Dec 13, 2019  
Website Catalog 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    HIS 225 - The Second World War


    A course on the history of the Second World War (1939-1945).  The course will discuss the background of the war; the causes of the outbreak of war in Europe and the Pacific; the military, political, social, and cultural dimensions of the conflict; and the consequences and legacy of the Second World War.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIS 100 The Rise of The West: 1500-Present, HIS 117 The West and the World Since 1500, or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the main causes of the Second World War.
    2. Discuss the entrance of the U.S. into the Second World War.
    3. Discuss the global effects of the Second World War.


  
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    HIS 299 - Independent Study


    An independent study project which is beyond the scope of courses currently offered by the department, directed by a faculty member with approval of the department chairperson.  Independent study does not satisfy the Liberal Arts requirement in history, and it may not be taken in lieu of a 100-series course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 hours of College History

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes will be developed by the instructor and approved by the department chair and the Dean of Liberal Arts.

  
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    HIT 101 - Introduction to Health Information Systems


    Introduction to the organization of healthcare delivery and overview of the profession.  Definition of, standards for, and development of both paper and electronic health records as to content, format, evaluation and completion.  Numbering and filing systems, registries, indexes, forms and screen design are addressed.  A study of methods for compiling statistics for administration, medical staff, and licensing and accrediting agencies.  Vital statistics, public health statistics and hospital statistics are covered.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Trace the development of the health information profession and understand the responsibilities of the health information profession.
    2. Recognize and describe the uses, users, and functions of the health record.
    3. Understand the content, documentation requirements, and formats of the health record in various healthcare settings.
    4. Understand the advantages of electronic health records over paper-based and hybrid records.
    5. Identify and define terms, initiatives, and technologies used in the planning and implantation of the electronic health record.
    6. Describe the purpose, development, and importance of healthcare data sets and standards.
    7. Recognize the purpose, development, and maintenance of registries and indexes used in healthcare.
    8. Describe research methodologies used in health care. (CAHIIM, III.5)
    9. Identify the types of vital statistics that are collected in the healthcare industry.
    10. Identify and explain statistical terminology used in the healthcare industry.
    11. Calculate statisitcs for health care operations (ex: Census Data, Percentage of Occupancy, Length of Stay, etc.)
    12. Summarize standards for the exchange of health information. (CAHIIM III.7)
    13. Describe consumer engagement activities. (CAHIIM, VI.8)
    14. Apply privacy basics, confidentiality, and HIPAA standards to protected health information.


  
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    HIT 106 - Medical Terminology


    A study of the language of medicine, including suffixes, prefixes and root words.  Emphasis on terminology associated with the anatomic systems.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and define the five basic word parts.
    2. Define, pronounce, and correctly spell the word parts (combining forms, suffixes, and prefixes in each chapter).
    3. Understand the concept of analyzing and defining medical terms.
    4. Apply the rules of word building when building medical terms when given definitions.
    5. Define, pronounce, and correctly spell medical terms related to body structure, color, and oncology.
    6. Define, pronounce, and correctly spell terms which are used to describe directional terms, anatomic planes, regions, and quadrants.
    7. Define, pronounce, and correctly spell disease and disorder, surgical, diagnostic, and complementary terms associated with 15 body systems.
    8. Identify, interpret, and correctly spell medical abbreviations associated with the 15 body systems.
    9. Interpret, read, and comprehend the medical language in simulated medical statements and documents.


  
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    HIT 107 - Medical Transcription and Correspondence


    Introductory course emphasizing the fundamentals of medical transcription.  Orientation to equipment and software including authentic physician dictation organized by medical specialty.  Transcription of various medical reports including chart notes, letters, history and physicals, consultation reports, and discharge summaries, while building typing speed and accuracy.  Review of medical terminology related to the medical specialities.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prior or Concurrent:  HIT 106 Medical Terminology, MDA 104 Keyboarding and Medical Word Processing, BIT 100 Keyboarding

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Produce an error-free transcribed letter, consultation, chart note, history and physical report, and discharge summary dictated by a variety of physicians.
    2. Edit the transcript to correct obvious grammatical and punctuation errors, while identifying medical transcription inconsistencies.
    3. Develop keyboarding skills and an increased knowledge of medical terminolgy, confidentiality, and professionalism.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to utilize references and resources efficiently.


  
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    HIT 117 - Reimbursement Methodologies


    A study of the reimbursement and prospective payment systems used in the health care industry.  Comprehensive review of the Official Guidelines for Coding and reporting, as well as Revenue Cycle Management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisitie:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding, HIT 205 Coding Practicum

    Corequisite:  HIT 214 CPT and HCPCS Coding

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Use basic language associated with the health care reimbursement methodologies.
    2. Describe the structure of the approved code sets used in the United States.
    3. Identify the Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting and to examine coding compliance issues that influence reimbursement.
    4. Distinguish between various insurance plans and government sponsored health care.
    5. Differentiate between inpatient, post-acute care and ambulatory reimbursement systems.
    6. Understand the components of revenue cycle management.
    7. Discuss inpatient and outpatient reimbursement methodologies.
    8. Define the provisions and functions of health care insurance plans.
    9. Differentiate between the various government sponsored health care programs.


  
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    HIT 203 - Computers in Health Care


    Identification of computer applications in the health care industry; types of hardware and software systems; components of a health care facility database; electronic patient records; principles of database coding design and data dictionaries; overflow of systems approach in the selection and development of an information system; data quality; methods to control security and confidentiality; and strategies for report management.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify computer applications in the healthcare industry.
    2. Differentiate between the types of hardware and software used in healthcare.
    3. Discuss the components of a healthcare facility database.
    4. Identify electronic patient record system.
    5. Explain the principles of database coding design and data dictionaries.
    6. Discuss a systems approach used in the selection and development of an information system.
    7. Summarize the concepts that relate to data quality.
    8. List the types of methods used to control security and confidentiality.
    9. Discuss strategies for report management.


  
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    HIT 204 - ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding


    Principles and application of the ICD-10-CM & PCS coding systems.  Introduction to the Official Coding Guidelines for Coding and Reimbursement.  Theory and practice of coding medical records using manual methods and encoder software systems.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  BIO 132 Anatomy and Physiology II, HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Corequisite:  HIT 205 Coding Practicum, HIT 240 Pathophysiology & Pharmacology

     

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine ICD-10-CM & PCS codes according to coding guidelines by coding medical record documentation.
    2. Compute DRGs from medical record documentation.
    3. Assign Principal Diagnoses.


  
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    HIT 205 - Coding Practicum


    Supervised practice structured so that students gain practical coding experience in a simulated hospital setting.  Laboratory hours: 2 hr/week for 15 weeks

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisites:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine ICD-10-CM & PCS codes according to coding guidelines by coding medical record documentation.
    2. Assign CCs, MCCs, and HACs
    3. Assign POA Indicators. 


  
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    HIT 208 - Advanced Medical Transcription


    Transcription of authentic physician-dictated reports organized by body systems or medical specialties.  Emphasis on advanced skills, developing accuracy, speed and additional detailed study of medical terminology.  Emphasis on the basic medical reports as well as specialized reports relating to the various body systems.  Emphasis also on using references and other resources efficiently, editing and proof-reading techniques.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 107 Medical Transcription

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours; 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Select the correct format for a dictated medical report.
    2. Demonstrate the proper use of reference materials.
    3. Transcribe consultations, chart notes, history and physical reports, discharge summaries and operative reports dictated by a variety of physicians.
    4. Edit the transript to correct obvious grammatical and puctuation errors.
    5. Identify obvious medical inconsistencies.
    6. Produce a final, neat, error-free transcript.
    7. Increase transcription speed and productivity throughout the course.
    8. Understand the process of speech recognition technology.
    9. Successfully utilize the ExpressScribe Transcription Program.


  
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    HIT 210 - Management Principles for Health Information


    Principles of management, planning, organizing, controlling, and directing as they relate to and are integrated with specific applications to health information management functions.  Principles of personnel supervision are also included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  HIT 236 Quality Improvement

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Participate in the planning, design, selection, implementation, integration, testing, evaluation, and support for organization-wide information systems.
    2. Use the principles of ergonomics and human factors in work process design.
    3. Apply the fundmentals of team leadership and conduct continuing education programs.
    4. Monitor staffing levels and productivity standards for health information functions, and provide feedback to management and staff regarding performance.
    5. Communicate benchmark staff performance data and priortize job functions/activities.
    6. Use quality improvement tools and techniques to monitor, report, and improve processes.
    7. Make recommendations for items to include in budgets and contracts, as well as monitoring coding and revenue cycle processes.
    8. Recommend cost-saving and efficient means of achieving work processes and goals.
    9. Contribute work plans, policies, procedures, and resource requisitions in relation to job functions.


  
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    HIT 214 - CPT and HCPCS Coding


    A study of CPT and HCPCs as it relates to ambulatory and physician coding.  An overview of ambulatory and physician coding and data collection.  Theories and practical applications of ambulatory and physician payment methodologies.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 204 ICD-10-CM & PCS Coding System, HIT 205 Coding Practicum

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Determine CPT codes according to coding guidelines by coding medical record documentation.
    2. Calculate APCs from medical record documentation.
    3. Create a physician query.
    4. Manage coding denials.
    5. Ensure coding compliance and accuracy.


  
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    HIT 220 - Survey of Healthcare Delivery


    The study of the regulatory issues, content, use and structure of healthcare data and data sets as they relate to long term care facilities, home health agencies, hospice, mental health facilities, ambulatory care, physicians offices and others.  The financing of health care services will be discussed as it relates to the various payment and reimbursement systems.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Systems

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the various types of healthcare facilities.
    2. Discuss the medical record systems used in healthcare facilities.
    3. Explain the regulations that impact various types of healthcare facilities.
    4. Discuss the role of HIM professionals in healthcare facilities.
    5. Describe the reimbursement methodologies used throughout healthcare.
    6. Identify the types of data sets used in healthcare facilities.
    7. Explain risk management, legal and quality management concerns that relate to the various types of healthcare facilities.


  
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    HIT 222 W - Medical Legal Aspects


    Introduction to legal aspects of medical records.  Legal basis for medical practice, confidentiality.  Patient's "Bill of Rights," HIPAA, voluntary and involuntary release of medical information.  Authorizations and consents, professional liabilities, medical-moral issues such as abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, artificial insemination and organ transplantations. 

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    This course is designated as a writing emphasis course.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Complete written lab assignments on various topics.
    2. Apply current laws, accreditations and certification standards related to health information initiatives.
    3. Apply policies and procedures for access and disclosure to personal health information.
    4. Understand procedures regarding the release of patient information to authorized users.
    5. Apply and promote ethical standards of practice.


  
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    HIT 236 - Quality Improvement


    A study of the components of a hospital-wide quality assurance program, including quality assessment, utilization management, credentialing and risk management.  Collection, organization and presentation of data will be included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 222 Medical Legal Aspects

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Discuss the development of quality review in the healthcare industry.
    2. Identify the pioneers of QI and discuss their theories.
    3. Explain QI processes that include ongoing monitoring and evaluation.
    4. Describe The Joint Commission standards that impact the quality of care in healthcare organizations.
    5. Perform quality assessment audits, analyze the findings and display findings using visual tools.
    6. Discuss the development of utilization management in healthcare.
    7. Identify the various components of utilization management that include preadmission, admission, and continued stay reviews.
    8. Discuss the development of risk management programs.
    9. Identify court decisions, federal regulations, and The Joint Commission standards that relate to risk management.
    10. Explain risk identification and risk control activities used in the healthcare industry.
    11. Develop quality improvement tools and policies that can be used in health information departments.
    12. Present data using tables, charts, and graphs.
    13. Explain the importance of clinical documentation improvement programs.


  
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    HIT 240 - Pathophysiology & Pharmacology


    The study of major disease processes, by body system, including their etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.  Students will learn which diagnostic tests are used, as well as the appropriate surgical techniques.  Basic pharmacology and the most commonly used drugs will be discussed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HIT 106 Medical Terminology

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define disease, etiology, signs, symptoms, and prognosis.
    2. Differentiate between an organic and functional disease.
    3. Identify the predisposing factors of disease.
    4. Track the essential steps in diagnosis of disease.
    5. Describe the five classifications of diseases.
    6. Describe the various components of the principles of diagnosis.
    7. List and describe some of the common diagnostic tests and procedures.
    8. Define pharmacology and other terms related to specialty fields within the field of pharmacology.
    9. List and describe three general areas of medical uses for drugs.
    10. Describe the function of the Food and Drug Administration with respect to approving or removing drugs from the market.
    11. List five things that the names of drugs might tell you about those drugs.
    12. Describe the therapeutic effect of given drugs on a specific body system.


  
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    HIT 245 - Clinical Practicum


    Professional practice experience in facilities, organizations and agencies related to healthcare.  Students will gain practical experience in technical procedures and in developing professional attitudes in interacting with other professionals and consumers in the healthcare field.  Clinical hours: 30 hr/week for 5 weeks.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  All HIT courses must be successfully completed prior to participation in Clinical Practicum

    Corequisites:  HIT 295 Health Information Seminar

    Credits: 5
    Hours
    150 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the HIM department in the overall function of the healthcare institution.
    2. Observe the working relationships of the HIM practitioners and department staff, facility staff, visitors, and medical staff.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of patient confidentiality throughout the clinical practicum experience.
    4. Recognize and apply the characteristics of a professional in his/her attitude throughout the clinical practicum experience.
    5. Follow and demonstrate an understanding of facility/departmental policy and procedures.
    6. Gain practical experience in a variety of HIM functions under the supervision of experienced practitioners.


  
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    HIT 295 - Health Information Seminar


    A capstone course that will review and integrate theory and practice in Health Information.  Guest speakers will present on various topics and issues relevant to the profession.  Career opportunities, resume preparation, interviewing techniques, the job application process, and RHIT exam preparation will be discussed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Corequisite:  HIT 245 Clinical Practicum

     

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Prepare a resume and cover letter identifying its purpose/value in the employment process.
    2. Apply networking in identifying employment opportunities.
    3. Conduct oneself appropriately during a job interview.
    4. Identify the importance of earning the RHIT credential and become familiar with the RHIT exam preparation/application process.
    5. Obtain valuable information on the various career opportunities for the HIM professional and strategies for success.
    6. Gain further insight and knowledge in various HIM topics through review of pertinent literature.
    7. Complete RHIT exam practice questions in HIM content areas, evaluating areas of strenghts and weaknesses.


  
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    HLS 111 - Introduction to Homeland Security


    An overview of homeland security.  Evaluation of the progression of homeland security issues throughout New York and the United States.  An examination of the roles undertaken and methods used by governmental agencies and individuals to respond to those issues.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required for degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the history behind the establishment of homeland security.
    2. Explain the roles and methods that encompass homeland security.
    3. Identify the goals and philosophy within the field of homeland security.
    4. Summarize programs and methods used to meet the homeland security needs of New York and the United States.
    5. Identify the specific roles that individuals and governmental agencies play in homeland security.


  
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    HLS 150 - Emergency Management (WE)


    A study of establishing a process and structure for systematic, coordinated, and effective delivery of emergency assistance to address consequences of major disaster or other emergency occurring in the United States.  This course covers public and private responses, mitigation, and recovery measures carried out by state, federal and local governments.  Topics include types of aid available to individuals and communities, intergovernmental emergency preparedness, planning, training, exercises, and coordination of efforts.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certiticate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the types of emergencies that require multi-agency response and the functions of those agencies in responding to disasters.
    2. Describe the process used in impact assessment and the planning that goes into preparing for emergencies.
    3. Identify steps in recovery effort and agencies that provide services to asist in post-disaster relief.
    4. Develop a model emergency response plan for an individual, a family, a community, and a non-governmental organization.
    5. Understand the components of an emergency drill.


  
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    HLS 200 - Theory and Practice of Terrorism


    A study of terrorism and why the United States is a terrorist target.  Includes methods of terrorism, domestic and international terrorism, Islam and Radical Islam, terrorist operations, cyber terrorism, narco-terrorism, the mind of the terrorist, and organized crime's impact on terrorism.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the evolving definition of terrorism.
    2. Identify terrorist organizations and their respective goals.
    3. Explain various models for combating terrorism and the roles of various government and private organizations in this effort.
    4. Discuss the economic and environmental impacts as a result of terrorist attacks.
    5. Discuss research results on terrorism from the 1980s to present.


  
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    HLS 205 - Bioterrorism & Public Health Emergencies


    An examination of the roles and responsibilities of hospitals, public health agencies, and the emergency medical services system in preparing for, and responding to, natural and human-made disasters, including bioterrorism.  This course explores the objectives and implementation of federal, state, and local health emergency management programs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe the difference between public health and medicine.
    2. Identify legal and ethical issues in emergency medical services and disaster medicine.
    3. Explain current Federal, State, and local organizations and programs supporting health emergency management.
    4. Explain the threat posed by Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) weapons.
    5. Identify response actions for selected Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) weapons.


  
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    HLS 207 - Emergency Medical Services Disaster Response


    A study of the roles and responsibilities of emergency medical services systems, with a focus on disaster response.  This course explores the history and development of federal, state, and local emergency medical services programs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Explain the major components of an emergency medical services system.
    2. Describe the roles and functions of emergency medical services systems.
    3. Explain current federal, state, and local roles in the oversight and development of emergency medical services systems.
    4. Identify how emergency medical services systems contribute to disaster response.


  
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    HLS 210 - Special Security Issues


    This course will cover a wide range of topics in Homeland Security related to transportation, border, and maritime security; executive protection; emergency communications; and infrastructure protection.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Required in a degree/certificate program

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and recognize critical infrastructures that are potential targets of terrorist attacks.
    2. Understand the difficulty in assessing and evaluating potential terrorist attacks.
    3. Describe various homeland security related activities the nation's organizations (federal, county, state, local, tribal, territorial, and non-government) participate in and the types of assistance they provide.
    4. Understand the definition of cybersecurity and the roles government agencies have in maintaining cybersecurity and protecting critical infrastructures.
    5. Discuss transportation safety and security.


  
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    HMS 250 - Human Service Organizations


    Overview of agencies whose mission is to assist people with needs that develop in their lives.  Emphasis is on human service organizations and the way these organizations function, their role in society, and the services they provide.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the variety of services provided by human services organizations.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the challenges, demands, expectations, and opportunities that human service organizations face.
    3. Appreciate the role of human service organizations and their importance to the social, economic, political, and cultural fabric of our society.
    4. Appreciate human service administration and practice and the factors associated with organizations becoming effective and efficient.
    5. Become better prepared to enter the human services as practitioner and professional.


  
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    HMS 290 - Human Service Field Experience


    A field placement in a health, human service or education setting, under the supervision of faculty and agency personnel.  Weekly seminar to develop helping and relationship-building skills.  Minimum of 10-hours of field work per week is required.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ENG 110 College Writing I, HMS 250 Human Service Organizations, PSY 110 General Psychology, SOC Introduction to Sociology

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 10 Field Experience Hours
    Note
    For Human Services students only.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Correlate knowledge of Human Services theories.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to apply Human Service theories to actual practice environments.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of how the Human Service network of organizations functions to assess and meet client needs.
    4. Apply skills to maintain personal well-being while in a setting that may lead to professional fatigue.
    5. Critically reflect on Human Service values and professional ethics.


  
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    HON 170 - Honors Seminar


    The Honors First Year Seminar is a one-credit interdisciplinary course to be offered each fall to the incoming cohort of students accepted into the Honors Program.  The course primarily serves students in the Honors Program during their first semester at SUNY Broome.  Students will develop skills essential to their success as Honors students including critical thinking, interdisciplinary inquirey, and effective collaboration with others.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate critical thinking through development of an interdisciplinary research project.
    2. Present their research in a multi-modal fashion before an audience.


  
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    HON 270 - Honors Capstone Seminar


    The Honors Capstone Seminar is a one- to two-credit interdisciplinary course that will be offered each spring for Honors Program students completing their Honors Program requirements.  Students will work on their capstone Honors research projects in this course while learning about research; proposal writing; source evaluation; library offerings; presentation platforms; and oral, visual, and written presentations.  The final project will be the culmination of intensive thinking, research, writing, and collaboration that will allow students to learn about a subject in depth and to teach others about that subject.

    Credits: 1-2
    Hours
    1-2 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate critical thinking through development of an interdisciplinary research project that includes a research proposal and an annotated bibliography.
    2. Present their synthesized research in a multi-modal fashion in a formal, academic, public setting through the Honors Program.


  
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    HOS 101 - Introductions for the Hospitality Freshman


    * This is a blended course.

    An introduction to college life and the hospitality industry for the beginning student in the Hospitality Department.  Familiarity with characteristics of the hospitality and tourism industry as well as hospitality industry sustainability and corporate responsibility are stressed.  Study of current trends and issues using a daily or weekly hospitality publication and Introduction to the Hospitality Industry text.  College and departmental policies and procedures, academic advisement and registration, study skills, transfer and employment, career navigation and mapping; work ethic; college and departmental resources.  Required course for all first semester hospitality students.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate awareness of SUNY Broome student academic policies and procedures.
    2. Analyze and investigate the various career fields in which hospitality skills may be utilized.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of a positive work ethic and how it can be applied in the hospitality field.


  
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    HOS 110 - Hospitality Industry Certifications


    This course provides preparatory instruction permitting students to sit for several hospitality industry recognized certifying exams and hospitality-related micro-credentials.  Required certifications may evolve with industry demands.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Study and prepare for hospitality industry recognized certifications, typically in food safety and sanitation, food allergy awareness, safe alcohol sales and service, and professional guest service techniques.
    2. Be eligible to sit for all required industry certifications.


  
  •  

    HOS 115 - Hospitality Marketing & Promotions


    Development of marketing and promotion systems for lodging properties, restaurants, bars, casinos, events, wedding planners, caterers, conventions, trade-shows, expositions, meeting planners, microbreweries and cruise ships.  Hospitality case-study and marketing project analysis will be a key aspect of the course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate familiarity with and competency in executing fundamental hospitality marketing and promotions.
    2. Explain the interrelationship of marketing and promotions with guest service quality, guest satisfaction, and guest loyalty.


  
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    HOS 127 - Hospitality Purchasing


    In depth instruction on foodservice purchasing techniques.  This course covers product information as well as management of the purchasing function and the relationship of effective purshasing toward maintaining a successful operation.  The selection and procurement functions of product and equipment within the hospitality foodservice industry are covered in detail.  Farm-to-fork concepts, locavore purchasing, and sustainability are explored.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply and demonstrate the concepts of purchasing techniques in the hospitality industry by addressing product and equipment identification, selection and procurement.
    2. Apply and demonstrate comprehension of the relationships between hospitality purchasing and effective hospitality cost controls.
    3. Apply and articulate purchasing concepts related to farm-to-fork, locavore, and sustainable purchasing techniques.


  
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    HOS 186 - Food in History and Society


    A socio-historical examination of food from the Middle Ages to the present with a focus on the United States and Europe.  Topics will include, but will not be limited to, how societies gather and prepare food; culinary tastes of different times and places; the influence of food/taste on trade, colonization, cultural exchange; and the impact of immigrations, globalization, and technology on food.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    SOS 186
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify socio-historical theories used by historical sociologists.
    2. Identify research methods used by historical sociologists.
    3. Discuss the role of food in social life based on a socio-historical perspective.


  
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    HOS 242 - Hospitality Human Resources


    This course provides a contextual background of human resources in the hospitality industry.  Effective resourcing of the hospitality industry, development of hospitality human resources, rewards and renumeration, hospitality employment relationships, and discussions of contemporary issues in human resource management in the hospitality industry are presented.  Human resource management in multi-site hospitality operations are introduced.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Articulate familiarity with unique hospitality human resource demands.
    2. Develop effective job designs, recruitment, selection, appointments, and induction techniques for the various hospitality industry resourcing demands.
    3. Effectively calculate probability and labor costs for the hospitality industry.


  
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    HST 100 - Seminar in Health Sciences


    This course provides an overview of various aspects related to selecting and preparing for a career in the health sciences.  Students will gain an understanding of strategies to become successful at SUNY Broome Community College, including development of learning and study strategies to enhance academic success, effective time management techniques, information management skills, a working knowledge of campus services and resources, and an understanding of academic and college policies.  Students will identify their career interests and the characteristics, educational, and training requirements related to their chosen career.  An introduction to professional behavior, ethical decision making, laws affecting the healthcare system, and cultural diversity and sensitivity is included.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify their learning style and strategies to be successful within their academic pursuits.
    2. Locate campus resources and state campus policies to increase academic success.
    3. Demonstrate ability to prepare and deliver a presentation which provides an in-depth exploration of a culture, precautions healthcare workers should take when working with patients from this culture, and a critical analysis of cultural competence and sensitivity.
    4. Indentify their career interest and the characteristics, education, and training requirements related to obtaining a career within this profession.
    5. Complete a resume for professional use.
    6. Demonstrate proficiency with information management.


  
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    HST 104 - Health for Haiti


    Students will use a scientific approach to explore dynamics between health care, education, and poverty, while engaging in experiential service learning in Haiti.  Classes will introduce students to scientific methods as well as the history, culture, economic, political, and spiritual aspects of Haiti.  Students will apply scientific concepts and models while engaging in diverse service projects in urban and rural communities.  Partner needs and students' preexisting skills will determine specific service projects.  The course is designed to foster fellowship, provide humanitarian assistance, enhance civic responsibility, develop scientific, critical thinking and reflection skills required for participation in our dynamic, global world.

    Credits: 4
    Cross-listed
    BIO 104
    Hours
    1 Class Hour, 6 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate critical reflection about how own attitudes and beliefs are different from those of other cultures and communities.
    2. Demonstrate increased understanding of personal social values with reflective insights about the aims and accomplishments of one's actions.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of scientific methods for observation, hypothesis development, data collection and analysis, and evaluation of evidence.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to apply scientific concepts and models by designing and engaging in hands-on activites in Haiti that will help improve overall health and quality of life in developing communities.
    5. Demonstrate civic engagement by integrating knowledge from their program of study and applying it on a practical level by producing a tangible product or program.

     

  
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    HST 109 - Personal Success Strategies


    This course is designed to help students become more successful in academic, personal, and professional realms.  Students will gain an understanding of how thought processes impact habits, attitudes, beliefs, and expectations.  Students will identify personal and professional goals, the barriers affecting their ability to reach these goals, and identify strategies to overcome these barriers.  Cognitive and behavioral strategies to help students enhance success and become self-empowered are included.  This course focuses on the development of the soft skills needed to help students reach their individual potential.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify beliefs they hold about themselves and their abilities, how they were shaped, and ways to overcome these scotomas.
    2. Explain how they can change their future by changing old habits, attitudes, and beliefs which are not effective in helping them achieve their goals.
    3. Recognize and discuss the three components of developing positive self-talk and how negative self-talk can impede achievement of set goals.
    4. Indentify future goals, barriers to achievement of these goals, and strategies for overcoming these barriers.
    5. Create affirmations and apply the affirmation process to help them achieve personal and/or professional goals.


  
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    HST 110 - Personal Care Aide


    Our Personal Care Aide training course prepares students to provide personal care services to individuals within the comfort of their home while fostering their independence.  This curriculum follows the Home Care Curriculum requirements set forth by the NYS Department of Health.  Upon successful completion of this program, students will be a New York State Certified Personal Care Aide and qualify for employment providing personal care within the homecare setting.  Student will be eligible to enroll in the Home Health Aide training course upon successful completion of this course.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to qualify as a New York State Certified Personal Care Aide.
    2. State what home care is, the type of clients who receive home care, roles of the home healthcare team, and expectations of the home health worker.
    3. Apply an understanding of basic human needs according to Maslow's theory to meet the changing needs of clients across the life span.
    4. Communicate effectively with clients, families, and members of the home healthcare team, while demonstrating ability to respect individual and cultural differences and maintain confidentiality.
    5. Explain tasks related to personal care and nutrition, housekeeping, budgeting, and medication administration assistance.
    6. Perform tasks correctly related to personal care and nutrition provision, housekeeping, budgeting, and medication administration assistance, while staying within scope of practice as a Personal Care Aide.
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to maintain safety, prevent personal and other injury, and provide basic first aid.
    8. State the process of infection and demonstrate ability to follow infection control precautions, as set forth by the CDC.


  
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    HST 111 - Home Health Aide


    Our Home Health Aide training course prepares students to assist clients with health-related tasks, such as performing simple measurements and tasks, or assisting with the preparation of special diets, prescribed exercise programs, or with the use of prescribed medical equipment.  This curriculum follows the requirements set forth by the NYS Department of Health for Home Health Aide Training Programs.  Upon succesful completion of this program, students will be a New York State Certified Home Health Aide and qualify for employment in the home health field.  In addition, this course will also include American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Providers CPR training.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HST 110 Personal Care Aide or Proof of Certification as a Personal Care Aide in the state of NY

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    1.72 Class Hours, 0.64 Laboratory Hours, 0.64 Clinical Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill requirements to obtain Home Health Aide certification in the State of New York.
    2. Demonstrate ability to integrate respect for an individual's dignity, self-worth, and sensitivity to cultural differences, while performing patient care.
    3. Follow prescribed care plans for patients as ordered and within the scope of practice for a Home Health Aide.
    4. Explain tasks related to performing simple measurements, collecting specimens, assisting with preparation of ordered diets, use of assistive devices/medical equipment/supplies, and skin/ostomy/urinary collection device care.
    5. Perform tasks correctly related to performing simple measurements, collecting specimens, assisting with preparation of ordered diets, use of assistive devices/medical equipment/supplies, and skin/ostomy/urinary collection device care.
    6. Demonstrate proper technique for 1 and 2 rescuer CPR for infants, children, and adults, including use of an AED.


  
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    HST 115 - Sanitation and Safety


    A course in the fundamentals of restaurant and hotel organization and sanitation.  In this certification course the student will learn the control points in food service, the importance of sanitation, and safety procedures.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    BHM 110
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify factors that affect growth of foodborne bacteria.   
    2. Analyze evidence to determine the presence of foodborne illness outbreaks.
    3. Identify personal behaviors that can contaminate food.
    4. Identify methods for preventing cross-contamination.
    5. Describe the flow of food through an organization.  
    6. Describe and understand the steps to a HAACP plan. 
    7. Recognize the importance of proper cleaning and sanitizing in lodging and foodservice establishments.
    8. Demonstrate their level of understanding of Basic First Aid/CPR/AED by successfully earning American Heart Association certification.
    9. Demonstrate their level of understanding of all course materials by successful completion of the ServSafe ® examination.


  
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    HST 161 - Women's Health


    The elective course introduces the student to the developmental, physical, psychological, social, socioeconomic, cultural, and political influences related to women's health care.  Students will be introduced to various healthcare resources available to meet the needs of women.  Activities throughout this course are designed to promote critical thinking and will assist students to analyze and evaluate information to create positive health care environments for women.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify the physical needs and healthcare issues of women throughout the life cycle.
    2. Identify the psychological needs of women.
    3. Identify cultural factors which influence health care of women.
    4. Evaluate healthcare resources to promote health in women.

     

  
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    HST 162 - Personal and Community Health


    This elective course introduces the student to the health issues and problems related to individuals and communities.  This course explores aspects of wellness/health promotion and factors which impede wellness/health.  Throughout the course, the student will explore various topics, including, but not limited to:  mental health, stress, nutrition, physical activity, body image, drug and alcohol use, social relationships, sexuality, reproductive choices, communicable diseases including sexually transmitted diseases, chronic diseases, aging, personal safety, and violence/injury prevention.  An exploration of current events related to community health topics assists the student to develop an understanding of issues related to wellness/health racing consumers.  This course will allow students to gain a better understanding of their physical, emotional, and social needs and to develop strategies to promote their overall health and well-being.

     

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    PED 162
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify factors to promote health/wellness for individuals and the community.
    2. Identify factors which impede health/wellness for individuals and the community.
    3. Identify steps to improve personal safety, and to prevent violence and injury.
    4. Locate and analyze current events related to community health topics.
    5. Assess their individual levels of wellness; identifying lifestyle changes they intend to make to improve their overall wellness.


  
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    HST 205 - Rural Health Externship


    HST 205 is an externship experience that will provide students with the opportunity to explore the unique rewards and challenges of providing rural healthcare through an immersion experience in a rural community setting.  Students will shadow a variety of professionals in a rural health care setting and immerse themselves in the local culture by taking part in arranged community events and experiences.  The course is designed so the students will gain a better understanding of the public health issues, recreational issues, educational resources, social influences, and other elements that impact rural healthcare.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Teacher Recommendation

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    4 hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Identify and evaluate challenges that rural communities face in access to high quality healthcare.
    2. Identify and describe the top five health issues in the target community.
    3. Compare and contrast the healthcare needs in the target rural community with urban or suburan settings.
    4. Describe the role of regulatory agencies and regulations that impact healthcare access in the rural community.
    5. List the health professionals, services, agencies, and facilities that comprise the continuum of health and related care and services available in the target community.
    6. List reliable sources of healthcare in the target community and sources for referred healthcare.
    7. List the barriers patients in rural communities may experience to obtaining healthcare, and services or options to overcome those barriers.
    8. Describe the active relationship between rural healthcare facilities and surrounding community.
    9. Develop and deliver a presentation on the concepts and information obtained from the course.


     

  
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    HST 207 - Capstone for Health Careers


    A capstone course that reviews the knowledge base, didactic theory, and skills applicable to the field of healthcare.  Preparation of professional portfolio, cover letters, resume and interview skills for professional employment in healthcare included.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  HST 100 Seminar in Health Sciences

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Utilize professionalism in communications.
    2. Create a portfolio, including a resume and cover letter suitable for healthcare employment.
    3. Discuss strategies to navigate and succeed in a new career environment.
    4. Evaluate areas of strength and weakness in preparation for professional interviews.


  
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    HST 210 - Pharmacology


    This course provides an introduction to the clinical concepts of pharmacology, relevant and useful to a variety of health science curricula.  Students will gain an understanding of the major drug classifications, uses, side effects, adverse effects, contraindications, and interactions used to treat and prevent disease, and maintain homeostasis for each of the body systems.  Basic principles of medication administration and pharmaceutical mathematics is included.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  BIO 131 Human Biology I or consent of instructor

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe methods of drug classification, controlled substance schedules, and preganany categories.
    2. Describe the FDA approval process for new medications, and the regulations related to medications, herbs, and supplements.
    3. Identify medication rights, guidelines, routes, and techniques of safe medication administration.
    4. Identify drug classifications, indications for use, side effects, contraindications, and how drugs affect the various body systems, including:  nervous; urinary; cardiovascular; immune; respiratory; gastrointestinal; endocrine; reproductive; musculoskeletal; integumentary; and the eye and ear.
    5. Demonstrate ability to apply knowledge of mathematical computations to solve equations related to medication dosages.

     

  
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    HUM 101 - Western Humanities I


    Critical analysis of western culture through a thematic investigation of literature, philosophy, music, and the arts as found in the ancient Near East, classical Greece and Rome, and Medieval Europe.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe some of the fundamental principles in understanding the humanities.
    2. Identify some of the major periods in the history of Western humanities from the Ancient world to the Renaissance.
    3. Identify some of the major stylistic conventions in the humanities.
    4. Identify some of the influences of the humanities from the Ancient world to the Renaissance on the contemporary world.


  
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    HUM 102 - Western Humanities II


    Critical analysis of Western culture through a thematic investigation of literature, philosophy, music, and the arts as found in the Renaissance, Early Modern Europe, and 19th to 20th Century Europe.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe some of the fundamental principles in understanding the humanities.
    2. Identify some of the major perods in the history of Western humanities from the Renaissance to the present day.
    3. Identify some of the major stylistic conventions in the humanities.
    4. Identify some of the influences of the humanities from Renaissance to the present day on the contemporary world.


  
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    HUM 104 - Introduction to Classical Mythology


    This course is designed to introduce the basic substance of the stories which constitute classical Greek mythololgy.  The course is also meant to provide experience in reading and understanding those stories in their original context - so far as that can be determined - in order to discern how they have continued to influence Western art and culture to express the values of that art and culture.  Key traditional interpretative methods will be examined and applied to the Greek myths.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Describe some of the major interpretations of mythology in human culture.
    2. Discuss some of the chief characteristics of Greek mythology.
    3. Identify the major categories of Greek mythology.
    4. Summarize some of the major myths and legends of ancient Greece.
    5. Discuss the influence of Greek mythology in ancient Rome and on later works of art, music, literature, and film.


  
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    INT 110 - Interior Design Studio I


    This studio course requires the student to become well acquainted with the designed physical environment.  Practical, aesthetic, and psychological aspects of the built environment are addressed.  Conceptualizing space through use of orthographic rendering to scale is stressed.  Visual presentation techniques are introduced.  The design vocabulary is applied to interior spaces.  The design projects emphasize affordable residential solutions and sustainable design.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART 105 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design, CIV 159 Architectural Drafting w/CAD, or CIV 119 Architectural Drawing w/CAD

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 4 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Apply the fundamental language of design to the process of building interior space within a specific environmental context.
    2. Identify and utilize the basic steps of creating successful design including initial research, design development, and presentation to client.
    3. Analyze and balance practical versus aesthetic elements enabling students to obtain clarity, creating an optimal interior for specialized use.
    4. Demonstrate an intuitive sense towards design solutions, meaning learning to see the end result of their efforts in their minds, before actual execution.
    5. Discuss and explain design ideas in a clear and coherent manner to peers and professionals.


  
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    INT 120 - Surface Materials for the Interior


    Appropriate use of fabrics, wood, laminates, tiles, vinyls, metals and glass is introduced.  Durability, cleanability, and flammability of materials will be studied emphasizing substainable and green design.  Aesthetic considerations will be explored.  Field trips are an integral part of this course.  Excellent for students interested in the building or hospitality industry.  This course is recommended for students pursuing a career in Interior Design.

    Credits: 2
    Hours
    1 Class Hour; 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Continue research for new design products that are appropriate for residential and commercial applications.
    2. Understand functional and aesthetic qualities of interior design products useful for a variety of applications.
    3. Develop an intuitive and analytical approach to choosing interior products that will function and visually work together.  Always consider the relationships between focal point, line, shape/form, color, texture and pattern, and quality of natural and aritficial light.


  
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    INT 210 - Interior Design Studio II


    Two complex interior projects are assigned.  At least one of the projects makes use of an existing space.  Students develop and present the projects through the process of conceptualizing space, drawing schematics and perspectives, rendering in scale, and creating material boards.  AutoCAD in combination with hand drawing will be used.  A full client presentation is made for each project using graphics, oral, and writing skills.  The assigned projects are excellent for inclusion in portfolio for transfer or job application.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ART 105 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design; CIV 105 Introductory to AutoCAD; CIV 159 Architectural Drafting I w/CAD or CIV 119 Architectural Drawing w/CAD; ART 111 History of Decorative Arts: 1600-present or ART 113 History of Modern Design; INT 120 Surface Materials for the Interior or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 4 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Develop a sense of responsibility towards the satisfaction of their client and the integrity of their own design work.
    2. Understand the importance of time management and meeting deadlines under less than optimal conditions.
    3. Strengthen their communication skills and learn to work with clients and other professionals enabling them to recognize the importance of team effort.
    4. Solve design problems transforming design theory into practical application.
    5. Develop a sensitive and critical eye strengthening their ability to suggest appropriate and inappropriate design solutions to clients therefore improving the human environment.
    6. Understand how to achieve a high level of self-sufficiency in the profession of Interior Design through self-motivation, self-discipline, organizational and research skills, negotiating skills, and decision-making skills.
    7. Produce tangible products in the form of presentation documents.


  
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    INT 215 - Special Event Interior Design


    This course addresses major trends and successful business practices in Special Event Management and Interior Design to provide the knowledge and tools to improve your effectiveness and profitability as a special event designer/manager/owner/operator.  Students will learn special event design materials and tool usage, special event centerpiece design and construction with a special focus on weddings, trade show booth displays and construction, table settings and material selection and related special even Décor props design and construction.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    EVE 215
    Hours
    3 Class Hours, 3 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Objectives of the Course:

    1. Students are to be taught the special event business and more specifically the interior designs that go along with that business that make it special.

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Create and manage a successful special events enterprise.
    2. Build special event clientele.
    3. Effectively select special event venues.
    4. Financially manage a profitable special event.
    5. Identify and prioritize special event goals and objectives.
    6. Identify potential challenges to creating a successful special event cabinet.
    7. Choose materials for, design and construct table centerpieces; special focus on weddings.
    8. Employ effective color coordination.
    9. Design and create islands of Décor.
    10. Create professional floral arrangements for special events.
    11. Employ and devise creative special event concepts.
    12. Research special event interior design ideas and experiences.


  
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    INT 220 - Principles of Floral Design


    This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the hands-on skills and theory required for career success in event function and commercial/residential floral design.  Students will understand the elements, principles, forms, styles and techniques of floral design.  Students will learn to identify flowers and interior foliage plants, create specialty floral items and develop knowledge of sound business management practices and careers in the floral industry.  Students will learn floral marketing, pricing and sales.

    Credits: 3
    Cross-listed
    EVE 220
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Gain familiarity with basic floral supplies and equipment.
    2. Practice the proper care and handling of fresh flowers.
    3. Understand and utilize the basic elements and principles of design.
    4. Create professional centerpiece arrangements with permanent flowers.
    5. Be exposed to and create asymmetrical arrangements.
    6. Have a working knowledge of the major foliage available to floral designers.
    7. Obtain the skill-set to work with and without floral foam.
    8. Develop expertise in the creation of a comosite flower - Glamellia.
    9. Obtain proficiency at creating a round bridal bouquet; a cascade bridal bouquet; corsages and boutonnieres.
    10. Develop a familiarity with comtemporary design techniques.
    11. Obtain the ability to select and recommend appropritate flowers for an arrangement.
    12. Experience and perform floral creations that maximize visual value.
    13. Develop pricing, marketing and selling plans for the sale of floral arrangements.


  
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    INT 299 - Independent Study: Interior Design


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of art.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Credits: (1-4)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning Outcomes are specified on an individual basis.

  
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    ITA 101 - Beginning Italian I


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate basic proficiency in the understanding and use of Italian in formal and informal situations, through speaking, listening and writing.
    2. Understand basic grammatical construction principles of the Italian language.
    3. Respond orally to questions in the target language at the beginner level.
    4. Acquire appropriate reading strategies (such as phonics, structural analysis, context clues) to read and comprehend selected materials.
    5. Write familiar material in Italian including sentences, phrases and basic paragraphs with ease.
    6. Demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the culture(s) associated with the Italian language.


  
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    ITA 102 - Beginning Italian II


    Basic principles of grammar and syntax.  Emphasis on oral practice in classroom.  Reading and discussion of graded literary and cultural texts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ITA 101 Beginning Italian I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Develop an understanding of high-beginning Italian grammar that cover forms, meanings and functions, and use them appropriately in oral and written communication.
    2. Develop high-beginning oral skills in pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking, and oral presentations.
    3. Develop their active vocabulary of high-frequency words, collocations, and idiomatic expressions that are commonly used in the Italian-speaking world.
    4. Develop reading comprehension skills at the high-beginning through a variety of authentic genres, including academic discourse, newspaper and magazine articles, fiction, poetry, and essays.
    5. Develop high-beginning writing skills through various writing assignments such as comprehension questions, paragraphs, essays, journals, and letters.
    6. Develop an understanding of Italian-speaking cultures and societies as well as that of their own.


  
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    LAW 110 - Survey of Paralegalism


    Role of the paralegal and attorney.  Introduction to jurisprudence and functions of administrative agencies. Local, state, federal courts.  Introduction to contracts, torts, negligence, criminal procedure, real property law, law office management.  Legal terminology.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Recognize the jurisdictional structure of the New York State court system.
    2. Recognize the jurisdictional structure of the local court system.
    3. Recognize the original and appellate distinctions of the judicial system.
    4. Prepare legal documents pursuant to NYS statutory law.
    5. Apply the rules learned to the preparation of legal documents.


  
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    LAW 200 - Real Property Law


    Comprehensive survey of law of real property, emphasizing, practical application to a paralegal function.  Analysis of form of deeds, bonds, notes,mortgages, assignments, discharges, purchase of contracts, leases and options.  Training in searching title, basic understanding of abstracts of title, real property litigation, estates, condemnation and foreclosure.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Define the legal terminology regarding the ownership, acquisition and conveyance of Real Estate.
    2. Articulate an understanding regarding the distinction between Personal and Real Property.
    3. Understand the Law of Fixtures by identifying various legal texts used in fixture law.
    4. Understand the process of transferring title to Real Estate; including the use of deeds, mortgages, promissory notes, real estate contracts, and closing statements and prepare such statements.
    5. Close the Real Estate transaction.
    6. Articulate the difference between a buyer representation and a seller representation.
    7. Understand the role of the County Clerk Records in the Real Estate Transaction by recording various documents.


  
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    LAW 207 W - Legal Writing and Research


    Development of legal research and drafting skills through use of digests, reporter systems, and other features of law libraries.  Analysis of various types of legal documents for clarity, composition, conciseness.  Practice in research and drafting of legal documents.  Writing Emphasis Course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism and ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of legal research by preparing an assignment using the Westlaw database and preparing a legal brief.
    2. Demonstrate an ability to identify and argue legal issues by responding to a classroom legal fact pattern in written and oral format.
    3. Illustrate an understanding in drafting legal documents by preparing legal briefs, courtroom briefs and legal position papers.


  
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    LAW 215 - Estates, Probates and Trusts


    Disposition of descendent's property, law of interstate succession, execution and probate of wills, nature and creation of trusts and the administration of estates and trusts, estate and gift tax preparation.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Articulate the mechanics of the disposition of testate property by analyzing a will and having a client meeting which discusses the disposition.
    2. Illustrate the substantive rules of will preparation by preparing a will.
    3. Illustrate an understanding of intestate distribution by distributing the proceeds and preparing a written document which outlines the correct distribution.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the probate process by filing a probate petition.
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the creation and administration of a trust by creating a trust.
    6. Illustrate an understanding of the tax laws, both Federal and New York, which affect the estate by preparing an estate for file.


  
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    LAW 220 - Contracts


    The law of contracts, their historical significance, formation, validity interpretation, transfer or contractual rights.  Assignment, third party beneficiaries, discharge, breach and remedies.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of contract information.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of contractual rights.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of contract Breach and legal remedies available.

     

  
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    LAW 222 - Medical Law


    General coverage of how legal and medical issues are inter-related, including right to treatment, organ transplant, right to die, abortion issues, medical malpractice, informed consent, insanity defense, surrogate mothers.  Lecture and discussion. How these topics affect the role of the attorney and paralegal in servicing client needs.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of Medical Law statutory periods.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of Discovery statues.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the issues surrounding the insanity defense.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the commencement and discovery procedure regarding a Medical Law litigation suite. 


  
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    LAW 225 - Family Law


    Pleadings relative to general practice of law in relationships to the family unit.  Laws relating to marriage, divorce, annulment, custody and support, adoption, name change, guardianship, paternity.  Written pleadings and necessary research pertaining to these aspects of family law.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Articulate an understanding of the rules governing the doctrine of equitable distribution by explaining the rules to a client in need of legal advise.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of current case law in the Family Law substantive area of the law by reading and preparing legal briefs of particular case law.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the Divorce process by filing a petition in divorce and creating a separation agreement.


  
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    LAW 226 - Taxation Law for Paralegals


    Principles of federal taxation, analysis of IRS code and related case law, emphasis on law and concepts of taxation, basic and advanced tax law terminology, litigation involving the IRS.  Exploration of social changes, and factors involving tax problems, current issues in tax reform, perspective of the paralegal regarding resolution of tax disputes.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of IRS related terminology surrounding taxation and tax filing requirements.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of commencements of and the resolution of the tax law litigation.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of IRS Tax Code.


  
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    LAW 227 - Constitutional Law


    The practice of everyday general law as affected by the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Issues of contemporary concern including cases of local courts and of the Supreme Court and their implications for law in general and society at large.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Illustrate an understanding of the role and jurisdictional position of the U.S. Supreme Court by preparing a jurisdictional chart.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of appellate and original jurisdiction by commencing a law suit in the jurisdictionally correct court.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the procedural history of a case by briefing the original and all appellate court decisions in the correct order.
    4. Articulate current laws based upon the established precedent.
    5. Use rules established by case law to demonstrate an understanding of the U.S. Constitution.


  
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    LAW 240 - Corporate Law


    Types, uses and organization of the corporation, antitrust and securities law, mergers and consolidation, liquidation and dissolution.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the differences of the legal liabilities of the Corporation, Partnership, and Sole Proprietorship by preparing a chart which compares and contrasts those differences.
    2. Illustrate the Corporate formation process by preparing a Corporation application for filing in New York State.
    3. Use and demonstrate an understanding of the rules established by the Business Corporation laws of New York while meeting with a client.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the jurisdictional rules relevant to a Corporate entity by correctly filing a Corporate legal cause of action.


  
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    LAW 250 - Municipal Law


    Structure and operations of local government in New York State.  Evolution of local government in New York during the first two centuries of its existence.  Laws, ordinances, and operations.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the existence of local municipal law ordinances, rules and regulations.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of New York State government.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal responsibility attaching to the various sections of New York State Government.


  
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    LAW 251 - Federal Civil Procedure


    Federal court system, rules of civil procedure includeing pleading, motions, depositions, litigation procedures and the role of the paralegal.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the rules of Civil Federal Procedure.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the function and structure of various pleadings used in the Federal Court system.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the preparation of 3 Federal Court documents.


  
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    LAW 252 - Applied Real Estate


    Role of the paralegal in Real Estate transactions including agreements, abstracts, preparation of documents, contracts, and closing procedures.  Students conduct a "mock" real estate transaction.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the commencement of the Real Estate transaction.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the paralegal role in the of the compilation of the Real Estate Closing legal file.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the paralegal role in the closing process of both a residential and a Commercial Real Estate closing.


  
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    LAW 253 - Computers in the Law office


    Computer applications including hardware and software, financial management, word processing, real estate practice packages, computerized research, litigation support, and document management.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    3 Class Hours - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the current software as used to assist the law office in the litigation process.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the current software regarding the administration of the Law Office.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the computer in the research and resolution of legal files.


  
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    LAW 260 - Labor-Management Relations (Labor Law)


    Labor-management relations in the public and private sectors.  Taft-Hartley Act, National Labor Relations Act and Wagner Act, unfair labor practices, labor contracts, arbitration and mediation, availability of injunctions in labor disputes.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the public and private sector labor management goals and responsibilities.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the negotiation process regarding contract formation between labor and management.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the various labor management related legislation which affects the relationship.


  
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    LAW 270 - Vehicle and Traffic Law


    Regulations of traffic within the state of New York. Emphasis on violations and traffic-related misdemeanors resulting from violation of the rules of the road and court proceedings resulting there from.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of various New York vehicle and traffic statues.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the Courts role in handling various violations of the Vehicle and Traffic Law.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the Paralegal in the creation of and the handling of the Vehicle and Traffic file.


  
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    LAW 280 - Litigation and Trial Preparation


    Intake procedure, systems and analysis, concepts of jurisdiction and venue, parties to an action, pleadings, pre-trial procedures, motions and special practice, special proceedings, trials, judgments and appeals.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of case file selection by preparing and getting a passing grade in a classroom simulation project which requires a selection of case files based upon law firm requirements.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of legal confidentiality by reading and preparing position papers on confidentiality case studies.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the pleadings known as complaint and answer by preparing a complaint and answer in acceptable legal format.
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of the stages of a litigation proceeding by drafting, in proper format, various documents used to commence and proceed in a trial setting.


  
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    LAW 290 - Landlord-Tenant relations


    Problems faced by landlords and tenants, private housing, live-in arrangements, covenants, leases, warranties.  Tenant and landlord rights and obligations.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    1 Class Hour - 5 Week Session
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of the selected research project and how the project enhances the Student's understanding the area of law researched.


  
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    LAW 295 - Paralegal Practicum


    Designed for students without previous exposure to the legal field to observe and study operations, policies, and procedures performed by paralegals in various settings, (private firms, public agencies, commercial corporations, etc.).  Students will be placed in the legal environment with emphasis on attorney and paralegal interactions and paralegal relations with areas outside the office (clients, municipal agencies, other firms, commercial institutions, other legal agencies, etc.).  Final report integrating the practical and theoretical aspects of their experiences.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  30 credits from program, at least 12 LAW credits or chairperson approval

    Credits: 4
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the selected internship/practicum location by engaging in the workplace for a time frame of 100-125 hours during which time all rules, company policies, and company quality levels will be met or exceeded.  These levels will be ascertained by the instructor prior to the beginning of the internship/practicum and will continue throughout the internship/practicum.
    2. Illustrate an understanding of time sensitive work product by being assigned a time sensitive project and responding within the time frame with legally acceptable work produce.


  
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    LAW 299 - Independent Study: Paralegal


    An individual student project in paralegal studies which is beyond the scope or requirements of the courses offered by the program.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member or attorney, and approved by the program coordinator.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  LAW 110 Survey of Paralegalism, plus at least 3 credits LAW 200 level or higher

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes for this Course:

    • The learning outcomes for this course will vary, depending on the material being covered
    • In each case the student will be able to demonstrate successful completion of the learning activities specified in the Independent Study Contract.


  
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    LIT 200 - Introduction to Literature


    An overview of the major literary genres and approaches to interpretation.  Students will practice the process of literary analysis in oral and written forms.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of literary work.


  
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    LIT 201 - Crime and Punishment


    This course focuses upon works of literature which incorporate the theme of punishment and justice.  An additional theme of resistance to punishment will also be represented in course readings and lecture-discussions.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Have improved their ability at oral discourse by discussing and explaining their interpretive responses.
    2. Have improved their ability to write analytically and argumentatively by composing applications of critical methods to literary works.
    3. Identify literary devices and define them.
    4. Use specific details to support a claim about a text.
    5. Express their interpretation of a work in clear expository prose.
    6. Utilize various literary analysis approaches toward literature.
    7. Express multiple viewpoints about the life questions dealt with in literature (even if they disagree with those viewpoints.
    8. Relate one literary work to another, and also to the culture from which it emerged.
    9. Learn and demonstrate competence in basic principles and techniques of literary research, using print as well as electronic sources.


  
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    LIT 210 - Studies in United States Literature I


    A study of United States literature from Pre-Colonial times through the 19th century, exploring recurrent themes and motifs in the works of both newly discovered and long-recognized authors.  Emphasis on engaging student curiosity, eliciting student response, and fostering student development of critical analysis and interpretation through close reading of texts, class discussion, and formal and informal writing assignments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 211 - Studies in United States Literature II


    A study of United States literature from the late 19th century to the present, exploring recurrent themes and motifs in the works of both newly discovered and long-recognized authors.  Emphasis on engaging student curiosity, eliciting student response, and fostering student development of critical analysis and interpretation through close reading of texts, class discussion, and formal and informal writing assignments.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 212 - Literature of the American South


    The literature of the American South has a distinct and rich tradition.  The focus of the course will be on the South as a diverse cultural place where race, religion, class, family, gender, sexuality, and language have shaped how writers see and construct the world.  We will examine the attitudes, assumptions, and values that have traditionally informed Southern literature and will also look at texts that challenge those ideas.  We will read texts written from the nineteenth century to the present including those of writers such as Kate Chopin, Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Tennessee Williams, Ralph Ellison, Carson McCullers, Walker Percy, Alice Walker, Lee Smith, Cormac McCarthy, and others.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 214 - Studies in British Literature I


    History and development of British literature from the Middle Ages to the 18th century.  Selections of literary merit from prose, drama, poetry.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 215 - Studies in British Literature II


    History and development of British literature from the beginning of the 18th century to the middle of the 20th.  Selections of literary merit from prose, poetry, drama.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 220 - The Short Story


    Close reading and analysis of stories produced in different times and places.  Attention to the relationships among author, text, reader, and context in the making of meaning.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 225 - United States Latino Literature


    A literary overview of contemporary United States Latino/Latina literature.  The course will focus on short stories, essays, poems, and films produced by this influential, fastest-growing cultural group.  Works will explore themes of gender, sexuality, class, race, and color within the context of the cross-cultural American experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 230 - American Drama


    A survey of American drama.  Examination of dramatic theories and techniques, and consideration of historic and thematic problems in American drama.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 233 - World Drama


    A survey of world drama produced in both Western and non-Western cultures.  Examination of dramatic theories and techniques, and consideration of dramatic themes common to diverse cultures.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 235 - Shakespeare


    Shakespeare as both dramatist and poet.  Emphasis on selected comedies, histories and tragedies.  Consideration of the playwright's life and times.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 240 - The Poetic Experience: Sight and Sound


    This course exposes students to poetry from different countries and cultures, to important aspects of poetic language, and to diverse poetic forms.  Students will read, discuss, and write about poetry, and strive to understand what poetry portrays of human experience.  Students will also write poems about their own experience.  In doing so, students will learn how poems are built or structured.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 250 - Women and Literature: Other Perspectives


    Critical analysis and evaluation of literary works by and about women produced in diverse socio-political contexts.  Emphasis upon the relationship between the text and its cultural setting and upon other, non-traditional critical perspectives, including feminist perspectives.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 253 - Psychological Investigation in Literature


    The application of Jungian, Freudian, and other psychological theories and insights to selected short stories, novels, and poems to promote more penetrating appreciation of characters' motivations and actions and the literary work in general.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 260 - Detective Fiction


    A critical study of one of the most popular literary forms of our time, designed for armchair detectives.  Starting with Poe, Conan Doyle (Sherlock Holmes), and other classics in the field, the course traces the development of the detective story from its puzzle-solving beginnings to the modern psychological novel of crime and detection.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 263 - Children's Literature


    Close reading and analysis of a diverse selection of literature written for children including short fiction, novel, and poetry.  Emphasis on the use of critical theories in investigating diverse interpretations of the texts and in exploring revelatory connections between the literature and contemporary human experience.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 264 - World Folktales: The Art of Storytelling


    Reading, analyzing, discussing, adapting, and retelling selected multicultural folktales transcribed from the oral tradition.  Emphasis on the importance of motifs, narrative structure, recurring global themes, cultural and ethnic specificity, as well as the morphology of the tales.  Identification of cross-cultural story techniques will build the story repertoire; diverse oral performance techniques will enhance motif and character analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 267 - An Introduction to Science Fiction


    This course will survey science fiction works from various genres such as poetry, the novel, and the short story.  It will provide students with a historical overview of the field of science fiction by exposing them, through readings and lectures, to works from the 19th and 20th centuries.  Titles chosen will reflect their importance in the literary development of science fiction over the last two centuries.  The essence of the course will consist of close readings and analyses of the texts for their artistic qualities as well as their representations of social trends and ideas.  Students will learn how to do research on the Internet, as it is one of the foremost domains of current cyber fiction.  One section of the course will deal with the history of science fiction in the cinema.  Students will come away from the course with an understanding of hard science fiction, utopias and dystopias, cyber fiction, the pulps, fantasy fiction, the Golden Age, and speculative fiction.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 270 - Twentieth-Century Working-Class Literature of North America


    An examination of literature in which 20th century North American working-class writers explore working-class life.  Emphasis upon the investigation of broad themes, such as the role of work in the shaping of values and identity and the impact of work upon human relationships.  Multi-ethnic and multi-racial perspectives; issues of gender and sexuality. Attention given to the sociocontexts in which works were produced.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 272 - Literature of the North American Wild


    This course aims to involve the student in the thinking of seminal writers who struggled to define human beings' relationship to the natural world.  The approach is both literary and historical.  It is historical in that it begins with the overwhelming effect that the fecundity of the new world had on writers and ends with the effect that profound environmental problems are having on thinkers who use the techniques and form of expression usually identified with writers of creative and imaginary literature.  Students will read essays, fiction, and poetry.  Some videos and media presentations will be viewed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 274 - Introduction to African American Literature


    This survey course will introduce students to African American literature from Colonial America to the present.  Various genres, representative works, and major writers will be examined in terms of development, theme, structure, and context.  This will be a study of African American literature as both artistic and cultural expression.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 275 - London and Literature (WE)


    The influence of Great Britain on American culture is deep and wide.  In this course we will explore major English works and the city and culture that is depicted in them.  Using literature and supporting historical and sociological documents, we will unravel the mystery of British literature and engage in a journey of exploration.  Course will be followed by a short study tour in London, England.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  ENG 110 College Writing I or its equivalent as a prerequisite

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


  
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    LIT 276 - Native American Literature


    A survey of the literature of selected Native American tribes in distinct geographical areas of what is now known as the United States (focusing on the Northeast, Southeast, Plains, and Southwest).  Critica reading of traditional and contemporary works, with emphasis upon translated myths, legends, and songs handed down through the oral tradition.  An examination of how Native American oral tradition, myth, and genre challenge "Western" notions of "literature."  Investigation of the texts as both artistic and cultural expression.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1. Show that they can share with peers and write about their ideas regarding the meanings of a literary work.


 

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