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Website Catalog
SUNY Broome Community College
   
 
  Feb 18, 2018
 
 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 
  
  •  

    MDA 206 - Medical Office Management


    Medical office administrative procedures, such as bookkeeping principles and practices, patient health records, insurance forms, banking and postal services, payroll records, patient accounts, office machines, mechanics of applicable medical correspondence, appointment scheduling, supplies and inventory.  Emphasis on practical application of administrative techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 090 Foundations for College Mathematics or equivalent, MDA 102 Medical Assisting Science, MDA 104 Keyboarding and Medical Word Processing

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    For Medical Assisting students only

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the desirable characteristics of the physical layout of the medical office.
    2.  Demonstrate the collaboration and creation of required medical information in role-play between the patient and the medical assistant student in: (1) registration forms, (2) creating the patient chart, (3) completion of a history and physical form, and (4) appointment scheduling.
    3.  Demonstrate appropriate interactions with typical, angry, scared, or problem patients, both in person and in telephone communications.
    4.  Discuss and practice outpatient/inpatient/other medical office referrals and paperwork.
    5.  Create a filing system for their laboratory results and information.
    6.  Discuss and use a physician fee schedule.
    7.  Analyze and implement correct CMS 1500 filing requirements for various insurance plans including (1) commercial, (2) managed care, (3) Blue Cross/Blue Shield, (4) Tricare, (5) Champus, and (6) Worker’s Compensation.
    8.  Describe and demonstrate insurance claim submission guidelines and appeals.
    9.  Explain the legal implications associated with creating and filing insurance claims.

  
  •  

    MDA 207 - Advanced Medical Office Management


    Manual and electronic accounting, payroll and bookkeeping procedures for Medical Office.  Includes banking, spreadsheets and reconciliations of bank statements.  Preparation of Internal Revenue deposits, records, and year-end reports.  Simulated office processes reinforce the accounting objectives.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  MDA 102 Medical Assisting Science

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 laboratory Hours
    Note
    For Medical Assisting students only

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the students will be able to:

    1.  Perform banking transactions for the medical office, including check writing, transfer of funds, NSF checks and bank reconciliation.
    2.  Process payroll.
    3.  Perform billing and collections procedures.
    4.  List and describe the basic principles of accounting.
    5.  Differentiate between a debit balance and a credit balance.
    6.  State the basic accounting equation.
    7.  Perform basic accounting entries for a medical office, including debits, credits, adjustments, accounts receivable, accounts payable and owner equity accounts.
    8.  Use a physician’s fee schedule when posting procedures.
    9.  Perform billing and collections procedures.
    10.  Prepare and record petty cash vouchers.

  
  •  

    MDA 208 W - Medical Ethics, Law and Economics


    Review of the medical ethics which set the standard of conduct for physicians and other healthcare professionals.  Requirements to practice medicine, legal liabilities of the profession, and the importance of medicolegal consent forms.  Legal arrangements of private medical practices, medical care financing, and systems of health care delivery.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define medical etiquette, ethics, and medicolegal principles and describe the difference between them.
    2.  Describe managed care and other medical practice policies and management procedures.
    3.  Identify the ethical principles as they pertain to the student’s healthcare specialty.
    4.  Define and discuss the importance of maintaining HIPAA regulations as it pertains to the healthcare setting.
    5.  Describe basis for the scope of practice of various health care professionals, including the education, training, credentialing, and personal capabilities of practitioners in each discipline.
    6.  Describe the differences and similarities between civil and criminal law.
    7.  Recognize and describe regulations and professional liability for the health care professional.
    8.  Define the public duties regarding statutory and regulatory requirements.
    9.  Describe the different types of consent and the consent process.
    10.  Define and describe allocation of medical resources.
    11.  Recognize and discuss the ethical implications of various situations such as abortion, death and dying, and genetic engineering.

  
  •  

    MDA 211 - Medical Assisting Procedures III


    Study of body systems and disease, cell and tissue damage, inflammation and healing, immune response, and infectious disease in relation to patient care and the human response.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 132 Human Biology, MDA 115 Medical Assisting Procedures I, MDA 201 Medical Assisting Procedures II, MDA 206 Medical Office Management, for Medical Assistants and BIO 131 Anatomy & Physiology I or BIO 101 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, for Medical Administrative Skills Certificate, Medical Transcription, or Health Studies Students

    Co-requisite:  MDA 211L Medical Assisting Procedures III Laboratory (for Medical Assisting Degree majors only or consent of chairperson)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and understand terms related to the disease and disabilities studied in this course, cell and tissue damage, inflammation and healing, immune response, and infectious diseases.
    2.  Explain the causes and classification of diseases and disability.
    3.  Describe the pathophysiology processes involved in the systems studied in this course, including immune, musculoskeletal, blood and blood forming organs, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, digestive, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, urinary, endocrine, nervous, eye and ear, reproductive, integumentary, genetic and developmental, and mental health disorders.

  
  •  

    MDA 211 L - Medical Assisting Procedures III Laboratory


    Practical application of advanced technical procedures in medical assisting specifically oriented to the various medical specialties.  Practice of the techniques of orthopedics, cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, obsetrics and gynecology, andrology, opthalmology, otolaryngology, and diagnostic imaging.  The medical assistant’s role in preparation for screening, and assisting with emergencies and providing patient education is emphasized.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 132 Human Biology II, MDA 115 Medical Assisting Procedures I, MDA 201 Medical Assisting Procedures II, MDA 206 Medical Office Management

    Corequisites:  MDA 211 Medical Assisting Procedures III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. List and discuss common diseases and diagnostic tests for body systems discussed.
    2. Perform and assist with advanced technical procedures within a variety of specialties, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    3. State the fundamental principles of evacuating a healthcare setting and demonstrate ability to devise and implement emergency preparedness plans, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    4. Educate patients effectively about a variety of diseases, diagnostic tests, and procedures through verbal and written communication.
    5. Demonstrate proficiency with development of patient educational materials which demonstrate clear and accurate patient instruction for diseases processes, procedures, self-exams, and follow-up care.
    6. Demonstrate ability to complete accurate documentation of patient care.


  
  •  

    MDA 245 W - Directed Practice Seminar


    Integration of theoretical knowledge and practical experience as an extern in physician’s offices, medical centers, school health departments, rehabilitation clinics, and other health care facilities. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  MDA 246 Clinical Practicum I, MDA 247 Clinical Practicum II

     

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Note
    For Senior Medical Assisting students

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the essentials of an externship and list the responsibilities of the student during externship.
    2.  Identify and demonstrate essential skills in seeking employment in the medical assisting field.
    3.  Describe the roles of temperament and communication style in interpersonal and professional relationships.
    4.  Define professionalism, give examples of professional behavior, and demonstrate appropriate professional behavior.
    5.  Define the professional role, certification, and “scope of practice” of a practicing medical assistant.
    6.  Explain the essentials of the certification process.
    7.  Identify strategies for becoming involved in the medical assisting professional community.

  
  •  

    MDA 246 - Clinical Practicum I


    Supervised practical experience for development of fundamental skills in medical assisting through an externship placement in a variety of healthcare facilities, such as general practice physician offices, medical centers, school health departments, rehabilitation clinics, and specialty medical practices.  Students will complete 2 rotations throughout the 15 week semester.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HST 210 Pharmacology, MDA 201 Medical Assisting Procedures II, MDA 206 Medical Office Management, MDA 207 Advanced Medical Office Management

    Corequisites:  MDA 211 Medical Assisting Procedures III and MDA 211L Medical Assisting Procedures III Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    8 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to effectively and correctly perform clinical and administrative tasks within the healthcare setting, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    2. Demonstrate ability to respond to emergency situations and ethical dilemmas, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    3. Comply with legal rules and regulations, such as those by OSHA, HIPAA, and standards, as set by the CDC.
    4. Document patient care accurately within the medical record.
    5. Demonstrate effective communication skills through verbal and written communication.
    6. Demonstrate ability to establish and maintain effective relationships with patients and other members of the healthcare team, while maintaining professional boundaries.
    7. Work as an effective member of the healthcare team by completing tasks as assigned, both independently, and as part of an interdisciplinary team.
    8. Demonstrate professional behavior expected of the medical assistant during externship, including ability to follow policies and procedures of the healthcare facility, course, department, and college.


  
  •  

    MDA 247 - Clinical Practicum II


    Supervised practical experience for development of fundamental skills in medical assisting through an externship placement in a variety of healthcare facilities, such as general practice physician offices, medical centers, school health departments, rehabilitation clinics, and specialty medical practices.  Students will complete 2 rotations throughout the 15 week semester.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HST 210 Pharmacology, MDA 201 Medical Assisting Procedures II, MDA 206 Medical Office Management, MDA 207 Advanced Medical Office Management

    Corequisite:  MDA 211 Medical Assisting Procedures III and MDA 211L Medical Assisting Procedures III Laboratory

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    8 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate ability to effectively and correctly perform clinical and administrative tasks within the healthcare setting, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    2. Demonstrate ability to respond to emergency situations and ethical dilemmas, while staying within scope of practice of a Medical Assistant.
    3. Comply with legal rules and regulations, such as those by OSHE, HIPAA, and standards, as set by the CDC.
    4. Document patient care accurately within the medical record.
    5. Demonstrate effective communication skills through verbal and written communication.
    6. Demonstrate ability to establish and maintain effective relationships with patients and other members of the healthcare team, while maintaining professional boundaries.
    7. Work as an effective member of the healthcare team by completing tasks as assigned, both independently, and as part of an interdisciplinary team.
    8. Demonstrate professional behavior expected of the medical assistant during externship, including ability to follow policies and procedures of the healthcare facility, course, department, and college.


  
  •  

    MET 112 - Metrology


    The study of the science of measurement systems and measurement.  Accuracy, precision and reliability compared. Standards, including surface finish.  Students learn to use the steel rule, calipers, micrometers, fixed gauges, feeler gauges, radius gauges, gauge blocks and surface plates, height and planer gauges, V-blocks, toolmaker’s flat, mechanical indicating equipment, visual guage, air gauges, toolmaker’s microscope, optical flats and angle measuring equipment.  Calibration of instruments and appropriate record keeping.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the principles of dimensional measurement.
    2.  Know the methods and skills necessary to perform practical measurements in industry.

  
  •  

    MET 113 - Engineering Drawing I w/CAD


    An introductory course in the fundamentals of engineering drawing and the basics of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD).  Manual drafting techniques are integrated with extensive use of AutoCAD.  Topics include use of the drawing instruments, geometric construction, freehand sketching, orthographic projection, sectional and auxiliary views and proper dimensioning techniques.  CAD topics include file management; command structure; creating, editing and manipulating drawing elements; dimensioning.  Students will gain an understanding of engineering drawing concepts by applying them in both manual drafting and AutoCAD assignments.

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    CIV 113
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Know the importance of engineering drawing and the requirements of this graphic language.
    2.  Demonstrate the ability to construct an acceptable freehand sketch.
    3.  Be competent in the use of manual drafting tools and techniques.
    4.  Develop technically correct orthographic projections using proper projection techniques and the latest ASME Y14.5M standards.
    5.  Demonstrate the ability to dimension a moderately complex part using proper dimensioning techniques.
    6.  Generate different types of sectional views and choose which type of section is most appropriate for a given part.
    7.  Understand the reasons and concepts of auxiliary views.
    8.  Demonstrate the ability to create part drawings using AutoCAD in a timely fashion.

  
  •  

    MET 116 - Engineering Drawing II w/CAD


    A second course in engineering drawing emphasizing the principles of descriptive geometry, working drawings, tolerancing methods, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, with an introduction to solid work or other CAD software.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 113 Engineering Drawing I w/CAD

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand solid work’s basic parametric modeling process by demonstrating the ability to create quality solid models.
    2.  Apply technical sketching skills of part and assembly concepts.
    3.  Generate detailed orthographic and axonometric drawings in a standard industrial format using the latest ASME standards.
    4.  Understand and apply the principles of descriptive geometry.
    5.  Develop a complete set of working drawings including identification numbers, bill of materials and engineering change documentation.
    6.  Have a thorough understanding of fits and tolerances.
    7.  Define typical thread notes and fastening techniques.
    8.  Apply geometric dimensioning and tolerance symbols and interpret their meaning on an engineering drawing.

  
  •  

    MET 121 - Manufacturing Processes I


    A basic study of manufacturing materials and processes, such as:  cutting-tool materials and cutting fluids, electrical discharge machining, properties of materials, drilling and related hole making processes, joining processes and equipment, producing and processing ferrous and non-ferrous metals.  Laboratory exercises provide an opportunity for actual practice in the operation of selected manufacturing equipment.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Calculate speed, feed, and depth of cut for material removal operations using the “Machinery’s Handbook.”
    2.  Apply standard safety procedures for a manufacturing environment.
    3.  Indentify and perform the basic material removal processes:  facing, turning, drilling, boring, honing and milling.
    4.  Improve your skills for working effectively in a team environment.
    5.  Communicate the steps required to manufacture a product using industry standard terms.
    6.  Accurately use basic measurement tools such as calipers, micrometers, gage blocks, and attribute gages to achieve the desired sizes of parts and/or part features.
    7.  Understand the fundamental methods of fusion and solid state welding.
    8.  Have a better understanding of how raw materials are turned into useful products.

  
  •  

    MET 122 - Manufacturing Processes II


    A continuation of the basic study of manufacturing processes.  The nature of metals and alloys, heat treatment, various casting processes and the processing of metals by hot and cold working techniques.  Special topics include screw thread systems and their measurement, indexing, gear terminology and manufacturing methods, tapers and computer numerical controlled machining.  Laboratory exercises parallel classroom topics and will provide the students with an opportunity to practice some of these manufacturing methods.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 121 Manufacturing Processes I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Improve their skills for working effectively in a team environment.
    2.  Be familiar with the control unit on a typical CNC machine tool to store, load and edit programs.
    3.  Demonstrate proficiency in CNC programming basic parts and be able to de-bug the CNC program if there is a problem.
    4.  Understand when and how to use looping (subprograms) in CNC programming.
    5.  Be knowledgeable with gear terminology, types of gears and understand how to calculate simple speed ratios.
    6.  Understand the fundamental types of heat treatment processes used on steel.
    7.  Understand the difference between expendable-mold casting processes and multiple-use mold casting processes.
    8.  Understand what indexing is and where it is used in the manufacture of parts.
    9.  Understand the difference between Hot and Cold working processes.

  
  •  

    MET 134 - Statics


    Instruction will be directed to the study of static force systems in equilibrium as applied to engineering technology.  Topics of study will include:  force distribution, moments, system equilibrium, free-body diagrams, friction, centroids, graphic statics, and moment of inertia. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry or departmental approval

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CIV 124
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the nature of rigid bodies, and the fact that they represent an idealization of real bodies.
    2.  Understand the nature of forces and moments, and will be capable of recognizing forces and moments acting on bodies.
    3.  Apply the principles of static equilibrium to the analysis of structures and machines.
    4.  Experimentally verify the laws of friction, and be capable of applying them to a variety of cases.
    5.  Locate centroids and centers of gravity, and compute moments of inertia.

  
  •  

    MET 164 - Quality Systems


    The total quality concepts including organizational, planning, monitoring and continuous improvement of the quality function in a business environment.  Students will become familiar with the planning process including defining the process, customers’ needs, process measurement, analyzing data and quality improvement methods and philosophies.  Topics also covered in this course include an introduction to statistical quality control and engineering ethics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the concept of quality in products and services, and customer satisfaction.
    2.  Understand total quality management and its principles and practices in continuous process improvement.
    3.  Use the mathematics of collection, organization and interpretation of data to produce graphical displays.
    4.  Apply the basic concepts of statistics to manufacturing processes in order to conduct, analyze and interpret quantitative data.
    5.  Produce control charts as a method of analysis and presentation of a particular variation in a process.
    6.  Use Minitab statistical software package for its wide range of data analysis and graphics capabilities.

  
  •  

    MET 200 - Senior Seminar


    Guest speakers, industry tours, videos, and special projects intended to make the student aware of the latest developments in the field of Mechanical Engineering Technology.  Topics will include Operations Management, Ethics in Engineering, Survival Skills for Graduates, etc.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I and Program Chairperson approval

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have experience developing concepts within teams.
    2.  Have the integration of knowledge from various academic courses.
    3.  Have insight into the practice of mechanical engineering technology.
    4.  Have a sense of the joy of technical work.

  
  •  

    MET 211 - Mechanical CAD


    Introduction to Mechanical CAD.  CAD command structure, screen controls, and use of menus to create, edit, and manipulate geometry for 2D and 3D models.  Use of special features for the production of fully detailed layout drawings from 2D and 3D models.  File management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 116 Engineering Drawing II w/CAD or Department Chairperson approval

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply technical sketching skills of parts and assembly concepts.
    2.  Understand Mechanical CAD as a 3D feature based associative, parametric solid modeling system for part and assembly design.
    3.  Have a through understanding of and apply the constructive solid geometry concepts and Boolean operations used in 3D modeling.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to utilize CAD to create quality solid models in a timely fashion.
    5.  Perform basic design changes and modifications.
    6.  Generate detailed working drawings in a standard industrial format using the latest ASME standards.
    7.  Demonstrate the ability to create a model using the college’s 3D modeler and its software package.

  
  •  

    MET 220 - Programming CNC Machine Tools


    An introductory course in the fundamentals and some of the advanced principles of CNC Milling/Turning.  Topics to include: Introduction to NC/CNC Machinery (history, input media and tooling), New Part Production Set-up, Typical Controller Operations (store, load and edit programs) and Manual Part Programming of CNC machine tools using the industry standard “G” and “M” Codes.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 122 Manufacturing Processes II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Set up a CNC machine (load and touch off tools, load programs).
    2.  Be familiar with the controls of a typical CNC machine.
    3.  Program basic linear and circular part geometry.
    4.  Know when and how to use subprograms, cutter compensation and canned cycles.
    5.  Make necessary corrections to programs and machine set-up to run quality parts.

  
  •  

    MET 223 - Computer Integrated Machining


    A continuation of Programming CNC Machine Tools.  The emphasis of this course is on “Computer Assisted Part Programming.”  The course is designed to include students who have had no exposure to computer operations, but have knowledge of machine shop operations including CNC machine tools.  MasterCAM and CadKey software are introduced.  CAD software will be used to construct geometry database files of various parts.  CAM software will be used to choose the machining process, assign tool parameters, define the tool path, give path verification, develop the post processor, and to transfer the CNC code to the CNC machine tool.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 220 Programming CNC Machine Tools

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create basic 2D and 3D geometry using MaterCAM X.
    2.  Assign toolpaths to cut parts using MasterCAM X.
    3.  Create programs using the MasterCAM X-Fanuc post.
    4.  Transfer programs to a CNC machine.
    5.  Operate a CNC machine.

  
  •  

    MET 234 - Dynamics


    Motion and Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration, Kinematics of Linear and Curvilinear Motion, Dynamics of Linear and Curvilinear Motion, Energy, Impulse and Momentum, Kinematics of Mechanisms.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 134 Statics, CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use mathematical and graphical techniques to analyze the motion of bodies and simple mechanisms.
    2.  Apply the principles of equilibrium to the analysis of the forces acting on accelerating bodies.
    3.  Determine the magnitudes of work, Kinetic energy, and potential energy interchanges.
    4.  Possess an elementary understanding of impulse and mementum, and be capable to analyzing their interchanges.

  
  •  

    MET 235 - Strength of Materials


    Normal, shear, bearing, thermal, and torsional stresses and strains.  Stress-strain curves. Shearing forces, bending moments, shearing stresses and deflection of beams.  Columns and pressure vessels.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 134 Statics, CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Calculate direct normal, shear, and bearing stresses.
    2.  Understand stress vs. strain graph and be able to determine yield strength, ultimate strength, and modulus of elasticity.
    3.  Understand design factor and be able to design a member under direct stress.
    4.  Design circular members under torsion and apply stress concentration factors.
    5.  Develp shear force and bending moment diagrams for simple and cantilever beams.
    6.  Apply bending stress and shear stress equations relative to beam design.
    7.  Operate industry standard mechanical testing machines.
    8.  Produce clear, concise, and accurate lab reports.

  
  •  

    MET 238 - Mechanical Design


    Application of the principles of strength of materials to the design of machine elements.  Design and analysis of shafts, gears, bearings, weldments, and mechanical assemblies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MET 235 Strength of Materials and MAT 160 Applied Calculus I

    Corequisites:  MET 280 L Capstone Project

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the nature of combined stress, and be capable of recognizing combined stress in elements of structures and machines.
    2.  Design a range of machine elements (shafts, gears, bearings, etc.) based upon strength and functional requirements.
    3.  Consider machining, assembly, and other manufacturing requirements in the design process.
    4.  Have experience in the design of mechanical assemblies.
    5.  Integrate fluid mechanical, and thermodynamic principles into the analysis and design of machines.

  
  •  

    MET 243 - Fluid Mechanics


    The study of fluid statics and dynamics.  Topics include fluid forces, flow measurement, the steady flow energy equation, viscosity, laminar and turbulent flow, frictional losses, pipeline systems, introduction to turbomachinery, drag and lift.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MET 134 Statics, CIV 124 Mechanics (Statics)

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Apply the principles of equilibrium to fluid systems.
    2.  Design series piping systems for conditions of steady flow.
    3.  Select an appropriate pump for fluid-handling systems.
    4.  Have had experience testing pumps, fans, and piping systems as part of a team.
    5.  Prepare laboratory reports to the level of standard professional conventions.

  
  •  

    MET 244 - Thermodynamics


    A study of the property and energy relationships in non-flow and steady flow applications.  Topics include ideal gas relationships, real working substances, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic cycles, and available energy.  The cycle concept is applied to steam power, internal combustion engines, gas turbines, refrigeration, and heat pumps.  Consideration is also given to combustion analysis and heat transfer.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  PHY 161 Physics I and MAT 160 Applied Calculus

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the behavior of single and two-phase substances, and be capable of determining their response to thermal and mechanical energy transfers.
    2.  Give an elementary explanation of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, and will understand the implications of these laws for technology, society, and the environment.
    3.  Apply the Laws of Thermodynamics to the analysis and design of heat engines and thermal devices.
    4.  Have had experience testing heat engines and thermal devices as part of a team.
    5.  Prepare laboratory reports to the level of standard professional conventions.

  
  •  

    MET 252 W - Engineering Materials


    Atomic bonding, crystalline and non-crystalline materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.  Phase equilibria, microstructures, and strengthening and toughening mechanisms.  Writing Emphasis Course.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MET 235 Strength of Materials or Department Chairperson’s Approval

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the composition-structure-processing-properties relationship of metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites.
    2.  Know the structural make-up of individual atoms and be able to predict the predominant bond type.
    3.  Define the atomic arrangement of crystalline material and understand the importance of crystal imperfections.
    4.  Have a thorough understanding of the strengthening process of strain hardening, solid solution strengthening, and dispersion of strengthening.
    5.  Describe the heat treating processes associated with slow cooling and quench & temper for such materials as brass, aluminum, and steel.
    6.  Interpret isomorphous, eutectic, and eutectoid phase diagrams.
    7.  Understand the statistical nature of brittle failure in ceramics.
    8.  Describe the structural response of polymers and FRP’s to applied stresses.
    9.  Conduct metallographic preparation and microscopic examination of various metals.
    10.  Have produced clear, concise, and accurate lab reports.
    11.  Have completed a research paper on a materials topic and have delivered an oral report.

  
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    MET 254W - Materials Science for Technologists


    Course includes overview of engineering materials with emphasis on non-metallic materials.  Atomic bonding, crystalline and non-crystalline materials, including ceramics, polymers, and composites.  Phase equilibrium, microstructures, strengthening and toughening mechanisms.  Course reviews current mechanical engineering applications of these materials.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    To provide an understanding of “the generic phenomena and behavioral characteristics of materials” by studying the relationship between the internal structure, and the properties and performance of engineering materials.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Understand the composition-structure-processing-properties relationship of metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites.
    2.  Know the structural make-up of individual atoms and be able to predict the predominant bond type.
    3.  Define the atomic arrangement of crystalline material and understand the importance of crystal imperfections.
    4.  Have the ability to interpret isomorphous, eutectic, and eutectoid phase diagrams.
    5.  Understand the statistical nature of brittle failure in ceramics.
    6.  Describe the structural response of polymers and FRP’s to applied stresses.
    7.  Have produced clear, concise, and accurate lab reports.
    8.  Have completed a research paper on a materials topic and have delivered an oral report.

  
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    MET 280L - Capstone Project


    Provides students with the opportunity to work on projects that they will likely encounter in the mechanical enigneering industry.  The emphasis will be on working in teams to design and build a component, product or system.  Project phases may include conceptual design, detail design, and prototype.  The deliverables will include standard documentation to describe the product using industry code, specifications and standards.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 160 Applied Calculus I and MET 235 Strength of Materials

    Corequisites:  MET 238 Mechanical Design

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Work effectively in a design team.
    2. Perform an analysis of a problem.
    3. Determine the product/system operating parameters.
    4. Produce a conceptual design for the product/system.
    5. Complete a detailed design of hte product/system including required engineering calculations and industry standard documentation.
    6. Build a prototype of a component/system.
    7. Complete acceptance testing of the component/system.


  
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    MET 298 - Cooperative Work Experience


    On-the-job experience directly related to the Mechanical Engineering Technology field.  Students will have the opportunity to work in one of the following areas:  Computer Aided Drawing, Computer Numerical Control Machining, Equipment Maintenance, Materials Testing, Production Control, Technical Sales, Tooling Technology, or other MET related areas.  To be eligible, students must maintain at least a 2.2 GPA through their first three semesters (minimum 38 credits in the MET Program).  On-the-job experience approximately 10-20 hours per week.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Placement by Department Chairperson

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    10-20 hours per week
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have an understanding of their field of engineering technology.
    2.  Have experience directly related to their field of study.
    3.  Have on-the-job experience and have earned some money.

  
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    MET 299 - Independent Study


    The student undertakes an independent project in his specialty under the guidance of a faculty member. Only one independent study course allowed per semester. Consideration may be given to a project involving a work assignment.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Approval of Department Chairperson

    Credits: (2-4)
    Hours
    Class Hours (TBD), Lab Hours (TBD)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


  
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    MFG 250 - Principles of Continuous Improvement


    Course includes various methods and techniques to provide for continuous improvement in manufacturing.  The initial course emphasis will be establishing a baseline for improvement.  Mapping existing processes, measuring quality, and determining the costs of manufacturing activities is included.  The course will then provide insight to the various contemporary practices to guide continuous improvement in the manufacturing industry.  Customer feedback, statistical quality control and industry trends including just-in-time production, lean manufacturing, TOYOTA practices, ERP, and MRP will be evaluated.  The course will also review actual case studies of successful and unsuccessful continuous improvement initiatives.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform professionally - exhibiting integrity, accepting responsibility, taking initiative, and provide leadership necessary to ensure project success.
    2.  Prepare a process flow diagram and process description of a manufacturing, procurement, or product development cycle.
    3.  Divide a manufacturing process into a series of activities/steps, and determine the activity based cost for each activity or process step.
    4.  Complete a statistical analysis of manufacturing production to determine quality problem areas and/or areas that have the potential for significant improvement.
    5.  Request and evaluate customer feedback on product quality and design for use in the continuous improvement process.
    6.  Research and evaluate case studies of successful and unsuccessful implementation of continuous improvement projects.
    7.  Apply common industry continuous improvement techniques for a specific manufacturing product line.
    8.  Apply advanced manufacturing techniques including robotics to further enhance manufacturing competitiveness and quality.
    9.  Continually evaluate manufacturing quality and cost to gain further improvements in the manufacturing cycle.

  
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    MFG 280 - Capstone Project


    Provides students with the opportunity to work on projects that they will likely encounter in the manufacturing industry.  The emphasis will be on improving the quality, cost, and productivity of manufacturing operations.  Topics include improving productivity by use of automated manufacturing processes, reducing manufacturing errors, increasing product reliability through enhanced inspection techniques.  Organizational and cost issues will also be considered.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Senior Standing or Faculty Approval

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform professionally - exhibiting integrity, accepting responsibility, taking initiative, and providing leadership necessary to ensure project success.
    2.  Produce quality design products.
    3.  Produce design products that meet important performance requirements while satisfying relevant societal and professional constraints.
    4.  Establish relationships for quality performance.
    5.  Establish relationships and implement practices with team members, advisors, and clients that support high performance and continuous improvement.
    6.  Manage project schedule and resources.
    7.  Plan, monitor, and manage project schedule, resources, and work assignments to ensure timely and within-budget completion.
    8.  Make decisions based on product design requirements, product life-cycle considerations, resource availability, and associated risks.
    9.  Demonstrate effective use of contemporary tools for engineering and business analysis, fabrication, testing, and design communication.
    10.  Communicate for project success; use formal and informal communications with team, advisor, and clients to document and facilitate progress and to enhance impact of design products.

  
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    MLT 110 - Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology


    Overview of medicine and the field of Clinical Laboratory Technology.  Designed to acquaint the student with the clinical laboratory and with the professional role of laboratory personnel within health care delivery system.  Review of safety issues connected with the clinical laboratory, introduction to values, ethics and interpersonal communication in these settings.

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    CLT 110
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate appropriate professional behavior.
    2.  Identify the health care providers in hospitals and clinics and describe their academic preparation and roles on the health care team.
    3.  Describe the various hospital departments and their major functions.
    4.  Describe the organizational structure of the clinical laboratory department.
    5.  Discuss the roles of the clinical laboratory personnel and their qualification for these professional positions.
    6.  List the most common types of laboratory procedures performed in the various sections of the clinical laboratory department.
    7.  Describe the roles of federal and state regulations on testing in the clinical laboratory.
    8.  Identify policies and procedures for maintaining laboratory safety.
    9.  Identify and discuss the modes of transmission of infection and methods for prevention.
    10.  Identify and properly label biohazardous specimens.
    11.  Describe electrical, chemical, radiation and biological hazards and fire safety procedures used in hospitals, including the clinical lab.
    12.  Explain basic types of isolation and exposure control techniques.
    13.  Discuss in detail the standard precautions outlined by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
    14.  Discuss in detail and perform proper infection control techniques, such as hand washing, gowning, gloving, masking, and double-bagging.
    15.  Explain the roles of temperament and communication style in interpersonal and professional relationships.
    16.  Distinguish between values and ethics.
    17.  Discuss and explain the importance of maintaining patient confidentiality.
    18.  Define professionalism and give examples of professional behavior.
    19.  Describe and discuss the major points of the Patient’s Bill of Rights as it applies to clinical laboratory personnel.
    20.  List the causes of stress in the work environment and discuss the coping skills used to deal with stress in the work environment.
    21.  Differentiate between values and ethics.
    22.  Apply ethical standards to potential situations in the health care setting.
    23.  Explain basic concepts of communication and demonstrate professional communication.

  
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    MLT 120 - Medical Laboratory Techniques and Practices


    Introduction to basic skills and equipment used in th clinical laboratory.  Orientation to elements of quality control, laboratory mathematics, clinical assay techniques, safety, and collection and handling of specimens for laboratory analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 110 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Technology and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    CLT 120
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and use basic laboratory glassware.
    2.  Utilize appropriate medical terminology.
    3.  Name and demonstrate the function of the components of the compound microscope.
    4.  Perform common laboratory mathematical calculations.
    5.  Describe the types of patient specimens that are analyzed in the clinical laboratory.
    6.  Demonstrate understanding of requisitioning, specimen transport, and specimen processing.
    7.  Demonstrate understanding of quality assurance.
    8.  Discuss the function of hematology, chemistry, microbiology, urinalysis, immunology, and immunohematology labs in regards to: (a.) type of specimen analyzed (b.) type of testing performed.

  
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    MLT 200 - Histological Techniques


    An introduction to the histologic techniques used in the clinical laboratory.  Course content includes preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting, and staining of tissues for the purpose of microscopic examination.  Also includes evaluation of stained tissues, preparations and identification of common cellular structures, laboratory safety and review of relevant regulations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    CLT 200
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of the morphology of the microscopic anatomy of the human body and correlate it with general function.
    2.  Relate the functions of cells, tissues, and organ systems to their structures.
    3.  Practice histologic techniques used in the clinical laboratory, including preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting and staining of tissues for the purpose of microscopic examination.
    4.  Perform basic evaluation of quality of stained tissues preparations.
    5.  Identify the basic tissues, the major organs, and the cells that compose them, when shown glass slides and photomicrographs.
    6.  Describe variations from normal histological structure (histopathology).
    7.  Adhere to laboratory safety practices and regulations relevant to the clinical histology laboratory.

  
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    MLT 201 W - Hematology and Coagulation


    A comprehensive study of the hematopoietic and coagulation systems, including the normal physiology and classic pathology of both systems.  Emphasis is on the theory, performance, interpretation and clinical significance of routine and special test procedures.  This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CLT 201 W
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the general principles and techniques of basic manual hematology procedures.
    2.  Perform a CBC on an instrument and review and interpret data from the instrument.
    3.  Perform peripheral blood smear differentials.
    4.  Describe and recognize cellular morphology changes associated with various disease states.
    5.  Integrate hematology panel results with other patient data through the interpretation of case studies.
    6.  Define the process of hemostasis, explain how the coagulation laboratory assesses it and be able to interpret the laboratory tests used in that assessment.

  
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    MLT 202 - Urinalysis/Body Fluids


    A study of the physiologic processes which result in the formation of urine and body fluids.  Emphasis on the analysis of fluids and interpretation of the clinical significance of test results.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    CLT 202
    Hours
    1 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain the colleciton and handling procedures for urine and body fluids.
    2.  Understand the observational and physical measurements of urine and body fluids required by the clinical laboratory.
    3.  Describe the chemical screening methods used on urine and other fluids analyzed by the urinalysis department.
    4.  Describe the preparation and performance of a urine microscopic analysis.
    5.  Identify commonly seen urinary crystals, cells and casts.
    6.  Identify the primary functions of the major components of the kidney and urinary tract.
    7.  Know the structure and function of the nephron.
    8.  Correlate urinalysis test data with specific disease states and state the clinical significance of test results.
    9.  Describe the performance and clinical significance of a CSF and other body fluid cell count.

  
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    MLT 204 - Fundamental Phlebotomy


    Training and experience in the practice of phlebotomy, teaching students to recognize and use blood collection equipment, practice standard precautions, and perform procedures of routine venipuncture and skin puncture.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, BIO 101 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    CLT 204
    Hours
    1 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe safety measures that should be followed at all times by a phlebotomist when collecting a patient’s specimen.
    2.  Identify the veins of the arm on which phlebotomy is performed.
    3.  Differentiate between serum and plasma.
    4.  Identify the most common additives used in blood collection, and explain their reasons for use.
    5.  Identify the evacuated tube color associated with the most commonly used additives.
    6.  List and select the types of equipment needed to collect blood by routine venipuncture and capillary puncture.
    7.  Identify special precautions necessary during blood collections by venipuncture and capillary puncture.
    8.  List the supplies that should be carried on a phlebotomist’s tray.
    9.  Identify routine sites for venipuncture and capillary puncture.
    10.  Differentiate between sterile and antiseptic techniques.
    11.  Describe and demonstrate the steps in the preparation of a puncture site.
    12.  List the effects of tourniquet, hand squeezing, and heating pads on capillary puncture and venipuncture.
    13.  Recognize proper needle insertion and withdrawal techniques including direction, angle, depth, and aspiration.
    14.  Describe the correct procedure for capillary collection methods on infants and adults.
    15.  Name and explain frequent causes of phlebotomy complications.
    16.  Describe signs and symptoms of physical problems that may occur during blood collection.
    17.  List the steps necessary to perform a venipuncture and/or capillary puncture on chronological order.
    18.  Describe the proper manner for greeting and interacting with a patient.
    19.  Explain the major points in interviewing a patient or a patient’s representative in preparation for obtaining specimens.
    20.  Perform a competent/effective venipuncture on a mannequin and on a patient.
    21.  Perform a competent/effective capillary puncture on a mannequin and on a patient.
    22.  Describe instructions to be given to patients in preparation for routine venipuncture or capillary puncture.
    23.  Describe and discuss techniques for dealing with family and visitors during the blood specimen collection.

  
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    MLT 206 - Immunohematology


    Introduction to the field of blood banking, including the study of the theoretica knowledge of blood groups and blood grouping, component and transfusion therapies, transfusion reactions, and allo- and auto-antibody formation.  In laboratory sessions, the student performs ABO and Rh grouping, antibody identification, and compatibility testing.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 216 Immunology or BIO 216 Immunology and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CLT 206
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Follow proper safety guidelines in the laboratory at all times.
    2.  Display appropriate professional behavior.
    3.  Demonstrate logical approaches to problem solving - selecting appropriate units and crossmatching them with unknown patient specimens.
    4.  Describe classic problems inherent to blood transfusion and the solutions currently in use.
    5.  Apply basic principles of genetics to immunohematology.
    6.  Apply basic principles of immunology to blood group serology.
    7.  Describe and perform the testing procedures performed in the clinical immunohematology laboratory, including Coombs’ (antiglobulin) testing, ABO testing, Rh testing, other blood group testing, alloantibody screening, elutions, RBC autoantibody testing, compatibility testing, and traditional and gel technology.
    8.  Explain the process of donor selection, describe the processes of blood or blood compenet donation, including apheresis.
    9.  Explain the clinical significance of abnormal and disease states related to immunohematology, including drug-induced red blood cell destruction, polyagglutination, transfusion reactions, and Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn (HDN) and list the procedures relevant to each.
    10.  Describe and perform transfusion test procedures, including procedures related to component therapy.
    11.  Discuss medicolegal aspects of bloodbanking and the medicolegal responsibilities of a immunohematologist.

  
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    MLT 207 - Clinical Chemistry


    Designed to cover principles, analytical methods, and clinical significance of clinical chemistry as performed in the medical laboratory.  The relationship of physiochemical of body function in health and disease including the renal, liver, digestive and respiratory systems.  Emphasis on those clinical tests which evaluate the function of these systems related to metabolism, protein synthesis, pH, blood gases, electrolyte balance, enzymes, and hormones.  Laboratory work includes the theory, operation and maintenance of the specialized and semi- and fully automated analytical instrumentation used to perform these tests.  Emphasis will be placed on basic assays performed in most hospital labs, regardless of size.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 132 Human Biology II, CHM 146 General Chemistry II, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CLT 207
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the general principles and techniques of basic manual and automated clinical chemistry procedures through performance, class discussion and examinations.
    2.  Correlate clinical chemistry data with normal and abnormal physiological states and identify the clinical significance of test results.
    3.  Perform clinical routine and special chemistry procedures within acceptable laboratory parameters.

  
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    MLT 210 - Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory


    A comprehensive study of diagnostic methods for identification of normal and pathogenic microorganisms from clinical materials by appropriate laboratory techniques.   Emphasis on cultural, microscopic and biochemical characteristics, clinical significance, collecting and processing of clinical specimens, diagnostic tests, and susceptibility tests.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    CLT 210
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Follow proper safety guidelines in the microbiology laboratory at all times.
    2.  Demonstrate logical approaches to problem solving by identifying unknown cultures.
    3.  Perform all basic procedures generally done in the clinical microbiology laboratory using aseptic techniques, including selection of media, Gram staining, isolating organisms, performing biochemical and serological identifications, and antibicrobial susceptibility testing.
    4.  Evaluate cultures and direct microscopic examinations of human specimens to identify the host and microbial elements and to indicate the clinical significance of those elements.

  
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    MLT 214 - Specialized Phlebotomy


    Advanced techniques in collecting venous blood and capillary blood specimens.  Topics include anatomy and physiology as related to specimen collection; properties of arterial blood versus venous blood; specialized collection equipment; specialized collection techniques; requisitioning, specimen transport and specimen processing, and quality assurance.  Competency required in the performance of routine venipuncture and microblood drawing techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy or approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    CLT 214
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify parts of the body according to their proximity to one of the body planes.
    2.  Identify the veins of the arms, hands, legs and feet on which phlebotomy is performed.
    3.  Explain the functions of the major constituents of blood.
    4.  Define hemostasis, and explain the basic process of coagulation and fibinolysis.
    5.  Discuss the properties of arterial blood versus venous blood, and describe the difference in collection methods.
    6.  Describe the phlebotomist’s role in collecting and/or transporting types of patient specimens which are analyzed in the clinical laboratory.
    7.  Identify the additives used in blood collection, and explain their reasons for use.
    8.  Identify the evacuated tube color associated with the additives.
    9.  Describe substances which can interfere in clinical analysis of blood constituents and ways in which the phlebotomist can help avoid these occurrences.
    10.  List and select the types of equipment needed to collect blood by a variety of techniques.
    11.  Identify potential sites for venipuncture and capillary puncture.
    12.  Identify alternate venipuncture collection sites and describe the limitations and precautions of each.
    13.  Describe the legal and ethical importance of proper patient/sample identification.
    14.  Describe the types of patient specimens that are analyzed in the clinical laboratory.
    15.  List the general criteria for suitability of a specimen for analysis.
    16.  List the circumstances that would lead to recollection or rejection of a patient sample.
    17.  Explain the importance of timed specimens, fasting specimens, and stat specimens.
    18.  Demonstrate understanding of requisitioning, specimen transport and specimen processing.
    19.  List the most common types of laboratory procedures performed in the various sections of the clinical laboratory department.
    20.  Describe the system for monitoring quality assurance in the collection of blood specimens.
    21.  Identify policies and procedures used in the clinical laboratory to assure quality in the obtaining of blood specimens.
    22.  Describe the laboratory criteria for identifying an appropriate request for specimen collection.
    23.  Relate legal responsibilities of the laboratory and phlebotomist to the need for physicians’ requests for all specimen collection and testing.
    24.  Explain methods for processing and transporting blood specimens for routine and special testing within the hospital.
    25.  Explain methods for processing and transporting blood specimens for testing at reference labs.
    26.  Describe potential clerical and technical errors that may occur during specimen processing.
    27.  In regard to processing and transporting of blood specimens, describe the general effects of time on test quality and patient care.
    28.  Describe the conditions that must be met if blood specimens and laboratory tests are to be used as legal evidence.
    29.  Describe instructions to be given to patients in preparation for glucose tolerance tests, bleeding times and other procedures normally performed by the phlebotomist.
    30.  Discuss the importance of appearance and grooming for phlebotomists.
    31.  Define the different terms used in the medicolegal aspect for phlebotomy and discuss policies and protocol designed to avoid medicolegal problems.
    32.  Prepare an acceptable blood smear.
    33.  Recognize unacceptable blood smears.
    34.  Describe the purpose and procedure for performing bleeding times.

  
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    MLT 215 - Phlebotomy Practicum


    A practical application of phlebotomy techniques in a clinical laboratory setting or health care environment.  The course focuses on safety, quality control, communication, interpersonal skills, and ethical considerations relating to patients.  Clinical hours: 160 total.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy and CLT 214 Specialized Phlebotomy, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 5
    Cross-listed
    CLT 215
    Hours
    10.6 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Successfully complete phlebotomy practicum objectives as listed in the Phlebotomy/MLT program policy manual.
    2.  Perform a minimum of 100 successful unaided venipuncture collections.
    3.  Describe and perform the correct procedure for capillary collection methods on infants and adults.
    4.  Observe and describe the organization and functioning of a typical clinical laboratory.

  
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    MLT 216 - Immunology


    An introduction to the basic concepts in immunology, including development of the immune system, innate immunity, immunoglobulin structure and genetics, antigen-antibody reactions, the major histocompatibility complex and antigen presentation, T cell receptors, T cell activation and effector functions, anergy and apoptosis, adhesion molecules, phagocytic cell function, immune responses to infections organisms and tumors, autoimmune diseases, allergies, immune deficiencies and AIDS.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 131 Human Biology I and BIO 132 Human Biology II

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BIO 216 and CLT 216
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  List the elements of the immune system and describe their roles in defense.
    2.  Describe the structure of immunoglobulins and discuss the mechanism for generation of antibody diversity.
    3.  Discuss the nature of antigens and the characteristics that contribute to immunogenicity.
    4.  Describe in detail the normal and abnormal functions of the human immune response, including antigen recognition by T lymphocytes, development of T and B cells, T cell-mediated immunity, immunity mediated by B cells and antibodies, innate immunity, and the complement system.
    5.  Explain the mechanisms and pathogenesis of disorders of the immune system, including immunodeficiencies, hypersensitivities, autoimmune disorders, and immunoproliferative abnormalities.
    6.  Describe clinical implications of the immune response such as immunization, transplant rejection, tumor immunity, and the immunity of pregnancy.
    7.  Evaluate clinical cases to apply information to assess diagnoses, symptoms, etiology, prognosis, possible treatments, and other case-related information.
    8.  Describe the lab tests performed used to assess immune function and status, and propose and evaluate clinical significance of appropriate laboratory testing results.

  
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    MLT 220 L - Serological Techniques


    An introduction to the theory, practice, and clinical significance of serological testing for the clinical laboratory setting.  Principles and practical applications of laboratory methods based on both traditional serological methods and molecular methods for detection and confirmation of disease.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 131 Human Biology I, BIO 131L Human Biology I Laboratory and BIO 132 Human Biology II, BIO 132L Human Biology II Laboratory

    Prior or Concurrently:  CLT 216 Immunology

    Credits: 1
    Cross-listed
    CLT 220
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the mechanisms and performance of basic serological techniques and immunological assays.
    2.  Select the appropriate testing methodologies for evaluation of infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.
    3.  Evaluate the clinical significance of clinical serology testing, including infectious disease, autoimmunity, hypersensitivity, and immune function.
    4.  Perform serological assays with the use of a written procedure, describing the methodology of each, its application in the clinical laboratory, and the clinical significance of results.
    5.  Follow appropriate safety procedures for each procedure performed and identify appropriate quality control results for each assay.

  
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    MLT 240 - Clinical Affiliation I


    Performance of procedures in clinical chemistry, immunology-serology, and immunohematology in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 206 Immunohematology, CLT 207 Clinical Chemistry, CLT 216 Immunology, CLT 220L Serological Techniques, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CLT 240
    Hours
    10.7 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    2.  Using established criteria, identify and evaluate patient specimens for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    3.  Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    4.  Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    5.  Recognize factors that affect procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits.
    6.  State how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    7.  Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    8.  List the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    9.  Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    10.  Demonstrate the methodologies used in technical training in the clinical laboratory at a level consistent with a new graduate.
    11.  Evaluate the technical training provided to students in the clinical environment.
    12.  Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the department policy manual.

  
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    MLT 241 - Clinical Affiliation II


    Performance of procedures in urinalysis, body fluid analysis, phlebotomy, hematology, and coagulation in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 4 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 201W Hematology and Coagulation, CLT 202 Urinalysis/Body Fluids, CLT 204 Fundamental Phlebotomy and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    10.7 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Collect and process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    2.  Using established criteria, identify and evaluate patient specimens for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    3.  Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    4.  Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    5.  Recognize factors that affect procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits.
    6.  State how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    7.  Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    8.  List the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    9.  Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    10.  Demonstrate the methodologies used in technical training in the clinical laboratory at a level consistent with a new graduate.
    11.  Evaluate the technical training provided to students in the clinical environment.
    12.  Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the department policy manual.

  
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    MLT 242 - Clinical Affiliation III


    Performance of procedures in microbiology in an affiliated medical laboratory under direct supervision of medical laboratory personnel.  Students will conduct routine analytical procedures, develop their laboratory skills, and apply knowledge gained in the program.  Emphasis is on specimen collection and processing, quality control, preventative maintenance, laboratory safety, and significance of abnormal results.  Clinical hours: 40 hr/week for 2 weeks.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  CLT 208 Pathogenic Microbiology and CLT 210 Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory, and approval of the CLT advisor

    Credits: 2
    Cross-listed
    CLT 242
    Hours
    5.3 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Process blood samples and other specimens for analysis.
    2.  Using established criteria, identify and evaluate patient specimens for acceptability, and take necessary actions if specimens are unacceptable.
    3.  Perform analytical tests on patient samples under the direct supervision of laboratory personnel in the relevant areas of the clinical laboratory.
    4.  Evaluate the clinical significance of laboratory results.
    5.  Recognize factors that affect procedures and results and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits.
    6.  State how quality control (QC) is monitored for the different procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory, how QC performance records are evaluated, and the proper corrective actions to be taken if QC values are outside established limits.
    7.  Perform preventive and corrective maintenance on laboratory equipment within predetermined limits.
    8.  List the quality assurance monitors used in each section of the laboratory.
    9.  Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel and other health care personnel.
    10.  Demonstrate the methodologies used in technical training in the clinical laboratory at a level consistent with a new graduate.
    11.  Evaluate the technical training provided to students in the clinical environment.
    12.  Demonstrate competence in performing tests, assays, and procedures as specified in the department policy manual.

  
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    MLT 298 - Special Topics


    The study of a topic relevant to the Clinical Laboratory Technologies that is beyond the scope of the existing course offerings.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Departmental approval

    Credits: (1-2)
    Cross-listed
    CLT 298
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define core concepts in the topic content area.
    2.  Discuss the relevance of the special topic to the field of Clinical Laboratory Technologies.
    3.  Demonstrate knowledge in the specified content area.
    4.  Differentiate the significance of the special topic.
    5.  Critique contrasting perspectives on the special topic.

  
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    MLT 299 - Independent Study


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of clinical laboratory technology.  Independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of courses currently offered by the department.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member with approval by the department chairperson.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Departmental approval

    Credits: (1-5)
    Cross-listed
    CLT 299
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the ability to work independently to achieve a goal.
    2.  Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
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    MUS 101 - Introduction to Music


    A survey course examining the music of the great composers representing each major period of Music History.  How to listen to different forms of music such as symphonies, concertos, opera and jazz will be included in the topics covered.  Emphasis on developing listening skills to bring the student to an informed awareness and understanding of great music.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcome of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the properties of sound
    2.  Identify the three kinds of musical texture
    3.  Explain the techniques that create musical form
    4.  List the instrumentation of a standard orchestra and also describe how the orchestra developed through time
    5.  Trace the development of music from Gregorian chant of the Middle ages to the breakdown of tonality into the Twentieth century
    6.  Give specifics characteristics of music from each period of study
    7.  Describe the roots, characteristics and different styles of jazz
    8.  Identify composers from each period and list pertinent characteristics
    9.  Identify musical examples from each period and give the composer for each musical example

  
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    MUS 104 - Fundamentals of Music


    This course is for those students having little or no prior knowledge of music theory but desiring to learn and explore the basic tools of music:  clefs, note names, scales, rhythm, intervals, key signatures, form and familiarity with the piano keyboard.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  To introduce students the fundamental elements needed to write and perform music.
    2.  To develop a sensitivity and appreciation for the creation and analysis of music and how its tenets are grounded in form and structure.
    3.  To develop in students an understanding of how the algorithmic and affective dimensions of music are balanced when composers create meaningful works of art.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Aurally distinguish the differences among various scales, keys and chords.
    2.  Aurally distinguish the differences between simple and compound meter.
    3.  Correctly identify the key names of the piano keyboard.
    4.  Identify and construct major and minor key signatures.
    5.  Correctly identify pitches in all of the commonly used clefs.
    6.  Construct and identify the basic intervals used in musical composition and performance.

  
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    MUS 105 - Music Theory I


    A beginning course in music theory, including the rudiments of music, harmonic analysis including inversions through the dominant seventh chord, passing tones and part writing in root position of all diatonic triads excluding the diminished chord.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives to the course:

    1.  To develop upon music fundamentals learned in MUS 104 or through previous music study.
    2.  To introduce students to the process of composing and analyzing music.
    3.  To foster and build a love and appreciation of all musical genres.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Visually and aurally distinguish between seven types of scales, Major and minor keys, and Major, minor, Augmented, and diminished triads.
    2.  Identify and build the seven different church modes.
    3.  Correctly build the Major and relative minor key signatures in the Circle of Fifths/Fourths.
    4.  Successfully identify the harmonic chords in both Major and minor keys.
    5.  Write a musical composition using and following all part-writing rules.

  
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    MUS 106 - Music Theory II


    Continuation of Music Theory I including part writing of all diatonic chords in first and second inversion, harmonic analysis of all non harmonic tones including inversions of the dominant seventh chord and transposition and scoring for brass instruments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 105 Music Theory I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives to the course:

    1.  To develop upon topics learned in MUS 105 (Music Theory I).
    2.  To introduce students to the process of analyzing music for chord and non-chord tones, as well as cadences, and small form.
    3.  To foster and build a love and appreciation of all musical genres.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Visually and aurally distinguish between all cadences and non-chord tones.
    2.  Construct and discuss the differences between small form types.
    3.  Correctly build seventh chords in both Major and minor keys.
    4.  Successfully analyze and compose counterpoint examples in First and Second species.
    5.  Write a musical composition using and following all part-writing rules while including non-chord tones, cadences, and seventh chords.

  
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    MUS 107 - Music Theory III


    Continuation of Music Theory II including writing and analysis of the dominant seventh chord, the diminished seventh chord, applied dominants, chromatic third relationships, modulation to related and foreign keys, mode mixture, Neopolitan 6th chord, Augmented Sixth chords, analysis of form including Sonata Form, Rondo, Theme and Variations and an introduction to Species Counterpoint.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 106 Music Theory II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives to the course:

    1.  To develop upon topics learned in MUS 106 (Music Theory II).
    2.  To introduce students to the process of analyzing and composing music with borrowed chords, mode mixture, and Neapolitan and Augmented Sixth chords.
    3.  To foster and build a love and appreciation of all musical genres.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Visually and aurally distinguish between Neapolitan and all three types of Augmented Sixth chords.
    2.  Construct and discuss the differences between Italian, French, and German Augmented Sixth chords.
    3.  Correctly build secondary dominant and secondary leading time chords in both Major and minor keys.
    4.  Successfully analyze a piano sonata that includes mode mixture and borrowed chords.
    5.  Write a large musical composition using and following all part-writing rules while including non-chord tones, cadences, seventh chords, borrowed chords, Augmented Sixth and Neapolitan chords.

  
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    MUS 108 - History of Music: Renaissance to 1800


    Students will develop an understanding of music from the Middle Ages through 1800 A.D.  Active listening and discussion of the important historical and cultural influences and the development of music during the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical Periods will be examined.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify essential elements of Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical Period styles.
    2.  Describe the transitions from each of those styles to the next.
    3.  Identify important composers and specific compositions representing all important genres.
    4.  Demonstrate the ability to apply that knowledge to any composition heard for the first time.

  
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    MUS 109 - Ragtime to rock: American Popular Music


    A survey of American popular music including folk songs, musical theater, jazz, country, rock, and bluegrass.  This course will familiarize the student with popular music which helped shape the American culture and reflect important social, historical and political events.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate a vocabulary for hearing, analyzing, and discussing any style of popular music.
    2.  Identify the origins and explain development of all major genres of popular music.
    3.  Recognize and describe cross-influences among those styles.
    4.  Explain the role of technology in the evolution of musical style and in the dissemination of music to the public.

  
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    MUS 111 - 19th Century Music


    Important musicians and musical styles of the Romantic Period.  Emphasis on developments in piano literature, the symphony orchestra and opera.  Listening to selected recordings and attendance at local concerts.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the many aspects of Romanticism and their effect on compositional choice and style.
    2.  Identify the important movements and individual composers of the century and the contributions of each to stylistic progress.
    3.  Identify representative compositions and develop the ability to hear similar characteristics in any music from the period.

  
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    MUS 112 - 20th Century Music


    Important musicians and musical styles of the 20th century.  Emphasis on the trends and development of music in America.  Leading European composers.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 101 Introduction to Music or consent of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the transition out of a Romanticism-based aesthetic into a wider range of styles and motivations.
    2.  Identify important composers, and the aesthetic point of view they illustrate.
    3.  Identify representative compositions and the stylistic movements they exemplify.

  
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    MUS 114 - History of Opera


    A survey of the various styles of opera from the 17th through the 20th centuries.  Emphasis on the works of master composers - Monteverdi, Mozart, Verdi and Wagner; impact of opera on music history; social and cultural contents of opera.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 101 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recall and be knowledgeable of great operas and arias from repertoir of Opera Seria of Baroque Period, Opera Buffa and Singspiel of the Classical Period, the golden age of opera in the Romantic Period, as well as masterworks and current operas of the 20th Century.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of the operas of Caccini, Monteverdi, Purcell, Handel, Mozart, Verdi, Donizetti, Bizet, Gounod, Wagner, Strauss, as well as current composers.

  
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    MUS 115 - Ear Training I


    Aural training in melodic dictation and sight singing in two clefs.  Also, discrimination of intervals needed to sight read music.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Sing simple major and minor songs using standard solfegge techniques.
    2.  Sing major and minor triads, major and minor intervals of Major 2-aPerfect 5th, as well as major scales, and minor scales including natural, harmonic, and melodic minor.
    3.  Write four measure, two-part examples of melodic dictation, and simple 4 measure examples of rhythmic dictation.

  
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    MUS 116 - Ear Training II


    A continuation of MUS 115 Ear Training I.  Emphasizes dictation in two parts in various clefs and further develops interval and rhythmic discrimination.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 115 Ear Training I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Sing medium level major and minor songs using standard solfegge techniques.
    2.  Sing and master singing in alto and other clefs.
    3.  Sing and identify intervals of major 6ths, 7ths, and tri-tones, and be able to sight sing using kodaly hand signals.
    4.  Sing various levels of chord progressions and be able to write Soprano/Alto/Bass examples of melodic dictation.
    5.  Master four measure examples of rhythmic dictation.

  
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    MUS 117 - Ear Training III


    A continuation of MUS 116 Ear Training II.  Will stress the development of dictation in three parts, modulation, and sightsinging.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 116 Ear Training II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Sing and identify all intervals.
    2.  Sing more advanced musical examples employing modulation.
    3.  Sing advanced chord progressions, as well as chords in root, first, and second inversions.
    4.  Write four measure soprano/alto/tenor/bass examples, as well as four measure rhythmic dictation employing syncopation.

  
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    MUS 120 - Piano Class I


    Group piano lessons are given which will allow students the opportunity to develop basic piano skills and develop proper technique on the instrument.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Studio Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Play an elementary to a late elementary piano solo.
    2.  Play Beginning scales, chords, arpeggio’s.
    3.  Sight read at an elementary level.
    4.  Play from a beginning lead sheet.

  
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    MUS 121 - Piano Class II


    This course is a continuation of Piano Class I and further develops the necessary piano skills required to perform elementary to intermediate piano literature.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 120 Piano Class I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Studio Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Play an intermediate to a late intermediate piano solo.
    2.  Play 12 major scales, chords and arpeggio’s.
    3.  Sight read at an intermediate level.
    4.  Harmonize melodies with I, IV, V, I.
    5.  Transpose short excerpts at the elementary level.
    6.  Play from a lead sheet.

  
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    MUS 160 - Sound Engineering I


    An introduction to the basic principles of acoustics, mixer formats, patch bays, decibels, equalization, reverberation, tape recorders, mixing consoles, microphones, and tape editing.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours, 2 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize different types of mics and understand their application in a recording studio.
    2.  Mic up individual instruments, including an acousic drum set.
    3.  Demonstrate aspects of digital audio, such as sampling rate, bit depth, and dither.
    4.  Use Pro Tools software to setup sessions, assign inputs and outputs, create tracks, set tempos and record audio.
    5.  Prepare and edit tracks for mixing.
    6.  Illustrate the basics of signal processing.

  
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    MUS 161 - Sound Engineering II


    An introduction to MIDI systems and applications.  Students will develop an understanding of the history and evolution of MIDI, as well as the hardware requirements involving channels and modes.  Implementation of MIDI applications in the studio environment using the KORG Triton keyboard is explored.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 160 Sound Engineering I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours, 2 Lecture Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use MIDI in a recording session.
    2.  Use MIDI for production with Reason 8 and Pro Tools.
    3.  Edit multi-track recordings in preparation for mixing.
    4.  Mix multi-track sessions.
    5.  Apply signal processing and time-based effects to mixes.

  
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    MUS 170 - Music and Computers


    A hands-on introduction to how computers assist in music notation, music sequencing, and MIDI data entry.  Topics include: audio synthesis, midi and audio editing, audio recording, creating a publisher ready score and Finale note entry and sequencing.  A strong understanding of music notation is required.  Music Theory I is recommended but not necessary.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss different ways musicians use computers as a music production tool including the preparations required by the musician and specific minimum configurations required from a computer before it can be used for various purposes.
    2.  Complete a paper comparing different software programs and explain which one would meet their musical needs and how they would guide others.
    3.  Use a computer to create complex sheet music involving time signature changes, changes in modality, use of various notation alternatives such as rhythmic notation and accurately making use of articulations, expressions, lyrics and interpretive features used in the professional publishing of sheet music and scores. (This is a writing component using notation software, FINALE-2012).
    4.  Use ProTools to create a basic audio project using audio interface, a MIDI interface and basic signal routing within the ProTools environment.
    5.  Discuss various resources professional musicians currently use to share and continue to expand their skill with music software to continue their self-learning.

  
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    MUS 180 - Jazz Improvisation


    Basic concepts of soloing in the jazz idiom for instrumentalists.  Teach students to interpret chord symbols and understand the sounds that they represent in a meaningful way to create a jazz solo with their instrument.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 105 Music Theory I or permission of instructor; May be repeated for credit once

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Note
    Attendance at jazz concerts required.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Construct a solo in the jazz style.
    2.  Employ digital playing over chord changes.
    3.  Utilize modes in soloing.
    4.  Demonstrate chord extensions and altered chords in their soloing.
    5.  Perform five jazz “standards” from memory.
    6.  Integrate the blues form and style into soloing.
    7.  Demonstrate “turn arounds” in their playing.
    8.  Plan the creation of a solo as it relates to range and rhythmic intensity.

  
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    MUS 183 - Lead and Blues Guitar Playing


    Guitarists are presented with techniques for soloing within the “blues” style.  Various scales, modes, arpeggios, and chording techniques are applied to the basic “blues” chord progression as soloing concepts are developed.  Guitarists should be intermediate players and have a fundamental knowledge of music theory.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform the “blues scale” in all keys.
    2.  Construct a solo based on the “pentatonic scales.”
    3.  Demonstrate “blues licks.”
    4.  Perform “blues chords” in any key.
    5.  Perform chord substitutions.
    6.  Demonstrate the diminished scale and whole tone scales.
    7.  Play a solo using the seven ancient church modes.

  
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    MUS 184 - Songwriting


    An introduction to the process of creating and marketing an original song that is suitable for recording and publication.  Topics include: chord progressions, hooks, style, form, melody, introductions and endings, demos, copyright, marketing and music publishing.  Music Theory I is highly recommended for this course but not necessary if a student has a basic understanding of music fundamentals.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Write a song suitable for recording.
    2.  Negotiate the selling and promotion of copyrighted music.
    3.  Record a rough demo of their music.

  
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    MUS 185 - Beginning Guitar


    Emphasis on Music Fundamentals, scales, chords, reading rhythms and learning to accompany singers.  Students must own their own instruments.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Play at least fifteen different chords.
    2.  Read basic musical rhythms in treble clef.
    3.  Demonstrate correct picking and fingering techniques.
    4.  Discuss and demonstrate chord and scale theory.

  
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    MUS 186 - Guitar Ensemble


    Provide students the opportunity to perform music for the guitar in a group setting.  Emphasis will be on group and individual playing.  The music played will be chosen with respect to the historical literature available.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Studio Hours
    Note
    May be repeated for credit 3 times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have participated in a concert that demonstrates their abilities to rehearse, analyze and perform music indigenous to the guitar ensemble repetoire.

  
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    MUS 187 - The Guitar: Its History and Music


    The development of the physical and musical history of the instrument is presented through live performances and recordings.  The history of the guitar and its importance relative to composers and performers throughout music history will be identified.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the development of stylistic guitar techniques beginning with the sixteenth century.
    2.  Demonstrate and discuss various tunings and stringings.
    3.  Identify recognized contemporary performers in varying styles.
    4.  Correctly place the guitar’s musical literature within the defined epochs of music history.

  
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    MUS 188 - Practical Music Theory for the Performing Musician


    Designed to help the novice performer of music understand key signatures, scales, rhythms, chords, form intervals, transposition, notation and sight reading.  Emphasis on fundamentals of music and practical application of what is learned.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Construct and identify the various fundamental elements of music listed in the course description.
    2.  Demonstrate the application of the course material through the critical analysis of musical compositions and popular songs.

  
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    MUS 189 - Flute Ensemble


    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times for credit.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Participate in a concert that demonstrates their abilities to rehearse, analyze and perform music indigenous to the flute repetoire.

  
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    MUS 190 - The College Choir


    Students who sing in the College Choir receive one credit per semester.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Studio Hours
    Note
    (May be repeated 3 times for credit)

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate correct breath support.
    2.  Demonstrate enhanced sight-reading skills.
    3.  Demonstrate the identification of music from various historical eras.
    4.  Demonstrate correct performance practice of various styles of vocal masterpieces spanning the Rennaissance through the Twentieth Century.

  
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    MUS 191 - Music Performance


    Students develop basic performance and musicianship skills by participating in recitals, concerts or approved music classes associated with SUNY Broome Community College’s Music Performance groups and music program.

    Credits: 1
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times for credit.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have been involved in an approved community-based musical ensemble that will have further developed their performance abilities in either vocal or instrumental music.

  
  •  

    MUS 192 - Woodwind Ensemble


    Credits: 1
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have participated in a concert that demonstrates their abilities to rehearse, analyze and perform music indigenous to the woodwind repetoire.

  
  •  

    MUS 193 - Brass Ensemble


    Credits: 1
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have participated in a concert that demonstrates their abilities to rehearse, analyze and perform music indiginous to the brass repetoire.

  
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    MUS 194 - Voice Class I


    Provides any student the opportunity to learn correct vocal production, breath control, diction, articulation and musical interpretation of art songs.  Emphasis is on tonal production and group and individual singing.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Sing simple class songs, as well as a more advanced solo song/aria employing standard techniques for good vocal production.
    2.  Sing with proper breath support, and will demonstrate frontal and pharyngeal resonance, proper diction, and vowel equalization.
    3.  Sing songs or arias with an understanding of proper vocal pedagogy.

  
  •  

    MUS 195 - Jazz Ensemble


    By audition only.

    Credits: 1
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have participated in a concert that demonstrates their abilities to rehearse, analyze and perform music indiginous to the big band jazz repetoire.

  
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    MUS 196 - String Ensemble


    (Not for guitarist)

    Credits: 1
    Note
    May be repeated 3 times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have participated in a concert that demonstrates their abilities to rehearse, analyze and perform music indiginous to the string repetoire.

  
  •  

    MUS 197 - Applied Music I


    For students in their first semester.  To enable instrumental and vocal students to study privately with a teacher and develop their musical performance abilities.  Not a course for beginners.  A minimum of 12 lessons required per semester.  Cost of lessons is included in SUNY Broome tuition if student qualify for financial aid.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate freshman level performance skills and techniques in their respective applied area (voice or instrumental) that meet, or exceed the requirements established at transfer institutions.

  
  •  

    MUS 198 - Applied Music II


    Continuation of MUS 197 Applied Music I, for second semester students.  A minimum of 12 lessons required per semester and continued musical growth and maturity in solo and ensemble performance is expected.  Cost of lessons is included in SUNY Broome tuition if the student qualifies for financial aid.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 197 Applied Music I

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate freshman level (second semester) vocal or instrumental performance skills and techniques in their respective applied areas that meet, or exceed the requirements established at various transfer institutions.

  
  •  

    MUS 199 - Intermediate Guitar


    Continuation of beginning guitar.  Emphasis on picking techniques, fingerings, chords, music readings and performance.  There will also be a greater emphasis on technique.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 185 Beginning Guitar

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Play movable chord shapes along the neck.
    2.  Read and perform treble clef melodies along the neck.
    3.  Read complex musical rhythms in treble clef.
    4.  Demonstrate advanced flatpicking and fingerstyle techniques.
    5.  Discuss and demonstrate chord and scale theory in relation to rock, blues, jazz, and classical styles.

  
  •  

    MUS 201 - College Band


    College band is required of all woodwind, brass and percussion majors and open to the campus community.  The band performs two major concerts during the year as well as providing music for various college functions.  Membership is by audition.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Studio Hours
    Note
    May be repeated three times.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have participated in a concert that demonstrates their abilities to rehearse, analyze and perform music indigenous to the concert band repetoire.

  
  •  

    MUS 260 - Sound Engineering III


    This course is part three of the four-semester sequence in Sound Engineering.  Introduction to the techniques of engineering and supervising a recording session using the Pro Tools sound recording system is presented.  The course focuses on how to:  organize a recording session, record midi data, produce a song and/or sound track, organize a session and integrate proper effects into recording projects.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MUS 160 Sound Engineering I and MUS 161 Sound Engineering II

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Track and edit full band sessions.
    2.  Implement advanced mixing techniques.
    3.  Mastering audio tracks and prepare them for replication.
    4.  Demonstrate different roles in the recording studio, such as an engineer and a producer.
    5.  Incorporate advanced Pro Tools techniques in the studio and during mixing.
    6.  Integrate reason 8 using rewire in Pro Tools.

  
  •  

    MUS 261 - Sound Engineering IV


    This course is part four of the four-semester sequence in Sound Engineering.  Students are instructed in the techniques of engineering and supervising recording sessions involving large and small music ensembles of varying musical genres.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 260 Sound Engineering III

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate how to record small and large musical ensembles.
    2.  Recognize the different requirements needed to record various styles of music such as classical, rock, jazz and folk.
    3.  Use advanced production, editing and recording techniques with the Pro Tools system.
    4.  Arrange, produce and mix an independently recorded project.

  
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    MUS 290 - Chamber Singers


    Chamber Singers is a select vocal ensemble of twelve to twenty-four singers performing choral masterpieces from all periods of music, including madrigals, spirituals, jazz arrangements, twentieth-century choral music, and contemporary choral music.  Utilizing small ensemble techniques, the group performs a cappella and accompanied music in concerts at high schools, nursing homes, churches, and service organizations in and around the local area.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  MUS 190 The College Choir

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Sight read simple and complex music using the solfege sight-reading system.
    2.  Have mastered the rules of correct diction while singing in several languages, including Latin, French, Italian, German, and English.
    3.  Identify stylistic differences among works from all musical periods, including Renaissance madrigals, traditional folk music, American spirituals, twentieth-century choral music, and contemporary choral music.
    4.  Incorporate correct small ensemble techniques into their singing of a cappella and accompanied music.
    5.  Practice proper breath support and correct vocal techniques in choral singing.

  
  •  

    MUS 294 - Voice Class II


    Continuation of Voice Class I and for students who have performed in high school musicals, chorus and/ or those who have studied privately.  This is a group situation in which vocal literature appropriate to individual and group singing will be sung.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 194 Voice Class I or permission of instructor

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Continue to sing moderately complex class songs as well as a more advanced solo song/aria employing standard techniques for good vocal production.
    2.  Demonstrate singing with proper breath support, and will demonstrate frontal and pharyngeal resonance, proper diction, and vowel equalization.
    3.  Continue to sing more advanced songs or arias with an understanding of proper vocal pedagogy.

  
  •  

    MUS 295 - Special Topics in Music


    No previous musical training or experience in improvisation is necessary for this class in improvisation.  All you need to bring to class is the willingness to sing or play, and to listen and comment respectfully.

    Students will learn to improvise through experience:  playing, singing, and actively listening.  There will be a minimum of discussion.  The goal is to learn natural self expression and creativity using spontaneous music making in solo, small ensemble and whole group settings.

    We hope by class’s end you will solo boldly, support sensitivity, make constructive contributions through silence, and develop a repertoire of contrasting sounds and styles.

    Credits: 1-3
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours; 1-3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Collaborate in group improvisations.
    2.  Demonstrate the ability to give useful an constructive feedback to peers.
    3.  Demonstrate skills in solo improvisation.
    4.  Individually design and develop a final improvisation project.

  
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    MUS 296 - Internship


    An internship for individual students with local arts, educational, or business organizations.  The students will gain professional work experience in preparation for careers related to music.  Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and keep a journal of tasks completed at their internship site.

    Credits: 1-3 Variable
    Hours
    3-9
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Integrate their experience with the workings of arts/business/educational organizations into developing a larger perspective of their chosen area of music.
    2.  Apply the knowledge gained within a particular field related to their career path.
    3.  Learn to budget time in relation to required tasks.
    4.  Establish a network of contacts in their chosen area.
    5.  Develop a list of references for future employment.

  
  •  

    MUS 297 - Applied Music III


    Continuation of MUS 198 Applied Music II, for third semester students.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 198 Applied Music II

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate sophomore level (first semester) vocal or instrumental performance skills and techniques in their respective applied areas that meet or exceed the requirements established at various transfer institutions.

  
  •  

    MUS 298 - Applied Music IV


    Continuation of MUS 197 Applied Music III, for fourth semester students.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MUS 297 Applied Music III

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate sophomore level (second semester) vocal or instrumental performance skills and techniques in their respective applied areas that meet or exceed the requirements established at various transfer institutions.

  
  •  

    MUS 299 - Independent Study: Music


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of music.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 semester hours of college level work in music

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Dependent on the specific approved activity.

  
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    PED 100 - Archery


    Fundamentals of shooting - seven-step approach.  Proper target shooting technique and form stressed.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 11 Laboratory Hours per semester
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify and execute with proficiency the seven steps of shooting the bow and arrow.  This includes the following steps: stance, draw, anchor, aim, release, follow through and after-hold.
    2.  Recognize and name the parts of the bow, arrow and target.
    3.  Recognize and apply the basic safety procedures when shooting the bow.
    4.  Demonstrate minimal levels of accuracy when shooting the bow at 11, 13, 15, and 18 yard distances.

  
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    PED 103 - Backpacking (CV)


    A series of laboratories and lectures culminating in a four-day mandatory backpacking trip.  Students learn to select, care for, and properly use the essential equipment, as well as some low-cost alternatives to expensive items.  The stress is on safety and low ecological impact camping.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    15 Class Hours, 15 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have knowledge of the fundamental skills and techniques of basic outdoor skills, to be able to safely navigate back country conditions.
    2. Have proficiency in execution of the skills covered.
    3. Have a positive change in the personal fitness as it relates to components such as cardiovascular and muscular endurance.
    4. Have an understanding of the history, etiquette, strategies, current research and safety associated with backpacking.
    5. Evaluate the conditions necessary for safe wilderness preparedness, choose appropriate equipment, and plan a hiking trip and take it.
    6. Minimize the impact on natural environment while hiking and understand and articulate the concepts of sustainability.


  
  •  

    PED 106 - Badminton (CV)


    Instruction and practice in the various strokes.  Rules, terminology and equipment.  Strategy for singles and doubles.

    Credits: (1/2)
    Hours
    4 Class Hours, 11 Laboratory Hours per half semester
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize and identify the five basic shots in the game of badminton.
    2. Demonstrate the five basic shots in the game of badminton.
    3. Have an understanding of the rules and scoring of a badminton game.
    4. Identity and execute the two basic service strokes/Drop and High clear.
    5. Have an appreciation of badminton as a game that allows for a wide range of expertise and conditioning, from leisurely played in back yard game to a highly competitive athletic event.


  
  •  

    PED 107 - Ballet I (CV)


    Beginning Ballet will introduce students to the basic elements of classical ballet in ballet technique classes.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    CV=cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Increase body awareness through skills in ballet technique.
    2. Recognize and utilize beginning ballet vocabulary and terminology.
    3. Understand the relationship between the personal dance experience and dance as a performing art form.


  
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    PED 108 - Ballet II (CV)


    This intermediate course is designed to enhance students’ proficiency in classical ballet technique through the execution of dance and choreographic skills.  Students with previous formal ballet training should enroll directly into PED 108 Ballet II.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Previous dance experience with some knowledge of ballet techniques

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Note
    CV = Cardiovascular

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize, demonstrate, and discuss the fundamentals of intermediate ballet technique.
    2.  Identify the tools necessary to plan a beginning ballet class.
    3.  Demonstrate coordination skills gained through the execution and repetition of exercises.
    4.  Show a heightened body awareness developed during their final project.

 

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