings, ceramics, and architecture with a focus on the social, religious, political, and philosophical influences that affected cultural development in the Ancient World.  Slide lecture format.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Broaden the student's knowledge of how works of art and architecture reflect and relate to the natural and built environments.
    2.  Have developed analytical approaches to discussing the cultures of the world, and their artistic creations.  The students will use writing as a critical analysis tool for the interpretation of works of art.
    3.  Have developed writing skills through a series of creative exercises in research and person expression.  The goal of the writing will be to create a substantial research project that focuses on multiple aspects of a single work of art.  The Writing Center in the Library is available to assist any student with the process of completing the assignments.
    4.  Correctly identify a broad range of art production, and relate that art to the social, political, economic and philosophical context of its time.

  
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    ART 103 - History of Western Art II


    Survey of the visual arts in Western culture from the early Renaissance until today, revealing the ways that the world and the thoughts of men and women have changed during this period, and how evolving ideas are reflected in works of art.  Slide lecture format.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Broaden the student's knowledge of how works of art and architecture reflect and relate to the natural and built environments.
    2.  Have developed analytical approaches to discussing the cultures of the world, and their artistic creations.
    3.  Have developed writing skills through a series of creative exercises in research and personal expression.  The goal of the writing will be to create a substantial research project that focuses on multiple aspects of a single work of art.
    4.  Correctly identify a broad range of art production, and relate that art to the social, political, economic and philosophical context of its time.

  
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    ART 104 - History of Asian Art


    History of Asian Art is appropriate for all students who are interested in the cultural traditions and artistic expressions of Asian countries.  This course presents a general survey of the development of Asian Art and Architectural forms in the Far East including India, Japan and China with supplementary study of Korea, Tibet, Indonesia, Burma and Thailand.  Cultural traditions, especially Buddhism introduced.  Prior experience in art history is not necessary.  The format involves slide lecture, readings and class discussion.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Broaden the student's knowledge of how works of art and architecture reflect and relate to the natural and built environments.
    2.  Have developed analytical approaches to discussing cultures of the world, and their artisitc creations.
    3.  Have developed writing skills through the development of a research project focusing on a particular topic in Asian Art.
    4.  Identify a broad range of artistic production, and to relate that art to the social, political, philosophical, and economic context of its time.

  
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    ART 105 - Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design


    Introduction to design involves the student with investigation of visual perception and organization.  Training the eye to become sensitive to design elements and principles is emphasized.  Critical analysis of point, line, shape, value, texture, and color; and balance, proportion, scale, rhythm, and unity.  The student will become familiar with a variety of media and intellectual comprehension of text, lecture, and visual examples.  Class projects will focus on learning design methods that are based on logic and expression, to create spatial illusion within a two-dimensional context.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Train their eye to be analytical and critical enabling them to become independent thinkers and solve design problems on their own, transforming theory into practical application.
    2.  Gain self-confidence in basic composition techniques in preparation for advanced two-dimensional presentations such as painting and graphic illustration.  This course will provide a foundation for compositional study in three-dimensional forms such as architectural models, interior design, landscape design, sculpture, fashion design, and product design.
    3.  Understand the emotional and symbolic significance of visual composition therefore considering it as an important tool for conveying a cultural or hidden message in design products.
    4.  Conduct themselves as a professional designer; learn organizational skills and manage their time.
    5.  Think like a professional designer; be creative within given limitations, methodical, make choices based on logic, and give special attention to the development of details.

  
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    ART 106 - Introduction to Three-Dimensional Design


    Developing sensitivity and awareness of our spatial environment is the object of this course.  Aesthetic and functional elements of three-dimensional design are explored.  Through reading, projects, lectures and field trips, techniques are explored to assist in heightening awareness.  This enables the student to understand the functional and aesthetic examples of the three-dimensional environment.  Emphasis is placed on studio projects.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the design process of layering (adding) & editing (subtracting) visual information and learn to create three-dimensionally.
    2.  Develop a thorough understanding of how applying the elements and principles of design the artist/designer can create a limitless possibility of forms that are aesthetically appealing, functional, thought-provoking and expressive.  Students will learn the importance of self-criticism and challenging their own abilities both conceptually and technically.
    3.  Establish a personal work ethic, time management/organizational skills and a professional design vocabulary leading to the clear articulation of their ideas, working process and intentions.  They will learn how to constructively criticize their own work, and accept constructive criticism from others.
    4.  Recognize good design and know when to stop in the creative process.  Build self-confidence and pride in accomplishing successful solutions to problems presented and to know when they have done well in this process.
    5.  Express themselves and find their own personal vision and how to integrate this with the requirements of specific design problems presented during the semester.  Students will also develop a design vocabulary that relates to materials, processes and design theory.  They will be exposed to the critical importance of being able to professionally articulate their ideas, working process and intentions to others.

  
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    ART 107 - Color Theory


    An introduction to the complex language of color, including the investigation of additive and subtractive systems in traditional and electronic applications.  Students gain practical knowledge and visual sensitivity giving them self-confidence in applying color to graphic presentations and three-dimensional forms.  Emotional, symbolic, and cultural significance of color is explored through visual examples in historical and contemporary contexts.  Knowledge applicable to painting, printmaking, illustration, website design, fashion design, interior design, landscape design, architecture, sculpture, and product design.  Coursework includes experimentation with various materials, lectures, discussions, and presentations.

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    COM 107
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop a physical sensitivity and analytical eye for color, enabling one to transform theory into practical application.
    2.  Employ acquired knowledge to further enhance the basic skills required for drawing, painting, graphic design (visual communication), animation, interior design, illustration, and other applied art fields.
    3.  Solve design problems involving color enabling them to develop self-confidence in regard to making independent decisions.
    4.  Apply theories connected with emotional, symbolic, and cultural significance of color, to contexts such as fine, applied art and art history.

  
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    ART 108 - History of Architecture I


    Overview of 40 centuries of building, beginning in Ancient Egypt. The student follows the political technological, religious and social movements that have influenced the major design styles, outstanding architects, and designer of each era through the Gothic period.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify major architectural monuments throughout historical periods covered in class.
    2.  Identify and label specific characteristics of said monuments and periods, employing appropriate vocabulary.
    3.  Address the social, historical, political and/or economic contexts in which architectural constructions are produced.

  
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    ART 109 - History of Architecture II


    Overview of the history of buildings from the Early Renaissance to the present.  Students achieve an historical perspective on and understanding of the development and evolution of architectural design.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify major architectural monuments throughout historical periods covered in class.
    2.  Identify and label specific characteristics of said monuments and periods, employing appropriate vocabulary.
    3.  Address the social, historical, political and/or economic contexts in which architectural constructions are produced.

  
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    ART 110 - Modern Art


    Art of the late 19th century.  Impressionism (circa 1870) to Cubism and other forms of abstract art.  Panorama of 20th century visual movements including Futurism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, and Post-Modernism.  Slide/lecture format and field trips.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Broaden the student's knowledge of how works of art and architecture reflect and relate to the cultures that produced them.
    2.  Develop analytical approaches to discussing concepts and theories of modern art.
    3.  Develop writing skills through creative exercises in research and personal expression.

  
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    ART 111 - History of Decorative Arts: 1600-Present


    Introduction to the development of style in fabric, furniture and accessories for the interior from 1600 to the present.  Emphasis will be placed on the history of American interiors.  Required for interior design students, recommended for students in Art and Design and as an elective for students interested in history or American Studies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify periods in western furniture and decorative elements.
    2.  Understand of causes in stylistic change.
    3.  Understand the social, economic, political and technological context of American culture from 1600 to the present.

  
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    ART 112 - Beginning Photography


    Basics of camera design and operation, plus the fundamentals of photographic visualization and composition; line, form, color, light shadow.  Darkroom procedures, film processing, basic printmaking, selecting printing techniques.  (Students can sign-out cameras and other supplies from the Communications Department thus reducing the overall costs for photo supplies.)

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 112
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Control camera, composition, and photographic approach (sharp focus, shalow D.O.F., blur motion, frozen image, etc.)
    2.  Make choices regarding film, paper, lens, filters and light to achieve a good quality photograph as a final product.

  
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    ART 113 - History of Modern Design


    Survey of modern design examines changing developments in graphics, industrial design, architecture and decorative arts from 1851 to the present.  Beginning with The Exhibition of Art and Industry in London and concluding with postmodernism, mass culture and the role consumption plays in design will be explored.  The course focuses on design as a creative activity influenced by technology, economics and social history. 

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the influence of technology, culture and historical events on modern design.
    2.  Identify visual characteristics of different modern styles, know when they developed, and who were the most important designers associated with each stylistic period.
    3.  Develop a vocabulary that will allow you to discuss historic aspects of modern design in an articulate manner.
    4.  Have a fuller understanding of the interrelationship of art, technology, mass consumption, production and marketing.
    5.  Be aware of the way in which American values have driven consumerism and modern design.
    6.  Think in a more interdisciplinary way.

  
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    ART 114 - The History of Art and the Human Figure


    A chronological survey of the representation of the human body in the production of art from antiquity to the present.  Emphasis is on the belief systems of specific cultures, and how those beliefs influence self-perception, and self-expression.  Students will study basic human anatomy looking closely at the rise of anatomical science and its influence upon Renaissance and Baroque art.  The current use and misuse of the human body in media is also explored.  Format involves slide lecture, readings, and class discussion.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Broaden the student's knowledge of how works of art depicting the human form relate to the environments which created them.
    2.  Develop analytical approaches to discussing cultures of the world and their artistic expressions.
    3.  Develop writing skills through the writing of a substantial research paper which addesses a subject pertinent to the history of the human figure in art.
    4.  Relate the production of art to the economic, social, political and philosophical contexts of its time.

  
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    ART 115 - Beginning Drawing


    Emphasis on a series of open-ended interrelated problems dealing with visual language and its vocabulary, and organization.  Drawing problems will intensify the student's perception and comprehension of the elements and principles of design including point, line, shape, tone, texture, and color; and balance, proportion, scale, rhythm, and unity in composition.  Student's perception and comprehension of light, space, and form will be given special emphasis.  Format involves intensive instruction and demonstrations in charcoal, pencil, pen and ink, and mixed media as a means to personal investigation, understanding, and expression.  Subjects include landscape, figure, and still-life.  Various historical models will be studied through text and visual examples.  Students are encouraged to develop their own style and viewpoint through discussion of art criticism.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have used the formal art elements including line, tonal value, shape, texture, spatial illustration, pattern, color, balance and composition to make a drawing.
    2.  Have handled charcoal, ink, pen, brush, conte, color media and mixed in order to produce a drawing.
    3.  Have used concepts of expression and technique in drawing.
    4.  Have learned about at least ten great artists and their work in drawing.
    5.  Have produced a portfolio of work (a minimum of ten finished pieces).

  
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    ART 116 - Painting I


    Lectures and practical application will focus on design fundamentals to depict form in space.  Subjects include value studies of form light, front light, rim light, and back light.  Paint-handling, position, figure-based vignettes, still-life, landscape, and abstraction will be explored.  In the Summer session, the landscape will be the subject of lectures and practical applications.  Lectures will include value studies of the sunny day, gray day, and moonlit sky with and without recession.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 115 Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Mix a constant chroma, constant hue palette.
    2.  Know the values and modeling characteristics for figures and object in normal, strong and weak, front lighting, form lighting, rim lighting, back lighting, and ability to execute a painting in any of these lighting conditions.
    3.  Make an underpainting (imprimature) demonstrating a knowledge of drawing, values, and edges.
    4.  Paint a figure painting.
    5.  Know the values and modeling characteristics or landscape painting, first for simple sunny day, gray day, moonlight in normal, strong and weak circumstances, then complicated landscape with recession and overlapping forms for sunny day, gray day and moonlight.
    6.  Execute value studies for aforementioned landscapes.

  
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    ART 117 - Basic Metal Working Techniques


    Acquaints art students who are taking three-dimensional design or Sculpture with basic techniques and safety measures involved in working with various metals.  Students will be introduced to welding, casting, and forging techniques.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate three forms of metal working: welding, forging, and casting.
    2.  Apply those techniques to projects designed and executed in three-dimensional design.

  
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    ART 118 - Introduction to Digital Photography


    This course is an Introduction to Digital Photography.  The purpose of this course is to develop proficiency in digital photography and the "digital darkroom" through projects in digital photography and Adobe Photoshop.  It is suggested that students have prior experience working with Adobe Photoshop, but it is not required.  Students will learn about: color temperature, exposure, and camera controls (depth of field; shutter speed), creative and technical applications relating to composition and aesthetics in photography, photographic representation, electronic publishing, digital output, portfolio preparation, and careers in digital photography.  Students will be encouraged to use the medium of digital photography to develop a personal vision as evidenced in his or her final portfolio.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the relationship between traditional photography and digital photography.
    2.  Utilize the proper technique and tools in relation to camera equipment, hardware and editing software.
    3.  Demonstrate understanding of the principles of design and artistry through the use of color, light, composition and balance.
    4.  Develop skills for varying types of photo shoots (i.e. Studio and location).
    5.  Effective use of time management skills as they pertain to the digital photographic medium.
    6.  Develop and utilize appropriate photo specific terminology and vocabulary.
    7.  Analyze artists, theory and techniques and implement this research in the conceptualization of personal projects.
    8.  Utilize the "digital darkroom" and output techniques as they apply to the digital photographic medium.
    9.  Demonstrate critical thinking and the ability to write effectively with consideration of conceptual, theoretical and historical ideologies pertaining to photography and digital photography.
    10.  Maintain an organized journal of plans, sketches, ideas, artist's statements, photographic inspirations and other research.

  
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    ART 119 - Art of Science


    The Art of Science is an introductory course that explores the fundamentals of scientific and medical illustration.  Learn how to visually investigate and represent plants, animals, microbes and insects while you heighten your appreciation and understanding of the natural world.  Create simple diagrams of plants and anatomical structures, as you delve into the mysterious worlds of botany, anatomy, physiology and entomology.  Learn how to make colorful and informative visuals that could be used in textbooks, journals, museum displays, web sites, videos, educational software, or anatomical diagrams for medical professionals.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BIO 119
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Objective of the Course:

    1.  Develop an appreciation for the relationship of art and science
    2.  Synthesize information, think critically and solve critical thinking problems; write clear, well organized essays or research papers that demonstrate synthesis.
    3.  Apply principles of scientific inquiry, differentiate a theory from a hypothesis, and differentiate fact from opinion in regard to biological sciences.
    4.  Define and correctly use scientific terminology in regard to biological organisms and processes.
    5.  Work well independently and in small groups.  Show self-direction and motivation, and contribute to group work.
    6.  Students will demonstrate the ability to acquire and communicate scientific data, ideas, and interpretations through written, oral, and visual means.
    7.  Students will produce written reports that clearly and accurately describe and illustrate the background, methods, data, and interpretations relevant to a particular project.
    8.  Maintain a sketchbook/journal documenting the creative process.
    9.  Establish a drawing process.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Articulate and appreciate the fundamental relationships between botany, zoology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology and entomology.
    2.  Reflect on the history of scientific illustration and the shift from classical scholarship to direct observation.
    3.  Describe several basic principles associated with botany, zoology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology and entomology.
    4.  Discuss relationships between art and science, including their personal relections about the value of exploring these relationships for both artists and scientists.
    5.  Explain essential considerations for making decisions about effective illustration (i.e., choice of medium, scaling, form, value, scientist goals) and provide constructive critique of illustrations.
    6.  Create detailed and realistic illustrations in a range of media that clearly convey essential scientific information about the subjects.
    7.  Implement the formal visual communication elements of line, shape, value, texture and space.
    8.  Appreciate and implement several visual communication mediums, including, but not limited to, pencil, ink, watercolor and digital drawing.
    9.  Understand copyright requirements, archival techniques, transfer methods, typography and techniques for presenting information.
    10.  Prepare a portfolio of their work.
    11.  Produce written reports that clearly and accurately describe and illustrate the background, methods, data, and interpretations relevant to a particular project.
    12.  Maintain a sketchbook/journal documenting the creative process.
    13.  Establish a drawing process.

  
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    ART 120 - Beginning Sculpture


    This course is designed for students to realize the creative process that takes place in the art making of sculpture.  Students will be introduced to various fundamental techniques and treatment of sculptural materials.  Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on experimentation, reading, and discussion.  This course will ultimately assist the student to further develop an artistic direction in three-dimensional studies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Three-Dimensional Design for Art majors.  An elective for non-art majors.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Execute the creative process of traditional sculpture.
    2.  Build the armature, sculpting the clay and casting plaster.
    3.  Create sculpture from observation.
    4.  Develop a basic working knowledge of sculpting and casting.
    5.  Compile the professional work of specific artists in traditional and modern periods.
    6.  State personal creative ideas and direction for future 3D studies.

  
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    ART 125 - Introduction to Computer Graphics


    The study of Visual Communication theory relating to applied arts fields such as advertising and editorial design, animation, gaming, and web design.  Students are introduced to vector and raster graphic programs on Macintosh computers, and learn how to develop initial thumbnail sketches into final design comprehensives.  Other topics include digital photography, scanning, image manipulation, color correction, and typography.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 105 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design, BIT 108 introduction to PC and Windows or equivalent.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 124
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply classical design theory to page layout, typographical composition and image manipulation.
    2.  Employ knowledge regarding various vector, raster and page layout digital software.
    3.  Articulate verbally and in written form the inherent process for conceiving a visual communication piece, such as a poster, print media advertisement or program cover.
    4.  Recognize significant cotemporary and historic graphic designers that were integral to the development of several design movements.
    5.  Describe verbally and in written form distinguishing characteristics relating to several design movements.
    6.  Investigate various professions relating to various visual communication fields, such as editorial design, advertising design, corporate design, book design, music/record design, information design, and animation.

  
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    ART 129 - The Chemistry of Art


    This course is a study of art from a scientific perspective.  The molecular basis of art will be explored by using the atomic theory to explain how paints are made, the function of binders and varnishes, the absorption of light, the structure of ceramics, the process of photography, and the materials used for sculpture.  The atomic structure of the material will be used to explain its function for the artist.  The use of chemistry in art conservation, restoration, and the detection of forgery will also be investigated.  This course includes a hands on laboratory and is intended for non-science majors.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CHM 129
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    2.  Demonstrate application of scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural (or physical) sciences.
    3.  Understand and use basic chemical principles and terminology.
    4.  Explain the basic properties of light based on atomic theory.
    5.  Understand how chemical changes lead to different colors of pigments.
    6.  Explain the chemistry of paints.
    7.  Describe the chemical processes in photography.
    8.  Identify art forgeries.
    9.  Explain the different processes of art conservation/restoration.
    10.  Possess an awareness of the influence of chemistry in the visual arts.
    11.  Identify the chemicals and/or materials used in various works of
    12.  Form opinions based on sound scientific reasoning.


  
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    ART 130 - Introduction to Ceramics: Construction and Glazes


    Study of the basic processes of design and creation of clay forms, both functional and sculptural.  Techniques of handbuilding, throwing on the potter's wheel, glazing and firing will be explored.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: ART 106 Introduction to Three-Dimensional Design.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Studio hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the aesthetic possibilities of clay.
    2.  Wed aesthetics and utility.
    3.  Execute the history of ceramic sculpture and pottery.
    4.  Demonstrate fundamental techniques of shaping and glazing.

  
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    ART 140 - Printmaking


    This three-part course will begin with an introduction to printmaking through the methods of collograph and monotype printing.  Then linecuts and woodcuts will be developed, and there will be a concentration on the silkscreen process.  The third part will be an historical survey of printmaking and its techniques.  This will be accomplished through visits to local print collections.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 105 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design or ART 115 Beginning Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Produce works of art using methods of relief printing, intaglio printing, embossment, and monotype printing.
    2.  Understand additional methods not covered in class through exposure to the works of other printmakers.
    3.  Know how to properly mount finished work for display and portfolio presentation.
    4.  Use printmaking tools and equipment properly.
    5.  Work in a focusedand productive manner.
    6.  Understand the system of labeling and printing an edition of prints.
    7.  Have participated in a student art exhibition.
    8.  Have insight into the history of the medium, how and why it came into being.

  
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    ART 145 - Children and the Arts


    This course prepares students to effectively teach the arts to young children.  Students learn the role of creative movement, dramatics, music, and visual art in young children's education through the exploration of their own creative identity and become comfortable in using integrated teaching methods, which nuture creativity in young children.  Through discussion and analysis of current research and theory in the teaching of the arts, they also learn how to choose and use multicultural fine artworks, music, and children's literature, how to use the arts in inclusionary practice, and how to assess children's artistic progress to enhance children's creative development in the arts.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ECE 145
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Plan and carry out developmentally appropriate, integrated activities in the arts that nurture creativity and foster children's development and meet the arts standards.
    2.  Understand the role their personal experiences in the arts play in how they approach arts education with young children.
    3.  Use authentic assessment tools to evaluate children's development in the arts.
    4.  Adjust and adapt arts activities to meet the needs of children of different ages, backgrounds, and abilities.

  
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    ART 146 - History of Photography


    This course is designed to give students a strong background in the historic, aesthetic, and cultural background of photography as both a significant art form and important cultural and communications medium.  The course content includes topics dealing with the invention of photography as art in the 19th century, great photographers, and new photography.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Know how photography evolved inside and outside the United States and its influence in society.
    2.  Understand the meaning of images and get ideas from it to apply in other aspects (visuals or not).

  
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    ART 150 - Perspective Drawing


    Graphic techniques developed for visual presentation of architectural, industrial and aesthetic forms.  Studio projects stress creation of the representational image using perspective, color, texture and light.  Applicable to advertising and illustration of ideas and products.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 115 Beginning Drawing or CIV 159 Architectural Drawing I w/CAD

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Represent clearly, the reality of form in three-dimensions as we naturally see it.
    2.  Use a variety of drawing methods on the flat surface to convey layers of space including overlapping of forms, convergence of parallel lines, foreshortening, and reduction in size.
    3.  Convey a myriad of interior and architectural forms, visually communicating three-dimensional design ideas and products.
    4.  Compile a number of appropriate viewpoints including one-point, two-point, and three-point perspective drawings to suggest a series of planes in space for specific projects.
    5.  Select color, texture, and lighting ideas for surfaces, and visually represent on architectural forms and in interior spaces.

  
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    ART 151 - Special Topics in Art


    Specific topics will be explored through classes that meet for periods shorter than a full semester. Courses can be any study that involves specialized work in the fine arts or related fields such as architecture.

    Credits: (1-3)
    Note
    The courses offered may be studio or lecture format.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    The specific learning outcomes will vary according to the particular course/subject taught.  The specific outcomes developed will all support and be grounded in the general Visual Communication Arts  Program outcomes.  (i.e. Students will be able to articulate how works of art and architecture reflect and relate to the natural and built environments of their time, and be able to articulate the fundamental elements and principals of formalist design that enable a visual message to meaningfully engage an audience).

  
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    ART 202 - Commercial Photography


    Students will gain practical experience as to the theory behind and application of commercial photography and illustration.  Projects will be relative to today's marketing and societal needs.  Lighting and composition will be heavily stressed.  Photographic format will be slide film.  Lab cost to student approximately $135 for supplies and processing.  Must have camera.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Art 112 Beginning Photography or Art 212 Intermediate Photography or by portfolio acceptance by instructor

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 202
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    Must have camera.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Possess a working knowledge of both digital and film photography, and each of their unique applications in both the technical and economic aspects of commercial photography.
    2.  Have acquired competence in standard and advanced lighting techniques for still life, including three-point lighting and flash photography.
    3.  Understand how to correctly stage still life subjects in a commercial setting, as well as the ability to follow standard safety protocols when working in a darkroom or laboratory environment.
    4.  Compile a portfolio of their individual work completed over the course of the semester.
    5.  Have acquired experience in sharing their work with their peers and instructor(s) in a group-oriented environment (i.e. - participate in peer and instructor evaluated critiques of their assignments).

  
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    ART 203 - Color Photography


    This course explores the fundamentals of color photography and offers students a working knowledge of the technical and aesthetic attributes of the most commonly used color photographic applications.  Students will learn color and slide film development and printing, as well as digital color applications and editing.  35mm medium format and other areas will be explored as well.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 203
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the concepts of color theory to the proper exposure color film.
    2.  Create color photographic prints of appropriate density and correct color balance.
    3.  Judge the effects of different types of light on color film.
    4.  Visually organize and balance the elements of a photograph.

  
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    ART 210 - Exhibition Planning


    Students will develop an understanding of the practical steps needed to mount an art exhibition, analyze the variety of art forms generally appropriate for creating an appreciation of art in a community, and learn to create a working relationship and dialog with artists.  Instruction for assembling a professional portfolio is discussed and reviewed.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 semester hours of college-level studio art or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Know the wide varieties of exhibition forms that exist and the diverse venues iin which they can take place.
    2.  Know the historic precedent for exhibition in this country and in our own community.
    3.  Know the variety of people for whom exhibitions have appeal.
    4.  Know the sectors of the population that can continue to learn about the personal enrichment art and culture cen bring into their lives.
    5.  Know the diverse organizations and commercial endeavors in our community that continually provide opportunities for intellectual and cultural growth.
    6.  Know the many ways in which exhibitions an cultural programs can be encouraged within a community.
    7.  Be a person who is a conduit for a variety of cultural activities in the community, finding ways to interconnect two, three or more cultural disciplines.
    8.  Be active as a volunteer or to seek an academic program that can prepare one for a career in arts management of museaum work.

  
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    ART 212 - Intermediate Photography


    Systems of precise exposure and processing control.  Advanced black and white darkroom techniques.  Introduction to color theory, processes and printing.  Functional portfolio development.  Introduction to digital electronic imaging.  (Students can sign-out cameras and other supplies from the Communications department thus reducing the overall costs for photo supplies.)

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 112 Beginning Photography

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 212
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Operate a twins-lens camera, control negative density and print contrast making use of the zone system.
    2.  Know how to light and operate "strobe lights."

  
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    ART 213 - Model Building


    Scale models built for specific design problems.  Projects to include interiors, buildings, site plans, furniture, stage sets.  Recommended for students interested in architecture, landscape design, and set design for theater. 

     

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Note
    Required for interior design students

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Produce works of art using methods of relief printing, intaglio printing, embossment, and monotype printing.
    2.  Analyze additional methods not covered in class through exposure to the works of other printmakers.
    3.  Mount finished work for display and portfolio presentation.
    4.  Apply the system of labeling and printing an edition of prints.
    5.  Critique the social and cultural history of the medium, how & why it came into being.
    6.  Utilize knowledge of basic color theory as described by the Munsell system.
    7.  Practice color separation and registration.
    8.  Select methods and techniques which best allow him/her to express his own personal artisitic vision.

  
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    ART 214 - Internship


    Available to second-year Art and Design students with a faculty member's recommendation. Internship requirements will be developed on an individual basis with an art faculty member's supervision.

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Integrate their experience with the workings of arts/business/educational organizations into developing a larger perspective of their chosen area of fine or applied art.
    2.  Apply the knowledge gained within a particular field related to their career path.
    3.  Learn to budget time in relation to required tasks.
    4.  Establish a network of contacts in their chosen area.
    5.  Develop a list of references for future employment.

  
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    ART 215 - Painting II


    An opportunity to refine the principles explored in Painting I with an emphasis on execution.  Preliminary studies in composition will be required before focusing on large-scale finished paintings.  Concepts of edges, lighting, planes, forms, value relationships, and brushwork re-examined.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 116 Painting I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the tradition of classical observational oil painting to the creation of individual expressive artworks.
    2.  Mix colors, values, and tones that reflect an understanding of classical color schemes and harmonies.
    3.  Solve compositional problems based on classical design principles.
    4.  Describe verbally and in writing the process for creating a representational painting.
    5.  Analyze the artwork of various noteworthy contemporary and historic fine art painters.

  
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    ART 217 - Advanced Drawing


    Advanced course presenting new media techniques and concepts; life drawing emphasized.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ART 115 Beginning Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Draw from a life model.
    2.  Understand the use of six types of lines:  thin, thick, soft, hard, dark, light.
    3.  Draw in a linear fashion the following:  portraits, still life, interior, landscapes.
    4.  Make three tone line drawings.

  
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    ART 222 - Advanced Photography


    Advanced Photography is a lecture/laboratory course that offers students with previous photography education or experience the opportunity to further explore photography as an expressive tool.  The scope and approach of the course is the study and application of advanced methods of working with a photographic camera, as well as processing film and prints with photochemistry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART/COM 112 Beginning Photography and ART/COM 212 Intermediate Photography

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 222
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use a light meter and gray card to calculate scene brightness ratios.
    2.  Adjust film speed ratings to compensate for camera or lighting factors.
    3.  Adjust film development times to compensate for lighting conditions.
    4.  Determine personal film speed.
    5.  Print "problem" negatives by making alterations in the prints.
    6.  Develop a vocabulary to critique basic photographic principles.
    7.  Recognize and appreciate diverse photographic expression.

  
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    ART 225 - Illustration


    This course is directed towards the student pursuing an emphasis in graphic arts.  It considers the drawn or painted image as a means of communication utilizing narrative imagery and pictorial illusion and space.  Students will solve illustrative problems relating to magazine articles, posters, packaging, book covers, children's picture books, and other materials.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART 105 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design, ART 115 Beginning Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    6 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Employ fundamental problem solving techniques inherent with using illustration to solve client's objectives.
    2.  Develop a personal style of illustration through investigation of materials, process, and willingness to explore and experiment.
    3.  Apply the various objectives and applications of illustration, including but not limited to, advertising and editorial design, medical illustration, publishing, children's book illustration, etc.
    4.  Articulate both verbally and in written form the basic history of illustration and the significant illustrators who shaped it.

  
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    ART 226 - Advanced Computer Imagery


    A continuation of Visual Communication theory that students were introduced to during ART 125/COM 124.  Through more advanced visual design problems, students will develop their conceptual problem-solving skills relative to applied arts fields such as advertising and editorial design, animation, gaming, and web design.  Advanced digital imagery techniques will be introduced using Photoshop CC, in addition to page layout theory using Adobe InDesign CC.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART 125 Introduction to Computer Graphics, ART 115 Beginning Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 226
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the field of Graphic Design more fully.
    2.  Develop skills on the computer in professional design oriented programs.
    3.  Create a professional portfolio of work relevant to the field.
    4.  Discuss the field of Graphic Design and its future.

  
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    ART 227 - Editorial Design


    Students investigate the segment of the graphic arts industry that is responsible for the creation of news-papers, tabloids, and periodicals such as magazines and monthly trade journals.  The art of page layout is explored as a powerful tool that editorial designers can use to influence how we interpret world and local events.  This course will emphasize the idea that "people learn best by doing". Students will publish a periodical.  The classroom setting will be transformed into a small-scale publishing business where students experience a variety of publishing roles such as: Art Direction, Advertising Design, Page Layout, Marketing, Advertising and Sales, and Editing.  Students will experience and understand the critical connection between Graphic Arts and Business.  The publication will contain advertisements created for local businesses and text gathered from faculty members, students, and our community.  Students will have the opportunity to develop professional relationships with local business clients.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART 125 Introduction to Computer Graphics, ART 226 Advanced Computer Imagery

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours; Required course for students choosing the Graphic Arts emphasis, Elective for other students
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand how magazines are written, edited, designed and published.
    2.  Create a simple saddle-stitched publication with several signatures.
    3.  Use design systems (grids) for typographic layout.
    4.  Create relationships using type and image, and type as image.
    5.  Connect typographic form to meaning.
    6.  Create a professional portfolio of work relevant to the field.

  
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    ART 228 - Animation I


    Animation I introduces the student to the beginning concepts of classical animation.  The focus is the investigation of two-dimensional animation using the program of Macro-media Director MX.  Topics covered are writing for animation and history of animation, in addition to basic animation concepts such as character development, storyboarding, audio/music timing and screening.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  Art 105 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design, Art 107 Color Theory, Art 115 Beginning Drawing, Art 125 Introduction to Computer Graphics, Art 225 Illustration or ART 217 Advanced Drawing

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    COM 228
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Illustrate a working knowledge of quality visual storytelling.
    2.  Demonstrate a competent application of the animation principles in a time-based visualization.
    3.  Demonstrate a competent application of foundation drawing skills.
    4.  Apply animation computer software knowledge to other digital art forms.

  
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    ART 230 - Producing Public Murals


    Producing Public Murals introduces students to all aspects of mural design and production.  The curriculum will help students develop several practical skills: drawing, painting, understanding logistics, planning strategies/processes, selecting materials, and problem-solving.  Students will identify and evaluate prospective mural sites; study the composition and durability of various paints and sealants; investigate various methodologies for painting and/or installing murals; and, ultimately, participate in the creation of a public mural.  In addition, students will explore the role of murals (and other forms of public art) in the aesthetic, social, and economic revitalization of communities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  Art 115 Beginning Drawing, Art 116 Painting I, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and evaluate prospective mural sites.
    2.  Describe the composition and durability of various paints and sealants available for mural production.
    3.  Analyze composition, durability and other practical characteristics of various substrates available for mural production.
    4.  Apply various methodologies for painting murals on-site.
    5.  Apply various methodologies for painting murals on substrates in a studio.
    6.  Explain various methodolgies for installing studio-prepared murals on-site.
    7.  Estimate mural production costs.
    8.  Articulate various ways in which murals (and other forms of public art) contribute to community revitalization: socially, aesthetically, and economically.
    9.  Creatively and constructively apply knowledge of color theory to mural painting.
    10.  Resize images to fit the scale of the mural site (substrate).
    11.  Explain relationships between traditional mural painting & various social, political, and theological ideologies.
    12.  Create a mural capable of eliciting heartfelt response and that has the potential to act as a catalyst for positive social change.

  
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    ART 288 - Mobile Web App Development


    Learn to design and create Web apps for mobile devices such as iPad, iPhone and Android, using collaborative, open-source mobile environments on both PC and Apple based platforms.  The focus will be on both design and development skills necessary to create functional, effective, and responsive Web pages and Web apps using standard Web technologies, including CSS3, HTML5 and JavaScript.  Techniques such as progressive enhancement and feature detection will be utilized as well as JaveScript APIs for functionality such as geolocation, device orientation, and handling touch events.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIT 173 Basics of Website Creation

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BIT 288
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  To design and create Web pages and Web apps for mobile devices such as iPad, iPhone and Android, using collaborative, open-source mobile development and environments on both PC and Apple based platforms.
    2.  To focus on both design and development skills necessary to create functional, effective, and responsive apps using standard Web technologies, including CSS3, HTML5 and JavaScript.
    3.  To present and practice mobile Web app design and development techniques such as progressive enhancement, feature detection, geolocation, device orientation, and touch events.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a working vocabulary for the tools and concepts related to the development of mobile Web apps.
    2.  Differentiate between Web apps and native apps.
    3.  Create effective designs for Web apps and mobile devices.
    4.  Use HTML/CSS/JavaScript to create and debug Web apps for mobile devices.
    5.  Create Web apps that integrate device features such as geolocation, accelerometers, and touch gestures.

  
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    ART 298 - Independent Study: Studio Art


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of art. Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of college level work in Art

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes are specified on an individual basis.

  
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    ART 299 - Independent Study: Art History


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of art. Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of college level work in Art

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes are specified on an individual basis.

  
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    ASA 110 - Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies


    This course provides an introduction to the physical, psychological, social, familial and legal aspects of chemical abuse.  The chemistry, physiology, psychopharmacology, theories and stages of addiction will be introduced and explored.  Relevant history, problems of special populations of addicted clients and contributions of 12 Step Programs will be reviewed.  Assessment, treatment planning, professional ethics, theory and skills building are integral to the course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Incorporate general concepts regarding addiction.
    2.  Correlate diagnostic criteria for addiction (DSMIVR) into diagnosis, planning and intervention for clients (real or hypothetical).
    3.  Demonstrate comprehension of the physical effects of alcoholism, on major body systems.
    4.  Discern the ASAM (American Society of Addiction Medicine) criteria for appropriate client placement on the continuum of care for addicted clients.
    5.  Integrate all general concepts, e.g. learning objectives into appropriate planning of client care.
    6.  Demonstrate understanding of Harm Reduction through application of knowledge of Buprenorphine and Methadone Maintenance Programs.
    7.  Integrate basic concepts of ethical considerations relative to chemical dependency including the special needs of mentally ill chemical abusers (MICA).

  
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    ASA 210 - Chemical Dependency Counseling I


    This course identifies the uniqueness of chemical dependency counseling by examining concepts, issues, and skills required to provide basic group therapy for chemically dependent persons.  Group norms, goals, content, process, stages of group growth, group curative factors, group principles, and issues/problems of group dynamics and professional ethics are explored.  Traditional theoretical models, such as Adlerian, Existential, Person-Centered, Behavioral, REBT, and various perspectives will be explored relative to chemical dependency group counseling.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies

    Prior or Concurrent:  PSY 217 Introduction to Counseling Theory and Practice

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify several types of groups.
    2.  Demonstrate understanding of groups in a multicultural context.
    3.  Identify general guidelines for group work with multicultural populations.
    4.  Discuss critical issues related to ethical guidelines for group counselors.
    5.  Identify main characteristics/issues/problems for beginning group leaders.
    6.  Name special skills needed for opening and closing group sessions.
    7.  Discuss advantages and disadvantages of co-leading groups.
    8.  Begin to identify personal style of group leadership.
    9.  Demonstrate knowledge of the stages of group development.
    10.  Discuss theorectical approaches to groups.
    11.  Identify main patterns of group dynamics.
    12.  Be able to apply group leadership skills to working with chemically dependent populations.
    13.  Critically discuss the nature of group therapy as it relates to curative factors.

  
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    ASA 220 - Chemical Dependency Counseling II


    This course builds on concepts from ASA 210.  Ethical standards and practices will be discussed relative to chemical dependency counseling.  Contemporary approaches to group counseling theories such as Reality/Choice Therapy, Rational Recovery Model, Motivational Interviewing, Short-Term Solution Focused Therapy, and Holistic Perspectives in Chemical Dependency Counseling will be explored in the context of ethical principles.  Holistic issues will include alternative and complementary medicine and the mind-body-spirit connection relative to relapse prevention and overall health and wellness.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies, ASA 210 Chemical Dependency Counseling I, PSY 217 Introduction to Counseling Theory and Practice

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Correlate knowledge of group counseling issues and skills with core concepts from ASA 210.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of several new types of group counseling techniques.
    3.  Incorporate critical issues related to ethical guidelines for group counselors.
    4.  Accurately self assess growth in application of group counseling skills.
    5.  Demonstrate understanding of client needs by purposefully selecting the best clinical approach.
    6.  Display evidence of knowledge relative to the evolution of group process.
    7.  Demonstrate knowledge of types of holistic treatment as they relate to chemical dependency counseling.

  
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    ASA 230 - Family Issues in Chemical Dependency


    This course will introduce family theory including systems, structural, and experimental models.  Critical issues involving family roles and dynamics specific to families with substance abuse issues will be emphasized.  In addition, the ethical practice of assessment and intervention with families will be explored.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the major theories of addiction.
    2.  Identify the major family structures.
    3.  Describe the history of the American family.
    4.  Describe Family Systems Theory according to three major family theorists.
    5.  Define a genogram and begin to create a personal genogram.
    6.  Define co-dependency and identify the family roles according to two major family theorists.
    7.  Define family resiliency and identify major ways family structures are changing.
    8.  Define Linear and Circular Causality.
    9.  Define Cybernetics, Feedback Loops, and Homeostasis related to family dynamics.
    10.  Identify open and closed systems, as well as subsystems related to family structures.
    11.  Identify five theoretical perspectives of the origin and definition of co-dependency.
    12.  Differentiate between major theories of family development and structures.
    13.  List the elements of a good family evaluation and assessment.
    14.  Identify and discuss different assessment tools and techniques.
    15.  Identify and discuss four major intervention models.
    16.  Present personal genogram and identify individual family dynamics.
    17.  Describe the main steps in intervention with a family that has addiction issues.
    18.  Create a treatment plan for a fictional family system.
    19.  Diagnose troubled family functioning.
    20.  Identify issues among diverse family structures and individualize assessment and treatment planning.
    21.  Identify issues such as counter-transference among addiction treatment professionals.

  
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    ASA 240 - Special Topics in Chemical Dependency


    This course is designed to provide an overview of topics of special interest and cultural diversity in the field of addiction counseling.  The course will examine issues of diverse and select client groups in treatment and recovery, including individuals with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered (LGBT), and the dually diagnosed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies, ASA 210 Chemical Dependency Counseling I, ASA 220 Chemical Dependency Counseling II or permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the concept of critical analysis to current course work.
    2.  Demonstrate understanding of the role that each consumer's needs play in the clinical process.
    3.  Demonstrate understanding of the balance between diagnostic criteria and the individual needs of the consumer.
    4.  Develop insight into current treatment practices regarding the specialized treatment responses to the needs of various consumer groups.
    5.  Develop the capacity to define the individual needs of the consumer in theory and practice.
    6.  Develop the capacity to integrate ethical professional behavior which is responsive to the needs of various consumer groups.
    7.  Develop the capacity to maintain a positive relationship with managed care rooted in individual consumer needs.
    8.  Develop critical thinking skills with affirmative and negative positions regarding the role of managed care in chemical dependency treatment.
    9.  Develop critical thinking skills regarding the special needs of the following groups:  women; physically challenged persons; LGBT clientele; narcotic dependent persons; criminal offenders; dually diagnosed; families; impaired professionals; and persons in chronic pain, and formulate affirmative and negative positions for specialized treatment responses to those needs.
    10.  Develop critical thinking regarding select current public policy issues and areas of concern in the arena of chemical dependency treatment.

  
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    ASA 245 - Cultural Competencies in Chemical Dependency Studies


    This course is designed to provide an overview of topics of special interest and cultural diversity in addictions treatment.  The course will examine the unique issues and treatment needs of selected client groups in treatment and recovery, e.g. HIV/AIDS; children/adolescents; racial, ethnic, and religious minorities; economically disadvantaged; disabled; women; the elderly; LGBT; and people with co-occuring disorders.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies, ASA 210 Chemical Dependency Counseling I, ASA 220 Chemical Dependency Counseling II, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Introduce the concept of critical analysis an develop application in the current course work.
    2.  Present the dimensions of cultural competency in counseling.
    3.  Explore the system of oppression in American society and the ways in which privilege serves to reinforce existing social structures.
    4.  Encourage insight into current treatment practices regarding the specialized treatement responses to the needs of various consumer groups.
    5.  Foster the integration of ethical professional behavior that is responsive to the needs of various consumer groups.
    6.  Identify sociocultural and ethno-psychological differences between groups.
    7.  Present the efforts of multicultural counseling theorists and researchers who are aiming to improve counseling forms so as to empower people who have been discriminated against and stigmatized by society.
    8.  Stimulate critical thinking regarding the special needs of the following groups:  women; racial minorities; religious minorities; socio/economically disadvantaged persons; physically challenged persons; LGBT people; narcotic dependent people; criminal offenders; dually diagnosed persons; impaired professionals; and persons in chronic pain, and formulate pro and con positions for specialized treatment responses to those in need.
    9.  Encourage critical thinking regarding selected current public policy issues and areas of concern in the arena of chemical dependency treatment.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the need to approach clients' issues in a culturally competent manner.
    2.  Identify several dimensions of culturally competent counseling.
    3.  Identify their own biases and prejudices so as to avoid projecting one's own values and negative judgements onto consumers.
    4.  Identify the system of oppression in American society, and articulate the ways the system of oppression serves the privileged in existing social structures.
    5.  Recognize the need for specialized treatment responses given the unique cultural experiences of various consumer groups.
    6.  Identify and practice ethical professional behavior in response to the various needs of various consumer groups.
    7.  Identify and articulate a preferred multicultural counseling approach to be used in one's own practice.
    8.  Articulate and understanding of the potential special needs of minorities and disadvantaged groups.
    9.  Identify current public policy issues of concern to the field of chemical dependency, and formulate ideas related to advocacy.

  
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    ASA 250 - Ethical Principles/Practices in Chemical Dependency Treatment


    This 5 week module will cover the content required for the Certified Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor (CASAC) credentialing process.  The focus will be on the chemically dependent population and the ethical considerations related to the treatment environment.  The student will gain knowledge of the Canon of Ethical Principles.  In addition to the Canon, topics wil include:  counselors in recovery, counselor relapse, counter-transference, confidentiality and the law, sexual harassment, client-counselor relationships, and ethics in the workplace.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies, ASA 210 Chemical Dependency Counseling I or permission of instructor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate awareness of the importance of ethical professional practice to assure the health, safety, and recovery of addicted clients and families.
    2.  Demonstrate awareness of the importance of ethical standards for counselors in the profession to deliver the highest quality service to clients.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the Canon of Ethical Principles.
    4.  Apply concepts of counseling and professional ethics to the field of addiction counseling.

  
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    ASA 255 - Chemical Dependency and the HIV/AIDS Population


    This 5 week module will cover content required for the Certified Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor (CASAC) credentialing process.  The students will be exposed to the application of principles of chemical dependency theory and practice to the HIV/AIDS population.  The unique needs of this client group require special consideration to adapt treatment.  Focus will also include Hepatitis-C and federal law pertaining to HIV/AIDS information, ethics, and confidentiality issues.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies, ASA 210 Chemical Dependency Counseling I or permission of instructor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate comprehension, recognition, and understanding of the co-morbidity of addiction and HIV/AIDS.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of the risks of HIV/AIDS related to addiction.
    3.  Integrate the basic concepts of harm reduction and its role in chemical dependency treatment with regard to HIV/AIDS.
    4.  Apply principles related to the unique needs of clients who are HIV positive.

  
  •  

    ASA 260 - Pharmacology and Chemical Dependency


    This 5 week module will cover content required for the Certified Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor (CASAC) credentialing process.  It will provide an introduction to the basic pharmacology of psychoactive drugs, with special attention to drugs with addictive potential.  The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic basis of drug action will be introduced and explored.  The basic structure of the Central Nervous System (CNS) will be reviewed along with neurotransmitter function and dysfunction.  The pharmacology of sedative-hypnotic drugs, stimulants, analgesics, and drugs used to treat psychological disorders will be explored in detail with regards to their pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacological attributes.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies, ASA 210 Chemical Dependency I or permission of instructor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of pharmacokinetic processes.
    2.  Apply the concepts of half-life, drug accumulation, efficacy, potency, and tolerance.
    3.  Describe basic neuroanatomy with special attention to the neuron, receptors, and the synaptic cleft.
    4.  Describe the major groups of neurotransmitters important in the action of psychoactive substances.

  
  •  

    ASA 320 - Supervised Clinical Internship


    Two semesters of internship practicum, under supervision, in a chemical dependency related facility is required to provide exposure to the work of such facilities and sensitize students to prevention, clinical, and documentation skills of the profession.  The student will enter the field work as an intern and will be subject to all legal, ethical, and professional standards required of staff members.  Placement may include rehabilitation programs, detox units, prisons, hospitals, public school prevention programs/education programs, crisis centers, clinics or other recognized facilities designated for the education, prevention, or treatment of chemically dependent persons.  A primary goal of the internship(s) is to evaluate the student under actual working conditions to ascertain readiness for clinical work in the field.  Ethical principles and supervision are integrated into all areas of the experience.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ASA 110 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Studies, ASA 210 Chemical Dependency Counseling I

     

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 16-20 Internship Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a level of integrated knowledge of addiction.
    2.  Complete an accurate client assessment.
    3.  Write a comprehensive treatment plan for an addicted client, given adequate screenings, assessment, and diagnosis as related to DSM-IVR criteria.
    4.  Write organized documentation regarding a client's verbal and behavioral responses to components of the treatment process.
    5.  Utilize the Chemical Dependency referral system in planning appropriate care for addicted clients.
    6.  Develop skill in utilizing therapeutic techniques in client counseling.
    7.  Integrate knowledge of ethical principles into all areas of communication regarding clients.

  
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    ASL 120 - American Sign Language I


    Introduces the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) including basic vocabulary, syntax, finger spelling, and grammatical non-manual signs. Focuses on communicative competence. The Direct Experience Method is used to help students learn to sign by experiencing the use of signs directly. Develops gestural skills as a foundation for ASL enhancement. Introduces Deaf Culture and increases understanding of the Deaf Community.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Know and use the manual alphabet of American Sign Language appropriately.
    2.  Master 400 basic signs, including number systems, and use them appropriately in simple conversations.
    3.  Understand and begin to produce affirmative and negative statements, Yes/No and wh-questions in everyday topics such as family, daily activities, personal preference and needs.
    4.  Understand and begin to use basic sentence structures, including object + subject + verb, sentences with identifying nouns, directional verbs, and verbs with classifiers.
    5.  Understand and use some basic language strategies such as getting attention, handling interruptions, providing listeners with feedback, and opening and closing conversations.
    6.  Have a basic understanding of Deaf Culture, including the history of Deaf people in the United States, prevalent myths and misconceptions regarding ASL and deafness.

  
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    ASL 220 - American Sign Language II


    Continues the study of the processes and basic structures of ASL to provide an in-depth understanding of the language and an ability to use the language more fluently.  Sign grammatical principles are expanded and practiced. Understanding and appreciation for the Deaf Culture and Community is encouraged to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ASL 120 American Sign Language I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand 400 new signs in American Sign Language, including conjunctions, size-shape specifiers and more advanced classifier verb pairs, and produce them appropriately in topics such as family, daily activities, personal preference and needs.
    2.  Identify main ideas and supporting details from longer and more complex signed texts.
    3.  Understand more complex sentence structures, including conditional sentences and use of temporal aspects, and begin to use them correctly in communication.
    4.  Understand non-manual markers including comparative/conditional and adverbial uses, and use them to express physical and emotional states.
    5.  Understand and use language functions such as offering/accepting help and offering advice to communicate effectively.
    6.  Begin to explore the various artistic uses of ASL such as storytelling, poetry, and sign-play.
    7.  Develop a greater awareness of and appreciation for the Deaf Culture and Community as well as develop an understanding of their own cultural values and beliefs.

  
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    ASL 230 - American Sign Language III


    Additional and expanded topics for conversation are introduced with the associated vocabulary.  Variations of signed messages by incorporating different sign principles and mime.  More emphasis on conversational fluency in sign.  The student will be able to generate increasingly more complex signing structures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ASL 220 American Sign Language II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand 200 new signs in American Sign Language, including plural forms and different locations through reduplication, use of body pronoun/agent suffix for some professions, and additional use of classifiers showing manner of flow and distance.
    2.  Identify main ideas and supporting details from longer and more complex signed texts.
    3.  Understand more complex sentence structures, including rhetorical questions, sequence of activities, using clauses as topics, and questions about measurement, and begin to use them correctly in communication.
    4.   Understand and use non-manual markers, including inflections of verbs with facial adverbs, as well as inflections of adjectives, and the use of 'never' and 'nothing' signs as forms of denial.
    5.  Develop a greater awareness of and appreciation for the Deaf Culture and Community, including Deaf people's strategies with non-signers. 

     

  
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    BHM 101 - Basic Nutrition


    This course presents a challenging science-based nutrition core curriculum that reviews of the role of nutrition in health promotion/disease prevention, and provides an overview of the interrelationships between diet, therapeutic nutrition and various acute/chronic medical conditions.  With an emphasis on normal anatomy and physiology and the metabolism of nutrients, the following topics will be studied:  the functions and sources of nutrients; digestion, absorption, and utilization of food; normal and therapeutic nutrition; and various foods, preferences, and customs, as well as dietary guidelines.  Topics relating to dietary policies, procedures and regulations will also be covered.  Other topics of student interest will be addressed as they arise.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BIO 121
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List specfic nutrients and identify foods necessary to maintain and promote health.
    2.  Understand normal anatomy and physiology.
    3.  Describe how the body ingests, digests, absorbs, and metabolizes nutrients.
    4.  Understand the role of nutrition assessment and intervention in a variety of disease states.
    5.  Plan adequate menus based on appropriate menu planning principles.
    6.  Describe regulations governing food and labor.
    7.  Recognize some reliable sources of information in nutrition, and be able to share nutritional concepts with others.
    8.  Demonstrate understanding of patient's rights and ethical principles as related to medical nutrition therapy and nutrition support.

  
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    BHM 110 - Sanitation and Safety


    A course in the fundamentals of restaurant and hotel organization and sanitation. In this certification course the student will learn the control points in food service, the importance of sanitation, and safety procedures.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    HST 115
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify factors that affect growth of foodborne bacteria.   
    2. Analyze evidence to determine the presence of foodborne illness outbreaks.
    3. Identify personal behaviors that can contaminate food.
    4. Identify methods for preventing cross-contamination.
    5. Describe the flow of food through an organization.  
    6. Describe and understand the steps to a HAACP plan. 
    7. Recognize the importance of proper cleaning and sanitizing in lodging and foodservice establishments.
    8. Demonstrate their level of understanding of Basic First Aid/CPR/AED by successfully earning American Heart Association certification.
    9. Demonstrate their level of understanding of all course materials by successful completion of the ServSafe ® examination.


  
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    BHM 123 - Bartending and Beverage Management


    Management techniques for effective beverage operations of a restaurant, bar, hotel, country club, or any place that serves beverages will be covered.  Familiarization with the history of the beverage industry and development of an appreciation of wine, beer, and spirits.  Equipping, staffing, managing, marketing and purchasing for a bar.  Mixology.  Liquor laws and profitable operations management will be emphasized.  New trends in beverages are also discussed.  Students will be certified in responsible  alcohol service.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Students will discuss the history of the beverage industry.
    2.  Students will complete a certified responsible alcohol service exam.
    3.  Students will demonstrate an understanding of creating and maintaining bar business.
    4.  Students will perform and apply standard bar mixology equipment use.
    5.  Students will recognize and identify a variety of beverages including spirits, wine and beer.
    6.  Students will critique beverage sales and marketing techniques.
    7.  Students will prescribe, practice and apply proper bar sanitation and service setup.
    8.  Students will role play basic mixology/bartending.
    9.  Students will memorize standard drink recipes.
    10.  Students will integrate and appraise various bar employee management techniques.
    11.  Students will employ purchasing, receiving, storage, and inventory controls for bar operations.
    12.  Students will establish and apply profitable bar and beverage management.
    13.  Students will recognize and review applicable bar regulations.

  
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    BHM 125 - Hospitality Law (WE)


    A study of the legal principles governing hospitality operations including: common law, contracts, laws of tort and negligence, hotel-guest relationship, laws regarding food, food service and alcoholic beverages and employment laws.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Illustrate an understanding of the role of the law as related to the Hospitality Industry.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of appellate and original jurisdiction.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the procedural history of a case by briefing the original and all appellate court decisions in the correct order.
    4.  Articulate current laws affecting the Hospitality Industry.
    5.  Use rules established by case law to demonstrate an understanding of the Hospitality Industry.

  
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    BHM 127 - Kitchen Chemistry


    Your are what you eat.  Cooking and recipes may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and chemical research.  This course will cover the basic chemistry of the main components of food, carbohydrates, lipids, and protein, as well as water, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, food additives, flavors, and colors.  It will also cover the processing of food and the use of fermentation in the production of yogurt, cheese, wine, and beer.  The laboratory component will give the students a chance to perform the reactions presented in lecture.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CHM 127
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the chemical reactions that occur when food is cooked.
    2.  Discuss the four basic food molecules.
    3.  Describe how the four basic food molecules are used chemically in the human body.
    4.  Explain the other important molecules in food.
    5.  Discuss the various additives used in food production.
    6.  Describe the GRAS list.
    7.  Explain the chemical process of fermentation.
    8.  Disucss various categories of food.
    9.  Explain the chemistry of baking, leavening, denaturing, and browning.
    10.  Describe the effect of cooking temperatures on chemical reactions of the cooking.
    11.  Characterize the chemical poisons which can get into the food supply.

  
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    BHM 201 - Hotel/Restaurant Internship I


    Career-related employment in the hospitality industry focusing on an area of interest in a hotel or restaurant.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a hospitality business setting.  First year course work must be completed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  30 credit hours successfully completed toward Hotel/Restaurant Management degree

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate working competencies in any of the following areas, or other areas as agreed between the student and instructor.

         Focus Areas--Hotel Internship:
                   Housekeeping Department
                   Personnel Department
                   Maintenance Department
                   Sales Department
                   Accounting Department
                   Food & Beverage Department
                   Front Desk Department
                   General Mangement

         Focus Areas--Restaurant Internship:
                   Sanitation of Facility
                   Food & Beverage Preparation
                   Food & Beverage Service
                   Food & Beverage Management
                   Accounting Department
                   Personnel Department
                   Sales Department
                   Catering Department

  
  •  

    BHM 216 - Professional Cooking


    This course focuses on the theory and practice of cooking methods such as frying, roasting, broiling, griddle work, poaching and sauteing, with a basic understanding of use and care of kitchen equipment.  Some items to be prepared by the student include:  stocks, sauces, soups, vegetables, appetizers, sandwiches, salads, dairy products, meat, poultry, seafood, international dishes and basic bakery products.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BHM 110 Sanitation and Safety

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 6 Lab Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the principles and theory of food production and preparation.
    2.  Acquire the knowledge necessary for the total production of a menu, including terminology, menu requirements, recipe reading and conversion, recipe substitution, techniques of mixing, and cooking times and temperatures.
    3.  Properly handle food and food products to insure wholesomeness.
    4.  Understand the science of food production as it relates to the individual item as well as the total recipe.
    5.  Become familiar with commercial food production equipment and its uses.
    6.  Achieve a professional attitude toward kitchen etiquette and personnel supervision.

  
  •  

    BHM 230 - Front Office Operations Management


    A study of the importance of guest service, communications with one front office and other departments, reservation systems, registration techniques, and safety and security.  Accounting and night audit, reports and yield management will also be covered.  A computerized front office simulation will be used in this class.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HOS 101 Introductions for Hospitality Freshmen, HOS 115 Hospitality Marketing and Promotions, BUS 108 Accounting for a Service Business, BIT 206 IT for Service Industries

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the importance of guest service.
    2.  Understand the methods for establishing optimum room rate (Hubbart Room Rate Formula), accurately forecasting room availability, budgeting for operations, and implementing yield management.
    3.  Understand the communication essentials between the front office and other departments.
    4.  Understand the principles for constructing an efficient reservation system.
    5.  Understand how registration techniques can help ensure a hotel's profitability while meeting guests' needs.
    6.  Understand the significance of safety and security precautions, including key control and emergency management.
    7.  Understand the role of front office personnel in posting accounts, conducting cash and check transactions, and performing the night audit.
    8.  Understand the considerations in developing check-out and settlement procedures that give guests a positive last impression.
    9.  Understand how to recruit, select, hire, orient, train, schedule, and motivate front office employees.
    10.  Understand various office computer applications.

  
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    BHM 235 - Hotel and Restaurant Cost Control


    This course presents practical techniques for protecting hospitality establishments profits.  Covering a broad area of controls over food, beverage and labor areas, this course builds a sound foundation of concepts and applications of management cost control procedures.  Computer spread sheet applications software will be used in class.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BUS 108 Accounting for a Service Business, BUS 112 Quantitative Business Methods

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and understand the principles underlying management controls, including the operating budget, the menu, purchasing and receiving controls, storing and issuing controls, and production and serving controls.
    2.  Calculate food and beverage costs.
    3.  Identify procedures involved in taking and evaluating corrective action to strengthen controls.
    4.  Understand and identify the principles of sales forecasting, production control, and the prevention of sales income theft.
    5.  Identify and understand the factors involved in labor cost controls and how to implement labor controls.
    6.  Understand the concepts involved in successful menu pricing.
    7.  Understand front office computer applications.

  
  •  

    BHM 270 - Hospitality Managerial Accounting


    This course provides students with a basis for planning and protecting a hospitality operation's financial success.  Covers methods of financial analysis, forecasting, and budget and cost management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BHM 235 Hotel and Restaurant Cost Control

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Employ accounting principles and interpret Income Statements and Balance Sheet information.
    2.  Analyze financial data and ratios.
    3.  Institute operating controls and pricing methodologies.
    4.  Conduct effective cost management operations.
    5.  Establish budgets and cash management systems.
    6.  Create financial and investment plans.

  
  •  

    BHM 275 - Hospitality Catering and Community Service


    Students interested in either the hotel or restaurant business will find catering an integral part of their operational bottom line. They will also find community relations indispensable to overall business success.  This course covers the basics of catering from planning to execution of actual events.  Students will perform various job functions for all planned catering events while serving the community through fundraisers or charitable events.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BUS 108 Accounting for a Service Business, BHM 110 Sanitation and Safety, BHM 216 Quantity Food Production, BHM 235 Hotel and Restaurant Cost Control, or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Active membership in the Hotel/Restaurant Club is strongly encouraged.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Think in enterprising and entrepreneurial ways.
    2.  Have an appreciation for the importance of public relations through community service.
    3.  Indentify and meet prioritized community needs.
    4.  Effectively deal with conflict resolution.
    5.  Market and publicize catering and fundraising events.
    6.  Understand the similarities and differences between for-profit and non-profit activities.
    7.  Establish non-profit organizational mission statements and strategies.
    8.  Discuss and identify various styles of catering operations.
    9.  Develop catering operations from its nascence through successful conclusion.
    10.  Create a catered even menu.
    11.  Purchase and procure food and equipment for a catering event.
    12.  Prepare a catering menu.
    13.  Price and cost control a catered function.
    14.  Effectively manage revenue from a catered event.
    15.  Select and utilize special catering equipment.
    16.  Layout and design a catering function.
    17.  Forecast and manage the beverage needs for a catered event.
    18.  Staff and schedule employees for a catered event.
    19.  Recognize their own professional weaknesses and strengths and objectively evaluate the professional strengths and weaknesses of others.
    20.  Manage the onsite operational concerns of a catered event.
    21.  Employ and ensure quality at a catered event.
    22.  Effectively manage sanitation concerns for a catered event.
    23.  Employ various software programs for menu creation, publicizing, marketing and cost controls of catered events.

  
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    BHM 297 - Hotel/Restaurant Internship II


    Career-related employment in th hospitality industry focusing on an area of interest in a hotel or restaurant.  The intern will experience the opportunity to apply the theory learned in the program within a hospitality business setting.  Senior status.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BHM 201 Hotel/Restaurant Internship I and senior status required

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate working competencies in any of the following areas, or other areas as agreed between the student and instructor.

         Focus Areas--Hotel Internship:
                   Housekeeping Department
                   Personnel Department
                   Maintenance Department
                   Sales Department
                   Accounting Department
                   Food & Beverage Department
                   Front Desk Department
                   General Management

         Focus Areas--Restaurant Internship:
                   Sanitation of Facility
                   Food & Beverage Preparation
                   Food & Beverage Service
                   Food & Beverage Management
                   Accounting Department
                   Personnel Department
                   Sales Department
                   Catering Department

  
  •  

    BIO 090 - Preparatory Biology


    A preparatory course for students with no previous biology or laboratory science experience and for students needing additional background.  Especially for prospective health science students.  Register with advisement only.

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the role of the scientific method and taxonomy in the study of biology.
    2.  Explain the structure of atoms and molecules and how they interact in chemical reactions in living organisms.
    3.  Describe the four groups of macromolecules including their general structure and function in biological systems.
    4.  Recognize the two basic types of cells including a detailed description of their structure and function.
    5.  Discuss how energy is obtained and utilized in both plant and animal cells.
    6.  Explain how eukaryotic cells reproduce to produce new cells.
    7.  Describe the structure of DNA and explain its role in protein synthesis.

  
  •  

    BIO 101 - Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology


    An introduction to the basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of human body systems, and anatomic terminology.  This semester-long course reviews each of the major body systems.  Students will also be introduced to the structures and processes of cells, and various tissue types present in the human body.  This course may not be used to substitute for BIO 131/132 for health science students.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have knowledge of basic anatomical terms and be able to use them correctly.
    2.  Correctly identify body cavities and name their contents, and correctly use regional and directional terms.
    3.  Have knowledge of basic chemical concepts and apply them to a better understanding of physiological phenomena.
    4.  Have knowledge of the basic principles of cell anatomy and physiology.
    5.  Have knowledge of the structure of the basic tissues and the integumentary system.
    6.  Describe the growth, development, anatomy and physiology of the skeletal system.
    7.  Explain the anatomical structure and physiological actions of the human muscular system.
    8.  Have knowledge of the basic facts concerning the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system.
    9.  Have knowledge and understanding of special senses, reflexes, and the autonomic nervous system.
    10.  Have knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine system.
    11.  Have knowledge of the compositon of human blood plasma and name the cells making up the formed elements of the blood.
    12.  Demonstrate an understanding of the electrical activity, pressure changes, and heart sounds that occur during a single, normal cardiac cycle.
    13.  Have knowledge of the anatomy of the human respiratory system and explain the activities involved in a single respiratory cycle.
    14.  Have knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the human digestive system.
    15.  Have knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the urinary system.
    16.  Have knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive systems.

  
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    BIO 104 - Health for Haiti


    Students will explore the dynamics between poverty and healthcare, address specific health-related needs of Haitian people, and learn historical, cultural, economic, political and spiritual aspects of Haiti.  Students will engage in service projects at orphanages, hospitals, health clinics and food distribution centers in Haiti.  Specific service projects will be designed based on the pre-existing skills of the students and the most pressing community needs as identified by our partners in Haiti.  The course will foster fellowship and cultural humility, provide humanitarian assistance to the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, and prepare students to participate in a dynamic, global world.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    HST 104
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate increased understanding of personal social values.
    2.  Demonstrate enhanced civic responsibility that can be applied on a local and global level.
    3.  Demonstrate enhanced reflective writing skills.
    4.  Have acquired practical experience in applying health or general science skills including:

    • Interaction with Haitian children in hospitalized and orphanage settings
    • Packaging and distribution of food
    • Assist at health clinics
    • Provide personal hygiene instructions
    • Provide water purification instructions
    • Assist in sustainability efforts in farming and animal husbandry
    • Provide social interactions with orphans during recreational outings


  
  •  

    BIO 111 - General Biology I


    Principles of evolution and ecology as unifying themes in biology.  Evolutionary processes and ecological adaptations illustrated by plant and animal diversity.  Cellular life processes.  Current environmental problems.  The laboratory includes physically demanding field trips.  Accommodations can be made for students with disabilities.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop the critical thinking process.
    2.  Understand the methods, objectives, and limitations of the scientific process.
    3.  Develop an understanding that Biology is a relevant science and that its study is imperative in a person's becoming an enlighteded citizen of the new millennium.
    4.  Understand the concept of evolution and see it as the continuing, unifying theme of life.
    5.  See the commonality yet diversity of life functions.
    6.  Appreciate our place in nature by being conversant with our evolution, physiology, and behavior.
    7.  Develop an ecological awareness and understanding of the inter-relatedness of life on earth.

  
  •  

    BIO 112 - General Biology II


    Principles of evolution and ecology as unifying themes in biology.  The human animal and its systems. Concepts of animal behavior.  Classical genetics, current concepts of gene function and human genetics. Organismal growth and development.  Current environmental problems.  The laboratory includes physically demanding field trips.  Accommodations can be made for students with disabilities.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop the critical thinking process.
    2.  Understand the methods, objectives and limitations of the scientific process.
    3.  Understand that biology is a relevent science and that its study is imperative in a person's becoming an enlightened citizen of the new millennium.
    4.  Appreciate our place in nature by being conversant with our evolution, physiology, and behavior.

  
  •  

    BIO 117 - Principles of Biology I


    To give science majors a working foundation of biology and to prepare them for transfer to a four-year institution and upper level biology courses.  The biological principles covered include, but not limited to, Ecology, Conservation Biology, and Evolution.  The underlying themes of unity and diversity of living organisms will be used to amalgamate the topics covered.  Scientific methodology will be emphasized in both laboratory and lecture using current publications to support discussion as well as developing and executing scientific experimentation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite: High School Regents Biology and Regents Chemistry

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of ecosystems, ecology, conservation biology, processes of evolution and speciation.
    2.  Apply knowledge of evolution to explain the unity and diversity of life.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method.
    4.  Demonstrate knowledge of the unifying themes of biology.
    5.  Apply the scientific method to plan and carry out laboratory exercises.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze, and understand scientific writing.

  
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    BIO 118 W - Principles of Biology II


    A continuation of Principles of Biology I.  To give science majors a working foundation of biology to prepare them for transfer to a four-year institution and upper level biology courses.  The biological principles covered include, but not limited to: Cellular Structure and Function, Molecular Biology, and Genetics.  The underlying themes of unity and diversity of living organisms will be used to amalgamate the topics covered.  Scientific methodology will be emphasized in both laboratory and lecture using current publications to support discussion as well as developing and executing scientific experimentation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 117 Principles of Biology I or equivalent

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of basic cell morphology and function, molecular biology, Mendalian genetics and molecular genetics.
    2.  Apply the scientific method to plan and carry out laboratory exercises.
    3.  Apply knowledge of the scientific method in analysis of current scientific literature.
    4.  Utilize knowledge of Mendelian genetics and molecular genetics in problems of inheritance and the role of mutation in organisms.
    5.  Demonstrate the ability to read, compose, analyze,and critique scientific writing.

  
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    BIO 119 - Art of Science


    The Art of Science is an introductory course that explores the fundamentals of scientific and medical illustration.  Learn how to visually investigate and represent plants, animals, microbes and insects while you heighten your appreciation and understanding of the natural world.  Create simple diagrams of plants and anatomical structures, as you delve into the mysterious worlds of botany, anatomy, physiology and entomology.  Learn how to make colorful and informative visuals that could be used in textbooks, journals, museum displays, web sites, videos, educational software, or anatomical diagrams for medical professionals.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    ART 119
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Objective of the Course:

    1.  Develop an appreciation for the relationship of art and science
    2.  Synthesize information, think critically and solve critical thinking problems; write clear, well organized essays or research papers that demonstrate synthesis.
    3.  Apply principles of scientific inquiry, differentiate a theory from a hypothesis, and differentiate fact from opinion in regard to biological sciences.
    4.  Define and correctly use scientific terminology in regard to biological organisms and processes.
    5.  Work well independently and in small groups.  Show self-direction and motivation, and contribute to group work.
    6.  Students will demonstrate the ability to acquire and communicate scientific data, ideas, and interpretations through written, oral, and visual means.
    7.  Students will produce written reports that clearly and accurately describe and illustrate the background, methods, data, and interpretations relevant to a particular project.
    8.  Maintain a sketchbook/journal documenting the creative process.
    9.  Establish a drawing process.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Articulate and appreciate the fundamental relationships between botany, zoology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology and entomology.
    2.  Reflect on the history of scientific illustration and the shift from classical scholarship to direct observation.
    3.  Describe several basic principles associated with botany, zoology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology and entomology.
    4.  Discuss relationships between art and science, including their personal relections about the value of exploring these relationships for both artists and scientists.
    5.  Explain essential considerations for making decisions about effective illustration (i.e., choice of medium, scaling, form, value, scientist goals) and provide constructive critique of illustrations.
    6.  Create detailed and realistic illustrations in a range of media that clearly convey essential scientific information about the subjects.
    7.  Implement the formal visual communication elements of line, shape, value, texture and space.
    8.  Appreciate and implement several visual communication mediums, including, but not limited to, pencil, ink, watercolor and digital drawing.
    9.  Understand copyright requirements, archival techniques, transfer methods, typography and techniques for presenting information.
    10.  Prepare a portfolio of their work.
    11.  Produce written reports that clearly and accurately describe and illustrate the background, methods, data, and interpretations relevant to a particular project.
    12.  Maintain a sketchbook/journal documenting the creative process.
    13.  Establish a drawing process.

  
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    BIO 120 - Human Sexuality


    Explores information about sexual attitudes, relationships, sexual anatomy, contraception, sexually transmitted disease, sexual physiology and dysfunction.  Course aims to make students feel more comfortable thinking and talking about sex and to prepare them to make rational decisions about this important aspect of their lives.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

    1.  Differentiate between the concepts of sex and sexuality and discuss their intimate relationship.
    2.  Explore the historical aspects of sexuality in order to better understand our modern perspectives.
    3.  Discuss the basic biological functions and dysfunctions of male and female sexuality.
    4.  Open communication channels in the area of sexuality to allow for meaningful free exchange of ideas pertaining to this most important area of human life.
    5.  See how subject matter could be applied to our everyday lives.

  
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    BIO 121 - Basic Nutrition


    This course presents a challenging science-based nutrition core curriculum that reviews the role of nutrition in health promotion/disease prevention, and provides an overview of the interrelationships between diet, therapeutic nutrition, and various acute/chronic medical conditions.  With an emphasis on normal anatomy and physiology and the metabolism of nutrients, the following topics will be studied:  the functions and sources of nutrients, digestion, absorbtion, and utilization of food; normal and therapeutic nutrition; and various foods, preferences, and customs, as well as dietary guidelines.  Topics relating to dietary policies, procedures and regulations will also be covered.  Other topics of student interest will be addressed as they arise.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BHM 101
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List specific nutrients and identify foods necessary to maintain and promote health.
    2.  Understand normal anatomy and physiology.
    3.  Describe how the body ingests, digests, absorbs, and metabolizes nutrients.
    4.  Understand the role of nutrition assessment and intervention in a variety of disease states.
    5.  Plan adequate menus based on appropriate menu planning principles.
    6.  Describe regulations governing food and labor.
    7.  Recognize some reliable sources of information in nutrition, and be able to share nutritional concepts with others.
    8.  Demonstrate understanding of patient's rights and ethical principles as related to medical nutrition therapy and nutrition support.

  
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    BIO 122 - Sensation and Perception


    An introduction to the biological and psychological processes involved in sensation and perception.  This course will examine the way in which the sensory systems receive information from the environment and relay it to the central nervous system and how this information is then integrated, organized, and interpreted to form perceptions.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding the processes of touch, vision, hearing, balance, taste, and smell.  This course will also explore a variety of situations and conditions which can alter perception such as occur with phantom limb syndrome, color blindness, and even illusions.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define and differentiate between sensation and perception.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic research methods used to analyze the processes of sensation and perception.
    3. Describe the basic structure and function of the central and peripheral nervous system and neurons.
    4. Describe the basic structure and function of the major sense organs.
    5. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the various forms of energy in the physical environment (such as light waves, air pressure, and chemicals) that can be transformed into a perceptual experience.
    6. Define multimodal perception, explain its importance, and provide examples.
    7. Describe how sensory information is integrated, organized, and interpreted to form perceptions.
    8. Provide examples of how perceptions can be influenced by biological, psychological, and environmental factors such as genetics, disease, injury, culture, prior knowledge, and expectations.
    9. Apply knowledge of sensation and perception to real world examples.
    10. Synthesize information, think critically, and solve problems.
    11. Work well independently and in groups and communicate effectively with others.


 

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