Jul 22, 2018  
Website Catalog 
    
Website Catalog

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    THR 111 - Introduction to Acting


    Fundamental principles of acting technique are introduced.  Exercises for body and voice are practiced as well as the skills of concentration, improvisation, imagination, sense memory, objectives, action, obstacles and circumstances.  Excellent for students in disciplines other than theater who wish to explore how acting techniques can enhance their life and work.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Use their voice and body (actor's tools) for effective performance skills.
    2.  Practice Stanislavsky's elements i.e. concentration, observation, imagination, etc.
    3.  Demonstrate the elements of a dramatic scene.
    4.  Explore the language and stories of Shakespeare.
    5.  Define the history of the acting profession and the "business" of acting.
    6.  Define the different skills needed for film vs. stage acting.

  
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    THR 112 - Acting II


    This is an intermediate course for those who wish to continue the study of the acting process in greater depth.  "Method" and classical approaches are employed for an actor's approach to a role; text and character analysis of various dramatic genres.  For a basic foundation, students work with the works of major playwrights including Shakespeare.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting or consent of Instructor by audition

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Be proficient in the skills of relaxation/concentration/observation/improvisation/imagination.
    2.  Practice voice and movement exercises to help develop their physical "instrument."
    3.  Analyze and write about the elements of dramatic material such as character, objectives, physical and emotional circumstances and actions.
    4.  Identify and write about acting theory as it developed over time including the methods, directors, actors and teachers involved.
    5.  Perform, recite and interpret the heightened language of Shakespeare.
    6.  Create a life for a character from dramatic literature.
    7.  Discuss and write about the development and history of the acting profession.
    8.  Employ a basic knowledge of the "business" of acting.

  
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    THR 114 - Oral Interpretation


    Oral presentation of prose, poetry, drama and comedy performed individually and in groups.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Acquire the performance skills necessary to share a believable, honest and clear interpretation of a literary work with an audience.
    2.  Analyze and understand the meaning of selected works of literature.
    3.  Apply their own life experience to performance of texts.
    4.  Evaluate and critique the oral interpretative skills of others.
    5.  Use constructive collaborative skills as a result of the team spirit needed to work with a group or partner on an interpretative project.

  
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    THR 117 - Creative Dramatics


    Fundamentals of creative dramatics, its use in teaching, recreation and rehabilitation.  Introduction to techniques used and practical application opportunities.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice the elements of drama such as voice/body utilization, imagination, improvisation, etc.
    2.  Utilize interpersonal skills and confidence in their own instincts by applying dramatic techniques.
    3.  Demonstate dramatic techniques as a teaching/learning tool.
    4.  Practice dramatic techniques of improvisation and role playing for the purpose of problem-solving.
    5.  Evaluate the effectiveness of dramatic exercises.
    6.  Conceptualize theatrical productions as a whole.
    7.  Demonstrate knowledge of instructional strategies through practice and creating a lesson plan.

  
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    THR 130 - Theories Behind South Asian Dance


    This course focuses on the emergence and major influence of dance styles from different countries in South Asia such as, India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.  In response to the assigned readings students will learn how to do their own research emphasizing critical thinking and writing.  This course will help students to understand how Western cultures have influenced South Asian cultural arts in a diasporic world while their online research and watching movies will expand their knowledge in understanding how these two different world regions have affected each other's identities while establishing an intercultural relationship.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Evaluate the fundamentals of traditional South Asian dance with a comparative approach that enables students to develop an understanding of cultural differences between dance styles in South Asia and the West.
    2.  Recognize various ways of presenting and performing South Asian dancing genres, including not only traditional formats, but also in modern settings, such as concerts, television, and film.
    3.  Discuss dance-related history of clothing and interior design; dancing-related vocabulary such as drum beats, costumes, artists, and art movements through assigned readings and watching movies, and online excerpt.
    4.  Appreciate the influences and interactions between South Asia and the West.

  
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    THR 140 - Announcing for Radio/TV


    Presentation as on-air personality.  Development of visual and vocal techniques relating to presentation of news, interviews, commercials and on-air announcements.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Formulate techniques of effective on-camera presentation, including posture, dress and presence.
    2.  Demonstrate knowledge of phonetic spellings and pronunciations.
    3.  Utilize voice skills for on-camera/microphone work and differentiate between the two.
    4.  Demonstrate various announcing styles.
    5.  Define and utilize equipment commonly used by announcers.
    6.  Acquire necessary skills to read and perform from scripts prepared by other writers.
    7.  Explain FCC rules that effect announcers.

  
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    THR 151 - Stagecraft I


    Classroom and workshop study relative to technical elements of theater production.  All aspects are introduced and can be practiced including costume design and construction, stage lighting design and mechanics, sound design, props and stage management.  Lecture, discussion and studio work on theater department productions.

    Credits: (1-4)
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 1-4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Assist in designing a model and set for a full-fledged theater production.
    2.  Practice with hand tools commonly found in theater scene shops.
    3.  Aid in constructing scenery from working drawings.
    4.  Choose the appropriate materials and hardware for scenic construction.
    5.  Identify the basic types of theater spaces and their differences in staging.
    6.  Express a basic knowledge of theatrical technology.
    7.  Define the roles and responsibilities of individuals involved in theatrical production.
    8.  Be somewhat proficient in one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.

  
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    THR 152 - Stagecraft II


    Classroom and workshop study relative to technical elements of theater production.  Particular emphasis is on stage management, house management, props and operation of stage crews.  Lecture, discussion and studio work on theater department productions.

    Credits: (1-4)
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 1-4 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Assist in designing a model and set for a full-fledged theater production.
    2.  Practice with hand tools commonly found in theater scene shops.
    3.  Aid in constructing scenery from working drawings.
    4.  Study the skills needed to properly fulfill the position of stage manager, house manager, prop master, costume master, etc.
    5.  Identify the basic types of theater spaces and their differences in staging.
    6.  Express a basic knowledge of theatrical technology.
    7.  Define the roles and responsibilities of individuals involved in theatrical production.
    8.  Be somewhat proficient in one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.

  
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    THR 161 - Playwriting


    Students will practice writing for the stage in a format of lecture/seminar and workshop.  Playwriting involves elements of dramatic action, character, plot, structure, story, style, conflict and staging suitability.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  ENG 110 College Writing I

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Write "conflict," "dramatic action," and "critique" plays in short, summary annotations.
    2.  Critically analyze and interpret theatre as dramatic "action."
    3.  Analyze plays in terms of dramatic components of P.A.S.T.O: Preparation, Attack, Struggle, Turning Point, Outcome.
    4.  Analyze plays from a playwright's point-of-view about story and dramatic action.
    5.  Recognize differences of "style"--lyricism, realism, naturalism, expressionism; epci.
    6.  Properly format a one-act play script and possibly write and revise a one-act play, 15-20 pages.
    7.  Use critical writing skills which comply with and meet standards of writing emphasis.

  
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    THR 165 - Dance for Actors I


    Basic dance techniques, dance characterization, and movement relative to performance in musical theater.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice movement techniques that develop musicality and rhythmic skills.
    2.  Perform choreography that contains simple rhythmic changes.
    3.  Develop greater strength, stretch, and range of mobility.
    4.  Approach all training, practice and performance from an anatomically correct standpoint.
    5.  Expand his/her expressive range of movement and performance.
    6.  Define dance (jazz, ballet, etc.) and its vernacular roots through performing historical and present day styles.

  
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    THR 175 - Dance for Actors II


    Intensive dance techniques, dance characterization, and movement relative to performance in musical theater.

    Credits: 1
    Hours
    8 Class Hours, 22 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice skills in movement including strength, flexibility, balance, control, musicality, and confidence in dancing in front of an audience.
    2.  Develop musicality and rhythmic skills through performing choreography that contains complex rhythmic changes.
    3.  Explain the history of dance (jazz, ballet, etc.) and its vernacular roots.
    4.  Practice spatial awareness through performing choreography that incorporates directional changes, diverse floor patterns and movements that demand expansion and retraction of the body.
    5.  Define new ways of approaching movement and will be encouraged to utilize these paths to enhance their movement experience.

  
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    THR 201 - Children's Theater


    Analysis of children-oriented plays, development of scripts, rehearsal and performace techniques.  Performance either in campus theater or at area elementary schools for classtime and assembly programs and visiting with children pre/post performance.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Practice acting techniques particular to performing for children.
    2.  Strengthen their voice and body skills as performers.
    3.  Articulate the characters, period, author and other aspects of selected dramatic material.
    4.  Adapt dramatic material to the needs and skill levels of different age groups.
    5.  Evaluate children's theater plays in order to analyze the dramatic text in action.

  
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    THR 216 - Special Topics in Theater


    Course will allow an in-depth examination of a critical topic, skill, or creative process as it applies to the study of theater. 

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of theater Coordinator/Chair

    Credits: (1-3)
    Hours
    1-3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    The Learning Outcomes will differ depending on the topic, skill or creative process that is taught.

  
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    THR 217 - Special Topics


    Course will allow an in-depth examination of a critical topic, skill, or creative process as it applies to the study of theater.

    Possible areas of study would be:

    • auditioning
    • business of acting
    • musical theater performance
    • performance studies
    • theater administration
    • stage management fundamentals
    • directing for film
    • movement for the actor
    • voice for the actor
    • study of individual playwrights
    • dramatic text studies
    • women in theater studies


    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of Theater Coordinator

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    Though the intended learning outcomes would be different for each special topic, they will include those pertainint to BCC's own campus-wide General Education requirements:  Effective Communication, Critical Thinking Ethical Reasoning, Civic Competence, Gobal and Multicultural Perspective, Mathematical Numeracy and Scientific Literacy, Good Health and Fitness Maintenance.

  
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    THR 218 - Acting III


    The purpose is to serve interested students who wish to continue the study of acting in greater depth.  More advanced acting methods and styles are explored and practiced.  Scene presentations are required along with accompanying written analysis.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting, THR 112 Acting II, or permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Create an original, crafted performance of a character in a dramatic scene and monologue.
    2.  Incorporate studies in Method theory and process as it relates to acting.
    3.  Articulate a thorough knowledge of the history of the acting profession, its great acting teachers, plays and playwrights.
    4.  Prepare an analysis of a play, scene and character.
    5.  Interpret and perform the heightened language of Shakespeare.
    6.  Practice and incorporate skills in physical actions, relaxation, concentration, observation, improvisation, as well as exercises of Uta Hagen, Lee Strasberg, Jerzy Grotowski, Tadashi Suzuki, etc.

  
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    THR 219 - Periods and Styles of Acting


    The study and practice of period and contemporary styles of acting.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Identify the historical periods and styles of acting.
    2.  Define and write about the playwrights, performers and directors from selected periods and their role in theater history.
    3.  Practice the progression of rehearsal and performance techniques for each period/style of acting.
    4.  Interpret, perform and practice the techniques and styles for a given period for an audience.
    5.  Speak and write on the aspects of any given period/style of acting.

  
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    THR 221 - History of the Theater


    History of theatrical production with selected periods of theater activity as a mirror of social and cultural experience from ancient times to the present.

     

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Note
    Good for students from all disciplines.

    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Explain and write about aspects of historical periods of theater from the Greek and Roman to the contemporary.
    2.  Speak and write about individual playwrights and their reflection of a given period of history.
    3.  Articulate theater epochs in terms of the styles, movements and plays specific to each period.
    4.  Explain their knowledge of recorded history in general with its political, sociological and artistic movements.
    5.  Use critical writing skills which comply with and meet standards of writing emphasis.

  
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    THR 231 - Stage Direction


    Director's art is examined in relation to the physical space, the actors and the texts.  Casting, pictorial emphasis, harmony, rhythm and rehearsal and production procedures are covered.  Students will direct a scene, fifteen minute play or one-act play.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisites:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting, THR 112 Acting II or consent of Coordinator

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Select plays and participate in the analyzing of scripts to be produced.
    2.  Demonstrate the importance of organization as well as the development of calendars, set designs, ground plans, costume plots, prop lists, performance cues, and a director's script.
    3.  Direct scenes for various theatrical genres including drama, comedy, Shakespeare, Children's Theater, Musicals, etc.
    4.  Discuss and write about the great theater directors and their methods.
    5.  Demonstrate an awareness of the techniques of movement, blocking, rhythm, tempo, pacing, stage pictures, pantomimic dramatization and focus.
    6.  Identify the basic types of theater spaces and their differences in staging.
    7.  Practice one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.
    8.  View and critique the direction of live stage and film productions.

  
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    THR 246 - Rehearsal and Performance for Stage


    Casting, rehearsing and acting in made-for-stage drama and comedy scripts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting, THR 112 Acting II, or permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Solve problems that naturally arise from a collaborative art such as theater in helping set priorities, tasks, deadlines, rehearsal discipline and process, etc.
    2.  Define the progression of rehearsal and performance techniques from play selection and first read-through all the way to set strike and post mortem.
    3.  Follow the necessary steps of the working "process" that brings a script alive on the stage.
    4.  Carry out specific skills relevant to the function fulfilled in the production such as:  acting, assistant directing or stage managing, costume management, play/period research, house management, set design, construction, lighting, sound, set decorating and props creation.
    5.  Speak and write on the process of rehearsal and performance for a full-fledged semi-professional theatrical production.
    6.  Practice one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.

  
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    THR 255 - Improvisational Acting/ Psychodrama


    Spontaneously developed acting sequences to mirror real-life situations.  Techniques of character, interaction with audiences.  Possible performances at local agencies, schools and pertinent organizations.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Utilize improvisational acting exercises for performance.
    2.  Articulate acting history, theory and vocabulary.
    3.  Demonstrate vocal and movement capabilities in order to perform improvisation.
    4.  Define the introductory exercises of improvisation.
    5.  Interpret the exercises in order to perform effective improvisation.
    6.  Take part in an improvisational ensemble.
    7.  Identify and practice beginning acting exercises as the foundation of improv technique, including warming up.

  
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    THR 256 - Rehearsal and Performance for Stage


    Casting, rehearsing and acting in made-for-stage drama and comedy scripts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  THR 111 Introduction to Acting, THR 112 Acting II, or permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Solve problems that naturally arise from a collaborative art such as theater in helping set priorities, tasks, deadlines, rehearsal discipline and process, etc.
    2.  Define the progression of rehearsal and performance techniques from play selection and first read-through all the way to set strike and post mortem.
    3.  Follow the necessary steps of the working "process" that brings a script alive on the stage.
    4.  Carry out specific skills relevant to the function fulfilled in the production such as:  acting, assistant directing or stage managing, costume management, play/period research, house management, set design, construction, lighting, sound, set decorating and props creation.
    5.  Speak and write on the process of rehearsal and performance for a full-fledged semi-professional theatrical production.
    6.  Practice one or more of the technical aspects of a theater production in costumes, props, scene design, lighting or sound.

  
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    THR 266 - Acting for TV, Film, and Commercials


    Proficiency in performing before the camera.  Character analysis, quick study, re-takes, voice-overs, studio projection, facial nuances, and subtlety of mannerism.

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Demonstrate skills and exercises involved in the art and craft of acting for the camera such as listening, concentration, relaxation, energy, spontaneity, character development.
    2.  Dissect and analyze a script with circumstances, character, events and objectives.
    3.  Interpret a script by using sub-text, scoring, intention, etc.
    4.  Analyze and critique the work of those working in the industry.
    5.  Speak and write intelligently on the theories and terminology used in the business of acting for the camera.

  
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    THR 276 - Rehearsal and Performance for Television


    Casting, rehearsing, and acting in made-for-television and film, dramatic and comedy scripts.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 3
    Hours
    3 Class Hours; 2 Class Hours, 2 Studio Hours
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this coure the student will be able to:

    1.  Perform single-camera acting techniques for acting in film and TV.
    2.  Perform actors' skills for a master shot and close-up shot.
    3.  Utilize on-camera blocking, business, subtext, and reactions.
    4.  Define and practice the differences between stage and film acting.
    5.  Audition for on-camera acting scenes.
    6.  Analyze and critique the work of those working in the industry.

  
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    THR 299 - Independent Study: Theater


    An individual student project concerned with advanced work in a specific area of theater.  Conducted under the direction of a faculty member, independent study is concerned with material beyond the scope and depth of the ordinary course.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  3 Semester hours of college level work in theater

    Credits: (1-3)
    Course Profile
    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Learning outcomes are specified on an individual basis.

  
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    TLC 110 - Telecommunications I


    This course is designed to train students in the organization, architecture, setup, maintenance, hardware, and software aspects of local area networks.  Topics include:  introduction to networks; types and characteristics of different network architectures and network topologies; intra and inter-network devices; network operating systems; peer-to-peer and client/server environments; LAN setup and maintenance, network printing; internal web server.  A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout.

     

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  EET 122 Electrical Circuits

    Corequisite:  EET 151 Electronic Systems I

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Describe Local Area Network (LAN) organization and operation.
    2.  Describe the purpose and function of various LAN protocols.
    3.  Describe the purpose and function of LAN interconnection technologies.
    4.  Use LANs for data communications.
    5.  Use network analysis software to view, verify, and troubleshoot network traffic conditions.
    6.  Explain general characteristics and devices of a wireless network.
    7.  Work productively as a team, practicing project leadership, interpersonal skills, and conflict resolution in a networked environment.
    8.  Practice problem solving via the planning, organization and delivery of projects in a networked environment.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe the organization, operation, set up, and maintenance of a local area network.
    2.  Explain the types and characteristics of different network architectures, topologies, and components.
    3.  Describe the OSI reference model and the functions of LAN protocols.
    4.  Describe the hardware aspects of a LAN:  the purpose and function of LAN intra and interconnecting network devices.
    5.  Set up and use LANs for data communications.
    6.  Explain the general characteristics and devices of a wireless network and configure a small wireless network.
    7.  Practice problem solving, teamwork, and leadership skills, via the planning, organization, and delivery of projects in a networked environment.

  
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    TLC 120 - Telecommunications II


    This course will cover the basics of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) systems.  Topics include:  an overview of TCP/IP networks with a focus on VoIP; an introduction to VoIP; Quality of Service (QoS); VoIP system components; VoIP protocols and VoIP protocol analysis; VoIP architecture and VoIP codes.  A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  TLC 110 Telecommunications I, EET 169 Digital Systems II

    Corequisite:  EET 152 Electronic Systems II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    4 Class Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Describe today's public system telephone network, its services and signaling, and compare it to Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP).
    2.  Explain VoIP technology benefits, applications, and Quality of Service.
    3.  Describe and analyze in-depth VoIP architecture and implementation.
    4.  Describe the purpose and function of various VoIP protocols.
    5.  Describe the purpose and function of VoIP interconnection technologies.
    6.  Explain the use of network analysis software to view and troubleshoot VoIP networks.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe VoIP system organization and operation.
    2.  Describe the purpose and function of various VoIP protocols.
    3.  Describe the purpose and function of VoIP interconnection technologies.
    4.  Use IP networks for voice communications.
    5.  Use network analysis software to view, verify, and troubleshoot VoIP networks.
    6.  Work productively as a team, practicing project leadership, interpersonal skills, and conflict resolution in a networked environment.
    7.  Practice problem solving via the planning, organization, and delivery of projects in a networked environment.

  
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    TLC 210 - Telecommunications III


    This course covers the organization, architecture, setup, hardware and software aspects of networked video delivery systems.  Topics include:  video transport; compression; packet transport; multicasting; content ownership and security; tranport security; IPTV-IP video to the home; video file transfer; VPN's and home-office video links.  A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  TLC 120 Telecommunications II

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Describe video transport technologies, networks, protocols, and applications.
    2.  Describe video and audio data compression techniques and transport methods.
    3.  Explain video streaming, multicasting, and videoconferencing over IP.
    4.  Describe content ownership, encryption, and transport security.
    5.  Describe IP-TV video to the home, video file transfer technology and applications.
    6.  Explain network administration, and the configuration and implementation of a network to support video and VoIP.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe video delivery system organization and operation.
    2.  Describe the purpose and function of various video related protocols.
    3.  Describe the purpose and function of video delivery interconnection technologies.
    4.  Use LANs/WANs for converged (voice, video and data) communications.
    5.  Use network analysis software to view, verify, and troubleshoot network traffic conditions.
    6.  Work productively as a team, practicing project leadership, interpersonal skills, and conflict resolution in a networked environment.
    7.  Practice problem solving via the planning, organization, and delivery of projects in a networked environment.

  
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    TLC 220 - Telecommunications IV


    A survey of current and emerging technologies in Telecommunications will be presented.  Lectures, interactive learning, demonstrations, and site visits will be employed.

    Prerequisite- Corequisite
    Prerequisite:  TLC 210 Telecommunications III

    Credits: 4
    Hours
    3 Lecture Hours, 2 Laboratory Hours
    Course Profile
    Course Objectives:

    1.  Explain advanced telecommunication techniques and principles.
    2.  Explain current and future integrated communication services and their applications.
    3.  Identify sources of information and reference material for current and emerging integrated technologies.
    4.  Articulate concepts of advanced networks and services.
    5.  Capstone the three previous telecommunications courses.
    6.  Further develop the following course competencies:  problem solving, teamwork, project leadership, quality, contextual learning, technology and service delivery, and customer focus.

     

    Learning Outcomes of the Course:

    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    1.  Describe advanced telecommunication techniques and principles.
    2.  Explain current and future integrated communication services and their applications.
    3.  Identify sources of information and reference material for current and emerging integrated technologies.
    4.  Articulate concepts of advanced networks and services.
    5.  Demonstrate the following course competencies:  problem solving, teamwork, project leadership, quality, contextual learning, technology and service delivery, and customer focus.
    6.  Demonstrate the ability to work in groups, research product, and develop design installation planning.

 

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