Sep 24, 2018  
Website Catalog 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    ITA 102 - Beginning Italian II


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ITA 101 Beginning Italian I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Develop an understanding of high-beginning Italian grammar that cover forms, meanings and functions, and use them appropriately in oral and written communication.
    2.  Develop high-beginning oral skills in pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking, and oral presentations.
    3.  Develop their active vocabulary of high-frequency words, collocations, and idiomatic expressions that are commonly used in the Italian-speaking world.
    4.  Develop reading comprehension skills at the high-beginning through a variety of authentic genres, including academic discourse, newspaper and magazine articles, fiction, poetry, and essays.
    5.  Develop high-beginning writing skills through various writing assignments such as comprehension questions, paragraphs, essays, journals, and letters.
    6.  Develop an understanding of Italian-speaking cultures and societies as well as that of their own.

  
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    LAW 110 - Survey of Paralegalism


    Role of the paralegal and attorney.  Introduction to jurisprudence and functions of administrative agencies. Local, state, federal courts.  Introduction to contracts, torts, negligence, criminal procedure, real property law, law office management.  Legal terminology.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize the jurisdictional structure of the New York State court system.
    2.  Recognize the jurisdictional structure of the local court system.
    3.  Recognize the original and appellate distinctions of the judicial system.
    4.  Prepare legal documents pursuant to NYS statutory law.
    5.  Apply the rules learned to the preparation of legal documents.

  
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    LAW 200 - Real Property Law


    Comprehensive survey of law of real property, emphasizing, practical application to a paralegal function.  Analysis of form of deeds, bonds, notes,mortgages, assignments, discharges, purchase of contracts, leases and options.  Training in searching title, basic understanding of abstracts of title, real property litigation, estates, condemnation and foreclosure.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define the legal terminology regarding the ownership, acquisition and conveyance of Real Estate.
    2.  Articulate an understanding regarding the distinction between Personal and Real Property.
    3.  Understand the Law of Fixtures by identifying various legal texts used in fixture law.
    4.  Understand the process of transferring title to Real Estate; including the use of deeds, mortgages, promissory notes, real estate contracts, and closing statements and prepare such statements.
    5.  Close the Real Estate transaction.
    6.  Articulate the difference between a buyer representation and a seller representation.
    7.  Understand the role of the County Clerk Records in the Real Estate Transaction by recording various documents.

  
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    LAW 207 W - Legal Writing and Research


    Development of legal research and drafting skills through use of digests, reporter systems, and other features of law libraries.  Analysis of various types of legal documents for clarity, composition, conciseness.  Practice in research and drafting of legal documents.  Writing Emphasis Course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism and ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of legal research by preparing an assignment using the Westlaw database and preparing a legal brief.
    2.  Demonstrate an ability to identify and argue legal issues by responding to a classroom legal fact pattern in written and oral format.
    3.  Illustrate an understanding in drafting legal documents by preparing legal briefs, courtroom briefs and legal position papers.

  
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    LAW 215 - Estates, Probates and Trusts


    Disposition of descendent's property, law of interstate succession, execution and probate of wills, nature and creation of trusts and the administration of estates and trusts, estate and gift tax preparation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Articulate the mechanics of the disposition of testate property by analyzing a will and having a client meeting which discusses the disposition.
    2.  Illustrate the substantive rules of will preparation by preparing a will.
    3.  Illustrate an understanding of intestate distribution by distributing the proceeds and preparing a written document which outlines the correct distribution.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the probate process by filing a probate petition.
    5.  Demonstrate an understanding of the creation and administration of a trust by creating a trust.
    6.  Illustrate an understanding of the tax laws, both Federal and New York, which affect the estate by preparing an estate for file.

  
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    LAW 220 - Contracts


    The law of contracts, their historical significance, formation, validity interpretation, transfer or contractual rights.  Assignment, third party beneficiaries, discharge, breach and remedies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of contract information.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of contractual rights.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of contract Breach and legal remedies available.

     

  
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    LAW 222 - Medical Law


    General coverage of how legal and medical issues are inter-related, including right to treatment, organ transplant, right to die, abortion issues, medical malpractice, informed consent, insanity defense, surrogate mothers.  Lecture and discussion. How these topics affect the role of the attorney and paralegal in servicing client needs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of Medical Law statutory periods.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of Discovery statues.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the issues surrounding the insanity defense.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the commencement and discovery procedure regarding a Medical Law litigation suite. 


  
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    LAW 225 - Family Law


    Pleadings relative to general practice of law in relationships to the family unit.  Laws relating to marriage, divorce, annulment, custody and support, adoption, name change, guardianship, paternity.  Written pleadings and necessary research pertaining to these aspects of family law.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Articulate an understanding of the rules governing the doctrine of equitable distribution by explaining the rules to a client in need of legal advise.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of current case law in the Family Law substantive area of the law by reading and preparing legal briefs of particular case law.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the Divorce process by filing a petition in divorce and creating a separation agreement.

  
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    LAW 226 - Taxation Law for Paralegals


    Principles of federal taxation, analysis of IRS code and related case law, emphasis on law and concepts of taxation, basic and advanced tax law terminology, litigation involving the IRS.  Exploration of social changes, and factors involving tax problems, current issues in tax reform, perspective of the paralegal regarding resolution of tax disputes.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of IRS related terminology surrounding taxation and tax filing requirements.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of commencements of and the resolution of the tax law litigation.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of IRS Tax Code.


  
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    LAW 227 - Constitutional Law


    The practice of everyday general law as affected by the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Issues of contemporary concern including cases of local courts and of the Supreme Court and their implications for law in general and society at large.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Illustrate an understanding of the role and jurisdictional position of the U.S. Supreme Court by preparing a jurisdictional chart.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of appellate and original jurisdiction by commencing a law suit in the jurisdictionally correct court.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the procedural history of a case by briefing the original and all appellate court decisions in the correct order.
    4.  Articulate current laws based upon the established precedent.
    5.  Use rules established by case law to demonstrate an understanding of the U.S. Constitution.

  
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    LAW 240 - Corporate Law


    Types, uses and organization of the corporation, antitrust and securities law, mergers and consolidation, liquidation and dissolution.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the differences of the legal liabilities of the Corporation, Partnership, and Sole Proprietorship by preparing a chart which compares and contrasts those differences.
    2.  Illustrate the Corporate formation process by preparing a Corporation application for filing in New York State.
    3.  Use and demonstrate an understanding of the rules established by the Business Corporation laws of New York while meeting with a client.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the jurisdictional rules relevant to a Corporate entity by correctly filing a Corporate legal cause of action.

  
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    LAW 250 - Municipal Law


    Structure and operations of local government in New York State.  Evolution of local government in New York during the first two centuries of its existence.  Laws, ordinances, and operations.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the existence of local municipal law ordinances, rules and regulations.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of New York State government.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal responsibility attaching to the various sections of New York State Government.


  
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    LAW 251 - Federal Civil Procedure


    Federal court system, rules of civil procedure includeing pleading, motions, depositions, litigation procedures and the role of the paralegal.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the rules of Civil Federal Procedure.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the function and structure of various pleadings used in the Federal Court system.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the preparation of 3 Federal Court documents.


  
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    LAW 252 - Applied Real Estate


    Role of the paralegal in Real Estate transactions including agreements, abstracts, preparation of documents, contracts, and closing procedures.  Students conduct a "mock" real estate transaction.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the commencement of the Real Estate transaction.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the paralegal role in the of the compilation of the Real Estate Closing legal file.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the paralegal role in the closing process of both a residential and a Commercial Real Estate closing.


  
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    LAW 253 - Computers in the Law office


    Computer applications including hardware and software, financial management, word processing, real estate practice packages, computerized research, litigation support, and document management.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the current software as used to assist the law office in the litigation process.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the current software regarding the administration of the Law Office.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the computer in the research and resolution of legal files.


  
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    LAW 260 - Labor-Management Relations (Labor Law)


    Labor-management relations in the public and private sectors.  Taft-Hartley Act, National Labor Relations Act and Wagner Act, unfair labor practices, labor contracts, arbitration and mediation, availability of injunctions in labor disputes.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the public and private sector labor management goals and responsibilities.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the negotiation process regarding contract formation between labor and management.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the various labor management related legislation which affects the relationship.


  
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    LAW 270 - Vehicle and Traffic Law


    Regulations of traffic within the state of New York. Emphasis on violations and traffic-related misdemeanors resulting from violation of the rules of the road and court proceedings resulting there from.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of various New York vehicle and traffic statues.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the Courts role in handling various violations of the Vehicle and Traffic Law.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the Paralegal in the creation of and the handling of the Vehicle and Traffic file.


  
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    LAW 280 - Litigation and Trial Preparation


    Intake procedure, systems and analysis, concepts of jurisdiction and venue, parties to an action, pleadings, pre-trial procedures, motions and special practice, special proceedings, trials, judgments and appeals.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of case file selection by preparing and getting a passing grade in a classroom simulation project which requires a selection of case files based upon law firm requirements.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of legal confidentiality by reading and preparing position papers on confidentiality case studies.
    3.  Demonstrate an understanding of the pleadings known as complaint and answer by preparing a complaint and answer in acceptable legal format.
    4.  Demonstrate an understanding of the stages of a litigation proceeding by drafting, in proper format, various documents used to commence and proceed in a trial setting.

  
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    LAW 290 - Landlord-Tenant relations


    Problems faced by landlords and tenants, private housing, live-in arrangements, covenants, leases, warranties.  Tenant and landlord rights and obligations.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of the selected research project and how the project enhances the Student's understanding the area of law researched.


  
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    LAW 295 - Paralegal Practicum


    Designed for students without previous exposure to the legal field to observe and study operations, policies, and procedures performed by paralegals in various settings, (private firms, public agencies, commercial corporations, etc.).  Students will be placed in the legal environment with emphasis on attorney and paralegal interactions and paralegal relations with areas outside the office (clients, municipal agencies, other firms, commercial institutions, other legal agencies, etc.).  Final report integrating the practical and theoretical aspects of their experiences.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  30 credits from program, at least 12 LAW credits or chairperson approval

    Credits: 4
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an understanding of the selected internship/practicum location by engaging in the workplace for a time frame of 100-125 hours during which time all rules, company policies, and company quality levels will be met or exceeded.  These levels will be ascertained by the instructor prior to the beginning of the internship/practicum and will continue throughout the internship/practicum.
    2.  Illustrate an understanding of time sensitive work product by being assigned a time sensitive project and responding within the time frame with legally acceptable work produce.

  
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    LAW 299 - Independent Study: Paralegal


    An individual student project in paralegal studies which is beyond the scope or requirements of the courses offered by the program.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member or attorney, and approved by the program coordinator.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism, plus at least 3 credits LAW 200 level or higher

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    • The learning outcomes for this course will vary, depending on the material being covered
    • In each case the student will be able to demonstrate successful completion of the learning activities specified in the Independent Study Contract.


  
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    LIT 200 - Introduction to Literature


    An overview of the major literary genres and approaches to interpretation.  Students will practice the process of literary analysis in oral and written forms.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express muliple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 201 - Crime and Punishment


    This course focuses upon works of literature which incorporate the theme of punishment and justice.  An additional theme of resistance to punishment will also be represented in course readings and lecture-discussions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints.
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 210 - Studies in United States Literature I


    A study of United States literature from Pre-Colonial times through the 19th century, exploring recurrent themes and motifs in the works of both newly discovered and long-recognized authors.  Emphasis on engaging student curiosity, eliciting student response, and fostering student development of critical analysis and interpretation through close reading of texts, class discussion, and formal and informal writing assignments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive respondes.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 211 - Studies in United States Literature II


    A study of United States literature from the late 19th century to the present, exploring recurrent themes and motifs in the works of both newly discovered and long-recognized authors.  Emphasis on engaging student curiosity, eliciting student response, and fostering student development of critical analysis and interpretation through close reading of texts, class discussion, and formal and informal writing assignments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 212 - Literature of the American South


    The literature of the American South has a distinct and rich tradition.  The focus of the course will be on the South as a diverse cultural place where race, religion, class, family, gender, sexuality, and language have shaped how writers see and construct the world.  We will examine the attitudes, assumptions, and values that have traditionally informed Southern literature and will also look at texts that challenge those ideas.  We will read texts written from the nineteenth century to the present including those of writers such as Kate Chopin, Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Tennessee Williams, Ralph Ellison, Carson McCullers, Walker Percy, Alice Walker, Lee Smith, Cormac McCarthy, and others.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss with peers their ideas about the meanings of a literary work.
    2.  Apply techniques of close reading to help unravel difficult passages.
    3.  Research and discuss the historical and cultural contexts of an author's life and work.
    4.  Write clearly and persuasively about their interpretation of a literary work.
    5.  Appropriately apply the conventions of literary criticism, such as literary terms and critical approaches.
    6.  Show in class discussions as well as written work that they can persuasively relate one literary work to another, and/or to the culture from which it emerged.
    7.  Locate and cite reference and/or critical sources.

  
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    LIT 214 - Studies in British Literature I


    History and development of British literature from the Middle Ages to the 18th century.  Selections of literary merit from prose, drama, poetry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their intrepertive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 215 - Studies in British Literature II


    History and development of British literature from the beginning of the 18th century to the middle of the 20th.  Selections of literary merit from prose, poetry, drama.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 220 - The Short Story


    Close reading and analysis of stories produced in different times and places.  Attention to the relationships among author, text, reader, and context in the making of meaning.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 225 - United States Latino Literature


    A literary overview of contemporary United States Latino/Latina literature.  The course will focus on short stories, essays, poems, and films produced by this influential, fastest-growing cultural group.  Works will explore themes of gender, sexuality, class, race, and color within the context of the cross-cultural American experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they desagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 230 - American Drama


    A survey of American drama.  Examination of dramatic theories and techniques, and consideration of historic and thematic problems in American drama.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LIT 233 - World Drama


    A survey of world drama produced in both Western and non-Western cultures.  Examination of dramatic theories and techniques, and consideration of dramatic themes common to diverse cultures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 235 - Shakespeare


    Shakespeare as both dramatist and poet.  Emphasis on selected comedies, histories and tragedies.  Consideration of the playwright's life and times.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (evenif they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 240 - The Poetic Experience: Sight and Sound


    This course exposes students to poetry from different countries and cultures, to important aspects of poetic language, and to diverse poetic forms.  Students will read, discuss, and write about poetry, and strive to understand what poetry portrays of human experience.  Students will also write poems about their own experience.  In doing so, students will learn how poems are built or structured.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 250 - Women and Literature: Other Perspectives


    Critical analysis and evaluation of literary works by and about women produced in diverse socio-political contexts.  Emphasis upon the relationship between the text and its cultural setting and upon other, non-traditional critical perspectives, including feminist perspectives.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 253 - Psychological Investigation in Literature


    The application of Jungian, Freudian, and other psychological theories and insights to selected short stories, novels, and poems to promote more penetrating appreciation of characters' motivations and actions and the literary work in general.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express muliple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 260 - Detective Fiction


    A critical study of one of the most popular literary forms of our time, designed for armchair detectives.  Starting with Poe, Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes), and other classics in the field, the course traces the development of the detective story from its puzzle-solving beginnings to the modern psychological novel of crime and detection.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 263 - Children's Literature


    Close reading and analysis of a diverse selection of literature written for children including short fiction, novel, and poetry.  Emphasis on the use of critical theories in investigating diverse interpretations of the texts and in exploring revelatory connections between the literature and contemporary human experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 264 - World Folktales: The Art of Storytelling


    Reading, analyzing, discussing, adapting, and retelling selected multicultural folktales transcribed from the oral tradition.  Emphasis on the importance of motifs, narrative structure, recurring global themes, cultural and ethnic specificity, as well as the morphology of the tales.  Identification of cross-cultural story techniques will build the story repertoire; diverse oral performance techniques will enhance motif and character analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 267 - An Introduction to Science Fiction


    This course will survey science fiction works from various genres such as poetry, the novel, and the short story.  It will provide students with a historical overview of the field of science fiction by exposing them, through readings and lectures, to works from the 19th and 20th centuries.  Titles chosen will reflect their importance in the literary development of science fiction over the last two centuries.  The essence of the course will consist of close readings and analyses of the texts for their artistic qualities as well as their representations of social trends and ideas.  Students will learn how to do research on the Internet, as it is one of the foremost domains of current cyber fiction.  One section of the course will deal with the history of science fiction in the cinema.  Students will come away from the course with an understanding of hard science fiction, utopias and dystopias, cyber fiction, the pulps, fantasy fiction, the Golden Age, and speculative fiction.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 270 - Twentieth-Century Working-Class Literature of North America


    An examination of literature in which 20th century North American working-class writers explore working-class life.  Emphasis upon the investigation of broad themes, such as the role of work in the shaping of values and identity and the impact of work upon human relationships.  Multi-ethnic and multi-racial perspectives; issues of gender and sexuality. Attention given to the sociocontexts in which works were produced.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 272 - Literature of the North American Wild


    This course aims to involve the student in the thinking of seminal writers who struggled to define human beings' relationship to the natural world.  The approach is both literary and historical.  It is historical in that it begins with the overwhelming effect that the fecundity of the new world had on writers and ends with the effect that profound environmental problems are having on thinkers who use the techniques and form of expression usually identified with writers of creative and imaginary literature.  Students will read essays, fiction, and poetry.  Some videos and media presentations will be viewed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 274 - Introduction to African American Literature


    This survey course will introduce students to African American literature from Colonial America to the present.  Various genres, representative works, and major writers will be examined in terms of development, theme, structure, and context.  This will be a study of African American literature as both artistic and cultural expression.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpertation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 275 - London and Literature (WE)


    The influence of Great Britain on American culture is deep and wide.  In this course we will explore major English works and the city and culture that is depicted in them.  Using literature and supporting historical and sociological documents, we will unravel the mystery of British literature and engage in a journey of exploration.  Course will be followed by a short study tour in London, England.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ENG 110 College Writing I or its equivalent as a prerequisite

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Discuss with peers their ideas about the meanings of a literary work.
    2. Apply techniques of close reading to help unravel difficult passages.
    3. Research and discuss the historical and cultural contexts of an author's life and work.
    4. Write clearly and persuasively about their interpretation of a literary work.
    5. Appropriately apply the conventions of literary criticism, such as literary terms and critical approaches.
    6. Show in class discussions as well as written work that they can persuasively relate one literary work to another, and/or to the culture from which it emerged.
    7. Locate and cite reference and/or critical sources.


  
  •  

    LIT 276 - Native American Literature


    A survey of the literature of selected Native American tribes in distinct geographical areas of what is now known as the United States (focusing on the Northeast, Southeast, Plains, and Southwest).  Critica reading of traditional and contemporary works, with emphasis upon translated myths, legends, and songs handed down through the oral tradition.  An examination of how Native American oral tradition, myth, and genre challenge "Western" notions of "literature."  Investigation of the texts as both artistic and cultural expression.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 277 - Introduction to Irish Literature


    A survey of Irish literature in several genres-novels short stories, poetry, drama, essays, and criticism from the nineteenth century to the present.  Students will read and critically analyze the work of major figures, such as Maria Edgeworth, W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and Seamus Heaney, and of figures who are less well-known.  Close attention will be paid to the ways in which Irish literary works respond to the pressures of Irish history and culture.  A research paper is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 280 - The Short Novel


    An introductory course on the novel, focusing on shorter exemplars of the genre written in English since 1850.  Emphasis on narrative technique, religious and philosophical ideology, as well as socio-psychological themes.  Students will demonstrate achievement through various writing and speaking activities and assignments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approachees toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 285 - Autobiography


    An examination of a variety of autobiographies from various times, cultures, and backgrounds.  Emphasis on detailed literary analysis of style, content, and context.  Students will be expected to engage in memoir writing and other various personal writing exercises to better appreciate and critique the autobiographical experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Students will be able to express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 290 - Banned Books


    This course will survey literary works from several genres, including drama, novels, poems, and stories that have been censored or banned at one time and may still be prohibited in some places.  The titles will be chosen for their importance to the study and interpretation of literature and to censorship history.  Emphasis will be placed on close reading of the texts and on research into the artistic, political, and social reasons for their censorship.  Some of the reading material will come from free Internet sources such as The Gutenberg Project and Banned Books Online.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 291 - Folklore and Fantasy


    This course will examine the roots and flowering of the modern genre of fantasy.  Beginning with myth such as that found in Genesis and The Odyssey and fairytales such as "Beauty and the Beast," proceeding through the great heroic tale tradition of Beowulf and King Arthur, we will arrive at the great fantasy works of the last hundred years.  We will use literary critical analysis to form a definition of fantasy that we can use as a touchstone with which to examine hybrids such as the Star Wars Epic and works yet to come.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate improvement of their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Demonstrate improvement of their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Be exposed to and be able to utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 292 - Darwin, London, and Literature


    This course will examine Darwinian principles of natural selection in human society as evidenced through classic British literature:  the works of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Austen, Bronte, and, most notably, Darwin's contemporary, Charles Dickens.  The course will conclude with a trip to London where students will explore these concepts in more depth by visiting cultural and historical sites important to these writers and the history of Britain.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss with peers their ideas about the meanings of a literary work.
    2.  Apply techniques of close reading to help unravel difficult passages.
    3.  Research and discuss the historical and cultural contexts of an author's life and work.
    4.  Write clearly and persuasively about their interpretation of a literary work.
    5.  Appropriately apply the conventions of literary criticism, such as literary terms and critical approaches.
    6.  Show in class discussions as well as written work that they can persuasively relate one literary work to another, and/or to the culture from which it emerged.
    7.  Locate and cite reference and/or critical sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 294 - Nature Literature


    Envirolit (Literature of the Environment) is a literary and visual journey into writings and viewpoints about nature, in addition to other explorations that trace the environmental movement.  In this Writing Emphasis course, students will respond to essays, short stories, poems, movies, and books as the usual method of learning, but guest speakers, field trips, research, and individual Service Learning options will also provide educational opportunities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 295 - Literature and Film


    Introduces students to literary and cultural inquiry through exploration of the compositional and aesthetic relationships between fiction and film.  Analysis of various literary texts (predominantly, novels) as well as films based on those texts will lead to significant discoveries concerning fundamental differences between the two genre and perhaps, most importantly - the transactional dynamics that exist between audience and image, reader and word.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 297 - World Literature I


    A multi-genre course surveying world literature from approximately 1300 B.C. to the 1500 A.D.  The course has a strong humanities component and is designed to engage students in the lives and histories of the people and cultures who created and enjoyed these poems, stories, and plays.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary search, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
  •  

    LIT 298 - World Literature II


    A multi-genre course surveying world literature from approximately 1600 A.D. into the 20th century.  The course has a strong humanities component and is designed to engage students in the lives and histories of the people who wrote these poems, stories, and plays as well as those who read, witnessed, and enjoyed them.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2.  Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3.  Identify literary devices and define them.
    4.  Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5.  Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6.  Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7.  Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints).
    8.  Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9.  Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.

  
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    LRS 105 - Learning Skills


    Principles and techniques of academic success.  Focus will be on classroom skills such as text reading and notetaking skills.  Time management and exam taking strategies also will be covered.  All techniques will be directly applied in the students' content courses.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  Students should be enrolled in a credit-bearing course which includes a textbook

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    3 Class Hours for 12 Weeks; course starts at the beginning of the third week of the semester
    Note
    Students may not receive credit toward graduation requirements from LRS 101/102/103/104/106 if they use LRS 105.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an ability to navigate and use SUNYBROOME resources list.
    2. Identify various theories of learning and demonstrate their application of it.
    3. Be familiar with collegiate culture and comply with appropriate classroom protocol.
    4. Acknowledge the importance of community building skills.
    5. Identify and practice/apply/evaluate a variety of study strategies to enhance learning and success.
    6. Create an academic plan that will include transfer and or career goals.
    7. Demonstrate self-empowerment and overall self-efficacy.
    8. Be aware of the Financial Aid/Academic Standards of Progress and the status of their continued eligibility.
    9. Critically analyze, synthesize and evaluate the course content as it applies to their own individual life experiences. 


  
  •  

    LRS 106 - College Success


    The goal of this course is to help students to become more aware, active, and capable learners.  Emphasis will be on a core of specific study strategies based on learning theory, such as reading academic texts, making notes from texts and lectures, managing study time effectively, and taking exams successfully.  Students will apply these strategies to their own courses.

    Credits: 3
    Note
    Students may not receive credit for LRS 101/102/103/104/105 if they receive credit for LRS 106 to fulfill graduation requirements.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate an ability to navigate and use SUNYBROOME resources list.
    2.  Identify various theories of learning and demonstrate their application of it.
    3.  Be familiar with collegiate culture and comply with appropriate classroom protocol.
    4.  Acknowledge the importance of community building skills.
    5.  Identify and practice/apply/evaluate a variety of study strategies to enhance learning and success.
    6.  Create an academic plan that will include transfer and or career goals.
    7.  Demonstrate self-empowerment and overall self-efficacy.
    8.  Be aware of the Financial Aid/Academic Standards of Progress and the status of their continued eligibility.
    9.  Critically analyze, synthesize and evaluate the course content as it applies to their own individual life experiences. 

  
  •  

    LRS 107 - Textbook Mastry and Notetaking


    Use of college textbooks as study aids, principles of effective text reading, and text study systems.  Extensive application of these principles in the student's own textbook.  Examination of the organizational patterns, as they exist, in oral communication.  Explorations on systems of note-taking and application of these systems to student's own lectures and notes.  The instructor will have the flexibility to determine, for each class, the amount of time required for each topic based upon student's needs.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Choose from several note-taking systems and apply them to their current courses.
    2.  Implement textbook study systems and improve their ability to read effectively and discern important information.

  
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    LRS 108 - Study Management & Memory and Exams


    Establish general principles of academic success, relationship between outside work and study, scheduling and organizing time, and evaluation of individual learning styles.  Introduction of theories of memory, methods of review, strategies for taking objective and essay examinations related to test anxiety.  The instructor will have the flexibility to determine, for each class, the amount of time required for each topic based upon student's needs.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Construct a schedule to include times for outside activities, work, class and study.
    2.  Use knowledge of their individual learning styles to develop strategies for succeeding in class.

  
  •  

    LTR 092 - Academic Literacy


    A content literacy course providing instruction and practice in reading and writing comprehension strategies, with an emphasis on critical thinking.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  To provide students with reading and writing comprehension strategies using a wide variety of content rich material.
    2.  To broaden students' understanding of the mutual/ beneficial relationships between reading comprehension and appropriate written response.
    3.  To engage students in the evaluation of multiple literacies, thereby enhancing critical thinking capabilities.
    4.  To heighten students' metacognitive awareness, promote self-regulation and enhance comprehension strategies.

  
  •  

    LTR 095-099 - Special Topics in Literacy


    Topics in this course will immerse students in critical reading, writing and thinking strategies.  Students will implement individually tailored academic success strategies.  Courses may include exposure and reinforcement of strategies in time management, study plans and community learning in preparation for future coursework.
     

    Credits: 1-3
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of this course:

    Specific learning outcomes will be provided for each Special Topics in Literacy course at the time it is offered.

  
  •  

    LTR 110 S - Critical Literacy


    A course designed to improve comprehension and language usage efficiencies required in collegiate level performance.  Emphasis on inferential thinking beyond the literal level.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Evaluate critical literacy and inferential thinking strategies in order to challenge the neutrality of multiple literacies.
    2.  Formulate written responses to readings using appropriate rhetorical modes.
    3.  Strategically incorporate multiple literacies into research to bridge comprehension gaps.
    4.  Practice and develop strategies for producing informed oral arguments.
    5.  Continue to develop and refine self-regulation and comprehension strategies according to purpose and course content.

  
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    MAT 080 - Integer and Decimal Arithmetic


    Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of integers and decimals; whole number exponents and square roots; order of operations and parentheses; evaluating variable expressions; estimation and appropriate calculator use; applications including graphs and scale.

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform operations with signed numbers.
    2.  Add, subtract, multiply, and divide Integers and decimals both with and without the use of a calculator.
    3.  Define whole number exponents and evaluate numerical expressions with whole numbers exponents.
    4.  Find the prime factorization of a number.
    5.  Recognize, use and understand the commutative, the associative, and the distributive laws of addition and multiplication.
    6.  Know and use order of operations effectively.
    7.  Define square root and evaluate numerical expressions with whole number square roots.
    8.  Perform arithmetic operations with whole number square roots.
    9.  Evaluate variable expressions given values for the variables.
    10.  Formulate and solve applications with integers.
    11.  Make estimates by developing a sense of relative number size.
    12.  Construct and interpret graphs and charts with appropriate scales.
    13.  Use all arithmetic functions on a scientific calculator, including square, square root, and power functions when available.
    14.  Use parentheses keys.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 081 - Fractions and Percents


    Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of arithmetic fractions.  Fractions in equivalent form.  Conversion between fractions, percents and decimals with rounding.  Define and simplify rational expressions with negative exponents.  Evaluate rational variable expressions given values of the variable.  Solve basic percentage, ratio and proportion application problems.  Solve problems using scientific notation.  Solve problems involving both English and Metric measurement conversions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 080 Integer and Decimal Arithmetic

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Add, subtract, multiply, and divide arithmetic fractions both with and without the use of a calculator.
    2.  Define negative exponents and simplify expressions containing them.
    3.  Write fractions in equivalent forms.
    4.  Convert between decimals, fractions and percents (including rounding).
    5.  Evaluate rational variable expressions given values for the variables.
    6.  Solve basic ratio and proportion application problems.
    7.  Solve percent application problems.
    8.  Solve application problems involving both English and Metric measurement conversions.
    9.  Solve problems using scientific notation.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 082 - Linear Equations


    Write equations of a given line in point-slope, slope-intercept and general forms.  Find equations of parallel, perpendicular, vertical and horizontal lines.  Identify parallel and perpendicular lines from the equations.  Graph linear equations in two variables using x-y coordinate system.  Graph solutions of linear inequalities.  Define and evaluate functions using function notation.  Formulate and solve problems involving linear equations and linear functions.  Solve linear literal equations and linear inequalities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 081 Fractions, Decimals and Percents

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Graph using the rectangular coordinate system.
    2.  Find the slope of a line.
    3.  Find equations of lines using point-slope form, slope-intercept form and general form.
    4.  Reduce all forms of line equations to slope intercept form.
    5.  Graph linear equations in two variables.
    6.  Find equations of vertical and horizontal lines.
    7.  Identify parallel and perpendicular lines from their equations.
    8.  Find equations of parallel and perpendicular lines.
    9.  Define and evaluate functions using function notation.
    10.  Formulate and solve problems involving linear equations and linear functions.
    11.  Solve linear literal equations.
    12.  Solve linear inequalities.
    13.  Graph solutions of linear inequalities.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 083 - Systems of Linear Equations


    Methods for solving 2-by-2 and 3-by-3 systems of linear equations.  Graphing, substitution, elimination, and row operation methods will be discussed and used.  Applications of linear systems will be presented.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 082 Linear Equations

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Solve 2 by 2 linear systems by graphing.
    2.  Solve 2 by 2 linear systems by substitution.
    3.  Solve 2 by 2 and 3 by 3 linear systems by elimination.
    4.  Solve 2 by 2 and 3 by 3 linear systems by row operations.
    5.  Solve applications problems involving 2 by 2 and 3 by 3 systems of linear equations.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 084 - Polynomials


    Arithmetic of polynomials:  Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.  Factoring polynomials, including special forms.  Solving polynomial equations.  Applications of polynomial functions will be presented.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 082 Linear Equations

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define and identify polynomials.
    2.  Add and subtract polynomials.
    3.  Multiply polynomials.
    4.  Factor a monomial from a polynomial.
    5.  Factor expressions that are quadratic in form.
    6.  Factor expressions that are the sum and difference of cubes.
    7.  Factor expressions that can be factored by grouping.
    8.  Divide polynomials by monomials.
    9.  Divide polynomials by binomials using long division.
    10.  Solve polynomial equations.
    11.  Solve applications involving polynomial equations.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 085 - Quadratic Equations and Circles


    Simplify square roots of non-square numbers and variable expressions.  Solve quadratic equations by factoring, the square root property, completing the square, and the quadratic formula.  Graph a parabola by finding the vertex, intercepts, and axis of symmetry.  Graph a circle given its equation.  Use completing the square to graph circles and parabolas.  Compare the graphing traits of functions and non-functions.  Apply the vertical line test.  Determine the range of a function.  Solve application problems with quadratic equations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 084 Polynomials

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Simplify square roots of non-square numbers.
    2.  Simplify square roots of variable expressions.
    3.  Solve quadratic equations by factoring and the square root property.
    4.  Solve quadratic equations by completing the square.
    5.  Solve quadratic equations by using the quadratic formula.
    6.  Find the vertex and axis of symmetry of a parabola.
    7.  Graph a parabola by finding the vertex, intercepts, and additional points.
    8.  Graph a circle given its equation in standard or general form.
    9.  Use completing the square to graph circles and parabolas.
    10.  Compare the graphing traits of functions and non-functions.
    11.  Apply the vertical line test.
    12.  Determine the range of a function.
    13.  Solve application problems with quadratic equations.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 086 - Rational Expressions and Equations


    Simplify rational expressions by factoring.  Determine the domain of a rational function.  Add, subtract, multiply and divide algebraic fractions.  Simplify complex fractions.  Evaluate complicated formulas using a scientific calculator.  Solve rational equations that reduce to linear or quadratic form.  Solve and evaluate literal equations.  Solve application problems with rational equations.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 085 Quadratic Equations and Circles

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Simplify rational expressions by factoring.
    2.  Determine the domain of a rational function.
    3.  Multiply and divide algebraic fractions.
    4.  Add and subtract algebraic fractions.
    5.  Simplify complex fractions.
    6.  Evaluate complicated formulas including complex fractions using a scientific calculator.
    7.  Solve rational equations that reduce to linear or quadratic form.
    8.  Solve and evaluate literal equations.
    9.  Solve application problems with rational equations.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 087 - Geometry


    Classification of polygons, quadrilaterals, triangles and angles; measurement of angles with protractor; similar and congruent triangles; Pythagorean Theorem; definition of circle; measure in English and Metric units; perimeter and area of polygons; circumference and area of circle; surface area and volume of cones, spheres, prisms, pyramids and cylinders.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 081 Fractions, Decimals and Percents

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Classify polygons.
    2.  Classify quadrilaterals as parallelograms, kites, trapezoids, isosceles trapezoids, rectangles, rhombi, and squares.
    3.  Classify triangles as scalene, isosceles or equilateral.
    4.  Classify angles, and measure angles using a protractor.
    5.  Classify triangles as acute, right or obtuse.
    6.  Relate the sides and angles of similar and congruent triangles.
    7.  Solve applications involving similar triangles.
    8.  Use the Pythagorean Theorem to solve problems involving right triangles.
    9.  Define a circle.
    10.  Use a ruler to measure lengths in both English and Metric units.
    11.  Find perimeter and area of triangles, quadrilaterals and compound shapes.
    12.  Find circumference and area of circles.
    13.  Calculate the surface area and volume of cones, spheres, prisms, pyramids and cylinders.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 088 - Introduction to Trigonometry


    Convert between radians and degrees, reference angles in degrees and radians, exact trigonometric ratios in 30o -60o -90o triangles and 45o -45o -90o triangles, values of six trigonometric functions using right triangles, applications using right triangles, evaluate six trigonometric functions of general angles and inverse trigonometric values in degrees and radians.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 087 Geometry

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Convert between radians and degrees.
    2.  Find reference angles for angles measured in degrees and radians.
    3.  Use exact trigonometric ratios in a 30o -60o -90o triangle and 45o -45o -90o triangle to solve problems without need for a calculator.
    4.  Evaluate the six trigonometric functions of general angles measured in degrees.
    5.  Evaluate inverse trigonometric values to degree measure.
    6.  Evaluate the six trigonometric functions of general angles measured in radians.
    7.  Evaluate inverse trigonometric values to radians.
    8.  Find values of the six trigonometric functions using right triangles.
    9.  Solve applications using right triangle trigonometry.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 090 - Foundations for College Mathematics I


    Arithmetic of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and signed numbers.  Percent, ratio and proportion.  Measurement, metric units and basic geometric concepts.  Language of algebra and solving simple equations.  Descriptive statistics.  Estimation, problem solving, critical thinking, writing and communication skills are developed in group activities.  This course is designed to provide the skills necessary for students to successfully complete MAT 092, MAT 113.

     

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course: 
    MAT 090 Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: 
    Perform skills in the following categories: Arithmetic, Basic Algebra, Geometry, Problem Solving and Estimation.
     
    Note: Throughout the course the students are expected to solve applied problems related to the topics of the course.

    Arithmetic

    1. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers, fractions, decimals. 
    2. Write fractions in equivalent forms. 
    3. Convert between decimals, fractions and percents (including rounding). 
    4. Define whole number exponents and evaluate numerical expressions with whole numbers exponents. 
    5. Find the prime factorization of a number. 
    6. Recognize, use and understand the commutative, the associative, and the distributive laws of real numbers. 
    7. Know and use order of operations effectively. 
    8. Find the mean, median, mode, and range for a data set and understand their meaning. 

    Basic Algebra/Geometry
     
    9. Identify polygons, classify angles, and measure angles using a protractor. 
    10. Use a ruler to measure lengths in both English and Metric units. 
    11. Find perimeter, area and volume of various geometric objects. 
    12. Use and understand the Pythagorean Theorem, similarity and congruence. 
    13. Combine like terms for basic linear algebraic expressions. 
    14. Solve and check basic linear equations. 

    Problem Solving/Estimation 

    15. Formulate and solve applications with whole numbers and integers. 
    16. Solve ratio and proportion application problems. 
    17. Solve percent application problems. 
    18. Formulate and solve problems involving linear equations. 
    19. Solve application problems involving both English and Metric measurement conversions. 
    20. Make estimates by developing a sense of relative number size. 
    21. Construct and interpret graphs and charts with appropriate scales.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

    Textbook Information
     

     

  
  •  

    MAT 091 - Mathematical Literacy I


    Mathematical concepts are investigated through group problems and class discussions based on real-life contexts of citizenship, personal finances, and medical literacy.  It integrates fluency with numbers, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning, modeling, and communicating quantitative information.  This course is intended for students that do not plan to pursue a STEM degree.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 093 (2-credits) Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use quantitative situations in real life.
    2.  Make sense of large numbers, scientific notation.
    3.  Estimate and calculate percentages.
    4.  Know order of Operations.
    5.  Perform multi-step calculations.
    6.  Convert between percents, ratios, and decimals in context.
    7.  Know probability (percent and proportion).
    8.  Use ratio and proportion to make sense of large numbers.
    9.  Know relative and absolute change.
    10.  Picture data with graphs.
    11.  Know measures of central tendency.
    12.  Know ratios and proportions.
    13.  Index numbers as a way to comparing the relative size of a variable over time.
    14.  Convert units.
    15.  Know meaning and use of variables.
    16.  Know Geometry and use formulas to make financial decisions.
    17.  Solve proportions.
    18.  Solve linear equations.

  
  •  

    MAT 092 - Foundations for College Mathematics II


    Signed numbers, exponents and equations in one variable.  Evaluating formulas and algebraic expressions.  Factoring and the distributive property.  Graphing, solving linear equations and inequalities in two variables.  Estimation, problem solving, critical thinking, writing, and communication skills are developed in group activities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 090 Foundations for College Mathematics I or equivalent

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    4 Class hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course: 
    Designed to give the student proficiency in elementary mathematics and provide a firm foundation for credit courses. 

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: 
    Perform skills in three categories: Algebra, Graphing and Problem Solving/Estimation. 

    Note: Throughout the course the students are expected to simplify and evaluate expressions. They are also expected to solve applied problems related to the topics of the course and use estimation to verify the reasonableness of their results. 

    Algebra 

    1. Know and use order of operations effectively. 
    2. Solve linear equations. 
    3. Solve basic literal equations. 
    4. Solve algebraic proportions. 
    5. Perform operations with signed numbers. 
    6. Use exponent rules with integer exponents. 
    7. Solve linear systems by elimination. 
    8. Solve linear systems by substitution. 
    9. Add and subtract polynomials. 
    10. Multiply polynomials. 
    11. Divide polynomials by monomials. 
    12. Perform arithmetic operations with square roots. (not algebraic expressions) 
    13. Simplify algebraic monomials inside a square root. 
    14. Add and subtract algebraic fractions with common denominators. 
    15. Multiply and divide algebraic fractions. 
    16. Factor a monomial from a polynomial. 
    17. Factor second degree polynomials. 
    18. Simplify rational expressions by factoring. 
    19. Solve quadratic equations by factoring and the square root property. 
    20. Solve quadratic equations by using the quadratic formula. 
    21. Solve linear inequalities. 

    Graphing 

    22. Know the rectangular coordinate system. 
    23. Find the slope of a line. 
    24. Find the slope-intercept equation of a line. 
    25. Find equations of vertical and horizontal lines. 
    26. Graph linear equations in two variables. 
    27. Solve linear systems by graphing. 
    28. Graph parabolas by plotting points and by using the intercepts. 
    29. Find the axis of symmetry of a parabola. 
    30. Graph solutions of linear inequalities. 

    Problem Solving/Estimation 

    31. Solve problems using scientific notation. 
    32. Solve application problems using linear systems of equations. 
    33. Write mathematical notation that is consistently correct. 
    34. Describe in writing problem solving methods. 
    35. Work as a member of a team to solve problems. 
    36. Solve applied problems. 
    37. Use estimation in problem solving.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 093 - Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra


    4 Credit Version:  Arithmetic of real numbers.  Percent, ratio and proportion.  Basic geometric concepts.  Language of algebra and solving equations.  Evaluating formulas and algebraic expressions.  Perimeter, volume, and area applications.  Graphing, solving and applications of linear equations and solving inequalities.

    2 Credit Version:  Arithmetic of real numbers.  Percent, ratio and proportion.  Basic geometric concepts.  Language of algebra and solving equations.  Perimeter, volume, and area applications.

    This course is designed to provide the skills necessary for students to successfully complete MAT 096, MAT 113, MAT 115, MAT 117, MAT 119.

    Credits: 4 or 2
    Hours
    4 or 2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:
    Perform skills in four categories: Arithmetic, Algebra/Basic Geometry, Graphing and Problem Solving/Estimation.

    Note: Throughout the course the students are expected to solve applied problems related to the topics of the course.

    2 Credit Version:

    1.  Understand signed numbers and absolute value, and be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide integers.
    2.  Evaluate numerical expression using exponents.
    3.  Perform operations using decimals.
    4.  Understand square roots and evaluate expressions using order of operations correctly.
    5.  Obtain factors and the prime factorization of integers.
    6.  Recognize, use and understand the commutative, associative, and distributive laws of addition and multiplication.
    7.  Write fractions in equivalent forms, and add, subtract, multiply and divide arithmetic fractions.
    8.  Convert among decimals, fractions and percents, and order numbers in various forms.
    9.  Solve fraction and decimal application problems.
    10.  Solve ratio, general percent, and percent increase/decrease applications.
    11.  Solve sales tax, discount and simple interest applications.
    12.  Solve basic linear equations.
    13.  Define square root and evaluate numerical expressions with square roots.
    14.  Perform arithmetic operations with square roots.
    15.  Interpret graphs and charts with appropriate scales.
    16.  Calculate the mean, median and mode of a data set.
    17.  Relate the sides and angles of similar and congruent figures and solve applications involving similar figures.
    18.  Understand and use the Pythagorean Theorem.
    19.  Find the perimeter and area of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles and compound shapes.
    20.  Find the circumference and area of a circle.
    21.  Perform unit conversions.
    22.  Classify angles.
    23.  Find the volume of cylinders, spheres and rectangular prisms.

    4 Credit Version:

    1.  Understand signed numbers and absolute value, and be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide integers.
    2.  Evaluate numberical expression using exponents.
    3.  Perform operations using decimals.
    4.  Understand square roots and evaluate expressions using order of operations correctly.
    5.  Obtain factors and the prime factorization of integers.
    6.  Recognize, use and understand the commutative, associative, and distributive laws of addition and multiplication.
    7.  Write fractions in equivalent forms, and add, subtract, multiply and divide arithmetic fractions.
    8.  Convert among decimals, fractions and percents, and order numbers in various forms.
    9.  Solve fraction and decimal applicaiton problems.
    10.  Solve ratio, general percent, and percent increase/decrease applications.
    11.  Solve sales tax, discount and simple interest applications.
    12.  Solve linear equations.
    13.  Solve equations with rational numbers, rational equations with monomial denominators that reduce to linear equations, and recognize no solution and identity equations.
    14.  Formulate and solve problems involving linear equations and linear functions.
    15.  Formulate and solve mixture problems.
    16.  Solve linear literal equations.
    17.  Solve and graph solutions of linear inequalities.
    18.  Graph points on the rectangular coordinate system and graph linear equations in two variables.
    19.  Graph lines using the intercepts.
    20.  Find the slope of a line using a graph of a line and find the slope of a line given two points.
    21.  Find equations of lines given a slope and a y-intercept and graph the equations using the slope and y-intercept.
    22.  Find equations of lines given a point and a slope and find equations of lines given two points.
    23.  Identify parallel and perpendicular lines from their equations.
    24.  Find equations of parallel and perpendicular lines.
    25.  Graph linear inequalities in two variables.
    26.  Define and evaluate functions using function notation.
    27.  Define square root and evaluate numerical expressions with square roots.
    28.  Perform arithmetic operations with square roots.
    29.  Evaluate variable (including rational variable) expressions given values for the variables.
    30.  Define and simplify expressions containing negative exponents.
    31.  Convert between scientific notation and standard notation and use it to solve problems using scientific notation.
    32.  Interpret graphs and charts with appropriate scales.
    33.  Calculate the mean, median and mode of a data set.
    34.  Relate the sides and angles of similar and congruent figures and solve applications involving similar figures.
    35.  Understand and use the Pythgorean and Theorem.
    36.  Find the perimeter and area of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles and compound shapes.
    37.  Find the circumference and area of a circle.
    38.  Perform unit conversions.
    39.  Classify angles.
    40.  Find the volume of cylinders, spheres and rectangular prisms.

     

  
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    MAT 095 - Metric Conversion and Dosages


    Common fractions and decimal fractions.  Metric computations.  Apothecary and household systems.  Conversions of metric, apothecaries and household units.  Calculations of dosage.  Designed to meet the mathematics proficiency required for clinical nursing course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Mathematics II or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent and Placement by the Nursing Department

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Add/Subtract/Multiply/Divide whole numbers, fractions and decimals.
    2.  Round decimals to required place value.
    3.  Simplify complex fractions.
    4.  Apply factor/label method to dosage problems.
    5.  Convert in metric system.
    6.  Convert in apothecary system using Roman numeral to 50.
    7.  Convert in household system.
    8.  Convert among all three systems.
    9.  Apply all symbols and abbreviations used in all three systems.
    10.  Apply the "required" equivalents.
    11.  Interpret dosage problems, read labels and accurately perform all clinical calculations.
    12.  Calculate oral medications.
    13.  Calculate Parenteral medications.
    14.  Do all the calculations by hand as well as using a calculator.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
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    MAT 096 - Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry


    Polynomials; factoring; functions; rational expressions; linear, quadratic and rational equations; graphs of basic functions; linear systems; topics in geometry; general angles in degrees and radians; right triangle trigonometry.  This is a self-paced model where each student completes the given objectives working in a computer classroom setting.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:
    Perform skills in four categories: Algebra, Geometry/Trigonometry, Graphing and Problem Solving/Estimation.

    Note:  Throughout the course the students are expected to solve applied problems related to the topics of the course.

    1.  Solve 2 by 2 linear systems by graphing, substitution, and elimination.
    2.  Solve 3 by 3 linear systems by elimination.
    3.  Solve applications problems involving 2 by 2 and 3 by 3 systems of linear equations.
    4.  Define and identify polynomials.
    5.  Add, subtract, and multiply polynomials.
    6.  Factor a monomial from a polynomial and factor expressions that are quadratic in form with a leading coefficient of 1.
    7.  Factor expressions that are quadratic in form with a leading coefficient not equal to 1.
    8.  Factor expressions that are the sum and difference of cubes.
    9.  Factor expressions that can be factored by grouping.
    10.  Divide polynomials by monomials.
    11.  Divide polynomials by binomials using long division.
    12.  Solve polynomial equations by factoring.
    13.  Solve applications involving polynomial equations.
    14.  Simplify algebraic monomials inside a square root.
    15.  Simplify nth roots.
    16.  Simpligy nth roots of variable expressions.
    17.  Solve quadratic equations by the square root property, completing the square, and the quadratic formula.
    18.  Solve application problems with quadratic equations.
    19.  Multiply, divide, add, and subtract algebraic fractions.
    20.  Simplify complex fractions.
    21.  Solve rational equations that reduce to linear or quadratic form.
    22.  Solve and evaluate literal equations.
    23.  Solve application problems with rational equations.
    24.  Define a function, evaluate functions at a given value, and determine the domain and range of a function.
    25.  Apply the vertical line test, compare the graphs of functions and non-functions and determine the domain of a rational function.
    26.  Graph a parabola by finding the vertex, intercepts, and axis of symmetry.
    27.  Graph a circle given its equation in standard or general form and state the center and radius of the circle.
    28.  Use completing the square to graph circles and parabolas.
    29.  Find values of the six trigonometric functions using right triangles, and evaluate the six trigonometric functions of general angles measured in degrees.
    30.  Know the exact trigonometric ratios in a 30º-60º-90º triangle and 45º-45º-90º triangle.
    31.  Evaluate inverse trigonometric values to degree measure.
    32.  Find reference angles for angles measured in degrees.
    33.  Convert between radians and degrees.
    34.  Evaluate the six trigonometric functions of general angles measured in radians.
    35.  Evaluate inverse trigonometric values to radians.
    36.  Solve applications using right triangle trigonometry.





     

  
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    MAT 097 - Intravenous Medications and Pediatric Dosage


    Calculations of intravenous medications, calculations involving drop factors, flow rate and infusion time.  Calculations of pediatric dosage in divided dosages and dosages based on body weight.  Calculation of minimum fluid requirements.  Designed to meet the mathematics proficiency required for second year nursing program.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Mathematics II or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent and Placement by Nursing department

    Credits: 0
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Calculate IV medications and solutions.
    2.  Perform calculations involving drop factors.
    3.  Perform calculations involving flow rate and infusion time.
    4.  Accurately calculate a pediatric dosage according to body weight (in kg.)
    5.  Accurately calculate pediatric dosage in divided dosages.
    6.  Interpret and calculate the minimum fluid requirements for pediatric clients.
    7.  Do all the arithmetic calculations by hand as well as using a calculator. 

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
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    MAT 100 - Math Success Seminar


    This course provides a series of interactive experiences that will help students identify the factors blocking their success, and understand and take control of cognitive, affective and behavioral dimensions of the learning process.  Learning styles, note taking and study skills specific to mathematics classes are emphasized.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Co-reqruisite:  MAT 090 Foundations for College Mathematics I, MAT 092 Foundations for College Mathematics II or MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    Course Objective, Content & Learning Goals:

    1.  To understand the three components of the learning process.
    2.  To assimilate math information with a feeling of confidence and control.
    3.  To process math information and retain it.
    4.  To organize math information so that it can be recalled in any format and be applied.
    5.  To practice strategies for removing blocks to success.

    Behavioral Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate the role of an active learner both in the classroom and as a member of a small study group.
    2.  Use the SQ3R methof to read a math textbook.
    3.  Organize and prioritize math information using note cards and a two-column notebook.
    4.  Use appropriate test taking skills to prepare for and take each test as well as analyze each test after it is graded.
    5.  Develop a good time management plan that includes class.

    Cognitive Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Discuss the relationships among basic structure of the brain cortex, learning and memory.
    2.  Explain, using concepts of brain theory, how study behaviors impact learning.
    3.  Recognize their individual learning styles and apply learning strategies that target their strengths.
    4.  Categorize questions about math topics according to a hierarchy of levels of thinking.
    5.  Formulate questions relevant to math topics at any given level of the thinking process.

    Affective Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Recognize and articulate their beliefs about themselves as math learners and the origins of those beliefs.
    2.  Use positive self-talk to improve their self-image as math learners.
    3.  Identify situations that have led them to avoid math.
    4.  Acknowledge areas of deficiency in their math background.
    5.  Formulate a workable plan that allows them to take controlof their math learning.

  
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    MAT 109 - The Mathematics of Gaming


    The Mathematics of Gaming is a Liberal Arts Mathematics course.  Using the backdrop of traditional casino games and horse racing, students will investigate relevant conceps that involve applications of arithmetic, algebra, probability and statistics.  The students will learn different ways to present and interpret numerical and statistical data.  The students will investigate mathematical models and simulations along with their applications.  The students will investigate gaming strategies involving mathematical reasoning and psychological components such as risk versus reward, wagering and bluffing.  Students will also be required to read and discuss the short novel "The Gambler" by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.
     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 093 (4-Credits) Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, MAT 091 Mathematical Literacy I, or equivalent
     

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    CAS 109
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.
    6.  Define basic terms related to probability and statistics.
    7.  Calculate theoretical probabilities and odds.
    8.  Set up and solve simple proportions.
    9.  Generate and employ a set of random numbers for simulating probabilities.
    10.  Discern between events that are independent and dependent.
    11.  Develop models for various casino games using expected value.
    12.  Discern between a fair and an unfair game.
    13.  Create a tree diagram to represent a multistage experiment.
    14.  Collect, organize and display data using tables and charts.
    15.  Create a probability distribution for an experiment.
    16.  Calculate the mean and variance for a distribution of sample means.
    17.  Apply concepts of the distribution of sample means using z-scores and the normal distribution.
    18.  Utilize the optimization strategies in games of chance.
    19.  Describe and explain strategy for money management and wagering in games of chance.
    20.  Calculate permutations and cominations for probability applications.
    21.  Describe and play games involving strategy (NIM, TIC_TAC_TOE, ROCK-PAPER-SCISSORS) and bluffing (LIARS DICE, BLUFF).
    22.  Investigate the mathematics of streaks using discrete and continuous methods.
    23.  Describe the differences between theoretical and empirical probabilities.
    24.  Calculate the odd and payoffs in a horse race based upon the betting pool.
    25.  Describe non-mathematical factors that may influence the results of chance events.
    26.  Perform simple regression and factor analysis.


  
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    MAT 113 - Mathematical Explorations I


    This course is an interdisciplinary approach to topics in mathematics using computer technology.  Topics include:  Statistical Analysis of Data, Financial Management, Network Analysis, Project Design and Voting Theory.  This course is designed for Liberal Arts and Business Students, not for Science majors.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 090 Foundations for College Mathematics I or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    At the end of this course the student should be able to:

    1.  Use e-mail.
    2.  Use Excel.
    3.  Use the Internet.
    4.  Use PowerPoint.
    5.  See where math can be used to solve problems in everyday life and in his/her discipline.
    6.  Find the mean, mode, median and range of a data set.
    7.  Construct boxplots, histograms and scatterplots.
    8.  Find the standard deviation of a set of numbers.
    9.  Identify distributions that are normal and those that are not.
    10.  Explain the difference between a parameter and a statistic.
    11.  Explain the difference between the majority and the plurality voting methods.
    12.  Identify Hamiltonian and Euler Circuits.
    13.  Solve the Traveling Salesman-like Problems.
    14.  Schedule a project.
    15.  Calculate compound interest.
    16.  Investigate annuities.
    17.  Calculate loans payments and credit card interest.
    18.  Investigate mortgage amortization tables.
    19.  Investigate risk, return, and liquidity of investments.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
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    MAT 115 - Mathematics for General Education


    This course is designed to satisfy the SUNY General Education Requirements at the baccalaureate level.  Its purpose is to enhance a student's quantitative literacy and critical thinking.  The course topics illustrate the relevance of mathematics in society.  Prescribed topics include introductory statistics, modeling with functions, and financial mathematics.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 091 Mathematical Literacy I or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, 4-credit or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Investigate and solve problems using financial mathematics.
    2. Create and use graphs of functions to model real-world applications.
    3. Organize and draw conclusions from data sets.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement. 
    In the context of the course learning outcomes listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
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    MAT 116 - Mathematics for General Education II


    This course is the second course of a two-course sequence designed to satisfy the SUNY General Education Requirements at the baccalaureate level.  It provides an interdisciplinary approach to quantitative literacy, critical thinking and the relevance of mathematics in society.  Prescribed topics include the mathematics of saving and borrowing money, functions (especially linear, quadratic, logarithmic, exponential and/or sine) as models for interpreting data.  Symmetry and fractals, voting or graph theory will also be included.  Computer technology will be used throughout the course to explore these concepts and to prepare a project demonstrating an understanding of mathematics as it is applied in another discipline.  The SUNY GER in mathematics is satisfied only upon completion of both MAT 115 and MAT 116.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Mathematics II or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra or Equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use e-mail.
    2.  Use electronic spreadsheets.
    3.  Use the Internet.
    4.  Use electronic presentation software.
    5.  Give examples of how math can be used to solve problems in everyday life and in his/her discipline.
    6.  Investigate risk, return, and liquidity of investments.
    7.  Calculate simple and compound interest.
    8.  Use spreadsheet templates and web-based calculators to evaluate whether an annuity plan or other types of investments will meet the need of the investor.
    9.  Calculate loans payments and credit card finance charges.
    10.  Investigate mortgage amortization tables.
    11.  Describe a function in words and use function notation.
    12.  Describe the domain and rage of a function.
    13.  Identify independent and dependent variables.
    14.  Create and use graphs of functions.
    15.  Identify a graph as linear or non-linear.
    16.  Create and use linear and non-linear models to analyze real data.
    17.  Discuss and apply topics in one of three applications of mathematics:  visual arts and music, voting theory, or networks and scheduling.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.  
    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
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    MAT 117 - Elementary Finite Math w/Algebra


    Solving systems of linear equations and linear inequalities, matrix algebra, linear programming, sets, counting, probability, statistics, finance, and logic.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Solve and graph systems of linear inequalities.
    2.  Add, subtract and multiply matrices.
    3.  Determine if a matrix has an inverse, and find it if it does.
    4.  Solve systems of linear equations using matrix methods.
    5.  Solve linear programming by graphing.
    6.  Explore sets and counting.
    7.  Construct sample spaces, events, and calculate probabilities.
    8.  Expand a binomial using the Binomial Formula and Pascal's Triangle.
    9.  Calculate frequencies and probability distributions.
    10.  Calculate the mean and standard deviation of a dataset, and calculate probabilities using a normal distribution.
    11.  Calculate interest, annuities, and amortization of loans.
    12.  Construct truth tables, understand logical implication and equivalence.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
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    MAT 118 - The Mathematics of Sustainability


    The Mathematics of Sustainability is a liberal arts mathematics course that satisfies the SUNY General Education Requirement.  Using the concept of sustainability as it relates to social, economic and environmental capitol, students will investigate relevant issues that involve applications of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and statistics.  The students will learn different ways to present and interpret numerical and statistical data.  In addition, they will investigate mathematical models and simulations in a variety of applications.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    General Education Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use an electronic spreadsheet.
    2.  Collect and critically evaluate mathematical information located on the internet and in the media.
    3.  Read and discuss a Community Sustainability Report Card.
    4.  Use sustainability indicators to create a community sustainability report card for a local community.
    5.  Create a frequency distribution table from a set of data.
    6.  Find the Mean, Median, and Mode for a data set.
    7.  Find the Weighted Mean and the Median from a frequency table.
    8.  Find Range, Interquartile Range and the Standard Deviation for a data set.
    9.  Create and interpret Bar Charts, Line Charts, and Pie Charts.
    10.  Read and interpret a variety of mathematical diagrams including contour maps, 3D graphs and flow charts.
    11.  Construct and interpret boxplots, stack plots, and scatter plots.
    12.  Collect a set of data using various sampling methods.
    13.  Recognize correlation and the implications regarding causation.
    14.  Find the equation for the line of best fit for data in a scatter plot.
    15.  Fit non-linear trend lines to data and make responsible predictions using the trend line equations.
    16.  Critically evaluate trends in data.
    17.  Identify a normal distribution.
    18.  Utilize the 68-95-99.7% rule for a normal distribution.
    19.  Calculate simple probabilities.
    20.  Discuss probabilities involved with unlikely and catastrophic events.
    21.  Describe relationships between large numbers.
    22.  Identify the domain and the range of a function.
    23.  Use Excel to create polynomial, rational, exponential, logistic, logarithmic and periodic functions.
    24.  Calculate Maximum Sustainable yield.
    25.  Identify Euler and Hamilton circuits in a graph.
    26.  Utilize various algorithms applied to the travelling salesman problem.
    27.  Find the critical path in a scheduling graph.
    28.  Use various functions to model real world phenomena such as population and investment growth.
    29.  Use periodic functions to model climate and predator/prey relations.
    30.  Discuss cost versus return for various investments.
    31.  Complete hands on activities using real world data.
    32.  Use algorithms to find solutions for various optimization problems.
    33.  Experiment with simple simulation applets.

  
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    MAT 119 - Mathematics for Elementary Education I


    An exploration of order of operations, fractions, equations of a single variable, graphing lines; visual display of data using charts and graphs, descriptive statistics, data analysis, hypothesis testing; area and perimeter of plane figures, volume and surface area of solids.  Students are expected to explain the material as though to a target audience.  Course uses a project-based instruction methodology.  Intended only for elementary education majors, this course is the first course in a two course sequence (with MAT 120) for completion of SUNY General Education Math requirement.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 092 Foundations for College Math II or MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Add, subtract, multiply, divide rational numbers, and explain why the basic arithmetic operations of fractions work.
    2.  Evaluate arithmetic expressions according to the algebraic hierarchy.
    3.  Adding, subtracting and multiplying polynomials.
    4.  Solve equations of a single variable.
    5.  Solve literal equations of a single variable.
    6.  Define and graph a linear function of a single variable.
    7.  Identify, interpret, and discuss line charts, bar charts, line graphs, and pie charts.
    8.  Construct line charts, line graphs, and bar charts.
    9.  Relate a shape to its place in the geometric hierarchy.
    10.  Identify various quadrilaterals and triangles.
    11.  Use formulas to calculate the perimeter and area of various polygons.
    12.  Use formulas to calculate the circumference and area of a circle.
    13.  Use the Pythagorean Theorem.
    14.  Calculate the perimeter of simple and compound planar regions.
    15.  Use formulas to calculate the surface area and volume of a cone, a cylinder, a prism and a sphere.
    16.  Calculate the volume and surface area of simple and compound solids.
    17.  Solve application problems involving area, perimeter, surface area and volume.
    18.  Explain the difference between central tendency and dispersion.
    19.  Calculate the mean, weighted mean, median, and mode and recognize the appropriate use of same to help describe a data set.
    20.  Calculate percentiles and relate them to a set of data.
    21.  Calculate the range and standard deviation for a set of data and recognize these as measures of dispersion.
    22.  Explain what a z-score measures and calculate the z-score for a given score.
    23.  Test a hypothesis about the mean of a population.
    24.  Complete and present projects.
    25.  Participate in cooperative learning activities.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement. 
    In context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 120 - Mathematics for Elementary Education II


    Simple probability, odds, expected value; patterns, symmetry, tilings, sequences, and pattern block manipulation; functions of one or more variables with graphs and applications; right triangle trigonometry; sine, logarithmic, exponential, quadratic and logistic curves.  Students are expected to explain the material as though to a target audience.  Course uses a project-based instruction methodology.  Intended only for elementary education majors, this course is the second course in a two course sequence (with MAT 119) for completion of SUNY General Education Math requirement. (Writing Emphasis Course)

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 119 Mathematics for Elementary Education I and ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:

    1.  Identify the sample space and event spaces in probability experiments.
    2.  Draw tree diagrams and tables to solve probability problems.
    3.  Calculate simple theoretical and experimental probabilities.
    4.  Calculate compound theoretical and experimental probabilities using trees and multiplication principle.
    5.  Determine odds.
    6.  Calculate expected value.
    7.  Write recursion formulas and explicit formulas for various sequences.
    8.  Recognize and write recursive and explicit formulas for arithmetic, geometric, Fibonacci and, optionally, polygonal umber sequences.
    9.  Hexiamonds, Polyominoes, Pentominoes, and Tetrahexes.
    10.  Tile a plane using various combinations of regular polygons.
    11.  Identify various types of plane tilings.
    12.  Identify symmetry in a pattern.
    13.  Identify and create the various types of border patterns.
    14.  Build designs with pattern blocks.
    15.  Evaluate functions of one or several variables.
    16.  Review solving equations of a single variable.
    17.  Recognize and appropriately use degree and radian measure.
    18.  Solve applications using right triangle trigonometry.
    19.  Recognize the graphs of the sine, logarithmic, exponential, quadratic and logistic curves.
    20.  Calculate angles using inverse trigonometric functions.
    21.  Algebraically solve equations in a single variable, including sine, logarithmic, exponential and logistic curves.
    22.  Recognize applications of sine, logarithmic, exponential, quadratic, and logistic curves.
    23.  Complete writing assignments.
    24.  Conduct research using professional journals and the Internet.
    25.  Complete and present projects.
    26.  Participate in cooperative learning activities.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement. 
    In context of the course objectives listed above, upn successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 124 - Statistics I


    Sampling theory, organization and presentation of data, measures of central tendency, variance, standard deviation, exploratory data analysis, correlation and regression, normal distributions, student's t-distributions, binomial distributions, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, use of a statistical software package. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 093 Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra (4 credit) or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    Descriptive Statistics:
    1.  Define a population, a sample, and random sampling.
    2.  Find and work with a published data set.
    3.  Collect data on a random variable.
    4.  Group data, make frequency tables and graphically display information.
    5.  Compute the mean, median, mode, standard deviation, and variance for raw data.
    6.  Find the coefficient of correlation for a set of paired data.
    7.  Write the equation of the least squares regression line.

    Statistical Inference:
    1.  Interpret the slope of the equation of least square regression line, and use equation to make and interpret predictions.
    2.  Find probabilities using definitions, some rules of probability, and normal, t, and binomial distributions.
    3.  Find areas under the standard normal curve.
    4.  Apply the Central Limit Theorem.
    5.  Analyze data on a random variable.
    6.  Set up confidence intervals for means and proportions for large samples.
    7.  Set up confidence intervals for means for small samples.
    8.  Perform large sample hypothesis testing on means and differences of means.
    9.  Perform large sample hypothesis testing on proportions and differences of proportions.

    Statistical Software Package:
    1.  Create bar charts, histograms, stem-and-leaf displays, and boxplots.
    2.  Produce descriptive statistics including mean, median, standard deviation, minimum, maximum, and quartiles for a data set.
    3.  Create scatterplots both with and without the graph of the least squares regression line.
    4.  Produce the value of the correlation coefficient and the equation of the least squares regression line.
    5.  Produce confidence intervals.
    6.  Conduct tests of hypotheses on means, proportions, difference of means, and differences of proportions.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement. 
    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 127 - Mathematical Literacy II


    Mathematical and statistical reasoning are explored through topics in everyday life.  It integrates quantitative literacy with percents, probability, mathematical modeling, and statistical thinking.  Concepts are investigated with hands-on activities using medical, environmental, and financial examples.  Communicating mathematics will be developed in this course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  MAT 091 Mathematical Literacy I, MAT 093 (4-credits) Integrated Arithmetic and Basic Algebra, or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1.  Scaling factors and area unit conversion.
    2.  Calculating interest rates and estimation.
    3.  Calculating with percentages.
    4.  Applied uses of percentages.
    5.  Understand Absolute and relative change.
    6.  Understanding designs of statistical studies.
    7.  Reading visual display of data.
    8.  Understanding visual display of data.
    9.  Using spreadsheet to organize data.
    10.  Reading, interpreting, and creating bar and pie charts.
    11.  Reading contingency tables.
    12.  Reading and creating statistical graphs of quantitative date.
    13.  Understanding and calculating measure of central tendency.
    14.  Understanding and calculating standard deviation.
    15.  Understanding and calculating weighted averages.
    16.  Understanding linear models with words, tables, graphs, and equations.
    17.  Understanding piecewise linear models.
    18.  Approximating data with linear models, scatter plots and lines of best fit.
    19.  Understanding basics of exponential models.
    20.  Modeling situations with exponential equations.


    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 130 - Applied Algebra and Trigonometry


    Designed for students in the Engineering Technologies only, the course covers algebra and trigonometry emphasizing computational skills and graphing using application problems from technology fields.  Topics include: function definition, graphs, exponents, logarithms, trigonometric identities, complex numbers and vectors.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Solve literal equations.
    2.  Solve polynomial equations.
    3.  Solve trigonometric equations.
    4.  Solve logarithmic and exponential equations.
    5.  Perform operations on algebraic and trigonometric expressions.
    6.  Define what a functions is, and graph it.
    7.  Perform operations defined on functions.
    8.  Recognize and graph linear functions, polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions and logarithmic functions.
    9.  Use the basic properties of logarithmic and exponential functions.
    10.  Recognize and use basic trigonometric identities.
    11.  Solve application problems using the Law of Sines and/or Law of Cosines.
    12.  Solve application problems using exponential functions in areas such as interest, population growth, disease, radioactive decay.
    13.  Solve application problems using logarithmic functions in areas as ph, Richter Scales, and decibel scales.
    14.  Define and recognize complex numbers.
    15.  Convert between rectangular and trigonometric forms for complex numbers.
    16.  Perform basic operations on complex numbers.
    17.  Represent vectors in polar and rectangular form.
    18.  Resolve a vector into its rectangular components.
    19.  Use vectors to solve application problems.

    Calculator Objectives:  The student should be able to:

    1.  Find roots of polynomials using the graphing calculator.  This involves three methods:  graphing, factoring and using the Numeric Solver application.
    2.  Solve equations using the graphing calculator.  This involves graphing and using the Numerical Solver application.
    3.  Use Exact and Approximate output modes.
    4.  Understand the Graph application menus.
    5.  Setup and read tables to look at limiting values of functions.
    6.  Find minima and maxima.
    7.  Graph piece-wise functions.
    8.  Get an appropriate window and accurately sketch the graph of a relation or function.
    9.  Establish a trigonometric identify using the graphing calculator.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.
    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 136 - College Algebra and Trigonometry I


    Rational exponents; radicals; polynomial long division; rational expressions; solving quadratic equations and inequalities; polynomial functions; absolute value equations and inequalities; complex numbers; operations of functions; inverse functions; properties of exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; reference angles; radian measure; graphs of sine, cosine, and tangent; basic trigonometric identities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:
    Perform skills in three categories:  Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry.

    Note:  Throughout the course the students are expected to solve applied problems related to the topics of the course.

    Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry:
    1.  Perform arithmetic operations and simplification of rational expressions including complex fractions.
    2.  Solve absolute value linear equations and inequalities using analytic methods.
    3.  Perform operations and simplify expressions involving radicals and rational exponents.
    4.  Perform operations and simplify expressions involving complex numbers.
    5.  Rationalize denominators and numerators.
    6.  Understand the definition of a function of x and find the domain and range of a function.
    7.  Use function notation.
    8.  Review linear functions and their applications.
    9.  Perform operations on functions including composition.
    10.  Find an inverse function algebraically.
    11.  Use properties of exponential and logarithmic functions.
    12.  Use the change of base formula.
    13.  Use interval notation.
    14.  Solve compound inequalities.
    15.  Perform polynomial long division.
    16.  Solve quadratic equations and inequalities and applications thereof.
    17.  Apply the Remainder Theorem and Factor Theorem to higher degree polynomials.
    18.  State the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra and find all complex zeros of a polynomial function.
    19.  Construct an expression for a polynomial given its roots.
    20.  Use radians to measure angles.
    21.  Find reference angles for angles measured in degrees and radians.
    22.  Find the trigonometric functions for a general angle.
    23.  Use reciprocal, Pythagorean, co-function, quotient and odd/even identities.
    24.  Use the distance and midpoint formulas.
    25.  Find the arc length and area for a sector of a circle.
    26.  Review trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions of acute angles and applications of right triangles.
    27.  Solve logarithmic and exponential equations.

    Graphing:
    28.  Identify and graph the following families of relations:
                 a.  ax + by = c
                 b.  y = ax2 + bx + c
                 c.  y = xn
                     
    d.  y=|x|
                 e.  y=1/x
                 f.  y = ax
                 g.  y = a sin bx
                 h.  y = a cos bx
                 i.  y = a tan bx
    29.  Graph functions and relations by using various graphing techniques:  symmetry, reflection, translation and contraction.
    30.  Sketch a comprehensive graph of a polynomial function including end behavior, extrema and real zeros.
    31.  Relate the graphs of y = sinx and y = cosx to the unit circle.
    32.  Graph inverse functions.
    33.  Graph piece-wise functions.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.
    In context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 146 - Applied Business Calculus


    Review of analytic geometry of lines and parabolas; functions, and their graphs; limits and continuity; differentiation rules and applications; integration techniques and applications; exponential and logarithmic functions and applications.  Recommended for Social Science, Health Science and Business students.  Not for Mathematics majors or Science majors in the A.S. Degree program.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 136 Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  After a brief review:

    • Write and recognize the equations of lines and parabolas.
    • Define a function and determine the domain of a given function.
    • Graph polynomials, rational functions and functions involving radicals.
    • Find the points of intersection of two functions.
    • Understand the composition of functions.

    2.  Understand the concept of limit and use limit rules to evaluate limits.
    3.  Understand the concept of continuity and find points of discontinuity of a given function.
    4.  Evaluate limits from a given graph.
    5.  Define a derivative and find derivatives of functions using the definition.
    6.  Understand the geometric interpretation of a derivative (slope of tangent line).
    7.  Understand the difference between a function and its derivative on a graph.
    8.  Use the rules of differentiation to find derivatives of more complex functions.
    9.  Find a relative extrema and inflection points of a function.
    10.  Use differentiation to solve max-min problems and to aid in curve sketching.
    11.  Find anti-derivatives of functions.
    12.  Evaluate definite integrals using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
    13.  Understand the geometric interpretation of the definite integral (area under curve).
    14.  Graph logarithmic and exponential functions.
    15.  Apply the properties of logarithms and exponents to solving equations (e.g., growth, compound interest, present value).
    16.  Differentiate and integrate logarithmic and exponential functions and apply this knowledge to solve problems in business and economics.
    17.  Apply differentiation (rate of change of a function) to solve problems in business and economics (e.g., marginal cost and revenue, maximization of profits).
    18.  Apply integration to solve problems in business and economics (e.g., total value, expected value).

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.
    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 148 - Applied Technical Mathematics I


    This first course in a two-semester sequence of intermediate algebra and trigonometry with technical applications.  Topics include:  operations in the real number system, expressions and functions, first-degree equations, properties of lines, systems of linear equations, trigonometric functions, geometry (perimeters, areas, volumes of common figures), polynomials, exponents, algebraic products and factoring, algebraic fractions and operations, rational expressions, radical expressions, quadratic equations, and graphs of functions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 096 Elementary Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Overall Goals of the Course:
    1.  To provide an integrated treatment of mathematics topics essential for a sound technical mathematics background.
    2.  To teach the transfer of mathematical concepts and skills to applications in telecommunications.
    3.  To increase analytical and computational skills, including use of a graphing calculator and the laptop computer.
    4.  To develop a systematic approach to problem solving.
    5.  To increase reading comprehensive in mathematics.
    6.  To provide sufficient skills so that the student will be able to effectively deal with mathematical requirements in other allied courses requiring a technical mathematics background.
    7.  To function as teams to learn team building skills while solving problems.

    Student Performance/Behavioral Objectives:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:
    1.  Demonstrate understanding of real, rational, and irrational numbers.
    2.  Demonstrate an understanding of operations with signed numbers.
    3.  Demonstrate the use of the laws of exponents.
    4.  Demonstrate the understanding of Order of Operations.
    5.  Demonstrate the fundamental algebraic operations and terminology of algebraic expressions.
    6.  Evaluate literal expressions.
    7.  Solve first-degree equations with one unknown.
    8.  Analyze and solve direct and inverse proportions.
    9.  Analyze and solve word problems involving the use of linear and rational equations and functions.
    10.  Graph and interpret functions.
    11.  Demonstrate multiplication of algebraic expressions using special products, long multiplication, and the FOIL method.
    12.  Demonstrate long division of polynomials.
    13.  Use various methods to factor algebraic expressions.
    14.  Demonstrate various operations with algebraic fractions.
    15.  Solve fractional equations.
    16.  Change a number to scientific notation and vice versa.
    17.  Solve quadratic equations by factoring and by the quadratic formula.
    18.  Solve incomplete quadratic equations.
    19.  Use the Cartesian coordinate system to graph and interpret equations of two variables.
    20.  Demonstrate knowledge of the slope-intercept form.
    21.  Demonstrate knowledge of the point-slope form.
    22.  Solve systems of linear equations by graphing, addition method, substitution method, and by determinants.
    23.  Identify geometric shapes and formulas (perimeter, area, volume) and use in applications.
    24.  Define and evaluate trigonometric functions from 0 degrees to 90 degrees and their inverses.
    25.  Analyze and solve right triangles.
    26.  Demonstrate the use of basic metric units and dimensional analysis.

    Computer/Calculator Skills
    1.  Convert decimal degrees to degree-minute-second to radians and reverse.
    2.  Evaluate trigonometric functions and inverse trigonometric functions.
    3.  Evaluate powers and roots.
    4.  Use scientific notation and engineering notation.
    5.  Evaluate real functions using the graphing calculator.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 149 - Applied Technical Mathematics-IS


    This is the second course in a two semester sequence of intermediate algebra and trigonometry with technical applications.  Topics include operations with exponents and radicals, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, trig functions of any angle, radians, sinusoidal functions and graphing, vectors, complex numbers and their applications, oblique triangles, inequalities, introduction to statistics and an intuitive approach to calculus.  The graphing calculator, a laptop computer, and umbrella competencies will be integrated throughout the course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 148 Applied Technical Mathematics I or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Simplify algebraic radicals.
    2.  Convert fractional exponents to radicals and the reverse.
    3.  Demonstrate fundamental operations in radicals.
    4.  Solve equations with radicals.
    5.  Convert degrees to radians and the reverse.
    6.  Evaluate trigonometric functions and their inverses for angles measured in degrees and radians.
    7.  Solve oblique triangles using the law of sines and/or law of cosines.
    8.  Graphically add vectors.
    9.  Solve vector problems by trigonometry using rectangular and polar forms.
    10.  Sketch and interpret the graphs of sinusoidal, exponential, and logarithmic functions and inequalities.
    11.  Perform fundamental operations on algebraic terms involving exponents and radicals.
    12.  Covert complex numbers in various forms:  rectangular, polar, exponential.
    13.  Perform the fundamental operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) using the rectangular form of complex numbers.
    14.  Perform multiplication and division of complex numbers in polar and exponential form.
    15.  Using DeMoivre's Theorem raise complex numbers to powers and roots.
    16.  Demonstrate the use of common logarithms and natural logarithms.
    17.  Solve exponential and logarithmic equations.
    18.  Graph exponential functions using log-log and semi-log paper.
    19.  Summarize and interpret data using frequency distribution, measures of central tendency, and measures of dispersion.
    20.  Given a set of data, find the line of best fit.
    21.  Apply process control and quality assurance.
    22.  Develop an intuitive feel for the concepts of limits, derivative (instantaneous rate of change), integral (area under a curve).

    Overall Goals of the Course:
    1.  To provide an integrated treatment of mathematics topics which are essential for a solid mathematical background for the telecommunication technician.
    2.  To demonstrate the transfer of mathematical concepts and skills to applications within telecommunications.
    3.  To increase computational and graphing skills using the graphing calculator and the computer.
    4.  To develop a systematic approach to problem solving.
    5.  To provide sufficient mathematical skills so a student will be able to successfully deal with mathematical requirements of allied courses.
    6.  To increase awareness and use of the umbrella competencies, particularly team building skills while solving problems.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 156 - Algebra and Trigonometry for Calculus


    Graphs of rational functions, asymptotes, exponential and logarithmic equations, conic sections, matrix arithmetic and matrix solutions to systems of equations, determinants,  trigonometric identities and equations, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, vectors, polar graphs, parametric graphs, polar form of complex numbers, powers and roots of complex numbers, limits of functions using tables.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 136 College Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Perform skills in three categories:  Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry.

    Note:  Throughout the course the students are expected to solve applied problems related to the topics of the course.

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry Objectives:
    1.  Determine the horizontal, vertical, and oblique asymptotes of a rational function.
    2.  Solve rational, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric equations analytically.
    3.  Solve rational and polynomial inequalities analytically.
    4.  Graph Inx, ex, logax and ax.
    5.  Name the equation of a transformed basic function/relation by viewing its graph.
    6.  Construct a graph of a rational function from its intercepts and asymptotes.
    7.  Solve systems of linear equations using substitution, elimination and row operations on matrices.
    8.  Perform the partial fraction decomposition of a rational expression.
    9.  Solve systems of linear inequalities.
    10.  Find the determinant of 2 by 2 and 3 by 3 matrices.
    11.  Add, subtract, multiply matrices.
    12.  Verify trigonometric identities involving the reciprocal identities, quotient identities, Pythagorean identities, angle sum identities, double angle identities, and half angle identities.
    13.  Solve problems involving inverse trigonometric functions
    14.  Graph y=sin-1x, y=cos-1, y=tan-1, y=sec-1x on a suitable domain.
    15.  Apply the Law of Sines to solve application problems.
    16.  Explain and solve the ambiguous case for the Law of Sines.
    17.  Apply the Law of Cosines to solve application problems.
    18.  Define a vector.
    19.  Perform vector arithmetic, including magnitude.
    20.  Use component vectors to solve application problems.
    21.  Convert between trigonometric (polar) and rectangular forms of complex numbers.
    22.  Find the real and complex zeroes of a polynomial function.
    23.  Compute powers and roots of complex numbers.
    24.  Solve problems involving conic section formulas for a circle, parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola.
    25.  Graph conic sections.
    26.  Graph basic parametric equations and basic polar equations.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.

     

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 160 - Applied Calculus I


    Designed for students in the Engineering Technologies only, this course covers the mechanics of calculus using application problems from technology fields.  Topics include:  equations of tangent lines; limits; differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions; product rule, quotient rule, and chain rule; implicit differentiation; related rates; maxima and minima; differentials; the definite integral and applications to finding area, center of gravity, volume of revolution and work done; numerical integration.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 130 Applied Algebra and Trigonometry or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Write the equation of a tangent line.
    2.  Evaluate limits algebraically.
    3.  Use limits to find vertical and horizontal asymptotes.
    4.  Find the points of discontinuity of a function.
    5.  Differentiate logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions.
    6.  Use the chain rule, product and quotient rules in differentiating.
    7.  Differentiate implicity.
    8.  Solve related rate problems.
    9.  Use differentials to find approximate values.
    10.  Antidifferentiate logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions.
    11.  Use calculus methods to find area, center of gravity, volume of revolution, work done.
    12.  Use calculus methods to find maximum and minimum points of functions.
    13.  Use calculus methods to solve simple circuit and kinematic problems.
    14.  Approximate integrals using numeric methods.

    Calculator objectives:

    1.  Graphing functions derived from applications to reinforce Calculus solutions.
    2.  Find limits graphically.
    3.  Find the slope of a tangent line to a curve at a specified point.
    4.  Graph a function and the tangent line at a specified point on the function.
    5.  Explain why the graphing calculator really does not draw a vertical asymptote for functions.
    6.  Graph a function and its derivative on the same axes.
    7.  Find relative extrema and inflection points of a function.
    8.  Evaluate definite integrals.
    9.  Show and determine the area under a curve.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.
    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 181 - Calculus I


    A university parallel calculus course covering functions, limits and continuity.  Differentiation and integration of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential functions using computational and intuitive methods.  Applications including curve sketching, rectilinear motion, related rates, maxima and minima.  Summation, integration and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications of the definite integral.

    NOTE:  Students may not use more than one of the following to meet graduation requirements:  MAT 146, MAT 160, MAT 181.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 156 Algebra & Trigonometry for Calculus or equivalent

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Find limits using computational and intuitive methods.
    2.  Understand the formal definition of a limit.
    3.  Determine continuity of functions.
    4.  Find the derivative of a function using the limit definition.
    5.  Graph, differentiate and integrate polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions, using computational and intuitive methods.
    6.  Find derivatives by the chain rule.
    7.  Find implicit derivatives.
    8.  Understand differentials and linear approximations and their relation to the derivative.
    9.  Understand the Mean Value Theorem and Rolle's Theorem.
    10.  Set up and solve maxima and minima problems and related rate problems.
    11.  Use the first and second derivatives as aids in sketching curves.
    12.  Find antiderivatives.
    13.  Understand sigma notation and know that a definite integral is the limit of a Riemann sum.
    14.  Understand the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
    15.  Integrate by Substitution.
    16.  Apply the definite integral to problems involving area under a curve and area between curves.
    17.  Apply the definite integral to problems involving volume, curve length, and surface area.
    18.  Understand and solve elementary differential equations.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.
    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 182 - Calculus II


    Exponential and logarithmic functions from an integral viewpoint, the calculus of inverse functions.  Techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions and trigonometric substitution.  Improper integrals. Sequences, detecting convergence, and L'Hospital's rule.  Infinite series, tests for convergence, power series, Maclaurin series and Taylor series.  Polar curves, parametric equations and conics in calculus.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 181 Calculus I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Define a sequence and a series.
    2.  Test series for convergence.
    3.  Test alternating series for absolute or conditional convergence.
    4.  Perform operations with power series.
    5.  Find the radius of convergence of a power series.
    6.  Develop Taylor and Maclaurin series expansions for a function.
    7.  Employ various integration techniques including integration by parts, trigonometric substitution and partial fractions.
    8.  Evaluate improper integrals.
    9.  Solve elementary differential equations.
    10.  Compute limits using L'Hopital's Rule.
    11.  Transform from rectangular to polar coordinates and from polar to rectangular.
    12.  Graph in polar coordinates.
    13.  Compute area in polar coordinates.
    14.  Compute arc length in polar coordinates.
    15.  Perform applications of integration.
    16.  Use Calculus with parametric equations.
    17.  Recognize graphs and perform calculus on various conics.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.
    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recongnize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 224 - Statistics II


    Review of probability fundamentals, discrete random variables and probability distributions.  The F distributions, chi-squared distributions, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation, nonlinear and multiple regression, the analysis of categorical data, nonparametric procedures, use of a statistical software package.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 124 Statistics I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Compute the mean and standard deviation for a discrete probability distribution and construct the probability histogram.
    2.  Solve probability problems using discrete probability distributions such as the binomial and Poisson.
    3.  Use the chi-square distribution to perform tests on multinomial experiments, goodness-of-fit and tests of homogeneity and independence.
    4.  Compute the probability of Type I and Type II errors associated with tests of hypotheses about means.
    5.  Compute the least squares regression line for a bivariate population and test it as a model for the population.
    6.  Compute, test, and interpret the meaning of the correlation coefficient for a bivariate population.
    7.  Use the F-distribution to test inferences about two variances.
    8.  Perform analysis of variance (ANOVA).
    9.  Test the assumptions for ANOVA.
    10.  Perform analysis using multiple regression and correlation models.
    11.  Use nonparametric statistics to conduct tests of hypotheses.
    12.  Use a statistical software package to conduct various data analyses.

    This course prepares students to meet the Mathematics General Education requirement.
    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

  
  •  

    MAT 245 - Design of Experiments


    This course is an introduction to the most common types of statistical designs and analyses of experiments.  Topics include single-factor experiments with randomized blocks, Latin squares, incomplete blocks, two-factor experiments, 2^k designs, fractional designs, response surface techniques, and other selected topics.  Technology will be used throughout the course. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  MAT 224 Statistics II or MAT 260 Applied Probability and Statistics

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Determine an appropriate design to fit the analysis.
    2.  Test hypotheses with contrasts.
    3.  Analyze an experiment using completely randomized designs, complete block designs, incomplete block designs, Latin square designs.
    4.  Develop and analyze factorial designs.
    5.  Use response surface methods.
    6.  Use nested design and covariance design.
    7.  Use technology for design and analysis of experiments.

    In the context of the course objectives listed above, upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables and schematics.
    2.  Represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and verbally.
    3.  Employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to solve problems.
    4.  Estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness.
    5.  Recognize the limitations of mathematical and statistical methods.

 

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